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Dictionary.com an activity or interest pursued for pleasure or relaxation and not as a main occupation: Merriam-Webster a small Old World falcon (Falco subbuteo) that is dark blue above and white below with dark streaking on the breast a pursuit outside one's regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation Cambridge ...


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It's a variant of a structurally ambiguous, but common idiomatic expression, that in practice only has one natural interpretation. If you wanted to use the phrase "defeated badly" to mean someone did a poor job at creating the defeat, you would need to add verbiage to counter the default interpretation. The much more common form of the idiom is the ...


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No. Although it may adhere to the dictionary definition, so do many other activities such as petting your cat and having a nice relaxing bath and these are not hobbies either. I would argue it isn't a hobby for these reasons: It (reproduction) is one of the 8 life functions and therefore would be biologically considered akin to breathing and eating (...


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As an adjective: duplicitous As a noun: dissimulation or equivocation ... the use of the same term in different senses (Collins) You might also consider doublespeak, but the connotations of that almost the opposite of your scenario: deliberately hiding unpleasant information behind a pleasant facade. On the road, coming back ...


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I've consulted several different dictionaries, and all say pretty much that both words mean the same thing. At first, I thought that "eternal" may indicate no start or end, while "everlasting" only specifies no end. But that is NOT the case. My Random House Websters College Dictionary (2001) lists "eternal" as a synonym for everlasting. The American ...


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Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968) has this entry for the term lynch law: LYNCH LAW. A term descriptive of the action of unofficial persons, organized bands, or mobs, who seize persons charged with or suspected of crimes, or take them out of the custody of the law, and inflict summary punishment upon them, without legal trial, and without the ...


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Two thoughts: The US instructions state: GO!: Every time you pass GO!, collect $2 from the Bank. Don’t forget to collect, because if you do, you’re out of luck! (their emphasis). That to me suggests that it's when you PASS Go, not when you land on it. As per your point in the question, it's also clear that the onus is on the player to remember ...


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That some sentences are syntactically ambiguous is not a fundamental problem of English syntax. Context and intonation are usually enough to guide hearers in constructing the intended phrase structure (that is, non-ambiguous syntactic structure) of the spoken or written utterance. Such a process is called disambiguation, and we do it all the time. ...


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The most common words I can think of for this practice would be "Deceive" or "Mislead" Mislead mis·led (-lĕd), mis·lead·ing, mis·leads 1. To lead in the wrong direction. 2. To give a wrong impression or lead toward a wrong conclusion, especially by intentionally deceiving. Deceive v. de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing, de·ceives v.tr. 1. To cause ...



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