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25

It refers to a previously well-regarded series (of films, television shows, books etc) suddenly including a very strange or illogical event. Such an event is often interpreted as an indicator that the series has lost its way and declined in quality. The name comes from a scene in the fourth "Indiana Jones" film, "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal ...


11

Nuke the Fridge Con is a sponsor of comic book/media "conventions". The show itself usually occurs twice a week - on Wednesdays and Saturdays - making it more of a collectibles swap-meet/flea-market than an actual convention. The TV/Movie trope, Nuke the fridge means when something so ridiculously unbelievable happens in a plot that the whole thing is ...


9

I think the most common term in America for this is saloon. In westerns the cowboys would be drinking at the saloon. Surely its floors weren't better than sawdust. Saloon usage can vary between Old Western to your corner pub that is a little old fashioned, to a retro microbrewery. It is still very common in the Midwest US to open a bar with the name ...


7

The OED notes this double-edge grammatical sword under sense 13b, which notes that this phrase is used both actively and passively: 13 b. in charge (of) is used both actively and passively; e.g. to leave children in charge of a nurse, or a nurse in charge of the children. The latter is the more recent use; thence officer, clerk, curate in ...


7

NG, as an Ame speaker who has (as a doctor) delivered ~100 babies then taken care of them as they grew up, needing to know the stages of development and milestones, and needing to discuss them with (usually mom), I think I can attest with some authority to which one is common in my part of the US. A baby crawls before it cruises (walks by holding on to ...


6

It's probably best to use English instead of Anglican (and Anglomania instead of Anglicanism), as Anglican is used to describe the Church of England, while "English" does not have this confusion. Dictionary.com reflects this in its meaning for "Anglican": adjective 1. of or pertaining to the Church of England. 2. related in origin to and in communion ...


6

OED does note that Anglican has been used to mean English: 2. gen. In non-religious contexts: English. Now rare. 1871 J. Ruskin Fors Clavigera I. iii. 19 The quite Anglican character of [King] Richard, to his death. 1959 Amer. Lit. 30 449 The sources of future enrichings of the Anglican speech are the same old fountains. Sense ...


5

No, you can't use latched onto simply for get a hold of or to obtain. Latching onto carries the connotation of sinking one's claws into, or sinking one's teeth into. For example, a pitbull might latch onto an arm (hence the joke what has four legs and an arm?) …He latched onto that harmonica. It stirred his imagination and he used that instead of toys, ...


5

I assume your confusion is about number agreement, but could and would are modal verbs and have the same form regardless. The bolded is is also correct, as each mate is singular as well. So the sentence works fine (and is also technically accurate. I'm guessing someone was thinking of heterozygous carriers of a recessive trait, not homozygous recessive ...


5

The orthogonal travel to uptown/downtown in Manhattan is crosstown. Yes, I know that u/d is binary and crosstown is not. New Yorkers ususally know where they presently are. If they are West of Fifth Avenue and say they are going crosstown, they are going East. Ditto on East of Fifth. When current location cannot serve as the indicator or more precision is ...


5

Consider "dump," "roadhouse", and 'juke (house/joint)." roadhouse: a tavern located on a road outside of a town or city. juke house: Southern US: a cheap roadhouse.


4

In AmE: As long as has the following connotations: 1) Provided or If or since (not time related) - see note below: As long as you use the term correctly, people will understand you. Note: Since is usually used for a past condition that is now fulfilled. So, it's not an exact fit in meaning to as long as. As requested in comments I will attempt ...


4

While the children may try to take advantage, the parents would never leave them in charge of the babysitter. (ref) They would leave them in the charge of the baby sitter. (ref)


4

When you want to say that you, or someone else, has done the same as someone else, you use too, indeed. However, in the negative, if you want to say they have not done something, just like someone else has not done it, you use either. I enjoyed watching the game. I bet you guys enjoyed it too! But: The game was boring, I could not watch it till ...


3

There are probably formal, official definitions in some government document somewhere. But in my experience (United States), conventional usage is: bike lane: A portion of a roadway that is primarily used by motor vehicles that has been set aside for bicycles. bike path: A paved area for bicycles, not part of a "regular" motor-vehicle road bike trail: An ...


3

In American English (well, American Northeast English, anyway), "carry on" has a slightly formal flavor; it'd be a bit more natural in a military setting ("Very good. Carry on, soldier.") or when one wants to jokingly invoke that kind of authoritative tone. "Go ahead" would be more common as an informal permission/suggestion to proceed, "go on" would more ...


3

Derogative comments can be offensive, depending on context - but they are certainly not synonyms. There can be a lot of overlap between the two, trying to explain the differences with examples: Derogative not offensive : Consider the example of 'housewife' given in MW definition for derogative - it might be 'belittling' or w/e (personally I disagree but it ...


2

Emphasis on the 'that' gives a negative tone, emphasis on the 'so' gives a curious tone. Same for oh really: emphasis on the 'really' is confronting, emphasis on the 'oh' is curious. This is only my experience with the terms in my culture, body language or general melody of the cultural language can change the desired effect of anything you say.


2

There used to be a distinction. "Do you have a car?" meant "Do you possess a car", whether the car is here now or at a garage or parked in your driveway at home. "Have you got a car?" had a more immediate meaning of "Have you got it with you now?" However, I think that distinction disappeared a long time ago.


2

This usage of unplugged probably originates with the long-running TV show MTV Unplugged, in which well known musical artists perform their hits using acoustic instruments rather than electrically powered ones--for example, playing traditional guitars instead of electric guitars, or a piano instead of a keyboard. By extension, therefore, "[subject] unplugged" ...


2

The word 'lieu' is a good word. I use it myself from time to time in communications, specifically in letters. Using it expands our vocabulary benefiting not only the user but the receivers as well. A dictionary I reviewed provides the following usages: 'lieu' noun-single [MF, from Latin locus---more at stall]: place, stead. e.g. (the mumbling cant that... ...


2

Cyclist (and the almost never used cycler) refer to bicycle riders. I suppose you could apply them to uni- and tri- cycle riders, too. I see the dictionary links show it can be applied to a motorcyclist. I rarely hear it used that way, and until I googled for an example to show you, I didn't realize it had any prevalence. From what I'm seeing, it seems ...


2

Americans in general say: 'coworker' for someone they work with, no friendliness (or lack of friendliness) implied 'officemate' for someone you share an office with 'friend at work' for someone they get along well with at work. This isn't a set phrase. It is very literal meaning they are chummy at work but aren't necessarily friends outside of work. ...


2

The general sense of charging something is to bring a strong accusation or assertion (particularly of wrong-doing). Clearly, the most common place for an assertion of this type would be in a legal proceeding. Charge that is used in the legal sense in your first two examples. It means that legal allegations have been brought against an entity or person ...


2

I think the phrasing is slightly different. Your reference makes a distinction between the two uses: in charge of--having the care or supervision of: She is in charge of two libraries. Also, in the charge of --under the care or supervision of: The books are in the charge of the accounting office. While I would understand the intended meaning of the ...


2

Generally, in AmE, a bakery is a place where baked goods are made, and usually also sold (though there are some factory bakeries which don't sell retail.) I have some fond memories of the local bakeries as I was growing up. Somehow, they seem to have been replaced, but not by bakeshops. I never saw that word until this post. (Similarly, I have never seen ...


2

Old Nick is slang with an interesting threap: "OldNick," the devil. Hotten says from the Scan- dinavian knickar, the destroying principle. Butler says in Hudibras: "Nick Macheivel had ne'er a trick. Though he gave name to our" OldNick." Probably the one explanation is as nearly correct as the other. The American slang dictionary, by James Maitland.


2

They are not synonyms. A comment can be offensive in many ways, eg by using explicit sexual or profane language in an inappropriate setting, without it being derogatory to any one particular person or thing. Derogative in Merriam-Webster: ...intended to make a person or thing seem of little importance or value. Derogatory seems to be more usual in ...


2

Firstly, the argument about one or other spelling "reflecting the origin of the pronunciation more closely" is essentially specious. The correspondence between pronunciation and written form is essentially arbitrary. For example, the letter 'z' is generally used to represent a voiced alveolar fricative when writing English, generally used to represent an ...


2

Unlike other cases (eg theatre vs theater, and colour vs color), it is simply not true that -ize is American and -ise is British. The first part is true: American sources generally use only -ize (and Americans who have not encountered British writing may see -ise as a spelling error). It is also true that many, perhaps most, British writers use -ise. But ...



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