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23

If you drop the 'I' it becomes less one-on-one - 'Love You' suggests a generic love for a person - like a rock band or an actress - 'We love you Paul' isn't a personal love, or the hippy 'free love' of the 1960's - 'Luvin' You Man', would go from Brother to Brother, regardless of skin color or religion beliefs. One may love the Lord in a passive way, and the ...


15

At the technology magazines where I've worked, our house style was to say "sign in to" and "log in to" instead of "sign into" and "log into." The rationale was that "sign in" and "log in" are verb phrases, not verb + start-of-a-prepositional-phrase combinations. In practice, however, it is sometimes quite difficult to tell which camp a particular pairing ...


15

I often tell friends both male and female that I love them; I don't think it's necessary to diminish the sentiment with flippant phrasing just because it's not romantic love. We don't do this for our family members, and they don't assume we mean we love them in a romantic way. I say trust in the existing context of your relationship; it isn't necessary to ...


10

The word immolation has this sense (among others): immolate tr.v. To kill (an animal, for instance) as a religious sacrifice. To kill, especially by fire: "[The soldiers] are crushed under rocks, pierced by bullets, immolated by flamethrowers" (A.O. Scott). immolation n. {AHDEL} [tidied]


10

If you qualify the meaning further, you can use the "I love you" such as "You are decent person. I love you, bro". Also, if you are addressing to a group of friends you can say "I love you guys"


6

Since the words toward and towards—as used today in the sense of "in the direction of"—are identical and interchangeable, the choice of which one to use is strictly a style question. The first U.S. discussion of toward versus towards that I'm aware of appears in Joseph Hull, English Grammar, by Lectures: Comprehending the Principles and Rules of Syntactical ...


6

"I'm just browsing, thanks" would be a good response in England or Australia.


5

Your interpretation is correct. That person who commented that "If you came third, then the next highest is second" (http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1300562) is wrong, as is your friend. Here is a good example of the usage of "next highest": http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Highest+bidder In judicial sales, where the highest ...


5

I believe the usage varies with community. For the vast majority of Americans, who live in urban or suburban communities, a farmer is anyone who makes a living by agricultural labor. This would include farm laborers (called farmhands or ranch hands in the US). Ownership/tenancy is irrelevant. Within rural communities, I believe the UK distinction is made. ...


5

My grandfather raised beef cattle (Aberdeen Angus) on an 87-acre farm in central Texas, and I remember asking him once why he didn't refer to himself as a "rancher." He laughed and said that anyone who owned less than a hundred acres of land and called himself a rancher was just kidding himself. In Texas (and I assume elsewhere in the United States) you ...


5

The meaning is as much about context and delivery as it is about wording. A sing-songy "Love ya!" as you're saying goodbye for the day can't be taken romantically. On the other hand, being physically close, locking eyes, and saying "I love you." with gravitas is difficult to take any way other than as a romantic gesture. John Mark Perry's answer, suggesting ...


4

Consider: I am very fond of you Be aware that in some cultures (Britain, US for example) non-romantic expressions such as "I like you" and "I am fond of you" can be used as ways to flirt or make romantic overtures, while making rejection less embarrassing. I really like Jean's answer, and I also think your own translation of I care about you holds a ...


4

If the information is condensed and summarised, then a common word for this is dashboard. It might apply even if the information is not summarized. "An easy to read, often single page, real-time user interface, showing a graphical presentation of the current status (snapshot) and historical trends of an organization’s key performance indicators (KPIs) - ...


3

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, there are at least 22 different reasons to say the word so, and that doesn't include set phrases, which most likely would not apply to this end-of-sentence application. Some of the 22 definitions might not be useful at the end of a spoken sentence. The obvious filler implication probably flows out of verbalizing ...


3

The usual term for this is immolation, derived from the verb immolate: VERB [WITH OBJECT] Kill or offer as a sacrifice, especially by burning EXAMPLE SENTENCES Chinese kings would immolate vast numbers of animals When her father - who did not accept Shiva, ever - publicly humiliated her beloved at the ritual, Sati immolated ...


3

Obviously the answer to this is in a state of flux as the technology age continues its maturation. The rule I've followed for the past few years based on various tech style manuals is that login is a noun, while log (in the sense of logging in) is a verb. Thus: What is your login? I have forgotten my login. How do I log in to the computer? How do I log in ...


3

People are regularly invited to simply sign in. As such sign into would seems inapposite. This ngram strongly supports that view.


3

GIVE ME SOME SLACK Still very much in use today and probably thought by most people as being relatively modern in origin, the phrase ‘give me some slack’ or ‘cut me some slack’ (meaning make allowances to complete something) is actually hundreds of years old. Tying a ship to a pier was no easy feat and took two teams of men armed with mooring lines. As one ...


3

Contrary to the above, "Have you got" is more common in British English than "Do you have" (about 2:1); but "Do you have" is much more common in American English than "Have you got" (more than 10:1). Note that the response includes only the relevant auxiliary: - "Do you have a pen"; "Yes, I do". - "Have you got a pen"; "Yes, I have". In fact, the most ...


3

Yes, that's right, and that's what the Sound Pattern of English stress theory predicts. The second syllable is unstressed, so it doesn't matter to the pattern in phrases, which has only to do with the primary stresses of the words that make up the phrases. There are always alternative intonations used for special contrast or other purposes, and here, ...


3

withhold verb: withhold; 3rd person present: withholds; past tense: withheld; past participle: withheld; gerund or present participle: withholding refuse to give sacrifice noun: to offer, to offer up grudge verb: 3rd person present: grudges; past tense: grudged; past participle: grudged; gerund or present participle: grudging ...


3

The best way I've come across for this sort of thing is phrases in the form "You're a" or "You're" . For example: "You're a good friend." "You're awesome dude." "You're a great guy." "You're a real pal." There are a few reasons why phrases like this tend to work well as a good expression of friendship. Firstly in the phrase "I love you" there are ...


3

From Grammarbook.com's rules about hyphen use: An often overlooked rule for hyphens: The adverb very and adverbs ending in -ly are not hyphenated. Incorrect: the very-elegant watch Incorrect: the finely-tuned watch This rule applies only to adverbs. The following two sentences are correct because the -ly words are adjectives rather than ...


2

I am almost 80 years old. When I was a child, I remember we had two collections, trash, and garbage. The trash was cans, paper, etc. Garbage was what we used to put into a strainer in our sinks before we washed dished (garbage disposers hadn't been invented yet?) The trash went to a "sanitary-fill" where piles of trash were burned, and then metal cans ...


2

I write as a linguist. There is something called compensatory lengthening in phonology and it's simply that when a sound is deleted, another sound is lengthened to fill up that empty space. This can be likened to sharing a small bed with your partner and then he has to leave for work as early as 3am. you spread out to fill the space he has left and enjoy the ...


2

In audio, a driver is just a loudspeaker cone (or other transducer). If you had a 3 way speaker, for instance, with a tweeter, a mid-range cone, and a woofer, each could be referred to as a driver. In programming, a driver is a software routine that controls a peripheral (such as a loudspeaker). So you could have a driver controlling a driver. ...


2

In my country we use the term an IS expert (IS for Information Systems/Information Solutions) to cover IT professionals.


2

So is used to imply causation. For example: It was raining, so we had to cancel our picnic. I had never been to the city before, so I quickly got lost. The professor is busy right now, so you'll have to wait. In other words, whatever follows so is a description of a result. However, sometimes the result is so easily discernible from what has already been ...


2

The two earliest instances of preplan/preplanned/preplanning (with or without a hyphen) that a Google Books search finds are from the pen of Robert Southey, who was Poet Laureate of England for the last thirty years of his life (from 1813 to 1843). The first instance is from a letter by Robert Southey to the Reverend Neville White, dated February 19, 1824, ...


2

Does a dog have the Buddha nature? Sexual orientation Your question reads, "...the context is a website whereby I allow the user to enter a sexuality." Part of your confusion starts here: using precise language to define your problem will help you find a solution. "Sexuality" is not precise enough. On your website, you are allowing users to enter their ...



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