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16

Here you're using however as an adverb, meaning no matter how or in whatever way. Since you said that your intention is "no matter how you analyze the data, the output would remain poor", however is the correct choice. When one uses how ever, "ever" usually takes the role of an intensifier -- it increases the strength of the statement being made with "how". ...


8

I think I've isolated the problem here. Carefully (or some other adverb) sounds "natural" when it follows intransitive verbs, and "unnatural" when the verbs are transitive. According to this wikipedia article: Some verbs allow for objects but do not always require one. In other words, a verb may be used as intransitive in one sentence, and as ...


5

Information packaging constraints Here comes he. This sentence would usually be considered malformed, whereas Here comes Bob would be considered perfectly correct. Both are cases of what is known as Subject-dependent inversion. Subject-dependent inversion has to do with the linguistic concept of information packaging. In other words it is about how we ...


4

In traditional grammar, words such as before were given different parts of speech according to what words they appeared before. According to this treatment we would see the following classifications in the following examples: I saw her before [the concert started]. (conjunction before clause) I saw her before [the concert]. (preposition before noun phrase) ...


4

The output remained consistently poor how ever the data was/were analysed". (i.e., how ever you analyze the data, the output ...poor) When ever is used for emphasis after how or why, it should be written as a separate word. Thus it is correct to write ‘how ever did you manage?’ rather than ‘however did you manage?’ (as distinct from other uses ...


3

Traditionally, words modifying just about anything other than a noun phrase were lumped into the default category: adverbs. Here, a more analytical approach is to label about as a quantifier modifier, which is obviously its function (if one is in the 'numbers are quantifiers' camp. Those who define numbers as being different from quantifiers on the grounds ...


3

In short, yes, about is an adverb here. It means approximately, and is used correctly in both your examples. EDIT: When I say adverb, I mean it modifies the adjective five, not the verb weigh. In English, adverbs can modify not only verbs, but also adjectives and other adverbs. This Oxford entry confirms that it is an adverb indeed.


3

Consider this example: There is some milk in the fridge. What would be the question to which you could offer that sentence as an answer? Do we have any milk in the fridge? Where is the milk? The first one - so, there is is used to say that some milk exists in the fridge, and therefore it is a dummy existential subject. As professor Lawler ...


2

"Shabby" and "hardy" are already adjectives; they provide a description of a noun. "Shabby" and "hardy" do not have a corresponding noun; they are used with a noun. e.g. A shabby person. The adverb for "shabby" is "shabbily", e.g. He dresses shabbily. There is no adverb for "hardy".


2

According to the oxford dictionary, it's an acceptable use of the word: immediately [conjunction] (chiefly British) As soon as: let me know immediately she arrives


2

Sentences like these use disjuncts A specific type of disjunct is the sentence adverb (or sentence adverbial), which modifies a sentence, or a clause within a sentence, to convey the mood, attitude or sentiments of the speaker, rather than an adverb modifying a verb, an adjective or another adverb within a sentence. Here are some examples (note: the ...


2

The two mean exactly the same thing and are both grammatically correct. Soon is a modifier of be promoted, so it can fit either before or after. Here, there is no confusion if soon is used before be promoted because the phrase stands alone in its containing clause (you will soon be promoted).


2

Closer in this sentence is the comparative of the adverb close. close (adv.) at or to a short distance or time away [M-W]


2

When shortened forms become idiomatic, it may be better not to try to identify parts of speech within them. I had more cups of tea than Harry [had] [cups of tea]. No problem with classifying Harry as a noun (phrase) (though 'they did' reduces to 'them' nowadays). ... I had more cups of tea than [I] [had] [cups of] coffee. Again, no problems. ...


2

I would use "between" here. The subject moved between camera locations A and B. I somehow get the feeling you're potentially talking about something security related (e.g. police report for a company burglary). I would definitely add in a later sentence that the two camera locations are separated, and that the subject's whereabouts between those two ...


1

You're quite right that normally the standard sequence never ever would be used (where ever is simply an optional intensifier for never). But for your second example, including ever actually alters the intended meaning. 1: Did you never [ever] need to use that pickup line? In this version, never would normally be understood to mean much the same as ...


1

The case of hopefully is a bit different here. It is a sentence adverb, a disjunct. It is modifying the whole sentence. Rather than in a hopeful manner, it means it is hoped in this case. Wikipedia Oxford's dictionary entry states this meaning and usage as valid, though it warns that some people think it is incorrect: Although this is the most ...


1

The question is whether you mean to say that the number of customers is more than the usual number (adjective) or that you had more customers than you usually have (adverb). So either is correct. Practically speaking, they amount to the same thing. We (in AmE, and per David Pugh, in BrE as well) tend to use the shorter form "usual", and not dwell on this ...


1

'I moved closer.' Here closer is a comparative adjective functioning as a complement of the verb move. It does not describe the process of moving, it describes the subject, I, at the end of the moving process. As such we could regard it as a type of locative complement. These types of complement are nearly always preposition phrases or adjectives. ...


1

There is a difference of meaning. "You will be promoted soon" tells when you will be promoted. It's primarily a comment about your prospects. "You will soon be promoted" tells what will happen soon. It's a comment on the process which results from you working hard. Of course, if the words are said to you in either form, you'd be pleased, but I think the ...


1

If I had to guess at the meaning of "objectively necessary", I suppose I might guess that it meant necessary as a matter of fact. The trouble is, I don't know how to interpret that. The difference between what is necessarily true and what is merely factually true is taken by logicians to be the difference between propositions that are true in all possible ...


1

"Was the movie good?" "Very." This makes sense, because the responder is applying "very" (adverb) to "good" (adjective)—producing "very good". However, you can't say that you "very like" something. Usage requires us to add "much" to create an adverbial phrase that can be applied to the verb "like".


1

Simply because language does not work that way, and most of it is arbitrary. Forms fall into disuse and new borrowings enter the language all the time.


1

Although 2 years have passed since your question, I have just found in a grammar book of mine that the right order is Manner-Place-Time. If the verb of the sentence is a verb of motion then the order changes to : Place-Manner-Time. For instance, "he goes to his office by bus at nine o'clock."


1

Perhaps is a synonym to maybe. Perhaps is more formal and maybe is more casual—but the difference in tone is smaller than the difference between, say, "deceased" and "pushing up daisies." Perhaps is common in academic writing. Maybe is common in conversation. Perhaps usually has the subtle implication that circumstance is involved—as if it depends on what ...



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