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Would has come from the OE wolde, the past tense and past subjunctive of willan: wish, want or will. So, although wouldn't and didn't are essentially interchangeable now, I think "wouldn't" in the context above can still imply some sense of "not wanting" to subside; some resistance to stopping. We are more likely, I think, to use "wouldn't" than "didn't" ...


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You can talk about things that happened in the past but don’t happen anymore in different ways using used to/would/past simple The OP says When I was in high school, a mosquito bite used to be itchy for many weeks. It didn't subside for a month or more. Repeated actions in the past are normally described using used to or would. So, ...it didn't use to ...


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«Didn't» is more appropriate for this case. But it's not so easy. «Wouldn't» is for Future in the Past or Conditionals sentences and it's about ability, not the fact (the second and the third, like if I could ... I would or if I were you ... I would ...). Here you're talking about past time using time period for a month or more so you have to use ...


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Grammatically, "will" and "can" are present, and the corresponding past forms are "would" and "could" (the others I don't know about -- maybe they're presents). But the past forms are often used when there seems to be no past meaning involved. "Can" and "could" in the ability sense are probably clearest. "I could speak Sanskrit yesterday, but today, I ...


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The only way to say this was once a very simple one: I haven't any money. You can still say this today, but it sounds very formal because it is so old-fashioned. The reason this has fallen out of use is that for a long time now, English has required do support when negating any verb other than those on a short list that doesn't even include do itself ...


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I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. Both are grammatically correct. People in some countries use the first one and some people use the second one. So it's better to know both ways in order to speak to everyone. But some native speakers will say "I haven't any money" which is informal English, so if someone says it like that you have ...


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Yes 'is' is an auxiliary verb to show the present continuous form of tense in the sentence you have quoted.


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The rule of "Error of Proximity" in Agreement of Subject with the verb applies here. The subject is 'duration' and not 'seconds' although the latter is placed closer to the verb in the sentence. As a singular subject takes a singular verb, 'has' will be a correctly used verb here, for the singular subject 'duration'. In other words, 'duration has' while ...


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One should be a good influence on others. He had a good infuence on his peers. In my opinion both are grammatically correct.


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Its in the present perfect form to denote an action just completed.


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Will is also a modal denoting determination. Example: I will never give in to temptation


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Are the following two examples grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. Consider as possible contexts: They said that I have to write it, and write it I have. -- (for #1) They said that I wrote it, and wrote it I did. -- (for #2) ANSWER TO MAIN QUESTION: In the appropriate context, those two expressions (#1 and #2) ...


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Wrote it I did It is wrong to consider this an instance of hyperbaton, because the regular word order is not altered In the first clause there is only the ellipsis of one word: the subject: "[I] wrote it " Hyperbaton Definition: A hyperbaton is a literary device wherein the author plays with the regular positioning of words and phrases and creates ...



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