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10

Generally, shit is an English curse word used to refer to human/animal waste (poop). Instead of saying you have to poop, you can say you have to [take a] shit. If you say somebody is a 'piece of shit', you are directly insulting them. It's also used as a vulgar exclamation on its own, usually when something unexpected (and problematic) happens suddenly. ...


6

Consider a reasonable definition of lexical ambiguity: The lexical ambiguity of a word or phrase pertains to it's having more than one meaning in the language to which the word belongs. wikipedia, emphasis added There seems to be some lexical ambiguity in the spoken sentence: Lost travelers in Egypt get just des[s]erts. Is the object of get to ...


5

To use it as a compliment is a cultural thing, and is usually said like this, coming after a definite article That video game is the shit! Your cooking is the shit! Winning money is the shit! It's impolite To answer, your question, it is a bit rude and forward. It isn't so much offensive as it is vulgar, though. To use it in it's ...


4

Dictionaries (from the OED to online references) define "handful" as the quantity that fills up the hand, so the amount you can grasp in one hand. For two hands' worth, we have "double handful." From August is a Good Time for Killing by Martin Greenberg: Tom scooped up a double handful of silver money. "Take it, sir," he said. "and you may have as ...


4

Your regret about a decision is your feeling about having made it; your going back on your decision is your action to reverse it. So if you decide to go to Mexico for a vacation and have a terrible time, then you regret that choice. If you decide to go to Mexico and later decide to go back on that decision, then you won't have made the trip.


3

I would not use diamond-shaped because then people might think it's not square shaped, when in fact it is. They might infer that it's a 'squashed square' or kite shaped, like either of these: The best description would be a square fan, with a handle on one of its corners.


3

Of the three, i'd pick "diamond-shaped". Diamonds are not always square, but they can be. And baseball diamonds, as well as the diamonds suit in playing cards, are typically portrayed with one corner up, not one side up. Of course, this would not imply anything as to where the fan handle is attached. (An illustration would be ideal—but that might not be ...


3

"Lost travellers in Egypt get just deserts." There is syntactic ambiguity because just can be adjective or adverb. (a) They get just deserts ---> They just get deserts ---> They only get deserts (adverb) (b) They get just deserts ---> They get rightful deserts (adjective) There is lexical ambiguity because 'just' has more than one meaning and ...


2

Since I guessed E when I read this question, and since the GRE is all about guessing which answer the test deviser has decided is the right one, perhaps my analysis in settling on answer E will be of some value to you. First, we need to nail down precisely what the author's contention and evidence are. The author's core contention is that the French are ...


1

I think the usage here is that doing something piecemeal means to only do a bit at a time, usually what is immediately needed (or what you can afford to). So, the prop car only needs one working door and so that's what the prop-makers build - a car with one working door. If the director later decides that he needs its wheels to go round too, then those will ...


1

Some writers attempt to work around these sorts of ambiguities by using hyphenation to denote compound modifiers. For example, one might say "dark-polka-dot necktie" to clarify that "dark" modifies "polka dot", rather than "necktie". If this approach seems less than universal, that's because it is. When and whether such constructions are used seems to ...


1

I don't see why one reading should necessarily exclude the other. For example, I could be an [old book] [collector] or an [old][book collector]. So it seems reasonable to me that we could have a [dark polka dot][tie] or a [dark][polka dot tie]. In both of the examples above book and polka dot are nouns modifying other nouns, so do I not concur that blue must ...



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