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A relative form is a pointer to some other constituent in a sentence. When a relative is employed, as here, in a bound relative clause, it points in two directions, toward an explicit constituent in the head clause and toward a missing constituent in the subordinate relative clause, and signifies that they are the same entity. This is [the dragon] which ...


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I would do just the opposite of what you do. In other words, if I'm using it as an adjective, I would do what one has always done when two words form one adjective--use a hyphen. Hence: "It's an on-line project." I am also out of step with the rest of the world in that I see two words, period, when the expression is used as what you call a predicate ...


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"We have to do this coordinated." appears to be the word-for-word translation of "Wir müssen dies koordiniert machen." Translation from German to English is better done by an Anglophone with the knowledge of German, as the nuances of such rendering are only known to a native speaker. The following may sound better: "We must coordinate and do this." "We ...


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Start by abandoning the notion that these adverbs are in any sense "conjunctive". They define the semantic relationship between two clauses, but they do not conjoin them in the grammatical sense of fusing them into a single syntactic unit. (In all of the examples in your comments that is accomplished by an actual conjunction, and.) That is why ...


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The answer is that adverbs like quietly have considerable flexibility. From http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/adverbs-manner/ He asked me quietly to leave the house. the request is quiet He asked me to leave the house quietly. the leaving is quiet Sometimes an adverb of manner is placed before a verb + object to add emphasis. EXAMPLES He gently ...


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I don't think there is any theory that accounts successfully for adverb placement in English. McCawley gives a pretty straightforward theory in The Syntactic Phenomena of English. It goes like this. Adverbs are modifiers, and the natural places for modifiers are prefixed to what they modify or suffixed to what they modify. "Quietly", like other manner ...


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(1) "I well understand something" strikes me as somewhat old fashioned, or formal. (2) "I understand well something" is ungrammatical, due to a prohibition on adverbs coming between verb and direct object. However, if you have in place of "something" some long and complicated phrase, then this becomes the preferred place for "well". (3) "I understand ...


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Use after: The speed after the time it takes the picket fence to travel 5 cm is 3 m/s.


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"Where, when, why" can be used in relative clauses as in "the church where my parents married". In this use they are often called relative adverbs, but the Longman English Grammar uses no name at all. The term adverb is perhaps not optimal. Here it does not mean that "where/when/why" modify a verb as an adverb of manner. The primary function is to connect ...


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Your rephrase isn't quite natural with "can be." But let's suppose you'd said "The sentiments in the tweets can be treated as an accurate measure, as is found with traditional telephone surveys." That's fine, but you've said that tweets are an accurate gauge, and that there are similar gauges to be found in analyzing traditional telephone surveys. Your ...


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English has many verbs that change their meaning when a preposition is added. In your question, one could say either Do you want to come over for dinner tonight? or Do you want to come for dinner tonight? The first feels a little more colloquial to a native English speaker, the second a little more stilted. I suspect that the colloquial feel ...



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