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4

If you are talking about person use who. He's a wizard who always makes good programs. If you are talking about a thing use that. It's a wizard program that installs the software.


3

The purpose isn't to dance like an elephant. The purpose is to not dance like an elephant.


2

"180% of quota" is 1.8 * quota. Hence, In excess of (180% of quota) just means > 1.8 * quota, which is your second option. The alternative - your first option - would be "180% over quota".


2

One simple way to indicate unambiguously that "It is incorrect to say that "dance like an elephant" is the goal" is to reorder the sentence as Dancing like an elephant is not the purpose [or goal] of this exercise [or whatever]. One simple way to indicate that "The objective is to prevent dancing like an elephant" is to say The purpose [or goal] is ...


2

Unless your Wizard can pass the Turing Test it is a "what" not a "who" no matter how animated it is. Mickey Mouse manages to pass the test (after a fashion) so get's to be a "who" despite not being an actual person. Using "that" side steps the whole issue so maybe go with that. I'll admit I'm applying the Turing test in a non-traditional way (hence, ...


1

This is an ambiguous construction in English. In Shakespeare's time, it would have been unambiguous, and would have meant that some DriveTest Centres provide rental cars, and others do not. Consider All that glisters is not gold. From the Merchant of Venice, which means "not everything that glitters is gold." However, some time between Shakespeare and ...


1

It means that there are no DriveTest Centres that do provide car rentals to applicants. If you move the negation from the verb to the noun, you get a sentence with the same meaning: No DriveTest Centres provide car rentals to applicants. There is no difference in meaning, but the negation applies to another part of the sentence. Sometimes this can lead ...


1

There is considerable disagreement among style guides on how to punctuate inclusive year ranges. Words Into Type, third edition (1974), for instance recommends using an en-dash and only the last two digits of the closing year of the range if it falls into the same century as the first year of the range: To represent to between figures or words an en dash ...



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