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79

'Descend,' 'dive,' 'drop,' and 'fall' are all perfectly fine and, in the case of an uncontrolled descent, 'crash' does indeed tend to be the end result (though this refers specifically to what happens when it stops falling due to an undesirable form of contact with terrain.) However, 'sink' is still perfectly valid to describe the actual falling. Indeed, ...


39

Very simple, it crashes. This word has been used throughout the history of airships. Most famously the Hindenburg. An airship is just another form of aircraft. It is not a ship of the seas. The vocabulary of flight is applied.


26

It plummets. Plummets - A steep and rapid fall


21

It falls It's not part of the plan for a ship to sink and it's often due to unfavorable circumstances. An aerial craft in free-fall is the closest equivalent I can think of. On an airship this would like be cause by a puncture or any other escape of the gaseous body. Corrected Answer - "Founder" That's not a typo, it's "f o u n d e r" Oxford dictionary ...


12

The reason that "sink" does not sound right when applied to an airship is because "2. descend from a higher to a lower position; drop downwards" can describe a normal part of airship operation. Therefore, it does not convey the same implication of unintended, uncontrolled, ominously doomed descent, as when applied to surface ships. Plummet and fall, work ...


11

The mobile subscriber is unaware when they move from one telephone operator's region to another, so from the perspective of the telephone operators, they are indeed roaming aimlessly from region to region. And the etymology for roam suits that well possibly from Old English ramian "act of wandering about," which is probably related to aræman "arise, ...


11

Any aircraft losing altitude is typically said to be 'descending.' de·scend dəˈsend/ verb 1. move or fall downward. "the aircraft began to descend" synonyms: go down, come down; drop, fall, sink, dive, plummet, plunge, nosedive When it hits the ground in an uncontrolled way it has crashed.


10

I think maybe it drops. drop: to fall vertically; have an abrupt descent. to sink or fall to the ground, floor, or bottom as if inanimate. Source: Dictionary.com, definitions 33 & 34.


9

As commented by FumbleFingers, roam is a synonym of travel. The definition in Learner's Dictionary should also help: to go to different places without having a particular purpose or plan From the communication service provider's perspective, the notion of the subscriber wandering in geographical regions where their service is not directly available ("...


6

In the context of war, or it being crashed through forceful means, consider using the verb "down". down verb informal past tense: downed; past participle: downed knock or bring to the ground. "175 enemy aircraft had been downed" synonyms: knock down/over, knock to the ground, bring down, topple; More


5

I think you can use dive: To fall head down through the air. (AHD) A dive may technically be described as "a steep descending flight path". While there is no specific definition for what degree of steepness transforms a downward trajectory into a dive, it is necessarily a rapid, nose-forward descent. Dives are used intentionally in ...


4

Oronym — About.com A sequence of words (for example, "ice cream") that sounds the same as a different sequence of words ("I scream"). The term oronym was coined by Gyles Brandreth in The Joy of Lex (1980). From Wiktionary noun 1. A word or phrase that sounds the same as another word or phrase. From "Oronyms and Homophones" by Fun With ...


4

And what would you think of a headline "He was shot in the street". Is the man dead or was he just 'shot at'? Neither. "He was shot in the street" only means he was shot. There's no ambiguity. It means a bullet from a gun struck him. It doesn't mean that the bullet missed him. It also doesn't mean he was shot dead. It makes no implication about ...


3

A trade off is a balance between two desirable but incompatible things. That is, you'd like to have both, but life doesn't make them available together. An economic example is the risk of and the return on an investment. You'd like to have both low risk and high return, but that rarely happens. If you accept a lower risk, the return is generally lower, and ...


3

"If a ship sinks, what does an airship do?" It depends on whether the airship is roped to the ship or not! ;) As others have pointed out, a ship moves in a two-dimensional space, the surface of the sea. If it sinks, that is the end of the ship! But an airship moves in 3-dimensional space: if it sinks, it merely loses altitude. Until, that is, it crashes (if ...


2

I'm nothing if not obedient @Rathony. :-) Here's my comment, copied into an answer... If he was shot, he was hit, not merely shot at. "Shot" doesn't give any indication whether the injury was fatal. Headlines tend to use "He was killed" or "He was shot dead" or something that also specifically mentions death by the gunshot wound, if that is ...


2

"Please conserve energy and turn off the lights when you are out of the room." And if your clientele tends to be environmentally conscious, you might add a phrase that it also lowers carbon emissions and fights global warming.


2

Biased is the more general term. It basically means "tendency". An opinion survey or scientific study can be biased, which means it has a systematic error that skews the results. When applied to a person, biased means that the person tends toward certain views (due to their position, self-interest etc.) Prejudiced, on the other hand, can mean for example ...


1

The sentence can have at least three different meanings: (1) I love her, and she is beautiful, but the fact that she is beautiful is not the reason that I love her. (2) I love her, she is not beautiful, so her non-existing beauty is not the reason why I love her. (3) She is beautiful, but I don't like beautiful people; her beauty is the reason why I don't ...


1

There's no contradiction between "auditing algorithms" and "algorithmic auditing", because it's the auditing algorithms that are doing the algorithmic auditing. There is some ambiguity (as is common English) where "auditing algorithms" could either mean: Algorithms that are used for auditing. The process of auditing the algorithms (i.e. ensuring that the ...


1

'Many' as a pronoun and adjective has no definite or precise value, but when you say 'there are many people in my class' and when you say 'there are many people in my country' it all depends on how you look at it psychologically. Let's assume you say to a person that does not know the meaning of 'country' and 'class' that “there are many people in my ...


1

Many designates "...a large but indefinite number" (OED). Ordinarily it implies, for me, a (statistically) significant proportion of a total population but fewer than 50%. If more than 50% are inolved I would say 'most' rather than 'many'. 'The many', is a special usage, used to compare and contrast with 'the few'.


1

I would take it to mean the place where they live, not necessarily that they were born there.


1

I think one can legitimately talk of "sinking" in any fluid medium, not just water -- especially for descent because it's no longer less dense than the medium it's in. Consider the behaviour of the little boat in this video -- it's a boat made of foil floating on sulphur hexaflouride gas. When the person uses the beaker to scoop up gas and fill the ...



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