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53

Acuity sharpness or keenness of thought, vision or hearing: intellectual acuity; visual acuity ODO; Wiktionary


33

Yes, you can use the word in the way that you have described, but it's considered more harsh than polite, and it has somewhat vulgar overtones. How it's regarded or received might be generational. I typed is suck vulgar? on Google, and found mixed responses. Feel free to do the same if you want diverse opinions on the matter. I thought this excerpt from a ...


20

This usage is not a universal in modern English. American dialects typically refer to a doctor's office as the building and/or room used for examination. The building may also be a clinic. The room itself may be called an examination room or, in most informal spoken English, an exam room. If the doctor is practicing within a hospital, they have an ...


15

To "kick butt" is to "Dominate" or to "Rule!" Dominate verb: have a commanding influence on; exercise control over. "the company dominates the market for operating system software" synonyms: control, influence, exercise control over, command, be in command of, be in charge of, rule, govern, direct, have ascendancy over, have mastery over. (Google) ...


14

Impulse Alternatives: Synapse, Neuron, Reflex Since it's a one word name for a score in a table-top game, I don't think the definition has to mean exactly what the score represents, it just has to be memorable with the player and loosely correlated to the actual definition.


13

Acumen may fit : The ability to make good judgments and quick decisions, typically in a particular domain. (ODO)


12

Yes, as used in the OP, "sucks" is always slang. SUCKS transitive verb; slang: a. To be highly unpleasant or disagreeable: This job sucks. b. To be of poor or inferior quality: The acting in that movie sucked. c. To be inept: I suck at math. see TFD The fixed-phrase “this/that SUCKS dick/cock” gained currency exclusively among male American ...


11

Perhaps Perspicacious Cambridge online: quick in noticing, understanding, or judging things accurately:


11

From my personal experience from conversations and reading, 'developed countries' is often used in the way that you understood first world. Any country with progress in technology, health, etc. and the others are sometimes referred to as 'undeveloped' or 'developing' as in the case of India which is making strides to improve its status. As someone who has ...


11

I suggest Trounce as meaning the same thing verb defeat heavily in a contest. "Essex trounced Cambridgeshire 5–1 in the final" synonyms: defeat utterly, beat hollow, win a resounding victory over, annihilate, drub, rout, give someone a drubbing, crush, overwhelm, bring someone to their knees; rebuke or punish severely. "insider ...


10

Quick-witted: adj. showing or characterized by an ability to think or respond quickly or effectively. Source (Google) Edit: After seeing that you want to use it as a measure in a game without context I would suggest wit Wit: noun. mental sharpness and inventiveness; keen intelligence. Source (Google) I also like resourcefulness. ...


9

It sounds to me like they're stalwart - combining both the meanings of "valiant" and "firm, steadfast and uncompromising" (reference). Often used in the phrases stalwart friend and stalwart supporter.


8

Harold Wentworth & Stuart Flexner, Dictionary of American Slang (1960) has some interesting commentary on suck and the seemingly allied phrases suck around, suck [someone] in, suck off, and suck up to [someone]. Of that entire group, only one term, suck off, is characterized as "taboo" across the board: suck off [taboo] 1 To commit cunnilingus or ...


8

The rule of thumb is, I think, that the Brits are much more likely to be familiar with American idioms than the other way round. We have been relentlessly exposed to them since the war; Murricans have been exposed to ours only if they are fans of Monty Python, Blackadder and The Office, which not all of them are. For example, my own language is infiltrated ...


8

The adverbial yet stands at the junction of past and future, expressing the persistence of action in time: ...used as an adverb, yet defines an action's persistence in time. The word can define an action in the past, present or future: I have never yet been late. I yet stand. I will yet arrive. Wikipedia.org The first example ...


7

TL;DR This is like asking how many words are in the English language. Everyone is different, words are created everyday (and fade away slowly), so naming a specific number is misleading. But for a single idiom, you can compare it’s frequency of usage in the US vs UK using corpora (COA/BNC or Google NGrams) Details: First a general observation: for ...


7

I have always heard the building as a whole called the "doctor's office", and the particular room where the doctor sees you the "examination room".


6

Did you look through the whole Wikipedia article? There's a subsection titled "Variations in Definitions" that has this to say: Since the end of the Cold War, the original definition of the term First World is no longer necessarily applicable. There are varying definitions of the First World, however, they follow the same idea. John D. Daniels, past ...


5

Try: The phone call from him at the eleventh hour was the icing on the cake. Also, Kristina was magnanimous enough to let me use one from her post: The phone call from him in the nick of time was the icing on the cake. (Oxford)


5

I like Wayfaring Stranger's answer of perspicacious (or for a stand-alone noun, perspicacity), but for a RPG context, consider this: it might be ok for success to be implied in the trait, only for your players to fail anyway. Someone with a low agility score, for example, isn't actually very agile; someone with a low charisma isn't charismatic. The same ...


5

tenacious adjective tending to keep a firm hold of something; clinging or adhering closely. "a tenacious grip" synonyms: firm, tight, fast, clinging; More not readily relinquishing a position, principle, or course of action; determined.


5

It's a fair question, I suppose – I mean, I believe you were told what you said you were told. However, I'm having trouble imagining anyone on this side of the Atlantic who would be confused by this use of the word key. As a matter of fact, sportswriters don't usually write for a sophisticated audience, but the Boston Globe wrote about: Three key ...


4

You could use... Mental reflexes The phrase is almost as common as physical reflexes, according to this ngram. See Google books results And this article from counselling resource. EDIT: Now that I know your context, try: flair [IN SINGULAR] A special or instinctive aptitude or ability for doing something well:


4

sagacious (adj) If you comment on something at a deeper level, you are making a sagacious observation. The word is a descendent of Latin sagus "prophetic" and is related to the Old English word seek. "keenness of perception, quality of being acute. Synonyms include discerning, insightful and another formal word ...


4

"The phone call from him at the last minute was the icing on the cake" Last minute Noun - The time just preceding a deadline or when some decisive action must be taken. www.dictionary.com Although this phrase seems to be specifying the last minute before the deadline expires, it is actually understood to mean just before the deadline and ...


4

I'm aware of a few different usages of "I'm sorry" in the US. I'm a native, by the way. I'm sorry - "I apologize for some error I've made." In this case, it is used to ask for forgiveness. Many times there's not anything you can do to "fix" the issue, so that case doesn't prevent you from saying it. For example, if you break a dish in someone's home, ...


4

It is not exactly foul language, but it is considered vulgar and rather common to use "suck" in this context. There are better words to express discontent or dismay at inefficiency of something. On another note, the term is usually applied to things or situations, not people; it is said that "something sucks" but it's unusual to hear that "someone sucks".


4

Sounds like your character is resolute. The word connotes both bravery and conviction.


4

There is also the widely used "consultation room", although many dictionaries apparently have "consulting room" instead.


4

Industrialized probably has the most neutral connotation. Developed implies (at least to some) that other nations are culturally undeveloped.



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