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21

Because the grammar is incorrect. It should be "him and his wife" as you correctly say. This is probably an example of hypercorrection. The speaker has been corrected at some time for using 'him' instead of 'he', e.g. "Him and me did it." He has misunderstood the grammatical rules, over-generalised and gone to the other extreme.


15

You have to understand that this novel is written from the perspective of a youth who speaks largely in slang and colloquialisms and the imperfect grammar is part of his persona. That said: Correct grammar would dictate that the pronoun used as an object of an action (here the action is waking up) should be "him". So correctly the phrase would include "him ...


15

To "kick butt" is to "Dominate" or to "Rule!" Dominate verb: have a commanding influence on; exercise control over. "the company dominates the market for operating system software" synonyms: control, influence, exercise control over, command, be in command of, be in charge of, rule, govern, direct, have ascendancy over, have mastery over. (Google) ...


11

I suggest Trounce as meaning the same thing verb defeat heavily in a contest. "Essex trounced Cambridgeshire 5–1 in the final" synonyms: defeat utterly, beat hollow, win a resounding victory over, annihilate, drub, rout, give someone a drubbing, crush, overwhelm, bring someone to their knees; rebuke or punish severely. "insider ...


11

From my personal experience from conversations and reading, 'developed countries' is often used in the way that you understood first world. Any country with progress in technology, health, etc. and the others are sometimes referred to as 'undeveloped' or 'developing' as in the case of India which is making strides to improve its status. As someone who has ...


10

The speaker is Holden Caufield narrating his life. Holden is the rebellious protagonist of the novel, and if you've read much of the book, you'll know that Holden doesn't get along in school. J. D. Salinger is trying to capture how such a character would sound. "Helluva" is a phonetic rendition of "hell of a," meaning a remarkable example of something. ...


6

Did you look through the whole Wikipedia article? There's a subsection titled "Variations in Definitions" that has this to say: Since the end of the Cold War, the original definition of the term First World is no longer necessarily applicable. There are varying definitions of the First World, however, they follow the same idea. John D. Daniels, past ...


5

"to be the case" is an idiom meaning "to be thus" or "to be true" "Why would that be the case?" --> "Why would that be true?" --> "What leads you to believe that that is true?"


5

"Birthers" are those in the U.S. who believe President Obama was born in Kenya or some place other than the United States. They do not accept the validity of his Hawaiian birth certificate. The expression, "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em," means that you've tried to work against a particular group or movement with no success, so you might as well give up ...


4

One needs to understand that a lot of this has to do with the advancing tide of universal public education in the US. Some public schools were developed in the mid to late 1700s (Benjamin Franklin had a hand in starting one), but the movement really gained steam in the early 1800s. (Horace Mann was a well-known advocate, and, as a result, has nearly as ...


4

Industrialized probably has the most neutral connotation. Developed implies (at least to some) that other nations are culturally undeveloped.


4

In this context Birthers are likely to be people who do not believe that Barack Obama was born in the U.S.A. They believe the Hawaiian birth certificate he produced in response to their claims, is a forgery and maintain the opinion that he was born somewhere else. This is important because The U.S. Constitution requires the President to be a "natural born ...


3

In Human Geography, More Developed Countries (MDCs) and Less Developed Countries (LDCs) are the generally agreed upon terms. These are relatively objective terms and do not imply condescension, although it is of course possible to take it one way or the other.


3

I'm British. I would say that very few speakers of English make two separate tongue 'clicks'. I have heard a few people that do - I'm pretty sure there's a British politician that does it. I'll try to remember who. Experimenting for myself, I can say that I make the tongue movement only once, however I can easily distinguish between "goodtime" "goodime" and ...


3

Just to confirm the surmise of stevesliva and aparente001, a Google Books search finds this quotation from by SamanthaBlackWhitlock, "The Potter Twins and the Goblet of Fire" on FanFiction.net: On the landing, Frank turned right, and saw at once where the intruders were: At the very end of the passage a door stood ajar, and a flickering light shone ...


2

If something focuses on the key component of an issue then it is said to focus on the 'crux of the issue'. Crux: the basic, central, or critical point or feature: 'the crux of the matter'; 'the crux of an argument'. A synonym of crux is nub. Nub: the essence; the core: 'the nub of a story'. Both definitions sourced from thefreedictionary.com


2

"root cause" is often the term used https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_cause_analysis


2

In nearly all cases, yes. -se is preferred in Australian and British English and -ze in American English. If you were to use -ze in Commonwealth English it wouldn't be wrong, per se, but you would probably receive a few remarks about how American it is.


2

Technically it depends on the origin of the word... Greek is -ized and French or Latin is -ised, but most British dictionaries says -ised is preferred as Latin derivation is more common but -ized is an accepted alternative, whereas US almost exclusively use -ized. A lot of people prefer one over the other simply due to the way they look when written and ...


2

If it's addressed to an audience which can understand baseball metaphors, you can use "hit it out of the park".


2

"name1 and name2 also want to join?" would be right. No need to say 'are'. Also, "name1 and name2 are also wanting to join?" would be right. Hope it helps :)


2

take them to the cleaners 103 It has the same very colloquial feel as kick ass, and generally means the same thing but very safe. It may not be racey enough!


2

To cream: "... defeat (a person or team) easily and completely" (Merriam-webster)


2

I'm English and I learned Spanish with a Castilian (central Spanish) accent from a CD. The CD was specifically about pronunciation and not about vocabulary. Answer Even though my Spanish is not very good, people consistently remark on my Spanish (rather than Latin American) accent. It must be weird for native speakers. Because my accent is so good they ...


2

Yes, but details of just exactly when [t] will drop will differ from person to person and according to how casual speech is. A general governing principle for this and other contextual phonological rules is the Law of Similarity, which here requires [t] to be lost when preceding and following sounds are most similar to the [t]. In the phrase "act tired", ...


2

A(n) set of parenthesis within a word has the same function as using them in a sentence (to provide supplemental information) In this case, the supplemental information is a dynamic letter. A(n) apple apple(s) Generally you see this syntax in technical writing. supplemental letter Using this parenthesis tip sheet, you can get a broader idea of ...


2

The example you give seems to be trying to sneak an additional meaning in; The author wants you to read the sentence both ways: "Saving the firm was a Mission Impossible." "Saving the firm was a mission (that he saw as) possible with skill/effort." Here's another example, this time implying criticism of a mad scientist: "The whole ...


2

Native US English speaker here: A standard US accent would link the two words together holding the airflow on the "d" and releasing it on the "t". Essentially, it become a hybrid sound that starts softly and ends sharply, by increasing the pressure of the tongue against the roof of the mouth. The position of the tongue does not change, just the pressure. ...


2

The birther movement refers to denying that Barack Obama was born in the United States and that he therefore became president in violation of the requirements of the US Constitution. birther - (slang, pejorative, US politics) A believer that President Barack Obama is not a "natural born" citizen of the United States, and therefore ineligible for ...


2

As far as I know (as an American who lived, very briefly in England), there is no word in the US for the British concept of "tea", "teatime" or "afternoon tea". In fact, the Wikipedia Article on it pretty clearly points out that it's a UK & Ireland concept: Tea refers to several different meals in countries formerly part of the British Empire. ...



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