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12

There is no such word because there is that linguistic phenomenon called "blocking". We already have percentagewise, so its existence blocks percentagely from getting any traction, or indeed from being created in the first place. This is actually the same mechanism that ensures we still have children and not childs, or say unequal but inequality. ...


4

It is neither: it is a preposition phrase with (figurative) locative sense, usually followed by a preposition phrase with of defining the danger. ... in danger of contracting the virus ... in danger of being fired The of phrase may be omitted when it is recoverable from context. John has been exposed to the virus. He is in danger. You ...


3

It's "protect". If it were "offer", for example, then the sentence would be, "Some governments even offer directly to help protect etc." So you mean that the word order in the sentence determines the modified element? In that specific case, yes: the location of the adverb in the sentence clarifies which of the verbs it's modifying. Is it wrong ...


2

I take it to mean something along the lines of "that doesn't necessarily mean to say [that]..." Substituting that version into Adam Smith's sentence, we therefore end up with: "[Division of labour] is commonly supposed to be carried furthest in some very trifling [industries]; that doesn't necessarily mean to say that it really is carried further in ...


2

"Was that a good thing or a bad thing?" "Certainly, that was a good thing." but "Was this or that (or both) a good thing?" Certainly that was a good thing.


2

If you go by usage, it isn't wrong. Several famous writers have used this construction both with "as adverb as if" and "as adverb as though". Some of these I found with Google book search, and others through citations in the OED. 1602 William Shakespeare: Merry Wives of Windsor; I'faith, Ile eate nothing: I thanke you as much as though I did. (OED) ...


2

The two words are very different in who's involved how with what. Ashamed is an emotion; it refers to some individual's experience of personal shame. Shameful is a moral judgement, not an emotion; it refers to an individual's belief that someone else ought to experience personal shame. Consequently, when used adverbially, without human subjects ...


2

While they both get the point across reasonably well, the second option "Shamefully" flows off the tongue a little easier. Since it is a play on "proudly presents," adding just one syllable to change the phrase to "Shamefully Presents" makes the connection easier to make.


1

Shamefully. Usage of the word this way as an adverb to mean "with shame" is listed as rare in my dictionary (OED), although I have certainly heard it before. Ashamedly is noted as much rarer still-- with only one example from 1600. If there's a comedic element, using Ashamedly might play that up. But from your second paragraph I don't get the sense that ...


1

Both are correct forms, but for a scientific article, perhaps: Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. No real reason, but it may be more readable to a not completely scientific audience as well.


1

This is perfectly fine, grammatically. It is akin to saying, "on the Monday after next".


1

None, in my opinion, for the meaning you provided. (How exactly) does X work? = What is the precision of X? (compare: How loudly can this speaker play?) How does (exactly X) work? = Why is precisely X effective, but if you modify X by a small detail it stops working? (compare: Why do we have exactly thirty-two teeth?) ?How does X exactly work? - I do not ...


1

"above" is an adverb and can't be used as an attributive adjective before a noun. So "the above gun" is wrong grammar. "above" is also a preposition. See OALD: http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/above_1 There is even an entry about above as adjective. One special case, in letters, e.g. "the above person". As this is short for the ...


1

Yes, you have to insert either in or where. The reason is that you generally cannot delete where but in certain cases you can delete that/which. Consider the following two sentences: This is the house which/that Romeo and Juliet fell in love in. This is the house where Romeo and Juliet fell in love. You cannot delete where from the second ...


1

funny in this sentence is an adverb (meaning strangely) modifying the verb acting.



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