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21

A word I've heard used in this context is a wager, which TFD defines as: An agreement under which each bettor pledges a certain amount to the other depending on the outcome of an unsettled matter. In this case, the unsettled matter is whether the lady will give the challenged party her number. The challenger is pledging a free beer to the challenged ...


16

Dare seems to be the right word to use in this case. It may not be the actual word you are looking for but it certainly fits very well: to tell (someone) to do something especially as a way of showing courage Source: Merriam-Webster I dare you to go to her and get her number. If you succeed, I'll buy you a drink! I have only one reservation ...


15

According to Etymonline expressions using the concept of holding the nose up in the air suggesting superiority or disdain are used from 1570. Probably other expressions like stick one's nose up in the air and stuck-up are derived from this usage: Nose: To turn up one's nose "show disdain" is from 1818 (earlier hold up one's nose, 1570s); similar ...


11

Past Definitions of Stuck-Up The earliest definition of stuck-up that I’ve been able to find is in John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, Second Edition (1860), published in London, which offers this very narrow meaning: STUCK-UP, “purse-proud”—a form of snobbishness very common in those who have risen in the world. Mr. ...


9

It has definitely crossed over to the UK. My 15 year old (a couple of years ago) daughter used it as expression of choice when faced with a gross situation. Sadly I have even used it myself but I like to think in a post-modern ironic sense ;) Like many Americanisms that cross the pond I imagine it is likely to have transferred through TV programmes, such as ...


9

The other answers correctly explain that Olive Pendergast is jokingly assigning an irrelevant, scientific definition to the word "climax" where it was clearly meant by Rhiannon to describe a sexual orgasm. I would add that a big part of the joke is that the definition of "climax" used by Olive Pendergast describes an ecological process that would take ...


6

John Lawler illustrates peeve nicely. Per his comment: A peeve is a frequently-felt irritation. Many people cherish them, whence the phrase my pet peeve. In the context of language use, a peeve refers to a habit of others' speech (never of one's own speech) that someone finds irritating. Such habits are always incorrectly perceived (see "zombie rules"), ...


6

At school in England around the turn of the millenium, "eww" was certainly in usage. I think (as mentioned in the comments) the huge popularity of US television shows may have had something to do with the frequent use of word. Other words that commonly replaced "eww" as expressions of disgust were "sick", "gross" and "vile". Another of the most frequently ...


6

I defy you to get her number. Per Meriam-Webster: defy: to challenge to do something considered impossible


6

There does not seem to be a definite answer here, but it seems that most people are generally satisfied that stuck up may have come from the idea of sticking one's nose up. However, I hope I can provide support for the idea that the phrase stuck up could easily have come from a meaning that has nothing to do with a person's nose. Possibly stuck up came ...


5

I’m a 62 year old (U.S. Male); the term ew or eww, as described, is equivalent to yuck in a more tactile sense. You may react to a slimy frog being offered to you, to hold; with the opportunity to say no, with Yuck!, as a response. But if a crass person just says here, hold this, without description, or knowledge of what it is, and you hold out your hand as ...


5

The term has an interesting story. From the “the celebrated gold brick swindle” of October 1879, the term took on a different meaning. It is currently used mainly with as a noun meaning shirker and as a verb meaning to swindle. As noted, its usage has been decreasing in recent decades. Goldbrick : (www.merriam-webster.com) Noun something ...


4

"Alls" is always wrong, except perhaps in some dialectical phrases.


4

This has definitely crossed! I would still associate it with a: scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting often a reaction towards blood or something they object to - spiders and snakes (esp. when eating) often get an "eew". I live in East Anglia, in a more affluent area, and because of that I don't hear as much ...


3

The paragraph quoted from Stienstra (which equates two hours of exhaust emissions from one Jet Ski with those from a car traveling 100000 miles) does not coincide with reality. The statement that “All the watercrafts operating in California together produce in 2 hours the same pollution as one car driven 100,000 km” actually is fairly accurate. Here is ...


3

I would make it slightly less passive: "An analysis performed by the insurance company ..." or other material to indicate who performed the analysis and where it was performed as well as the issue being analyzed. If you or your associates performed the analysis, you might phrase it: "An analysis performed by the authors into insurance company ...


3

A deal noun 1. An agreement entered into by two or more parties for their mutual benefit, especially in a business or political context Oxford Dictionaries When the Op states that it is a word related to a game or sport, perhaps he was thinking of a card game where each player is dealt a hand that consists of several cards. A synonym for the word ...


3

Storyline: What happened was that while at work one of my colleagues asked me to get a girl's number. He promised me a beer if i succeeded in getting her number. So i went to the girl and asked whether she knew any swimming pool nearby the place. She said that she knows one and that she will get me the details. So i asked for her number by ...


3

I grew up in the Seattle area, 1960s-1970s, and we always called the rubber sandals thongs. I moved to Boston in 1987, and they were called flip-flops, there. When I returned to Seattle in '92, I started hearing flip-flop, and now I never say thong other than around family members who know what I'm talking about.


3

With my personal writing style, I would have punctuated the first sentence as follows: When I was younger, I skipped the superhero phase and never really thought about it twice. Here, I chose to use a comma at the first juncture only and not before the 'and'. I used a comma here because the first clause adds context to the entirety of the sentence and ...


3

Batman According to this wikiquote page: Batman: Good thinking, Robin. -- "The Penguin's Nest", first aired December 7, 1966 (Wikipedia, season 2, number 61). So Batman is 7th December, 1966. Having searched through scripts + quotes of all the series, I couldn't see it, however this answer (Yahoo! answers) says: "When batman gets a riddle from ...


2

It's a reference to the show "The Sopranos." She means that the name "Carmela" makes her friend sound like a member of a New Jersey mafia family. "Big Pussy" and "Meadow" are also names of characters from the same show. The reason for the joke is that the name "Carmela" is relatively unusual and most people would know it primarily from the show.


2

It's a reference to her fake name. Cameron's character is named Carly Whitten The Really? is a sarcastic expression meaning You did not seriously choose that specific name now, did you? Kate then refers to the Carmela which is the wife of Tony in The Sopranos. Meadow is their daughter Big Pussy is the nickname of Sal Bonpensiero, also from the ...


2

It is a joke. Movie scene The conversation is between two girls (Rhiannon and Olive) about the name George which according to Rhiannon is not a great name to shout out during sex. The last part is overheard by a teacher and Olive tries to explain away the word Climax in a non sexual way - taken verbatim from Dictionary.reference.com - Climax 4. an ...


2

The problem with this question is we're dealing with an orthographic representation of an "imitative/onomatopoeic" interjection. It's worth noting OED's two different pronunciations... Brit. /ˈiː(j)uː/ U.S. /ˈi(j)u/ OED list the alternative spellings euuw, euuww, euuwww, euw, euww, euwww, eww, ewww, and point out "forms with u occurring three or ...


2

I think you are referring to: Hard sell practices: high-pressure selling techniques. (*Typically: get ~ give someone ~.) They gave me the hard sell, but I still wouldn't buy the car. The clerk gave the customer the hard sell. Advertising and sales practices denoted by aggressive or forceful language. A hard sell is designed to get a consumer to ...


2

A facet is usually one aspect or 'face' of something. We usually talk about a facet of something. Probably because a facet of something is literally one 'face' of it, we don't about facets in things - think of a diamond with many facets. The facets are the flat surfaces or faces on the diamond. We often talk about facets of jobs, problems and even people's ...


2

The Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms says both forms (in and on) are used, and that the origin is in Tarot: in the cards also on the cards based on the use of tarot cards (= a set of cards with pictures representing different parts of life) that are believed to be able to show what will happen in the future But, despite the mystical ...


2

Ngram AmE shows both usages are popular. Ngram BrE shows on the cards as the most used. In the cards also on the cards: very likely to happen I think winning the World Series this year is definitely in the cards for Boston. Some reports suggest that a tax cut is still on the cards. Etymology: based on the use of tarot cards (a set of cards with ...


2

The first that clause is an object clause, because it functions as the object of arguing. It is not appositive, because it is simply an object on its own. The second example is not written in proper English; I would dismiss it.



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