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16

Those are not typos. Native speakers of British English do use bath as a transitive verb. Bathe on its own suggests swimming, and probably specifically seaside swimming — not even in swimming baths (which are swimming pools these days anyway). Bathe is almost poetic: something might be bathed in light. Apart from bathe a wound, to hear it used ...


10

Just some observations and Ngrams. The results on the American English corpus indicate that the verb to bath is rarely used if at all. Whereas the expression to wash the baby seems to be overtaking its counterpart to bathe Meanwhile the British English corpus shows the slow upward trend for to bathe the baby which has been picking up momentum since the ...


9

In conversation: it can mean, "I'm listening and I understand what you're saying, please continue". with a questioning intonation, it could mean "Is that really what happened? I am surprised. Tell me more". with a vehement intonation, it could express strong sympathy or agreement that a course of action is correct: "I understand your feelings. I think ...


8

Oh, dear. The root meaning of narrative ‘a story’ or the telling of a story. The most recent generation of academics have adopted the word to designate the expression of an understanding or account of how the world works—an ideology—through stereotyped stories. In that sense, narrative has largely replaced the term myth used in my youth fifty years ago. ...


7

The verb corresponding to declension is decline. However, your example of day - daily is not an example of declension. It is an example of word formation (with the adverbial suffix -ly). Declension adds/changes inflections, not suffixes. And here's a little on-topic joke I came across recently: A verb walks up to a noun in a bar: -- Hey, babe, ...


6

REVISED A lesson in the dangers of relying too heavily on Google Ngram (aka mea culpa) Previously, I posted an Ngram chart illustrating my surprise that waffle used in its verb form seemed to not exist before the late 1950s. When using Ngrams I started with a much wider timescale: 1800 to 2008, I hadn't noticed the tiny bump that appeared sometime in the ...


6

You are looking for The Devil’s Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce.


5

As you've discovered, it is a valid British usage. I would like to confirm that "to bath" is never used in any American dialect I've heard. If you're preparing students to speak American English, they can safely ignore that usage :)


4

Apart from containing bad grammar, yes, the two sentences illustrate a quirk in at least AE. Bad and good mean pretty much the same thing in your exemplars. (A special case, or exception, involves the use of bad to mean good, as in, "That's a bad pair of kicks you wearin.'") I'd summarize the slight differences between the two sentences as follows: ...


4

You won't find compeled in the American Heritage Dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, or ODO's US English corpus, either. The Corpus of Contemporary American English, which samples published texts from 1990–2012, returns zero matches for compeled versus 2651 for compelled. For that matter, it also returns zero results for expeled (vs. 2057 ...


4

I think it depends on the etymology of each term. During centuries of separation from Britain, American English retained the original -se ending in certain words borrowed from French, while British English modified it to -ce. finance (n.): was originally spelt with the suffix '-ce '. c.1400, "an end, settlement, retribution," from Old French ...


4

'Peak' means 'decline in health and spirits, waste away' -http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/peak#peak-2; 'Pine' means 'become ill or feeble through worry or longing' - http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/pine The 'I' of the chorus is Clementine's lover. It is not her father.


3

I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? Only among the English and Aussies, as far as I'm aware. Incidentally, the term mate in this context came into the English lexicon via sailors in the 18th century. Presumably that's why it's commonly associated with pirates. I hope that answers your question.


3

No, those are just typos. I have never heard a native speaker of American English use bath as a verb. It is bathe or take/give a bath. (Indian English, at least, and so British English I guess, they do use bath as a verb.)


3

It's wrong in standard English. It's used regionally in the U.S.; see this webpage. The webpage says it's used in Eastern New England (it also appears in DeKalb county, Illinois, which was settled by New Englanders). it means "so did I".


3

I would just say they laughed at the clever word-play; to me, the sentence basically means "He likely doesn't have the energy he used to have when he was younger any more". Just like this paraphrase, and just like the words energetic or virile, it could, but does not have to, carry a sexual undertone. Got-up-and-gone is not an idiom, it is just a past tense ...


3

This is an old joke based on the idiomatic phrase "get-up-and-go" (which is typically defined as you have found). The most notable variant is probably from the well-known humorous poem "My Get Up and Go Has Got Up and Went" (later set to music by Pete Seeger) but I imagine the witticism precedes it. It's not unlikely that the women you overheard intended ...


3

Shifting second-syllable stress to the first syllable is characteristic of Southern (US) accents. Indeed, it's a trope, reaching #59 on the Stuff Southern People Like blog: How to Sound Southern: Accent the First Syllable … HALLoween, THANKSgiving, TEEvee, UMbrella, and JUly The THANKSgiving pronunciation is also covered in a Language Log post which ...


2

In the 1850's, Sir Richard Owen (the man who came up with the word "dinosaur") hired a sculptor named Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins to create the world's first life-sized dinosaur figures to display in the Crystal Palace. In 1953 while the Iguanadon model was still under construction, Hawkins hosted a New Years Eve gathering and a dinning area was set up ...


2

Forget about "for both types of kayaks" for a second. With or without that piece of information the sentence retains it's meaning.Try to imagine the following: The equipment are similar, and fairly simple. The above does not sound quite right, does it? How about: The equipment is similar, and fairly simple. It's not the kayaks that are ...


2

Waffler The suggested US meaning is found in the glossary of "Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects" by "Various Writers in the Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects", published in 1839. Waffler, A waverer This is provided in reference to a poem of c.1803 called "Matthew Macree" in the following stanza: The he wad shek the bull-ring, and brag the heale ...


2

There is a subtle difference between "created by" and "created from" in your sentence. Created from his inability.... His circumstances had their origins at his inability... Created by his inability.... His inability created the circumstances. Your choice depends on which meaning you want to emphasize, "the origin" or "the action". "created by" - ...


2

I think there may be a certain propensity for using the hyphenated form as an adjective, but not as a noun.


2

One thing that interests me is exploring how machine learning can be applied to real world problems.


2

"Top Ranked" while not one word would usually suffice. adjective: considered to be the best or among the best ⇒ "the top-ranked amateur in France" http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/top-ranked


1

A rule of thumb guide for consonant doubling before suffixes is this: If the last syllable of the root is: stressed ends in: consonant vowel consonant we usually double the final consonant before the suffix. There are some letters that we don't generally double before suffixes. The most important are 'w' and 'y'. The letter 'l' is not one of these ...


1

John Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms, second edition (1859) identifies several terms from various parts of the United States that might suit. From New York: HIGHBINDER. A riotous fellow. New York slang. From what was then considered the Western part of the United States: SCROUGER. A bouncing fellow or girl. A Western vulgarism. and ...


1

The Collins online dictionary (definition 3)says that it is mainly used in England, Australia and New Zealand. As a native speaker of BrE, my impression is that it was more commonly used in England in the 1950s than it is now. I have rarely heard it used by what we might snobbishly call 'educated' people of my generation (over sixty), though my son and his ...


1

This is another instance where looking at it as a BrEng versus AmEng issue simply confuses the matter. You bath by dumping yourself in a bath of some sort specifically to get clean, as in the two dictionary entries provided by the OP. There is naturally a grey area on deciding what is or isn't a bath. You bathe by cleaning yourself someother way. At a ...


1

In the context given, pretty is used for emphasis. The online dictionaries don't quite capture this use. See, for example: ... To a fair degree; moderately: a pretty good student. ... -- American Heritage Dictionary



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