Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

83

Sate, "To satisfy; fill up" is the usual term. In etymology, quench and sate are somewhat parallel: quench derives via an Old English word from a Proto-Germanic word, while sate derives via a Middle English word from an Old English word from a West Germanic word. Note, sate came into use half-a-century before satiate, the latter directly from Latin ...


62

To paraphrase Maslow's Law... Got a hammer, now everything looks like a nail! The "standard" version is usually given as If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail, but in practice people often use it in contexts where said hammer has only recently been acquired.


59

Man-eater and vamp are a little bit "slangy" compared to seductress - a woman who seduces someone, esp. one who entices a man into sexual activity Per Neil's comment to the question itself, bitch isn't really relevant to the meanings involved here. Per comments/discussion below, it's probably impossible to come up with a "feminine version of ...


43

I don't think there is a single transitive verb for "give drink to [someone]". If that someone is an animal, you could use water, as in to feed and water a horse: I didn't go anywhere the next day except up to Grandpa's to feed and water the horse and mule and Granny's chickens. However, it's unlikely you would use this for a person; the phrase fed ...


38

There's the archaic word coolth: (archaic) The state of being cool, temperature-wise; coolness.  [eg] The water pushed large blocks of tepid air about around his chair, giving the faint illusion of freshness and coolth. – Lawrence Durrell, Constance, 1982 Edit 2: In many uses coolth corresponds better to warmth than does cool. Architects' use of ...


34

A great thing about English is its rich lexicon. These are the seasonal adjectives that come to mind: hiemal/hibernal vernal estival autumnal Incidentally, two of the above also have verb forms: hibernate and estivate.


30

In terms of anatomical locations, front (anterior) and rear (posterior) are on the anteroposterior axis. So you could say "Which end of the Anteroposterior axis?" This is obviously ludicrous, but might be OK if your customer was an MD or biologist.


28

A few options: lies fiction fantasy falsehood fabrication nonsense deception untruth (though you couldn't say, "I stand for the untruth") He speaks lies! This deception affects everyone


25

The words orient and occident are two of the set of six French words orient, occident, zénith, nadir, septentrion, midi, which form the set you were looking for. The word septentrion (north) is obsolete in English, and I can find no evidence that midi (formerly spelled midy) was ever an English word at all. In Old French, the word méridien was used ...


23

There is no distinction: less is to fewer as more is to more. more water; less water more dogs; less/fewer dogs 10 items or more; 10 items or less/fewer one more bell to answer; one less bell to answer weighing 100 pounds more; weighing 100 pounds less 500 words or more; 500 words or less more than 10,000 miles; less than 10,000 miles


20

The true response will depend on the context, I think. Truth as "fact" is best opposed by "falsehood" because these two words apply to whether or not statements correspond to reality. You might also make the argument the "fiction" is usually used in opposition in this same context. This one falsehood is important to all This one fiction is important ...


20

Sectarian is probably the right word for the job. (though it usually refers to opposing forces within a group). Note that in some cases, people identify their ethnicity as the religion (jews for instance), in which case, "racism" and "religious bigotry" are nearly equivalent.


18

The sense verbs are an interesting paradigm. English has three types of sense verb (with a lot of overlap), and a number of derived nouns. Two of the verb classes differ in whether they're volitional, and the other one is an experiential sense with special "Flip" syntax. One type of verb is the Non-Volitional: hear, see, smell, taste, touch/feel Another is ...


16

Approaching this question etymologically: "Feed" is not related to "eat" because the former originally means to "foster", "nourish" or "protect". See Etymonline's entry for feed. Similarly "nourish" has cognates in French "nourrir" (to feed) and "nourriture" (food), but notice how "nourrice" (nanny) refers to the woman who looks after (and used to give ...


16

tl;dr: So long as you are content with historical terms rather than merely contemporary ones, the precise word you are looking for is coquet. Here’s why. The OED says that a coquette is first: 1. A woman (more or less young), who uses arts to gain the admiration and affection of men, merely for the gratification of vanity or from a desire of ...


16

You might consider epicurean: adjective 2 relating to or suitable for an epicure epicure noun a person who takes particular pleasure in fine food and drink [ODO] Gastronomic might fit, although that does include the whole process including cooking: gastronomy noun [mass noun] the practice or art of choosing, cooking, and ...


15

There's nothing at all wrong with mentoree, as these 1270 written instances in Google Books show. The fact that most dictionaries don't explicitly list this particular inflection of mentor is of no consequence - it's used often enough already, and will always be understood even at first sight. Mentee also occurs quite often in written form - but I have to ...


15

The suffix -acusis pertains to hearing, and is normally combined to form words like presbycusis (presby + acusis, age-related hearing loss) and paracusis (para + acusis, any hearing impairment). When you combine the an- prefix (meaning not or without) with -acusis, you get anacusis -- deafness.


13

I would go with "dress": "wear" being like "dressing oneself". "feed" and "dress": properly reflexive verbs The concept of a verb applied to oneself reminds me of reflexive verbs (a verb whose semantic agent and patient (typically represented syntactically by the subject and the direct object) are the same.) More specifically, Properly reflexive verb, ...


13

Actually, venomed exists and you can find it here. In literature I have seen the expression venomed arrows, meaning covered with venom, but according to this source it also means poisoned as the past participle of the verb venom.


13

There isn't really a specific word for someone who likes/collects hats (i.e. - you won't find one in a dictionary). But people who are interested in hats may well know that... A hat maker is called a milliner. ...in which case they would doubtless understand this coinage that I found in Google Books... Sadly, living in sunny, funny LA, l have to ...


11

"Resize" is a verb and "size" can also be one, but "capacity" is never a verb. If by "capacity" you mean ability and not volume, you have the verbs “capacitate” and “recapacitate”. From The Free Dictionary by Farlex: capacitate To render fit or make qualified; enable. recapacitate To qualify again; to confer capacity on again. ...


11

Perhaps one of the following may simply: rake ladies’ man player (urban and somewhat slangy) Don Juan Lothario Casanova wolf (less suave) womanizer


11

According to this paper (PDF) from Phillip Slavin, chicken was one meat that even the peasantry could afford to eat. Although poultry occupied the smallest part of demesne livestock, constituting about two per cent of it (Table 1), its social importance and omnipresence cannot be understated, despite scholarly marginalization. Chicken meat constituted ...


11

You wouldn't say it that way. You'd say I want you to listen to something. or I want you to hear something. or even I want to play something for you. The latter could be switched around to I want to play you something. But that still wouldn't cover all sounds, as I mentioned in my comment to you.


10

I'm not sure what the objection to using saucy is all about. Merriam-Webster says: saucy adj 1: served with or having the consistency of sauce 2a : impertinently bold and impudent b : amusingly forward and flippant : irrepressible 3: smart, trim <a saucy little hat> The very first definition is exactly the meaning you are looking for. ...


10

On its own, the word plantingly is not a "real" word (not much evidence of use, not in dictionary). However, in this particular sentence, plantingly is being used in the phrase "plantingly challenged". This is a phrase that was formed by analogy with other phrases of the form "__ly challenged", for example: mentally challenged (mental difficulties) ...


10

I know that mentee is common in American English, and is used by a variety of mentoring programs. One example of such is the US Department of Health and Human Services's Mentoring Program. I know several people that work in this field, and they all use the word mentee. Although the term mentee is relatively new and not near as popular as mentor, it far ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible