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4

Evan Morris has a 2008 article which mentions this (and other uses of 'square') in The Word Detective: ... In adopting the term “square” to their own use, the jazz musicians were, ironically, simply employing a very old sense of “square” meaning “fair, honest, reliable or in proper order” (still heard in phrases such as “square deal”). This ...


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He must have already gone to sleep/bed He must [already] be sleeping He must be asleep already Any of the above can express the idea of a person who is either in bed or sleeping at the moment of speaking. The modal verb must is used for speculating, and making deductions. It expresses the speaker's conviction or certainty. In other words ...


3

From Dictionary.com: et Chiefly North Atlantic, South Midland and Southern US Nonstandard A simple past tense of "eat".


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Based on the context of the paragraph, I would say without a doubt that "yams" is slang for "legs," although it is not a term I have heard used in that way in my part of the United States. One does occasionally still hear the very similar term "gams" to refer to legs, but almost exclusively in reference to a woman's legs, not a man's, and mostly in a ...


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A Newfoundlander I once met recounted that he had just et. I said "...have eaten" and was roundly beaten for he was greatly upset!


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What you are noticing is a "migration to schwa" that is common in English. Most unstressed syllables in English assume a schwa sound, a neutral vowel sound. Similarly, you're noticing a lack of consonant enunciation. Because the speaker is being a bit lazy, they are not interrupting the voice when reaching the voiceless consonants. Nonetheless, a native ...


2

"Taller" is the correct answer for this, because you are comparing only two nouns, and in this case, Sara and Janet. "Taller" is a comparative adjective, those which are used to compare one noun to another noun. The other choices you gave, "tallest" and "the tallest" are both in superlative form, meaning they are used to compare three or more nouns. For ...


2

"Memo" is short for "memorandum". A memorandum is often a small note, verbal or written, telling someone to remember something.


2

The spanner for the wheel lock gun looked like a wind-up key for a clockwork toy, with the major difference that the socket that fitted over the projecting axle of the wheel that was to be wound to tighten the inner spring was about three sixteenths of an inch square, and much more sturdy than the key for a clockwork train. The crossbow “spanner” was ...


2

Yes it is correct. It probably sounds peculiar because it is the same as present tense. You can avoid confusion regarding tense if you say, for instance: I shut up when [somebody] [did something]. There are many English verbs (such as cut, put, cast, etc.) whose past tense and past participle are the same as present first-person. Here is a list: ...


2

I've seen both spellings: "canceled" and "cancelled". Subjectively, cancelled looks better to me, like it better represents the pronunciation. Objectively, there is that rule which says that you double the trailing consonant for monosyllabic words and you don't for polysyllabic words. One of the frustrating things is when I use a spelling I know is correct ...


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The first algorithm was applied over a gradually decreasing value of X to obtain the norm solution Over is a good word to use when talking about ranges.


1

You essentially have two independent clauses here separated by a conjunction. In those cases, a comma is necessary. ("As" can be many parts of speech, but in this case the use is that of a conjunction.) The word "fear" also takes a new meaning, as it comes to represent a more self-centered notion. The electric chair seemed an ironic choice of ...


1

The Chicago Manual of Style and Associated Press Stylebook both say to leave out the ordinals. However, since the ordinal is nearly always pronounced when the date is read, I think this seems absurd. Searching around the internet has not revealed any reason to leave out the ordinal beside an appeal to these authorities. I have no idea why they think this is ...


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What the idiom dictionaries say There appears to be a clear split in preference between British English usage and U.S. English usage on this idiom. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idiom (1996) offers this discussion: in the cards Likely or certain to happen, as in I don't think Jim will win—it's just not in the cards. This term, ...


1

It's indeed You play, you pay. It's a shortened version of If you play (and you lose), you (have to) pay your debts. or simply, you cannot play (get something) without paying; a sentiment that is also expressed as TINSTAAFL: There is no such thing as a free lunch.


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Tim's comment is a great idiom. I believe the full original proverb is: Give a man a fish, he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he will eat for a lifetime. Another option that is slang but perhaps a bit more useful for many cases: I can't figure out how to code this. Could you point me in the right direction? Essentially, "point me ...


1

Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Book of Clichés, second edition (2006), offers this entry: square meal, a A substantial and nourishing repast. A mid-nineteenth century Americanism, the term appears in humorist Stephen Leacock's Literary Lapses (1910): "Any two meals at a boarding house are together less than two square meals." One astute ...


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Memorandum is the most common meaning of "memo." See link for others.


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It is almost certainly a typo, for gams.


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An invoice - or purchase order or bill - may have a codebar and a sequence of numbers on it. The codebar system allows you to pay the amount due on the document at a bank where a codebar scanner identifies the payer and all the information concerning your purchase. From wikipedia: a typical invoice contains The word invoice (or Tax ...



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