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95

A milkshake usually contains only milk and ice cream. However, sometimes strawberries or bananas can be added. If the beverage is mostly fruit and ice, then I would call it a smoothie. If you add some milk, nuts, or ice cream to it I would still call it a smoothie. The key ingredients determine the name. So if it is mostly ice cream and milk, it's a ...


51

For most Americans, a milkshake is served as dessert (usually at the end of the meal), although it may also replace the main beverage for the meal if one is feeling indulgent. Milkshakes are generally not associated with breakfast. Smoothies, however, are generally viewed as a meal-replacement, most often for breakfast (when one is in a hurry to get to ...


22

The critical thing I would go with is to make it clear that the smoothies contain milk and nuts. It's not a given that a smoothie will contain either (in the UK, most contain yoghurt as the base ingredient, or are pure fruit), and if someone is lactose intolerant or allergic, it can range from embarrassing to catastrophic to get that wrong. For preference ...


18

The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) has 277 instances of chaperone and 60 instances of chaperon from 1990 to 2015. (I excluded the spoken sections.) ...


17

How about "going against the grain"? https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/against_the_grain


16

No, they can't be used interchangeably (in the US) since nylon bags and plastic store-purchase-type bags are different materials entirely. Nylon bag (typically called a laundry bag) Plastic shopping bag Edit: and to Aml's point, nylon is a synthetic woven fiber and plastic is not.


12

If it's a lassi (which I know commonly are fruit, and sometimes use the pistachio nut or almonds) call it a lassi An American going on an assignment in India should understand "lassi" as a dairy-and-fruit beverage at a baseline and may be pleased by menu verisimilitude as a recipe of Indian origin.


12

It depends on what is in the drink and how thick the drink is. From Honeybell's Cookery: The main difference between smoothies and milk shakes is that fruit is the principal ingredient of the smoothie and ice cream is the primary ingredient of the milkshake. The link contains quite a bit more information, but that is the main point. There is also ...


9

The variant "chaperone" appears to be from a mistake: Chaperon: 1720, "woman accompanying a younger, unmarried lady in public," from French chaperon "protector," especially "female companion to a young woman," earlier "head covering, hood" (c. 1400), from Old French chaperon "hood, cowl" (12c.), diminutive of chape "cape" (see cap (n.)). "... ...


7

I believe swimming upstream is about as opposite a sentiment as you can get. It even means the opposite in the two phrases' literal sense.


6

The term "war horse" or "old war horse" is often used to refer to an aged, experienced soldier. (Informal) a veteran, as a soldier or politician, of many struggles and conflicts. (Dictionary.refeence.com)


6

According to Wikipedia, the major league baseball venues are named as follows: 12 are "parks", such as PNC Park in Pittsburgh. 10 are "fields", such as Citi Field in New York. Only four are "stadiums," such as Yankee Stadium in New York. Then there is the O.co Coliseum in Oakland, and the Rogers Centre in Toronto. The "park" in Cincinnati actually ...


6

Yes, Nylon is a plastic, but the lightweight plastic bags they give you at stores are not nylon. Nylon works well as a fiber, so a 'nylon' bag could refer to a woven bag, such as are re-used instead of re-cycled. {And I don't think it was construed as requesting a bag for nylon stockings.}


5

I agree that 'three times less' sounds a bit confusing. You could say: Fat is a third as dense as muscle. Fat has one third the density of muscle.


5

They are not quite the same. Road refers almost exclusively to something use for the travel of motor vehicles as the definition you quote says. Pavement is a hard surface, almost always for travel of some kind, but sometimes other things. For most kinds of road the terms could be used interchangeably, but there are exceptions. Let me give examples to ...


5

You normally wouldn't use "crackup" for a plane, nor would you ever use "cracked" in this sense. And "crackup" is informal and implies a less severe wreck, so it normally would not be used to describe an incident resulting in death. "Crash" and "wreck" are almost interchangeable in this sense, though, eg, "wreck" is more idiomatic for an incident involving ...


5

This is widespread, but relatively rare; it's called the so don't I construction. As it happens, I was one of the first to study this construction, since it's part of my idiolect. Briefly, the negative is essentially spurious, and has no meaning the construction is restricted to so-clauses with Subject-Auxiliary Inversion the construction is a tag, and ...


5

equivalent to <thing> when two things may be substituted for one another Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? equivalent for <field> when a thing is like something in another field "Mare" is the word for a female horse. What is the equivalent for dogs equivalent of <thing> is the same as ...


5

For some reason, all the answers so far seem to have missed the natural opposite of going with the flow — going against the flow: to do or say the ​opposite of what most ​people are doing or saying: With this new ​book, she is going against the flow. Admittedly, it's not a perfect fit for your sentence, since that context really needs an ...


5

I was interested in seeing what use authors have historically made of the construction "mind and [other verb]," along the lines of the poster's wording "would you mind and do something." So I ran Google Books searches for three phrases—"now mind and," "mind and do," and "you mind and"—for the period 1600–2008. These searches yielded quite a few matches, ...


4

Generally speaking, when referring to the letter of the alphabet "A," it's pronounced /ei/, but when referring to the word "a" that appears as an article before words, such as "a car" or "a boat," then it is almost always pronounced /ə/. The word "a" is occasionally pronounced /ei/, but only when the speaker wishes to give it special emphasis. For example: ...


4

Consider, thinking-outside-the-box think outside (of) the box; also think out of the box: to develop ideas that are different and unusual. Usage notes: sometimes used with verbs other than think: You need to look outside the box and see what you can come up with. Etymology: based on the idea that limiting your thoughts is like thinking inside a box ...


4

The common idiom bucking the trend appears to fit your scenario: to be ​obviously different from the way that a ​situation is ​developing ​generally, ​especially in ​connection with ​financial ​matters To adapt this into an adjectival form you could say you have a trend bucking personality or, in nounal form, that you are a trend bucker. Both of these ...


4

Some words and expressions that come to mind are: nonconformist: a person who does not conform to a generally accepted pattern of thought or action (Merriam-Webster) rebellious: refusing to obey rules or authority or to accept normal standards of behavior, dress, etc. : having or showing a tendency to rebel (Merriam-Webster) marching to the beat of a ...


4

I have many Brits as friends here in Canada and what they call a smoothie, we also call a smoothie. A smoothie is fresh fruits and even veggies (carrots, broccoli, kale, etc) blended with juice or milk or with protein powder. You can also add nuts. You can add just about anything and it's still a "smoothie." But some of the commenters are correct, people do ...


4

Before the phoneme /r/, the English contrast between lax and tense vowels is neutralized. That means no English words exist that distinguish lax /ɪr, ɛr, ɔr, ʊr/ from tense /ir, er, or, ur/. This varies in many dialects; in Rhode Island (and many other NE N.Am locations), for instance, speakers distinguish the words Mary /'meri/, merry /'mɛri/, and marry ...


3

It means the woman looked like she was between the ages of 20 and 30. As @jera notes, it doesn't disclose her true age.


3

It appears to be a common mistake that has become a variant of the more common, correct spelling fine-tooth comb: Fine Toothcomb - Fine-tooth Comb: Brush your teeth, but don’t comb them. Although the spelling “fine toothcomb” is common enough to be listed as a variant in dictionaries, it looks pretty silly to people who prefer the traditional ...


3

The earliest use I could uncover was in the June, 1883 volume of The Indian Forester: OED Online attests the use in forestry with this 1895 quote: W. Schlich Man. Forestry III. i. 36 Under ‘form factor’ is understood the proportion which exists between the volume of a tree and that of a regularly shaped body which has the same base and height as ...


3

My suggestion is to use the phrase "going against the tide" as an adjective before the noun personality, if you want to retain the idiomatic meaning, i.e. doing something in opposition to the majority. Another choice is to use word "non-conformist" before "personality". Non-conformist also refers to one who does not conform to, or refuses to be bound by, ...



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