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36

According to Merriam-Webster: implicate: (3a) to bring into intimate or incriminating connection evidence that implicates him in the bombing So I would write this: Lucy realized she found the proof that implicated Robert in the murders. You can omit "in the murders" if it is implied by context.


15

Þære spræce and þære ácsunge You suggested perhaps the 1800s for the origin of this use: I’ll see that bet and raise you a millennium. Not an Americanism but perhaps a Wessexism, for some one thousand one hundred and thirty years ago in ᴀᴅ 885, King Ælfred the Great wrote not only: Hit is þeaw þære spræce and þære ácsunge. but also: Mid ascunga. ...


14

Lucy realized she finally had enough evidence to indict Robert on the charge of murder. Indict in·dict /inˈdīt/ verb, North American –Google past tense: indicted; past participle: indicted formally accuse of or charge with a serious crime. Because of double jeopardy, one had best be sure you have all your ducks in a row before you indict a ...


14

I agree that the verb convict pretty much means found someone is guilty of a crime. The proving part is the prosecution process itself. If you are looking for a more direct way to apply the proof in your sample sentence, I would use committed: Lucy realized she had proof that Robert committed the murders.


12

My guess is that Italian immigrants in the United States themselves adopted the duplicate name as a kind of Rosetta Stone approach to naming things in familiar Italian and unfamiliar English. A Google Books search turns up an interesting but all-too-brief snippet on the the possible origin of pizza pie in Arthur Livingston, "La Merica Sanemagogna," in The ...


12

You already have the most common phrase: the evidence to prove [ or that would prove] Robert guilty. If the word proof is important, simply the proof that Robert was guilty would work well.


9

convict is the correct word here. It's the strongest and most succinct, though legally speaking, Lucy would not do the convicting: that would be filled by the role of judge, jury, or relevant prosecuting attorney for the government. indict and implicate are too weak: especially in modern, western legal systems, the accused benefits from the presumption of ...


8

The term pie might have been first used in New York where Italian immigrants had settled from the second half of the 19th century. My idea is that Americans rightly called it 'pie'. But since Italians told them its name was pizza, 'pizza pie' was a natural way to call it. Gennaro Lombardi entered the picture as the father of American pizza. - He ...


6

The word most frequently used by far in American English by children to refer to other children is kid itself. I met this kid at the playground today. I'm sitting next to a new kid in class this week. After that, gender-specific terms to use by a boy would be girl (to refer to a girl) or boy by a girl to refer to a boy. This would be to ...


6

In a New-York Tribune article, printed December 06, 1903, the journalist clearly refers to the classic Italian dish. The piece is entitled: Do Fiery Foods Cause Fiery Natures? and tells us that Italian immigrants living in New York at the turn of the 20th century used to call it pomodori pizza (tomato pizza). Native New Yorkers saw its semblance to a pie ...


6

Sentence 1 (with nail) sounds a bit colloquial to my non-native ears. Furthermore, I think that “nailed Robert to the murders” links Robert to the murders but is ambiguous as to whether he was the murderer, an accomplice, or perhaps even merely involved in some way (e.g. he drove the murderer to the place where the crime took place but did not know of the ...


5

"That's a mercy" means approximately "Well, that at least is something to be grateful for"; it expresses satisfaction or, more often, relief upon perceiving some redeeming positive feature in an otherwise distressing situation. I'd guess that it originated in pious circles—we may presume that the "mercy" involved is God's mercy in sparing us a worse ...


4

Okay, this is the deal... To an Italian American,from the NY/NJ area,"spaghetti sauce" means anything (usually served on top of spaghetti) that stains your shirt. However, if one is requesting a specific type of sauce, this is the way we differentiate: Marinara: Tomatoes, (in one form or another) garlic, basil, salt&pepper. It may be cooked with whole ...


4

This is colloquial. 'Finna' means 'fixing to', it's usage is similar to 'going to' or 'gonna', perhaps closer to 'getting ready to' If you're trying to use this slang in an otherwise properly constructed sentence then you would say "I'm finna(fitting to) go to the store", but usage of this slang might go hand in hand with eschewing conventional sentence ...


4

In Britain 'to knock off [work]' is a perfectly normal and innocent thing to say. It is informal so you might more often hear 'to finish work' or 'to leave work'. I've never heard it used to mean 'masturbate'. In Britain someone might say 'to knock one out' to mean masturbate but the addition of the words 'one' and 'out' makes the verb completely ...


4

I am tempted to propose the following: Lucy realized she had the proof to establish Robert's guilt. Per Merriam-Webster: : to cause (someone or something) to be widely known and accepted : to put (someone or something) in a position, role, etc., that will last for a long time : to begin or create (something that is meant to last for a ...


3

It means she was not in the habit of sleeping eight hours. You don’t want a completed past for that, as it was habitual.


3

Aside from the direction of text, it's also worth noting that ancient Hebrew did not include punctuation as we know it in English. Including it in quotes therefore can look doubly odd. Therefore, although (American) English places the punctuation inside the quote, I recommend breaking with this for Hebrew quotations. For example, The text states that ...


3

Those are all just fine. Imagine your boss’s husband’s sister’s hairdresser’s salon, for example. Those all just chain together. We don’t have to write the salon of the hairdresser of the sister of the husband of your boss in English, and really should avoid doing so. :)


3

I think this is more about the different definitions of sharp. Informally sharp can be used in relation to someone style, clothing, or general appearance and in that context, I would say either could be used acceptably. In this sentence, I think more sharp actually aides the clarification of the adjective used because saying "these earrings are sharper" ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


2

The English organization responsible for the sport is called the Football Association, so the sport became known as Association football, which may be abbreviated "Assoc. football." Footballer would be a good term for somebody playing the game, except for the confusion with players of American football. "Assoc + er" makes the distinction clear. It's a ...


2

As in the Urban Dictionary: Green means Money. I want to eat, but I need some green. and yes, it's acceptable in AE. As an example: Spend some green at local stores and restaurants to help keep Houston green.


2

I understand it as : She was so alone (= alone to such a degree that) that I was the only one she knew, but she didn't even (at that time/in that place/in those circumstances) have me. If that is the meaning, only "have me" makes sense. As an alternative, you might have written "... knew, but she had not even me." All are references to the past, so you ...


2

Grammatically you cannot use to receiving as one unit. But "receiving" can be preceded by by the preposition "to" like: I'm looking forward to receiving a letter from my penpal. - in this case, to is not a marker of an infinitive but part of the combination "to look forward to".


2

I don't know of anything that would directly answer such questions, but maybe you could do it by process of elimination using as a resource the reference work Dictionary of American Regional English, a four-volume work that attempts to collect Americanisms.


2

In African American Vernacular English, the verbs is and are usually (not always) get dropped, but the verb am is almost always kept. See for example Wikipedia. Thus, you may hear: He finna go to the store, I'm finna go to the store.


2

Relationship between son, daughter and mother does not separate the relationships, because it talks about a single relationship between three parties. If you need to separate the two individual relationships I'm afraid you'll have to mention them separately. You can, however, make the title shorter by removing between; simply play around with word order: ...


2

"To think," in this case, is an exclamation expressing the speaker's surprise at an unexpected realization. In writing, it is mainly used in dialogue or, perhaps even more commonly, in a character's direct internal dialogue.


2

In British English usage 'more clear' or 'clearer' strictly speaking mean the same. I agree with a previous answer - 'more clear' is used for emphasis, especially when negated. Often one form or the other seems more natural and also may help remove ambiguity ( see previous answers). For example, "the edge of that desk seems more curved than usual" versus ...



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