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5

Both the definitions of "college" and "university" and the meanings of the idioms in which those words appear (e.g. "to go to college", "to attend university"), differ by country (including native-English-speaking countries), so it would be very difficult to give you a good answer here. I'm afraid the best I can do is refer you to the Wikipedia article ...


3

This is about as silly an argument as I have ever encountered in Shakespearean scholarship — even sillier than the celebrated Impediment of Adipose. Jonson's compliment is a fairly pretty one: “Despite your lack of a Classical Education (like Mine), your work commands the admiration of the Classical Masters.” But the reading Ingleby urges makes no sense at ...


2

Not a word I've ever looked up, but I always take it to mean a combination of bruised/sore/inward looking/selfish. You've been injured in some way, physically or mentally, and you've retreated to 'lick your wounds'. You are feeling hyper-sensitive and guarding yourself against further hurt. This may just mean lying low for a while, but it could mean behaving ...


1

I can read four meanings in this motivational slogan, which is certainly conversational in style, but none of them includes the OP's second interpretation, i.e. Work hard/awesome to be/stay at this company. 1st interpretation: Life is short, you need to work anywhere, somewhere. Awesome! I interpret the exclamative tag, awesome, as meaning What an ...


1

And though thou hadst means "although you have", and is read the same way today as two centuries ago. I am no scholar, but I don't think it the subjunctive, but merely the indicative. As you know, the subjunctive expresses a wish, a suggestion, a command, or a condition that is contrary to fact (today... and then?) Would I were sleep and peace, so ...


1

Does "And though thou hadst" here mean "And even if you had" or "And although you had"—or is it impossible to tell? I think it's impossible to tell: because although "hadst" is the subjective, it's also the indicative. If it is impossible to tell, were listeners and readers in Shakespearean/Jonsonian times accustomed to having to draw their own ...


1

The intent of the speaker is perfectly clear: it is the subject that is expected to undress. At the same time, the sentence can be construed to be ambiguous, which the debased subject can use to their advantage to gain the upper hand right back. "I would like to paint a picture of you naked!" — "Well, start undressing, then". This kind of retort is a ...


1

I don't see how it could imply reluctance. But in the context 'then' could mean 'in that case', now that I know I did something wrong. From Oxford English dictionary 'then' can means: ... a. In that case; in those circumstances; if that be (or were) the fact; if so; when that happens. Often correlative to if or when. what then? (ellipt.) what happens (or ...



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