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The OP said: To me, the best proof in support would be an example of the broader use by a first-rate writer Here is an example of fluke being used, first as an unlucky accident, and second, as a lucky accident. The quotation is perhaps too long, but it illustrates that the first speaker used fluke as unlucky, and the second as lucky. From E. ...


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You're talking about two meanings of have. The first is to hold or possess, and idiomatically we talk about holding an opinion as "having something to say." The second is to be under complusion, as in I have to go to the dentist today. So, you're right: Let's listen to what our students have to say can have (see what I did there?) two meanings, ...


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The French verb tracer (to trace) in its colloquial sense means "to get a move on". tracer vi familier (aller vite) (colloquial) get a move on v expr (colloquial) put your skates on v expr Il faut qu'on trace si on ne veut pas rater le train ! You'd better get a move on if you don't want to miss your train. A traceur is someone who ...


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No, the term “special needs” does not usually only refer to severe mental disability. The broadest definition (from ODO) is: (In the context of children at school) particular educational requirements resulting from learning difficulties, physical disability, or emotional and behavioural difficulties: "the absorption of children with special needs ...


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As far as I know, none of the authors of the following examples are considered to be "first-rate" by anyone (which helps make whatever "evidence" that's contained below fall well short of the "best proof" that you seek), but I’m most familiar with hearing and seeing “fluke” used negatively when the subject is disappointing performances, grades, or test ...


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The simplest fix is to turn that comma into an em dash. The latter half of the sentence defines the term used in the first part.


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The following are three propositions but reworded slightly different. The first proposition is the OP's one Should any (whoever) employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any (whatsoever) project with Company X's name associated? In other words, does it matter who has the authority in a project, as long as the person is an ...


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The question Should any employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any project with Company X's name associated? does indeed permits at least two very different readings. To simplify the analysis, let's consider a similar question that uses any just once: Should any employee of Company X have the authority to turn off the ...


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In 2015, ODO added Mx (pronounced like "mix") as a gender-neutral pronoun. See definition 2 for Mx on ODO Pronunciation: /məks/ /mɪks/ NOUN A title used before a person’s surname or full name by those who wish to avoid specifying their gender or by those who prefer not to identify themselves as male or female "To me, Mx Bond embodies ...



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