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32

Date as a synonym of "anus" is Australian slang. The definitions I've found are a bit vague in terms of what specific anatomical feature it refers to (some say "anus," some say "buttocks"), but other people responding to this post have provided evidence that this vagueness may just be due to some dictionary-writers misunderstanding the meaning. (For example, ...


28

It's a take-off on "dial O for operator". For example, in Tennessee Williams' Streetcar Named Desire (1947), we have Blanche: How do I get Western Union? — Operator! Western Union! Stella: That's a dial phone, honey. Blanche: I can't dial. I'm too — Stella: Just dial O. Blanche: O? Stella: Yes. "O" for Operator. Since dialing ...


12

The Australian National Dictionary has an entry for "date" meaning anus and vagina. http://australiannationaldictionary.com.au/index.php The link does not work well. You have to fill in "date" in the search field. 1919 W.H. Downing Digger Dialects 18 Date, a word signifying contempt.] 1961 M. Calthorpe Dyehouse 214 “In your bloody date! What do ...


8

It's a reference to the letters you sometimes see next to the numbers of a telephone pad (a rotary dial in those days). When telephone numbers were first introduced people were much more comfortable with letters than digits and would commonly give mnemonics for at least the first few digits of the number. In New York all the numbers in Flushing Meadows ...


3

'People care way too much about their appearance' usually means that people, in general, are over-concerned with the way they look to others. Each person has only one way that they look, hence the use of the singular. 'People care way too much about their appearances' might mean that people, in general, are over-concerned with their performances [in movies, ...


2

Why not say The first one is convex all the time, and the second one is linear only when x>2. Your own suggestion is unambiguous. You could adjust it slightly: The first one is convex for all x, and the second one is linear only when x>2.


2

I happened to find this thread while doing a little research for my MIT dept (the descendent of the old MIT Writing Program), and the most authoritative/detailed answer I can find comes from the 1998 "Reports to the President", wherein every department writes up their activities from the prior 12 months. On page 121 (PDF) it reads: Two completely new and ...


2

This sounds like a quote from a contract, so really this is a legal question. However the term "vested" here means " fully and unconditionally guaranteed as a legal right, benefit, or privilege" (Merriam-Webster). In other words the "Consultant" owns, and will continue to own, all rights to the "Consultant's Materials". This makes it clear that the client ...


1

Ngram Viewer agrees with Google and says by their appearance (blue line) is more commonly used than its plural equivalent by their appearances (red line). There is also the expression "judging someone by their appearance" which is derived from the Biblical proverb “Do not judge by appearances, but judge with right judgment.”; John 7:24, and its more ...


1

X is in the control of Y means that Y is controlling X. X is in control of Y means that X is controlling Y. So in your examples, the terrorist is in the control of the government means that the government is controlling the terrorist, while the terrorist is in control of the government means that the terrorist is controlling the government.


1

The answer depends upon what you wish to convey. They do mean different things. 'Directory path' is a compound noun. 'Path' is the main word and 'directory' is a modifier. If you are talking about the full path of a file for example, you could say, "Be sure to specify the full directory path when saving." If you are describing the path as a ...


1

Look in Merriam-Webster, definition 2. Available: valid—used of a legal plea or charge. Similarly, the OED says: 1b: in Law. Valid. It's a specialized usage, and cannot be used for concert or train tickets. The OED also gives a (probably obsolete) U.S. political sense of available; it seems that a candidate was available if he had a good chance ...


1

Any synonyms to the word hate generally have to do with describing the intensity of the feeling, not so much as to how long it lasts. One could assume that the more intense it is the longer it lasts, but this can be, as you've pointed out, unclear. It is also a stylistic choice to impulsively say "I hate him." (temporarily, becuase he ate my chocolate) or ...



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