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14

As an aside, I think three articles can be dropped to form a clearer sentence. Also, the question mark confuses me a little bit, because the sentence is structured as a factual statement, not as a question. You can of course add a question mark to turn any sentence into a question, using intonation, but I'll assume a statement for now. You may not have ...


11

It sounds like the phrase you're looking for is "kicked out on the street", which typically implies homelessness or unemployment.


10

This will be a fairly common pronunciation. It is caused by the influence of the /r/ which follows afterwards. In the word /ˈɡroʊsəri/ there's a schwa between the /s/ and the /r/ - in bold in the transcription. This weak vowel can be omitted altogether. When this happens our mouths will be preparing for the forthcoming /r/ before we actually make the /s/. ...


4

Since the two phrases you quote appeared as part of a comedy sketch, I think it makes sense to consider how and in what sense the use of the word bitch may be played for laughs. First, though, I note that the frequency of the term "bitch" in Google Books search results has increased considerably in the past 100 years—and especially in the past 50 years—even ...


4

It is sense 4 of the verb fiddle per the OED. It has been around since at least 1630 and Daniel Defoe was using it in 1703. Interestingly the nounal use is said by the OED to be of US origin, and dates from more recently. Verb trans. and intr. To cheat, swindle; to ‘wangle’, intrigue; (see also quot. 1850). Also with into, out of. Now only slang. 1630 ...


4

Evan Morris has a 2008 article which mentions this (and other uses of 'square') in The Word Detective: ... In adopting the term “square” to their own use, the jazz musicians were, ironically, simply employing a very old sense of “square” meaning “fair, honest, reliable or in proper order” (still heard in phrases such as “square deal”). This ...


3

The relevant rule: Elision of alveolar plosives /t/ /d/ In rapid, casual speech the alveolar plosives are commonly elided when preceded by the following consonantal sounds: In the case of /t/ preceded by /s, f, ʃ, n, l, p, k, tʃ/ ... In the case of /d/ preceded by /z, ð, n, l, b, g, dʒ/ Working with Words: An Introduction to ...


3

"Once bitten, twice shy." "Older and (or but) wiser."


3

The best advice is: don't. Just leave it out. Readers do not like being constantly (or even repeatedly) reminded to pay attention. If it is a fact, state it as a fact. If it is an opinion, clarify that it is an opinion. If it is somehow related to other statements, use connectors to clarify or emphasize that relationship, such as however, moreover, ...


3

I don't think we (Brits) have a neat expression for that, we would have to say that NN became a homeless person, or a "rough sleeper". "Pushed to the streets" has to be Indian English, right? AFAIK we don't have it, but I think it is nevertheless transparent to us. Just don't have the person "walking the streets" unless you honestly mean that (s)he is now ...


3

"Getting reamed", is slang for being fucked hard, in one hole or another. It is just a grosser, more exaggerated form of the slang "getting screwed", meaning to be taken advantage of, mistreated or abused.


3

He must have already gone to sleep/bed He must [already] be sleeping He must be asleep already Any of the above can express the idea of a person who is either in bed or sleeping at the moment of speaking. The modal verb must is used for speculating, and making deductions. It expresses the speaker's conviction or certainty. In other words ...


2

Slave out likely refers to the archaic practice of forcing criminals, prisoners of war, or victims of kidnapping into slavery. From the transitive verb definition of slave: transitive verb 1 archaic : enslave merriam-webster.com The dialogue of Desert World Allegiances, by Lena Gala, suggests criminals sentenced to slavery: “That we ...


2

My first thought is that I would tend to use DE-tail as a noun and de-TAIL as a verb, usually in the past tense. That's an irrelevant DE-tail. She de-TAILED her problems for us at great length. However, I don't see any backup for this in the dictionary, so it must be regional (or familial!) for me. In fact, the accent on the second syllable ...


2

You are right. However if you expand the sentence to "I am sorry to keep you waiting." then you can choose which of "sorry", "keep" and "waiting" you stress in order to modify the intended meaning. Do you, the speaker, want to stress how sorry you are, or that it's not the waiting but the prolonged nature of it that is bad, or that waiting itself is just ...


2

Long story short Consequenced has been in use for nigh on 200 years, albeit not exactly at the top of the pile of first words to use when you want to talk about being on the receiving end of consequences so it seems that to call it an error would be something of an injustice; without a governing language body determining what's right and what's wrong in ...


2

Barrera Ramirez, perhaps with a hyphen to show it is one name: Barrera-Ramirez. If you aren't from the US, how would you answer in your home country? That's probably the way to answer in the US, too.


2

It is to be observed that (/Please/One should/) Observe that (One should) Bear in mind that (One should) Keep in mind that


2

I believe the "negative" version you're looking for is worse yet: You may not have access to trusted counseling, worse yet 24/7 support? Alternately or worse: You may not have access to trusted counseling, or worse: 24/7 support? Or you could reverse the order to make use of much less: You may not have access to 24/7 support, much less ...


2

This is certainly a timely question for readers in the United States: The final day for citizens to file their federal and state income tax returns without incurring a penalty for late filing is April 15. In the spirit of the impending dismal day, I'll focus on Mari-Lou A's third question: 3. Do Americans fiddle their taxes? What's the American English ...


2

I can tell you it's one of the versions mentioned (the last one) gro·cery noun \ˈgrōs-rē, ˈgrō-sə-rē; ˈgrōsh-rē\ by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary I also have heard it this way in Canada. It's also mentioned here in IPA: (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹoʊsəɹi/, /ˈɡɹoʊsɹi/, /ˈɡɹoʊʃɹi/ http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/grocery


2

I apologise for not being able to match you in the phonetic alphabet. I never learned it. But no, I don't hear the same stress as you. I would stress the "expect" but not the "some". Why would one want to stress "someone" – to create a contrast with possible "something" or "non-human"? Hardly. Whereas one would stress "expecting" because your sentence is ...


2

"Clean out" means to empty the contents. clean out 2.) To empty of contents or occupants. 4.) Slang To deprive completely of money or material wealth: The robbery cleaned us out. So, in this context, it means the person ate all the food, though that's likely a exaggeration. Best inference of the meaning: the person ate a bunch of food.


2

Sure, you should practice pronouncing the diphthongs (and trifthongs as well) correctly. Try phonetics practice exercises. American English Diphthongs by Rachel's English Listening to your own speech when you repeat after a native speaker record and try to repeat as close to the native speech as possible is very helpful. Actually, many people who ...


2

A reamer is a device or object that enlarges a hole, as this definition from Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2013) indicates: reamer n (1825) : one that reams, as a : a rotating finishing tool with cutting edges used to enlarge or shape a hole b : a fruit juice extractor with a ridged and pointed center rising from a shallow dish. ...


2

Yes it is correct. It probably sounds peculiar because it is the same as present tense. You can avoid confusion regarding tense if you say, for instance: I shut up when [somebody] [did something]. There are many English verbs (such as cut, put, cast, etc.) whose past tense and past participle are the same as present first-person. Here is a list: ...


1

The school is recognized as the most outstanding TVET school in Calamba, Misamis Occidental. "is recognized" is a passive construct using the past participle "recognized"


1

If what you are trying to emphasize is the fact that you're proud, then yes, stress the word "proud" a little. Like you said in the second paragraph, if your intention is to distinguish between the people involved, stress the "I" and "you".


1

Yes. And that's done even in writing; you can find: Sweet Dreams at the Goodnight Motel - Page 207 Curtiss Ann Matlock - 2009 - “Not if you were callin' Claire Wilder.” That was a surprise. “Yes, I was. Who's this?” “Who's callin'?” The guy, whoever he was, was a wise-ass. “This is Andrew Wilder, callin' my wife.”


1

It seems a easy path to me from the energetic movement of the hands and arms while playing a fiddle to energetic movement using the hands when fiddling with an object to energetic work on your taxes - and if you need work that hard, the odds are you are cheating somewhere.



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