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The Latin expression "Reductio ad absurdum" seems to cover this. from Wikipedia: that a false, untenable, or absurd result follows from its acceptance reductiones ad absurdum), also known as argumentum ad absurdum (Latin: "argument to absurdity", pl.: argumenta ad absurdum), is a common form of argument which seeks to demonstrate that a statement is ...


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This is sometimes referred to as an overstretched or overblown analogy. As an example, Leslie Evans' critique of The Soul of the Marionette: A Short Inquiry into Human Freedom, by John Gray, has: Gray, in what I would regard as an overstretched analogy, regards as Gnostic modern scientific secularism's faith that ...


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For the use intended I'd choose location. A particular place or position: 'the property is set in a convenient location' I like location better than surrounding but it's a matter of taste. All round a particular place or thing: 'Cardiff and the surrounding area' References: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/location ...


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I'd say an environment contains a place, as long as place is defined (as a town or a region, for example): the North Sea environment contains many small islands. The problem is how one should think of a 'container': is this an idea? Is the container something I can draw on a map? Is the container bounded in some way?


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This is a difficult question because "place" has no definable boundary, whereas a town or a county does. With that caveat in mind, I'll offer "area," "region," "neighborhood," or even "environs" as words that can contain "place." One's choice is a matter of scale and context, of course. "Town" or "county" could also contain "place," for that matter ...



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