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10

Out of context the sentence StackExchange is the website I wanted to win is inherently ambiguous because of the nature of the verb to win, which is ambitransitive. In other words, win can be both transitive and intransitive: She won the award. (transitive) She won. (intransitive) So if Polly is a cat and I read the decontextualised sentence Polly ...


4

In answer to question 1, you can't crash 'into' a bend unless there is something to crash into... If there wasn't, one might say: 'came off (the road) at the bend and (then) crashed into a ___ (tree/house/giant grand piano)' As for your examples: 7) Reading the rest of the post, the person is not very literate, example can be discounted as poor ...


3

Although there is technically ambiguity in your original phrase, the context makes it very obvious which meaning you meant. However, if you are really desperate for a phrase with no ambiguity I would go for: I wanted Stack Exchange to win


3

Pray in aid exists as both a noun and a verb, and has in each respect, a specifically legal meaning. The following is extracted from the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Noun. Pray in aid Law. Help in defending an action, legally claimed from someone who has a joint interest in the defence. Freq. to have aid of . Cf. to pray (also call, crave) in ...


2

There are a number of ways you could structure this sentence, all of which would convey your point precisely as you mean it. Firstly, you could say "I hope that StackExchange wins [the Best Website Award]". This implies that, of the various potential 'nominees' for the Best Website Award, you want StackExchange to win the award. Alternatively, you could say ...


1

That passage is from the flash fiction story Note To Self by Tracy Guzeman. The protagonist makes a brief list of life memories, those she would chose to forget and those she would chose to remember. She would chose to forget the memory of the look on her son's face, presumably this is one of the most painful memories in her life - she has chosen to accuse ...


1

I don't know if this is exclusive to BrEng but you can say: crashed on a bend crashed [on + a bend] See Google Books link for more examples After a long time, he admitted to having stolen it. He said that he had been driving too fast, and had crashed on a bend. A Tragedy Waiting to Happen – The Chaotic Life of Brendan O’Donnell. By Tony Muggivan, ...


1

It seems unlikely that there is such a word. Many idioms stem from an actual, non-idiomatic usage so it doesn't seem surprising that there are idioms that can still function in a non-idiomatic form. He let the cat out of the bag by letting the cat out of the bag. If you scratch my back by scratching my back, I'll scratch your back by scratching your back. ...


1

Pronouns can be syntactically ambiguous, but relative clauses can't (at least when the subject is a noun). The difference can be subtle: "The secretaries will destroy the documents after being digitized." "The secretaries will destroy the documents after they've been digitized." Sentence 1 clearly says it's the secretaries that will be digitized. ...


1

Examples #1 and #2 are identical semantically. #2 is the more common way to express this. They both equate to your rephrasing #1. Examples #3 and #4 are identical semantically. #4 is the more common way to express this. They both equate to your rephrasing #3. As for your rephrasings 2 and 4: I have only 1000 yen This means that I have 1000 yen, ...


1

My understanding of the phrase "pray in aid" is that the verb pray has the sense of "request" or "seek" and the prepositional phrase in aid has the sense "in support of [one's cause]" or "by way of assistance to [one's cause]." Unlike the OED entry cited in WS2's interesting answer, Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968), does not categorize "pray ...



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