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Short answer Present and Past Simple verb forms do not usually have an auxiliary verb. However auxiliaries are needed for sentences with negation, inversion, code (stranding), or emphasis. When we need an auxiliary for one of these reasons we use the 'dummy' auxiliary DO: I like cheese. (normal declarative sentence without DO) I don't like cheese. ...


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Full Answer I worked. I did work. The word did in the second sentence is an example of do-support. This occurs because of the special role of auxiliary verbs in English. (I have changed the order of the examples for easier reading.) English auxiliary verbs Most verb phrases in English involve at least one AUXILIARY verb. These verbs appear before the ...


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I did work could mean 'I performed work' with work as a noun ( e.g. I did work on the second paragraph last week but it's still not right). I still think that the most common use is to contradict the suggestion that you didn't work. E.g.: 'You were supposed to do your homework, but I see you've done nothing...' 'No, I did work, but my dog got hungry...'


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There are three common usages for the auxiliary verb do: Emphatic do - strongly stressed, often contradicting something in context Q: Why didn't you tell her? A: I did tell her. Active do - pro-verb substituting for active (non-stative) verb What I want to do is buy that house now ~ *What I want to do is own that house now Do-Support do - dummy verb, no ...


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It is perfectly grammatical indeed, but this way of sentence construction is used to emphasize that you really performed the action you are talking about. Thus I did work (and I did get results) means that you really worked (and that you really got results). More information on emphasis you can find here: http://www.michellehenry.fr/emphasize.htm and ...


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In your question, I assume, you are treating “work” as a verb, not as a noun. Hence: Present tense: Do | Work Past tense: Did | Worked You wouldn't say I do work, but you would say I work. Hence, you wouldn't I did work, but you would say I worked.


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It is perfectly acceptable. As to "So why did he not reply 'So do I buddy'?", this would be saying "I like me, too". Which may be true in any case, but doesn't express reciprocity. In other words, instead of the two of them saying that they like each other, they would each be saying that they like one of them. I might say "I enjoy eating crab for ...


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A says to B "I love you" B says to A "And I you" Perfectly acceptable. Where is the verb in the latter sentence ? It's in the former sentence and understood to be also in the latter, the repetition is unnecessary. "love" could be replaced by a range of other verbs, such as "hate" or "admire" or "despise"; in fact I can't think of a transitive verb ...



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