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6

The phrase so much is modifying the noun phrase a part of x in these examples. It isn't modifying the verb BE. We most often see this pattern when adverbs like so, too or as are modifying an adjective which in turn modifies a noun phrase: so forceful a blow too convenient an excuse as brutal an attack Notice that these adverbs can also modify the word ...


4

No, because "better" already functions as an adverb. So the -ly ending would be redundant. In your example, then, you would simply say, "Sorry for the poorly worded sentence, I could not find a way to word it better."


4

It's a variant of a structurally ambiguous, but common idiomatic expression, that in practice only has one natural interpretation. If you wanted to use the phrase "defeated badly" to mean someone did a poor job at creating the defeat, you would need to add verbiage to counter the default interpretation. The much more common form of the idiom is the ...


3

A: I cleared the exam. B: That's great "Great" is an adjective here; it is subjective predicative complement of the verb "be". It's called 'subjective' because it is ascribing the property of being "great" to the subject "that", which happens to be anaphoric to the preceding sentence. In other words A's utterance is the antecedent for B's "that", which ...


2

English has a grammatical structure for describing the condition(s) that can occur to a person, animal or thing. It is a passive construction (subject + passive: be + adverb) where an adverb is appended after the action verb the subject has experienced or been subjected to. They all function like: He was shot dead. Here are some examples I've generated or ...


2

McCawley describes time adverbs as sentence modifiers, which can be converted to V' modifiers by his Raising rule. His discussion begins on page 255 of The Syntactic Phenomena of English.


2

The correct usage would be The bride's mother sniffed all through the wedding service. AND The bride's mother sniffed throughout the wedding service. Check this and this for more ideas.


2

Of course, there are other ways to say it, such as cravenly (suggested by commenters) and timidly. However, many dictionaries do indeed list cowardly as both an adjective and an adverb. Google (Oxford Dictionaries Online, as pointed out by @EdwinAshworth) (lists adverb form as archaic) Wiktionary (also lists adverb form as archaic) Dictionary.com Merriam ...


1

As @Deadrat and Hotlicks mentioned in the comment, in Latin, "et" is a conjunction which means "and" and "cetera" is an adverb which means "others" or "the rest". Therefore, if you write "and et cetera (etc.)", you are writing "and and others" which is not correct. That's why you should not use "and" before "etc."


1

The prepositional adverbial phrase "at least" has at least two meanings. at the lowest estimate or figure. at any rate; in any case: 'You didn't get a good grade, but at least you passed the course.' Usually it is placed before a number when it means No. 1 and placed at the beginning (or end) of a sentence (sometimes without any number as the ...


1

Both 'at' and 'as' are prepositions, and both are used adverbially. The coordination is ambiguous. Is it 'at the heart of every nation' and 'as the heart of every nation', or merely 'at every nation' and 'as the heart of every nation'? You might disambiguate as follows: There is a statue "at and as" the heart of every nation.


1

What does it mean?  What does it matter?  What do you care?    Whatever "what" is, it isn't identical across these three sentences.    The sentence "what does it mean" is the simplest case.  This "what" is a direct object.  It is an interrogative pronoun.  We can separate the question per se from the ...


1

As an Adverb is a word that generally answers the questions with 'how', 'when', 'where' and 'why', only these four WH words of degree used in asking questions are branded as interrogative adverbs and grammar books mostly group WHAT with 'who', 'whom', 'whose'& 'which' as interrogative pronoun — mere substitutions. That said we cannot deny 'what' of its ...


1

It modifies the verb ran. Remember adverbs of time tell us when an action happens. They also tell us how long or how frequent an action happens.


1

Here is a tree for your example showing the coordination of two NPs with "never" in the second one. I think this is much better than saying we have a coordination of VPs (or clauses), with ellipsis within the second coordinate.


1

There's two totally different things going on there. 1) "so much" is synonymous with "such", eg "Law is so much a part of my life" = "Law is such a part of my life" 2) Using "so" on it's own, as an intensifier (as in "I'm so marrying you!"), is a relatively modern informal (ie ungrammatical) usage, and is often used for comic effect, possibly because ...


1

This is just like "His design improvement made the car fast", with "fast" modifying "car". An instructive contrast is "He drove the car fast", in which "fast" is an adverb modifying "drive". I don't think "dead" can be used to modify a verb, though it can be used as a "degree adverb" modifying an adjective, eg, "dead tired"


1

This is called a resultative construction. You can look at the Wikipedia page or a detailed reference grammar for more details. In linguistics, a resultative is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as predicates of sentences, and are ...



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