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22

There are many ways, depending upon the situation. The direct answer would be "You don't need to flatter me." For a polite rejoinder you could use "Please, you are too kind. I will be glad to help." If you wish to be humorous you could say "Flattery will get you everywhere."


16

The terms are often confused, probably for the fact that some people think that tact is a short for tactic (which is similar to tack): Tact is sensitivity in social situations. A tack is a course or an approach (the word has nautical origins). When switching courses or taking a different approach, one changes tack, not tact. Tact often appears in ...


10

Despite your tags, you asked how common the funny meaning in British English. Hysterical would normally mean very funny in the more common uses in British English, although it does depend on the context. In common speech, I doubt most people would understand it to mean anything else, despite its history. Affected by or deriving from wildly uncontrolled ...


6

Flattery can be used here, it can be also said like :- I will do that for you, this sweet-talk is not required. or sarcastically - "Butter-up and get things done." I'll do that for you, without taking your blarney seriously.


5

How common is the usage of the term hysterical meaning “funny” in BrE and AmE? It's fairly common in American English, less common than it used to be. Does hysterical actually carry a negative connotation as suggested in the above extract, or does it only convey a neutral meaning? Hysterical has never contained a negative connotation from my ...


5

It is impossible to tell from the minimal description of the circumstances surrounding the guard's comment what his intentions were in saying "Nice shoes." On the one hand, there is at least a possibility that the intention was sincerely to compliment you on your shoes. After all, some consultants recommend it as an ingratiating strategy. From David Topus, ...


5

Considering that there is no such thing as “the actually 100% correct pronunciation for almond in American English”, it is not possible to provide you with that. There are, however, at least different six pronunciations in common use: [ɔlmənd], with the first syllable homophonic with the common word all and the less common work awl. [ɔmənd], as before but ...


5

There isn't any unusual accent in that speech. What you're referring to, though, is intonation, and one of the things you're specifically objecting to is called vocal fry. In vocal fry, the vocal folds are shortened and slack so they close together completely and pop back open, with a little jitter, as the air comes through. That popping, jittery effect ...


4

The Corpus for NOW Data that may help in discovering the answer to your question were recently released at corpus.byu.edu. Among other corpora, the NOW Corpus (News on the Web), with data from 2010-2016, can be used to analyze use of 'hysterical' in the sense of "funny" in the overall middling-formal English commonly found in online newspapers and journals. ...


4

In American English, either seductive or deceptive would be all right, depending on which attribute of the snake you wanted to highlight. I would use seductive if you want to focus on the appeal of the apple, but deceptive if you want to refer to the snake's dishnonesty. Deceptive: intended to make someone believe something that is not true likely ...


3

The items you listed are on the list of fast-moving consumer goods.  The description also applies for household goods.


3

Necessities, Vocabulary.com When used in the plural, necessities are items required for a situation but nothing extra. You probably only bring the bare necessities to a sleepover — pajamas and a toothbrush The things the OP lists as examples are considered necessities in modern life, although they would have been luxuries 100 years ago.


3

It depends what you actually want to say in your reply. In UK English 'don't mention it' is a common reply to thanks which is fairly neutral in meaning but depending on tone and context can imply 'I did you a favour now shut up about it and leave me alone'. If you want to be a bit more explicit you might say something like 'well you caught me on a good ...


3

The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary lists the following pronunciations for American English: /ˌɑːlmənd/ This is listed as the "main" pronunciation, recommended as a model for learners. /ˌæːlmənd/ /ˌɑːmənd/ /ˌæːmənd/ These three are alternative pronunciations which are also in use, although perhaps less frequently. As you can see, there are ...


2

No. Despite what it sounds like, "bent out of shape" is generally used not to describe the health of a person or the integrity of an object. Instead, as defined by oxforddictionaries.com, it means: Angry or agitated


2

In American English "freshman" is common, especially when discussing legislators. freshman: lacking seniority or experience; junior:


2

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


2

He DID say "queue". If I (British) visited New York, would I ask "Where's the elevator" or "Where's the lift?". Would you try to extract any deep meaning from my choice? Would I be accused of "cultural appropriation"? Is there any point whatsoever in this topic, other than a chance for us to display our political agendas?


2

On this question, a swarm of Stack Overflow users and computer experts have talked about queries and queues, as if everyone knew what they meant. Specialized language is not the language of common folk, and this is true for university level mathematics and computer science jargon. Maybe very soon everyone will be familiar with these terms and how they are ...


2

Typically people use Doorman a usually uniformed attendant at the door of a building (as a hotel or apartment building)


2

As in MacMillan Dictionary the alternatives are : bellboy : a man whose job is to carry people’s bags to their room in a hotel bellhop : a person whose job is to carry people’s bags to their room in a hotel chambermaid : a woman whose job is to clean the bedrooms in a hotel and from Wikipedia, "A bellhop (North America) or hotel porter ...


2

I've come across "femicide" with the "hate crime" meaning, but never "feminicide". If it was commonplace I probably would have seen it despite only reading a little on related subjects. Here in Britain, "homicide" isn't used as much as in the US, thus "murder" is the standard gender-neutral term. We only need a term for killing someone of a particular ...


2

Importunate - making repeated or annoying requests or demands Persistent - continuing to do something or to try to do something even though it is difficult or other people want you to stop


2

Dictionary coverage of 'terminate' and 'with prejudice' The phrase "with prejudice" is a legal term of long standing. Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968): offers this entry for it: WITH PREJUDICE. The term, as applied to judgment of dismissal is as conclusive of rights of parties as if action had been prosecuted to final adjudication adverse ...


1

Phrasal verbs are definitely a huge help. I've noticed there are a few other spots in a sentence where I know a writer doesn't have English as their first language when I see them. I worked as an English tutor in college and these days do a lot of ghost writing and proofreading for my employer who is a native Spanish speaker. These things come up constantly. ...


1

I'm also born and raised in Kalamazoo, MI. From my understanding of NCVS, I don't think I have it (can't entirely decide), but I'm sure my parents don't. Considering my friend group of people who are from the cities (excluding suburbs) of Chicago, Detroit, and New York (the Bronx), I find NCVS: very noticeable from New Yorkers not at all noticeable from ...


1

This complement was likely genuine but likely also meant as a humorous, slightly sarcastic understatement. It's a stereotype almost to the point of cliche in business that you can tell who really has money by looking not at their suit, but at their shoes. The same mentality is also behind the term "well-heeled" meaning wealthy; shoes typically have a ...


1

A few examples right off the bat: The word spunk has a secondary offensive meaning in British English Pants are undergarments in British English and outer wear in American English Floor numbering is different. Brits have a ground floor, just like Germans, the Dutch and other European countries. In America, the first floor is on the ground. The C-word is a ...


1

Grammatically, it's correct. I'm just not sure if "perpetually" is getting your message across. Without context, it's not entirely clear what you mean. Right now, it sounds as if you're saying that animals yawn incessantly/always/without interruption and that there's a reason for that. However, do animals really yawn incessantly? Are you using it as a ...


1

One term for these is consumer staples What are 'Consumer Staples' Essential products such as food, beverages, tobacco and household items. Consumer staples are goods that people are unable or unwilling to cut out of their budgets regardless of their financial situation. Consumer staples stocks are considered non-cyclical, meaning that they ...



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