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72

So, "line" is much more common in American English, especially when talking about a line that is actually physically embodied. However, queue is not unknown, especially among those with exposure to British English. Whether he was fed the line or doing it as a favor, I can't say, but it would certainly be more than reasonable for Obama to use the ...


61

I agree with those who have said it is more likely he used 'queue' in preference to 'line' after speaking to advisors. But it's also interesting to note that Obama seems to like the word. He's used it a few times before, and in a non-British context: February 25, 2010 Remarks in a Discussion on Insurance Reform at a Bipartisan Meeting on Health Care ...


39

"Queue" was used, in the reported statement, in the sense of a "priority" ordering of the elements, and that sense is perfectly idiomatic US English. It's saying, in effect, that the UK would have the lowest priority. This is different from saying "I had to stand in line for hours to order the new iPhone." And "queue" is well-known and understood in the ...


21

"Line" is used rather than "queue" for these purposes in American English, but in a technical, rather than colloquial, context, the term "queue" gets used all the time. As an American computer programmer, I work with queues and queued data on a regular basis, and I would never use the word "line" in that context. But if a person is being sent to the back ...


16

My choice would be hypercritical. The only disadvantage being that lazy listeners will think you are saying "hypocritical".


12

Unforgiving means intolerant of any mistakes, regardless of size, reasoning, or infrequency. It is often used in contexts like yours: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/unforgiving It was unforgiving of him to judge the employee in such a way.


12

As a software engineer in the US, I use the word "queue" all the time. Back when most people who subscribed to Netflix used the DVD delivery service, we called it a "queue." I think it's conceivable that the President, being a literate person, would believe that "queue" is the best word to use in this case just because it indicates a priority ordering. It is ...


11

The Youtube video was broadly correct. Your daughter may have a slightly unusual accent for an American, or her perception of the sounds may be influenced by the spelling. I say "broadly correct" because for most American English speakers, the sound used in a word like "little" is actually not exactly a [t] (voiceless alveolar plosive) or a [d] (voiced ...


10

Much of the terminology in medicine is from Latin, some from Greek, and in extremely rare instances, it's made up (usually initially as something humorous.) -Stat comes from the Latin stare (statum), meaning: remain, rest; stand, stand still, stand firm The use of -stat as a suffix usually means that it will make something come to rest, to stop, to ...


9

Does President Obama say "queue"? I'm not sure. But I'd like to address the other part of the question, which is: Do Americans use the word "queue"? Do you know of any idiomatic alternatives for a phrase like "message queued for sending"? I can't think of any. That sentence already seems 100% idiomatic American English to me. So yes, most ...


6

Does President Obama say "queue"? Here's some evidence. There are 358 speeches and press conferences by Barack Obama on this website. I'm not sure how they decide which ones to transcribe. Collecting all the speeches there, out of 1,162,735 words it seems he's publicly said "line" at least 130 times and never "queue." Anyway I think it's pretty ...


6

There may be some confusion here between language and behavior. Politeness is a combination of the two, and care with the former cannot forgive lapses in the latter. If you were to interrupt two strangers having a semi-private conversation, perhaps by physically inserting yourself between the two so that you address one party while turning your back on the ...


6

Gofer A person who runs errands, especially on a film set or in an office; a dogsbody: Oxford Dictionaries Online


5

This American English native speaker says the example sentence is incorrect. The "have been found" should be paired with "had moved" to express the correct temporal relationship between the two actions. Your corrected version is indeed correct. It is also in the past subjunctive mood, but that's not so relevant to the the question of verb tenses. One ...


5

I'm sure Obama knows the distinctions between British and American English on 'queue' and 'line'. He is noted for his oratory skills, so I am confident that he chooses his words in light of his audience. It is unlikely that he would use the word 'queue' speaking to an American audience, but I would be surprised to hear him use the word 'line' when ...


5

For a general british audience 'queue' and 'line' are certainly not synonymous. Most british people would understand it in context but it has much less impact as a headline. This is also different from things like faucet vs tap or fall vs autumn where the difference in transatlantic usage would be obvious. So this seems very much like a key phrase being ...


5

Klinger is striving for a Section 8 because being booted out of the Army for any reason is still preferable in his mind to the alternative of getting shot and killed in Korea. "Bucking for" is not solely a negative expression. A young person could be working very hard to get straight A's and could be said to be "bucking for" straight A's on his/her ...


5

Considering that there is no such thing as “the actually 100% correct pronunciation for almond in American English”, it is not possible to provide you with that. There are, however, at least different six pronunciations in common use: [ɔlmənd], with the first syllable homophonic with the common word all and the less common work awl. [ɔmənd], as before but ...


4

It's a speed thing. Say "little" slowly, and it's ['lit(ə)l], say it faster, and eventually it becomes ['lid(ə)l]. Saying ['lid(ə)l] slowly is associated with "baby talk", most adults publicly avoid that.


4

I'd suggest, unjust Something or someone that is unjust is just not fair. An unjust boss might fire you the very first time you're late for work. Vocabulary.com


4

The subject is "working" which is singular; thus "has" is correct. You're tempted by the "many years" or perhaps by the "academic and administration fields" to make the verb plural, but that just describes the work. This will be clearer if you boil the sentence down: Working ... has not only contributed to my professional growth, but also to...


4

It's quite possible that politicians use different varieties of English in different countries. For example, Tony Abbott, who is generally perceived as less intellectual and less internationally-minded than Obama, and therefore less likely to use different varieties of English in different countries, nonetheless gave the following anecdote differently in a ...


3

You could describe the boss as harsh. ‘Robbins's disciplinarianism won him a reputation as a harsh and cruel taskmaster.’ source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/harsh meaning #2.


3

These people are often negatively characterized as punctilious. In particular, "punctilious implies minute, even excessive attention to fine points." Punctilious can be used as either a positive or negative word.


3

I don't know who wrote those lines, but queue is used in in AmE: a ​line of ​people or things ​waiting for something: There was a ​long queue for ​tickets at the ​theater. (Cambridge Dictionary) Ngram: queue in AmE vs BrE.


3

The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary lists the following pronunciations for American English: /ˌɑːlmənd/ This is listed as the "main" pronunciation, recommended as a model for learners. /ˌæːlmənd/ /ˌɑːmənd/ /ˌæːmənd/ These three are alternative pronunciations which are also in use, although perhaps less frequently. As you can see, there are ...


3

The 1998 Wingspread Statement on the Precautionary Principle summarizes the principle this way: When an activity raises threats of harm to the environment or human health, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically. All statements of the Precautionary Principle contain a ...


2

No. Despite what it sounds like, "bent out of shape" is generally used not to describe the health of a person or the integrity of an object. Instead, as defined by oxforddictionaries.com, it means: Angry or agitated


2

In American English "freshman" is common, especially when discussing legislators. freshman: lacking seniority or experience; junior:


2

He DID say "queue". If I (British) visited New York, would I ask "Where's the elevator" or "Where's the lift?". Would you try to extract any deep meaning from my choice? Would I be accused of "cultural appropriation"? Is there any point whatsoever in this topic, other than a chance for us to display our political agendas?



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