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51

It is used to emphasise the bad words: holy: (from TFD) (Informal) Used as an intensive: raised holy hell over the mischief their children did. I think this is an interesting comment: Things holy were once referred to Medieval times in oaths and blaspheming, such as "s'blood" (god's blood) etc. Many cultures worst swear-words are formed ...


14

Three of the most central origins of curse words are excrement, sexual acts (or organs), and blasphemies (sacred words used inappropriately). Although blasphemies are now considered mild in most contexts, in more religious times, they were considered much more shocking than they are now. As expressions lose their shock value, they need to be intensified to ...


4

"Two day classes will take place this week." I understand this to mean that during the week a day class will be held twice. Not necessarily on consecutive days. "Two-day classes will take place this week." This now means that classes will cover the entire subject over two various or consecutive days. More useful information about hyphens can be found ...


3

Maybe it would mean either, had it not carried a picture with it. But with the picture in it, it is just so straight forward that putting your bag down makes commuting easier and definitely considerate too for fellow passengers.


2

'Could' implies the conditional. So you 'could contact' them in what circumstances? I suppose you could just say '...so we can contact you', but you imply that you will only contact them if they have won a prize. In that case you need to say: '...so we can contact you in the event you are lucky', or something like that.


2

An older, more widespread expression used to exclaim surprise (up until the Eighties) was "Holy cow!": Holy Cow! dates to at least 1905. The earliest known appearance of the phrase was in a tongue-in-cheek letter to the editor: "A lover of the cow writes to this column to protest against a certain variety of Hindoo oath having to do with the vain use of ...


2

This use of "Holy" with swear words is a case of euphemism. It was once considered more offensive to say "Holy Christ" when there was no actual intention to call on the name of Christ. Hence, lesser forms were used, such as "Holy hell/crap/shit." Euphemism has been used as long as we can tell to allow someone to say something that is otherwise offensive. ...


2

Profanity used to be synonymous with blasphemy and in many cultures, it still is (the French "bodel de...", blood of, is acceptable so long as you don't finish it with "Dieu", God. Indeed, I have heard older people expressing surprise with "Holy", followed by actual Christian references and then feeling shocked at themselves. Instead, to get around the ...


2

Interoperability is the ability to operate (work) together. And interaction is the actual process happening between two or more subjects when they interact. See interoperability and interaction for Wikipedia descriptions.


1

Actually, there are at least three idiomatic expressions that do the trick: "ten minutes and change": (idiomatic) and some quantity, but less than the increment to the next round number "ten minutes and then some": (idiomatic, colloquial) used to confirm preceding utterance, while implying that what was said or asked is an understatement "ten-odd ...


1

In English, there is no short expression for "between 10 and 20" in common use. The closest direct translations are, in fact, "between 10 and 20 minutes" and "10 to 20 minutes". However, there are some other expressions that may be appropriate: A dozen minutes: if you intend to express "approximately twelve". Technically, a dozen is exactly 12, but it ...


1

The three examples you give are all adjectives - you are curious, and the object is also curious. But when you say I am excited you are not using an adjective, you are using a present participle from the verb to excite, and the adjective from this is exciting. You could say I am furious about the furious man (though it sounds a bit weird), meaning that you ...


1

Firstly, travel money is a common idiom for the expenses incurred in travelling. Secondly, there may be two possible interpretations of "is good for you". On one hand, as you suggest it could mean that the exchange rate is beneficial at the moment. On the other hand, the phrase is good is idiomatically used to mean that it is provided for you. It is ...


1

Isn't it from Bat Man and Robin? "Holy bad-guys Bat Man" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_exclamations_by_Robin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHjRwCu6yBY


1

You should rephrase your question as: We have an app in which users could win prizes, and in which case we would contact them by email, to enable them to receive their prizes. Otherwise, is your app meant to let everyone win prizes? When you have straightened your understanding of your situation and motivation, it would naturally come to you that ...


1

Try: "Please enter your email address so that we can contact you:" "Please enter your email address to enable us to contact you:"


1

Based on the construction of the survey, I think the most direct answer to your question is to answer in the "opposite" direction of your answer to the previous question. As K points out, the survey is poorly constructed. Having worked on survey design, I can tell you that with the two questions they were trying to get a more precise measure regarding your ...



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