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15

Because it was not a French word, but a Scottish one. And we did lose a u — just not the u you were expecting. Per the OED, it was a corruption of grammar, which during the 18th century was variously spelled glamer, glamor, glammar, and then in Scotland, as glaumour. That was one u too many, though, and it went then to glamour where it has remained ever ...


12

According to Etymonline expressions using the concept of holding the nose up in the air suggesting superiority or disdain are used from 1570. Probably other expressions like stick one's nose up in the air and stuck-up are derived from this usage: Nose: To turn up one's nose "show disdain" is from 1818 (earlier hold up one's nose, 1570s); similar ...


11

I would say tailing. That cop has been tailing me for a few blocks sounds the most normal. Tailgating is not quite what you're looking for—that implies following someone too close, and shadowing is for other contexts. To further substantiate my answer (from the Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus) verb informal the paparazzi tailed them: follow, ...


10

The thesaurus answer gives some terms, but what's more interesting to me is the antonym old-fashioned. Based on that, I'd go with antonyms of old-fashioned which bring up such terms as contemporary, fresh, and in vogue. All of those terms, and especially the synonyms to in vogue work well. In somewhat of a self-referential point of view, the use of the ...


9

The other answers correctly explain that Olive Pendergast is jokingly assigning an irrelevant, scientific definition to the word "climax" where it was clearly meant by Rhiannon to describe a sexual orgasm. I would add that a big part of the joke is that the definition of "climax" used by Olive Pendergast describes an ecological process that would take ...


7

The reason the spelling wasn't changed is that Noah Webster didn't know about it. The word glamour does not appear in the original 1828 Webster's Dictionary, so he couldn't change its spelling in that dictionary the way that he did for armour, honour, humour, neighbour, etc. In fact, it does not even appear in the 1892 Webster's International Dictionary, ...


6

stroke strōk/ noun: stroke; plural noun: strokes an act of hitting or striking someone or something; a blow. "he received three strokes of the cane" synonyms: blow, hit, thump, punch, slap, smack, cuff, knock; (from Google) Your replacement word is just as violent as the word you wish to replace. As a Canadian I can tell you ...


6

It has definitely crossed over to the UK. My 15 year old (a couple of years ago) daughter used it as expression of choice when faced with a gross situation. Sadly I have even used it myself but I like to think in a post-modern ironic sense ;) Like many Americanisms that cross the pond I imagine it is likely to have transferred through TV programmes, such as ...


5

"Textbook case" is an expression, meaning an example of a class of situations that is so typical, it could be used in a textbook devoted to such situations. "Family dynamic" just means what it says: the "dynamic" (that is, the way the people interact with each other) of the family. So (for example) one person complains, which makes another family member ...


5

You can express the idea of a near-freezing state of the water in a bucket, without attributing human-style intentionality to the water, by saying: The water in the bucket is on the verge of freezing. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines anthropomorphism as follows: anthropomorphism n (1753) an interpretation of what is ...


5

I’m a 62 year old (U.S. Male); the term ew or eww, as described, is equivalent to yuck in a more tactile sense. You may react to a slimy frog being offered to you, to hold; with the opportunity to say no, with Yuck!, as a response. But if a crass person just says here, hold this, without description, or knowledge of what it is, and you hold out your hand as ...


5

John Lawler illustrates peeve nicely. Per his comment: A peeve is a frequently-felt irritation. Many people cherish them, whence the phrase my pet peeve. In the context of language use, a peeve refers to a habit of others' speech (never of one's own speech) that someone finds irritating. Such habits are always incorrectly perceived (see "zombie rules"), ...


4

Perhaps surprisingly, the accepted answer at "A place nearby" but not "A place good" answers this. However, that question title is not an intuitive match for this problem, and the relevant sentence is a bit buried. In the phrase 3-month retreat, the main noun is retreat and three-month serves as an adjective (or an attributive noun, I ...


4

Based on what Wikipedia and LDOCE suggest, the difference isn't between the American and British English (apart from the little bit of background on ditch). It's just the subtle difference in the type of hole that's dug/built. Ditch and trench are much closer in the meaning, while gutter is slightly different. A street gutter is a depression running ...


4

At school in England around the turn of the millenium, "eww" was certainly in usage. I think (as mentioned in the comments) the huge popularity of US television shows may have had something to do with the frequent use of word. Other words that commonly replaced "eww" as expressions of disgust were "sick", "gross" and "vile". Another of the most frequently ...


4

There does not seem to be a definite answer here, but it seems that most people are generally satisfied that stuck up may have come from the idea of sticking one's nose up. However, I hope I can provide support for the idea that the phrase stuck up could easily have come from a meaning that has nothing to do with a person's nose. Possibly stuck up came ...


4

Past Definitions of Stuck-Up The earliest definition of stuck-up that I’ve been able to find is in John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, Second Edition (1860), published in London, which offers this very narrow meaning: STUCK-UP, “purse-proud”—a form of snobbishness very common in those who have risen in the world. Mr. ...


3

Scientifically it is ridiculous to say the water is 'trying to freeze'. But idiomatically that sort of expression is used all the time. In Britain it is quite normal to say, of the weather, 'it is trying to rain' and it is an accepted idiom.


3

Instances of schtup/shtup, schtupped/shtupped, and schtupping/shtupping in popular fiction go back more than half a century. From Saul Bellow, The Victim (1956) [combined snippets]: "Three minutes. Two bits. They cost me eighteen. That's the con." He made his joke sullenly. His cheeks were heavy, his gaze unconciliating. "Three minutes. Don't pester, ...


3

"Can" is usually pronounced /kən/ (with a schwa sound): as in "I can (/kən/) ride a bike". It is treated as a function word and as such, is unstressed. "Can't" is pronounced /kæn?/ (with a glottal stop replacing an expected /t/ sound) as in: "But, I can't (/kæn?/) ride a horse." The distinction for the listener is the unstressed schwa (/ə/) in "can" and ...


3

I grew up in the Seattle area, 1960s-1970s, and we always called the rubber sandals thongs. I moved to Boston in 1987, and they were called flip-flops, there. When I returned to Seattle in '92, I started hearing flip-flop, and now I never say thong other than around family members who know what I'm talking about.


3

I would make it slightly less passive: "An analysis performed by the insurance company ..." or other material to indicate who performed the analysis and where it was performed as well as the issue being analyzed. If you or your associates performed the analysis, you might phrase it: "An analysis performed by the authors into insurance company ...


3

This has definitely crossed! I would still associate it with a: scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting often a reaction towards blood or something they object to - spiders and snakes (esp. when eating) often get an "eew". I live in East Anglia, in a more affluent area, and because of that I don't hear as much ...


2

"Didn't" is an informal contraction of "did not". It would be out of place in a formal communication, and out of place compared with the tone of the rest of your statement. "dint" is a rare slang/dialect contraction of "didn't" and so is going to be a) even more out of place compared with the rest of the statement and b) extremely hard to understand for ...


2

It depends on a number of factors, namely the tone / emphasis you wish to convey. If you are suggesting negotiations were made on the recipients behalf, but an agreement could not be reached (without inferring failings on the side of the party representing the recipient), why not say: "I regret to inform you that "name of company" is currently focussed ...


2

As noted the two prepositions have different meanings, and according to Goole ( see Ngram below) their usage is similar both in US and UK. You climb onto a a pedestal both in US and UK. Onto prep: On top of; to a position on; upon: The dog jumped onto the chair Informal Fully aware of; informed about: The police are onto the robbers' plans. ...


2

Yes, it is grammatically correct, and it is meaningful. No, of course water does not have an intention. But it can make figurative, poetic sense to talk about it that way - and people do. This is not unusual, and everyone (I hope) understands what is really meant by such an expression: It is as if the water itself is trying to freeze but has difficulty ...


2

In the first two instances "Thank you" would be fine. In the third, "Hi, Mr. Abe" or applause.


2

I think you are referring to: Hard sell practices: high-pressure selling techniques. (*Typically: get ~ give someone ~.) They gave me the hard sell, but I still wouldn't buy the car. The clerk gave the customer the hard sell. Advertising and sales practices denoted by aggressive or forceful language. A hard sell is designed to get a consumer to ...


2

According to Wikipedia in US the 'silly season' is referred to as the 'slow news season' while in Australia and New Zeland it is closely related to the Christmas season: In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Israel, and in some other places, the silly season is the period lasting for a few summer months typified by the emergence of frivolous news stories ...



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