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7

Never perhaps did any man suffer death with more justice, or deserve it less. In general, the phrase with more justice meant "more appropriately" close to the current sense of justice in ODO: 1.1 The quality of being fair and reasonable: This can be seen by examining the specific occurrences of the phrase in the Corpus from 1700-1820. As an ...


5

In hardboiled detective stories and noir fiction, dick is a well-established synonym for detective (particularly private detective, as opposed to law enforcement). For example, from the Miskatonic Glossary of Hardboiled Slang: Dick: Detective (usually qualified with “private” if not a policeman)


4

"There ain't no ..." is not standard English, but it is genuine English and genuine grammar in a certain sociolect - that's the authentic way some people speak. Added: "There ain't no + noun" is typical of the variety of English called Afro American Vernacular English (AAVE). Link to an article about AAVE with typical examples (at the end of the article). ...


3

Pray in aid exists as both a noun and a verb, and has in each respect, a specifically legal meaning. The following is extracted from the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Noun. Pray in aid Law. Help in defending an action, legally claimed from someone who has a joint interest in the defence. Freq. to have aid of . Cf. to pray (also call, crave) in ...


2

Never perhaps did any man suffer death with more justice, or deserve it less. I don't think that Hamilton intended any ambiguity here, but I think I see how the ambiguity might arise for a modern reader. I believe that the meaning of suffer here is the first sense in the OED, namely: I. To undergo, endure. trans. To have (something ...


2

The definition for "vacillate" on Merriam-Webster is: "to repeatedly change your opinions or desires." That would seem to me to imply that, in common usage and outside some sort of personification, the vacillating thing at least has opinions and desires. As for whether that requires a mind... ask on Philosophy Stack Exchange :).


2

In Classical Latin, scribes wrote letters in capital or block script -- just as they appear on monuments. It wasn't till the Middle Ages that what we now call Lower Case letters appeared. This developed in monasteries, the main repository of Latin learning and letters during that period. To save space, ink and parchment, the letters were written in ...


1

Examples #1 and #2 are identical semantically. #2 is the more common way to express this. They both equate to your rephrasing #1. Examples #3 and #4 are identical semantically. #4 is the more common way to express this. They both equate to your rephrasing #3. As for your rephrasings 2 and 4: I have only 1000 yen This means that I have 1000 yen, ...


1

My understanding of the phrase "pray in aid" is that the verb pray has the sense of "request" or "seek" and the prepositional phrase in aid has the sense "in support of [one's cause]" or "by way of assistance to [one's cause]." Unlike the OED entry cited in WS2's interesting answer, Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968), does not categorize "pray ...


1

To depend confidently on and put trust in do actually convey the correct meaning when properly understood. When you rely on something that means you place the successful outcome of your endeavor on the proper performance of that thing. In other words, if the thing that you rely on fails, then you cannot complete your mission successfully. You may use ...


1

Immeasurable implies that something is too large or extensive to measure. However, unmeasurable implies that something cannot be measured objectively. The terms are subtly different in the usage and I suppose you should add it to your lexicon. For better explanation, please read the following link: ...


1

I think this is actually fairly unambiguous. Go there in five minutes means to begin your journey. "I am going to the store in five minutes." Yes, "leaving" would be even more clear, but that still clearly refers to the moment of departure, not the moment of arrival. Get there in five minutes means to complete your journey. "I will get to the ...


1

This is definitely ambiguous, however, from my experience with Uber, the intended meaning is the former, since they indicate this ETA before the destination is known. I believe that if they did not have length restriction due to screen real-estate they could have worded it to say "Be on your way there with Uber in 5 minutes". Phrasing it ambiguously ...


1

I would have no problem with that use of vacillate. Definition 1a at M-w.com states: to sway through lack of equilibrium It is frequently used of people who cannot choose between possible options (indeed, other definitions do specifically mention "changing your opinion" and so forth), but it does not have to be used only for people; it makes perfect ...


1

Before the 17th century, the double negative was used to express or even strenghten the negative meaning of the sentence. After the 17th century the double negative started to mean the same as affirmative, as, when trying to systematize the English grammar, stated Lowth. The double negative still hasn't vanished and is now commonly used by certain societies ...


1

Mostly, but not necessarily. Here are some examples where they have negative connotations: A new, extraordinary tax was imposed by the government. Theirs was an exceptionally stupid idea. You have outstanding debts. Granted, the last one is cheating since this is a different meaning of outstanding, but it is certainly not a good connotation. ...


1

It seems unlikely that there is such a word. Many idioms stem from an actual, non-idiomatic usage so it doesn't seem surprising that there are idioms that can still function in a non-idiomatic form. He let the cat out of the bag by letting the cat out of the bag. If you scratch my back by scratching my back, I'll scratch your back by scratching your back. ...



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