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26

You can say that somebody has a six pack. informal - A man’s set of visibly well-developed abdominal muscles. Or perhaps even an eight pack. You can also say that someone has washboard abs or a washboard stomach, although commentators on this answer suggest that this is used more in fitness circles to describe a flatter, less "ripped" set of abs than ...


19

The referent is just elided here. You can read this as meaning "sick [friends]" or "sick [relatives]." The reason it sounds odd to British ears is that the current British colloquial usage of "sick" as a euphemism for "vomit" is overpowering any other interpretation for you. Since that colloquial usage is relatively unheard of in America, you are ...


7

This is a use of double negative. Here, it seems like it is just used to emphasize the point. The sentence, with proper grammar, would thus be: And I don't count anybody out of that, not anybody. Which means that there is no exception to the first statement: you can trust no one, with no exception to the rule. You can find more Double negative uses in ...


6

Their sick is a noun phrase without any noun and with an adjective functioning as Head of the phrase. These are referred to by The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language as fused Modifier-Head constructions. We most usually see these with a definite article: the good, the bad and the ugly the rich the poor the blind Occasionally, however, they can ...


6

Nyah, defined by Oxford Dictionaries Used to express the speaker’s feeling of superiority or contempt for another: ‘I won the gold and she didn’t. Nyah, nyah, nyah’


6

You have to keep in mind that <l> and <ll> are both extremely common in English, regardless of region. For example, bill is always spelled <bill>, and nil is always spelled <nil>; excel is always spelled <excel>, and retell is always spelled <retell>. There are a lot of individual rules, but there's no single over-arching ...


4

It is an archaic but correct usage: Sick (n.) "those who are sick," Old English seoce, from sick (adj). sick (adj.) "unwell," Old English seoc "ill, diseased, feeble, weak; corrupt; sad, troubled, deeply affected," from Proto-Germanic *seukaz, of uncertain origin. (Etymonline)


4

Try ripped abs MW having high muscle definition


3

Traditionally, 1b requires a semicolon or full stop: Clean your room. Otherwise I will ground you. The reason is that otherwise is traditionally considered an adverb, and two sentences can traditionally only be joined with a mere comma if there is a conjunction between them: $ I don't like him, consequently I will sack him. This is ...


3

Your sentence is missing the third part completely, and I largely misunderstood it. I suggest using a paraphrase of your explanation: When you submit a request to hire a developer, a Senior Developer will evaluate our available members whose qualifications match your requirements and link you to them.


3

You wouldn't receive developers. (I'm picturing a programmer in a shipping crate.) You might receive resumes or contact information, or you might be connected to developers. These developers have been screened by other developers. You might say: Connect with qualified developers who have been screened by our Senior Developers.


3

For any colonial friends, it would sound very natural indeed, because of Bring me your tired, your poor, your ... huddled masses, et cetera. It is the same construction, omitting "persons," and implying group. Note too that "wounded" is also very commonly used in this way. "Bring me your wounded," "Bring the wounded here..." {Thanks to action movies ...


2

As well as the straight expert answers already provided, you also have the common corporate concept of a subject matter expert or SME (also domain expert in certain contexts). Wikiref: A subject-matter expert (SME) or domain expert is a person who is an authority in a particular area or topic. I know Wikipedia isn't the best of dictionary-style ...


2

This isn't strictly an "answer", but I thought you would be interested to see this pot-pourri of spellings of cipher/cypher from the 16th century onwards. It is from sense 5 of the word cipher/cypher in the Oxford English Dictionary. Of course the word began life from the French cuffre (modern French chiffre) with an entirely different meaning (the figure, ...


2

It seems there are some, but the examples are few and often obscure—at least if you're looking for words whose primary pronunciation in standard American English start with the ny- sound. (See yod-dropping.) Searching the CMU Pronouncing Dictionary for words beginning with the N consonant followed by the Y semi-vowel returns the following results: KNEW(1) ...


2

Allow me to introduce Nyaff, defined in Chambers as 'a small or worthless person or thing'. OED


2

In my experience in the USA using 'please' can come across as overly formal/patronizing in some contexts, and absolutely necessary in others. Take into account the age and general manners of the other person. One phrase that you can use to avoid sounding patronizing that will typically still be considered polite/respectful: Excuse me, could you kindly ...


2

Actually, Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) does have entries for both reoccur and reoccurrence—but it lists them under the entry for the prefix re-, which is where it puts words whose meanings differ from the root word(s) (in this case, occur and occurrence) only in adding "again" to each definition. The full-size Merriam-Webster's ...


2

The Collins Dictionnary agrees with The Grammarist: reoccur [ˌriːəˈkɜː] vb -curs, -curring, -curred (intr) to happen, take place, or come about again reoccurrence n Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003 recur [rɪˈkɜː] vb -curs, -curring, -curred (intr) 1. to happen again, ...


2

As the question stands now (DST 16h45 Montreal, Quebec) the four different events indicated in segments of the standing question are defined generically as changes in altitude. The events pictured could also represent acceleration (gain in altitude) and deceleration (loss of altitude) so long as there are no changes to the elevators or ailerons. Changes to ...


2

You could also say: shredded abs. shredded — ODO 2 informal Having well-defined or well-developed muscles; muscular Example: a step-by-step plan that will help you achieve shredded abs in as little as 76 workouts


1

Perhaps you would accept "neanderthal." The faster you say it, the closer it gets. I might be exposing my Midwest accent a little too much here.


1

This Question has three different parts having three different answers. The title asks What is the terminology for the things happening in between airline flights. The answer to such a vague question can be from "a layover" to "not much at all." The question body asks for a generic term that can be equally applied for the four separate "events" as things. ...


1

There seems to be no single-word that combines "Takeoff" and "Landing". However, there is the short form TOL. From Wikipedia's article, "Takeoff and Landing", we can read about different kinds of TOLs such as VTOL, CTOL, etc.


1

It's usually two words: mind game. "Mental game" doesn't quite work because it could imply a SPORT that is essentially played with the mind, i.e. Chess. In the context of English football, media outlets frequently comment on the mind games played by club managers prior to upcoming matches, which take the form of insults or misinformation which are meant to ...


1

I'd make it two words, mind game. A mind game in a sports context would be an attempt to break the concentration or confidence of an opposing player, perhaps by taunting or insulting. There is a line to be observed with respect to such "trash talk" and poor sportsmanship. An athlete preparing him- or herself mentally for an event is just that -- ...


1

Nyan cat It may have originally come from Japanese onomatopoeia, but now it's just an English word.


1

Flip side — TFD 2. Fig. another aspect of a situation. "On the flip side, if we lower the taxes it may stimulate consumer spending" For single words, consider angles, sides, etc.


1

Have you been listening to a lot of British English? In British English, one of the major differences between /ɒ/ (not, hot) on the one hand and /ɔː/ (caught) and /ɑː/ (path) on the other, is that /ɒ/ is shorter. Most Americans don't pronounce the vowel in not any differently than the vowel in hot, but we often shorten the vowel in not, because it's a ...


1

When I was a child, we always spent hours on the piazza, which was a large screened porch on the front of the house. There was another piazza in the back. That was 90 years ago in a neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts. With our Boston accents, it was pi azz zah, Weezey



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