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Lost violin found by tree. Bridge held up by red tape. The old fashioned name for this is Amphibole. There is renewed interest in the form due to the work being done on machine translation. Amongst this brotherhood it is known as global semantic ambiguity if both meanings make some sort of sense. General MacArthur flies back to front. is a ...


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My proposition: "The rest of this page is intentionally left blank."


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"Lost travellers in Egypt get just deserts." There is syntactic ambiguity because just can be adjective or adverb. (a) They get just deserts ---> They just get deserts ---> They only get deserts (adverb) (b) They get just deserts ---> They get rightful deserts (adjective) There is lexical ambiguity because 'just' has more than one meaning and ...


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The phrase would be put right if it excluded itself from the message. Therefore, I suggest: This page intentionally left otherwise blank


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Just to be clear, you're asking what is meant when someone says "Do you have aids?" or "Do you want aids?" in the context of spoken English, and possibly humour. There are only two possible interpretations (owing to the aides/AIDS homonym): "Do you have/want AIDS?" They are asking about the syndrome resulting from HIV "Do you have/want aides?" They ...


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Partial answer Beside oneself The same metaphor is used in the term dissociation. www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/ People who experience a traumatic event will often have some degree of dissociation during the event itself or in the following hours, days or weeks. For example, the event seems ‘unreal’ or the person feels detached from what’s ...


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C. is not really about the point the author is discussing the French are very fond of ‘junk food’ does not imply where French tourists eat in NY since it is a situation of eating during lunch break not during holidays. Moreover the author says that [they] are not too proud to eat it. So, it is going in the same author's way. They are not proud ...


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I would liken the use of the word Sound in this context to follow Oxford's definition 1.1 under the adj form. Based on reason, sense, or judgment Ex: the scientific content is sound So considering that the idiom 'scapegoating' is generally used with a negative connotation the sentence is saying. because "We cannot, like fear-ridden peasants of ...


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This is a passage from Christopher Hitchens' book God Is Not Great in which he disparages the idea that Christ died for our sins. He notes that "our everyday idiom is sound" to contemn the term "scapegoat." I think "parlance" is a better term than "idiom," in that we consider someone who has been scapegoated to be someone wrongly blamed for the trespass of ...


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Answer "C" is in fact the correct answer. The words you've highlighted give you your answer. The writer's argument can be summarized as follows: The teaching of science may have succeeded somewhat in familiarizing today's students with the universe in which they are living and acquainting them with great scientific discoveries, BUT the teaching of ...


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First My question was not as good as I thought when it came in my mind so I am posting a proper answer based on comments (principally of @DanBron and @Mari-LouA) The mistake Three major meanings steered me to post this question : AIDS, Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, aid, mass noun synonym of help, aids qualified with adjectives (medical, ...


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This idiom is general in that we can 'take action' or 'take an action'. Most courts, however, have read the specific intent requirement to be satisfied in police excessive force cases if the defendant purposefully took an action which he or she knew or should have known violated the victim's constitutional rights. Police Violence: Understanding and ...


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The phonetic similarity between AIDS and aids or aides is sometimes used for dark comedic effect, either intentionally (as in the South Park episode “Jared has Aides”) or unintentionally (as in 1970s Ayds commercials).


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Consider a reasonable definition of lexical ambiguity: The lexical ambiguity of a word or phrase pertains to it's having more than one meaning in the language to which the word belongs. wikipedia, emphasis added There seems to be some lexical ambiguity in the spoken sentence: Lost travelers in Egypt get just des[s]erts. Is the object of get to ...



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