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14

You are incorrect. Weird means odd: strikingly odd or unusual, especially in an unsettling way; strange. AHDEL Sometimes a word reflects to a person the biases of the person hearing/reading it. Here are some perfectly non-sexual and common used of the word weird. Weird News: California Man Fatally Stabbed By Rooster It was weird the way the ...


8

For slang use, Urban Dictionary can be rather enlightening. If a word has a slang sense which hasn't yet made it into mainstream publications, the online community maintaining the Urban Dictionary can often come up trumps. But even Urban Dictionary doesn't define weird as "paedophile", or even "sexually perverted". The closest that gets is 2.2: "horny; ...


6

A "feed the children commercial" is an ad on TV asking for donations to provide food for poor children (often in places like Africa where poverty is widespread). A few decades ago, it would have probably been written as a "feed-the-children commercial", which is easier to understand, but hyphens are out of style. I have to say in advance that the entire ...


3

The word "weird" has no specific relationship with sexuality, per se. The question seems to be one of cultural dynamics rather than the English language.


3

I would interpret it as the time between Friday and Saturday, and I think most people would, but it's still definitely ambiguous. If you're writing or speaking, try to use an alternative instead: 11:59 PM on Friday The beginning of Saturday At midnight between Friday and Saturday If someone else says it, it's not a bad idea to ask for clarification. Even ...


2

Like the bureaucratic, Date of Birth, birthdate includes the year. Baryshnikoff (Jan 27, 1948) and Mozart (Jan 27, 1756) share a birthday but not a birthdate. I have met many people who were born on the same day of the year as me, but only one who also was born the same year. I did refer to her as having the same birthdate as me. (American English)


1

In this context, 'just' appears to mean 'only', which is by far the most common usage of the word in English today. It can also mean: very recently (often clarified by saying 'just now'), which was your ambiguous meaning legally or morally correct (for example, in the phrase 'a just and wise decision') In spoken English, you can often convey the ...


1

Depending on the context it can mean unwell, unfit, or more likely from the sentence given, stopped liking sth. The American Heritage Dictionary says ... adj. ... No longer taking place; canceled: The wedding is off. ... 6. a. Not up to standard; below a normal or satisfactory level: Your pitching is off today. ...


1

It is about language. Since the author was careful not to specify one side or the other (only saying "the opposing side"), I would construe it symmetrically, to mean #1, AND "The opposing side presents experts' opinions, and we attack them." (both of these occurring often in discovery and always at trial.) I do not glean #2 from it though.


1

This answer will probably elicit scores of down-votes, but no matter. I suggest the increasingly secular, post-Christian zeitgeist of recent history is at least partially to blame for the gradual erosion of the concept of forgiveness as a pardon for an offense--or even, gulp, a sin! I deplore this relatively recent trend. As a Christian myself I identify ...



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