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The past perfect is formed with the auxiliary had to indicate time preceding a fixed point in the past: I had come to that conclusion before you called. Likely you're talking about the present perfect, which is formed with has and have. In English, can one optionally use the "is" form of the past [sic] perfect for any intransitive verb? Assuming that ...


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The morpheme for 'not' usually applies to the verb, no matter where it appears in the verb phrase, and even if a modal auxiliary (like 'will') is used. This is not true when using the modal 'can' (which expresses possibility). Instead of having a separate modal for impossibility, we make do by negating the possibility. This requires us to use nuance when ...


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"You can not do it now and do it later." means (to me at least) "It's not possible to do it now and also do it later": like the expression "You can't have your cake and eat it", which would be better worded as "You can't eat your cake and still have it". "You may not do it now and do it later." means the same as the above, with the exception being that ...


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This is a surprisingly challenging question! In such a situation, it's usually helpful to break down the components of the sentence and assess them for their meaning both on their own and in context. First, let's correct the grammatical error. There are two clauses, each with a different subject ("this" and "information"). It's convention in such cases to ...


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By conditional/hypothetical, I take it you are referring to the unhelpfully-named third conditional, as explained on Perfect English Grammar: We make the third conditional by using the past perfect after 'if' and then 'would have' and the past participle in the second part of the sentence: if + past perfect, ...would + have + past participle ...


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If the sentence were something along the lines of If we were to attempt collection of this debt, any information obtained would be used for that purpose. this would be a hypothetical; we cannot say either way whether an attempt will or will not be made, so right now it's an imaginary situation where it could go either way. This is not the case with ...



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