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19

I believe it depends very much on where the speaker needs to place the emphasis. Q. Where did you say you put the white elephant? A. I put it on the table. Q. I thought the charity box was under the table. It's not here. A. I told you I put it on the table. Q. How did that strange letter come to be on the table? A. I put it on the table. Q.Who put ...


15

Slinging = selling drugs Mad volume = a crazy amount Fat stacking = creating large stacks of Benjies = $100 bills (which feature Benjamin Franklin) Thus: I am selling a crazy amount of drugs and making a ton of money.


9

I hear it a lot, so I'd say in the USA at least it's a fairly common word. The context is usually either corporate or political. In a corporate setting, this usually refers to some corporate event that seems (to the speaker) to be a waste of the company's money for participants' benefit (eg: stopping work for some kind of "leadership training" or "team ...


8

Edit: Your updated question has provided context. As a simple response to the question, "Have you been waiting long?", the subtle stress is placed upon got, just like you have determined. Word stress can also introduce meaning to the sentence when the emphasis is not so subtle. Any of the words can be emphasized to change the meaning of the sentence. ...


7

"I'm just browsing, thanks" would be a good response in England or Australia.


7

I found 143 cases of boondoggle in the COCA corpus. Since that corpus consists of 450 million words, 143 is a relatively low occurrence. I would say that the word is indeed uncommon. For the sake of comparison I will mention that brouhaha had 211 hits and shenanigans 420. A quick look at the results confirms that the overwhelming majority is in a political ...


7

The answers and comments to this question have already demonstrated that it varies across the country. I would have answered that the terms "Primary School" and "Grade School" both refer to elementary, middle, and high school collectively. According to Wikipedia, the government considers "elementary school" to cover anything up to grade 8, whereas in my ...


6

World Wide Words defines boondoggle as: the typically North American term for an unnecessary or wasteful project that is often applied in two specific ways: to describe work of little or no value done merely to appear busy, in reference to a government-funded project with no purpose other than political patronage. It can also be used for ...


5

In the US, there is a thriving industry which involves buying distressed properties and re-selling them for a profit before the first mortgage payment comes due - it is called "flipping houses". "Flop" means failure (in this context). So, the title means: Will the objective of "flipping" the property be successful, or not? "Flip-flop" is an expression ...


5

Not sure if the rest of the country uses this, but.....Around here, the difference is more esoteric. A spigot is more functional, less decorative than a faucet. Our garden hose is attached to a spigot, but the kitchen sink has a faucet.


5

Alternatively, you can tell someone he has nothing between the ears. (TFD) If you say someone has nothing between their ears, you are saying they are stupid, that they have no brain. With most idioms you cannot alter any of the words, but with this one there are a few variations: She has nothing between the ears He has nothing between ...


5

If the Boy Scout etymology is true, I suspect that this word may ultimately derive from toggle: boon (benefit, good) + toggle ("pin passed through the eye of a rope, strap, or bolt to hold it in place") And it would look something like those seen in this image from Pinterest: This is the sort of crafts project undertaken by scouts in which they ...


4

If the information is condensed and summarised, then a common word for this is dashboard. It might apply even if the information is not summarized. "An easy to read, often single page, real-time user interface, showing a graphical presentation of the current status (snapshot) and historical trends of an organization’s key performance indicators (KPIs) - ...


4

[He] ain’t got the brains God gave a squirrel or ain’t got the sense God gave geese. It seems your friends may be struggling with idiom overload: "Ain't" is a very informal replacement for "doesn't". "Got" is an informal expression for "have". "Brains" is idiomatic for intelligence. Here is a simpler version to start with: His brain is smaller ...


4

The OED has some examples of humans being offloaded e.g.: 1968 M. Woodhouse Rock Baby v. 43 A Director who has to offload one of his staff and is embarrassed. and, 2001 FourFourTwo Sept. 104/3 Lazio were prepared to offload Juan Sebastian Veron because they had secured the services of Italian playmaker Stefano Fiore. But the OED doesn't have any ...


4

If you used the categories Pre-College and College, I think people could easily determine that "pre-college" refers to grades 1-12.


3

Driving right to the point, the top ten hits from the Corpus in the last 60 years were He's as stupid as a: Sheep Donkey Fish Man (LOL!) Cow Goose Horse Pig Stone White Man The list for British English is slightly different: Fish Donkey Pig Goose Mule Stone Giant Post And in American English: Man ...


3

Maybe. We judge the stress by pitch, vowel reduction, and perhaps in other ways. In your example, judging by pitch, I think I would say the first two syllables of "Alexandra" out of context with higher pitch on the first syllable than on the second, but in your example sentence, "Hey Alexandra!", I find it most natural to give those syllables the same low ...


3

It has that meaning in the US, although it's a bit jargon-y. Most people will say "plates", but most will understand "tags" at least in context. When you buy a car at the dealer you pay a "tag and title" fee through the dealer to have the car registered and receive a license plate, and the shops that exist in some states to handle registration paperwork ...


3

The line "come rain, blood, or horse manure" is but a colourful variant of the idiom come rain or shine: no matter whether it rains or the sun shines; in any sort of weather Don't worry. I'll be there come rain or shine. We'll hold the picnic—rain or shine. This one-off variant was coined by ABC president John B. Sias in 1987 after ...


3

Here is an approximation to what SPE (The Sound Pattern of English) predicts for the stress contour. The Nuclear Stress rule applies to the constituents in the syntactic structure to make the last primary stressed syllable have a primary stress, and all other stresses in the same constituent are weakened by one degree. I've bracketed the constituents that ...


3

From Grammarbook.com's rules about hyphen use: An often overlooked rule for hyphens: The adverb very and adverbs ending in -ly are not hyphenated. Incorrect: the very-elegant watch Incorrect: the finely-tuned watch This rule applies only to adverbs. The following two sentences are correct because the -ly words are adjectives rather than ...


3

It's not so much that set is American and that lay is British - rather, that Brits use both forms more or less equally often... ...whereas Americans almost exclusively stick with set... Personally, I find set slightly more "formal, dated" - but I suppose that's just because half a century ago, my mother always instructed one of us kids to lay the ...


3

My own inclination would be to refer to grades 1-12 as "Grade School", but Wikipedia warns me that this may often be taken to refer only to the lower grades (K-5). So perhaps you would be better off just referring to it as "School" (since "College" will be right there as a higher level), or by breaking it down further (based on Wikipedia's Educational ...


2

I stress that like this: [3gɛt̬ 2ɔf jər 1hɑɪ 3hoərs]. I've used "1" for primary stress, "2" for secondary, and so on. As you say, the "t" of "get" is flapped -- that is independent of the stresses of neighboring vowels, because the "t" is at the end of a syllable and is between vowels. (I don't understand the diacritic you've put on the [t].) If by ...


2

'À la mode' meaning 'in the fashionable way' The phrase à la mode has appeared in English in the sense of "according to current fashion" for hundreds of years. It occurs, for example, in "marriage à la mode" used by John Dryden as the title of a comedy (1673) and by William Hogarth as the title of a series of paintings (1743–1745); in both of these ...


2

Stress in sentences in English often indicates the shade of meaning the speaker wishes to convey. In this case, there is not a unique way to say this phrase. (2)Keep your (1)voice down: What you'd use when reminding somebody they will have to speak softly (say, they're going into an animal shelter where speaking too loudly will agitate the animals). ...


2

This idiom is an "intensifier". It expresses shock, horror or at least dismay at what you seem to be doing. The implication is that the speaker thinks you should not be doing what you are doing. The reason for originally invoking God's name was to shame a religious person who would not want to do anything evil "in God's name". This is an old-fashioned ...


2

Using other brain metaphors: [He's] a bird-brain. a stupid person [He's] a feather-brain. a stupid person [He's] a brack-brain. a stupid person [He's] a lamebrain. a fool [He's] got shit for brains. to be very stupid Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced ...


2

I can't speak definititely for other countries, but certainly in Canada and the US, referring to a car's "plates and tags" indicates their license plate, which generally lasts for multiple years (my state replaces my license plates every 7 years) and their registration renewal tag, which is a smallish sticker (about 3cm x 5cm) affixed to one corner of the ...



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