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43

I don't think there's a perfect word for this, but here are some suggestions: insatiably This does not, of course, refer specifically to thirst, or to the action, but it does mean "incapable of being satisfied", which covers the motivation and thereby suggests the action. voraciously "having a huge appetite". Of course appetite typically relates to ...


29

Agree with "parchedly," but that's a pretty sorry word! You may be better off using a different verb than "to drink": gulp or guzzle, or, taking considerable poetic license with the meaning of the words, gasp or croak ("he gasped / croaked down a liter of water"). Another alternative is to use an adverb not specifically meaning "thirstily" but implying ...


18

gulpingly might fit gulpingly: (adverb) in a gulping manner gulp: (transitive verb) often foll by down to swallow rapidly, esp in large mouthfuls I see the usage of "guzzlingly" also but there is no dictionary entry. It might be a neologism. guzzle: To drink greedily or habitually: guzzle beer. Other than that, you can always use "greedily" ...


4

Greedily (or insatiably) might be indeed be good answers. Often, "ravenously" describes how someone eats as much as from what cause the manner of their eating proceeds. Thus, to fill in the gap: He drank the water .... analogously to: He ate the food ravenously. you could use compulsively, wildly, with abandon, immoderately, urgently or obsessively. ...


4

Even as “rough estimates,” most of those figures are poor. For example, usually can mean anything between “more often than anything else” and “almost always.” It doesn't even necessarily mean a majority of the time. I'd say that sometimes and occasionally are much less common than the estimates above – but there are exceptions. Likewise, I'd say that ...


3

We can know because grammar books define the parts of speech. An adverb (among other things) modifies a verb, expressing manner (e.g., gently). Adjectives modify nouns. In Love Me Tender, what is the subject, verb, direct object, and then what does that left-over word modify? Here's my take: Love me tender: subject (implied): you; verb: love; direct object: ...


3

There is no direct counterpart that is in typical usage. Use any word that suggests desperation or urgency, if you must use an adverb. Describing the way the person drank visually would probably be far more descriptive, however. For example: "The traveler sank to her knees, grabbed the jug with both hands, drank the entire contents in one messy draft." ...


2

I don't have a whole lot to base this on, but to use an example given by another poster: "The ticket sales barely/hardly cover the expenses" - either could be used but there is a different "feel" to them. It seems to me that they are completely different here. If the ticket sales barely cover the expenses, they cover them, but only by a little (e.g., ...


2

I don't think people are understanding your question. You are asking how can tell the difference between 'threw', 'through', 'thorough' when you are hearing them being said, right? Jimmy threw the ring at Emiko. Elvis walked through the door. John was through with work for the day. Gareth was through with mosquitoes coming through the ...


2

The reason "maybe" sounds awkward when followed by "be" or "is" or similar is that we semi-consciously perceive that the "maybe" wasn't needed in the first place. Your first example, "maybe he is in the office today”, is colloquial, but it would be more economical to say, "he may be in the office today". In the other case, "This maybe is an interesting ...


2

It is a typical characteristic of colloqial AmE ( American English) to use the adjective form after a verb instead of the adverb with the ending -ly. And the probability is high that this use is due to German influence. In German normal adjectives after a verb have the function of an adverb; there is no special adverb ending. The position after a verb ...


2

It is an adverb because it should read: "Love me tenderly, love me slowly." Tenderly and slowly are both describing the verb love. Moden English usage frequently uses an adjectival form where there should correctly be an adverbial form. How many times have you heard this: He drove real slow. If you want to hear grammatically correct lyrics, you should ...


2

The etymology of ravenous according to the OED: Originally: (of an animal) given to seizing other animals as prey; predatory; ferocious. Later: (of an animal or person; also of the appetite, hunger, etc.) voracious, gluttonous. Also fig. and in extended use. A synonym would be 'voraciously'. So in order to answer this question one has to think of an ...


2

You could also get creative with watery words and make some adjectives up, if you're into that sort of thing: they drank gushingly (from gushing) she drank oceanically (from oceanic) he drank flowingly (from flowing) she drank floodingly (from flooding) she drank tidingly (from tiding) he drank lakedly (from lake) they drank shoringly (from shore) I drank ...


2

I know what you mean. But if you wanted to be precise you'd be using numbers in the first place. Below my shot at non numerical quantification. Always - As far as I can remember every time. Frequently - Often enough to be annoying. I could even tell you how often. I go there on a regular *basis* with a constant frequency. Usually - Most of the time but I ...


2

No, "before since" can't be used here. "Ever since" is a set construct, so it is considered normative, but "before since" is not. I would suggest the following: This company has provided products since 2010. Consequently, there is no prior record of this product.


2

as if means that happens while giving a (false) impression. He acted as if he owned the place. He acted in such a fashion that the impression was created that he was the proprietor of the place. and yet means that something happens, even if the context makes it unexpected: I am old, and yet I learn new things. Old people often do not learn much ...


2

I don't think any of the sentences you mentioned are inherently negative. It's entirely contextual. If somebody gives you a great birthday present, saying "you are too nice" isn't negative. If a waiter comes out with your food right away, saying "you are too fast" isn't negative. It's all about context.


2

Are there any instances when we could use 'too' but in a positive way? Sure there are. It all depends on context: “Rhonda got her results back from oncology. She's cancer free.” “Really? I'm too happy for words – it's almost too good to be true!” Also, as others have said, "You're too kind" is idiomatic; it can mean: "You're very helpful." ...


2

श्री गणेशाय नमः The problem here is that parts of speech (adverb, conjunction, pronoun, etc.) are being used as labels to classify words as "being" one and only one part of speech, and that this categorization seems to be directed by faulty definitions. Parts of speech are uses of words, and in English almost any word can be used in a number of such ways. ...


1

If in doubt, ask Google: In the comments, Bradd Szonye says that "the first sounds like brochure speak". I'd disagree with this as "home delivers" is definitely brochure speak as it's not a commonly used phrase, where as "home delivery" is much more common.


1

The positioning of now depends on what you want to stress in the sentence, Another alternative is: Now she is writing a letter; here Now is the word you want to emphasise, unlike in your first sentence. Your second example is more neutral with respect to the adverb of time.


1

Fibo, the presentation of your question as a logical argument makes the answer easier if you follow the line of reasoning. You can't have two premises in one of your lines, only one. If "A believes B" is true, and if "B equals C." is true, then (not B equals C, but also, if "D") "A believes C." is true. Adverb placement doesn't matter. John believes ...


1

To me the above table seems to be taken out of the air and I would like to know where it comes from. I would consider "seldom" and "rarely" as variants with the same meaning ( not very often) and I don't believe that any speaker ever thinks of a differentiation according to percentages.No speaker has statistic values in his pocket and choses adverbs of ...


1

Perhaps "guzzled". Or a metaphor. He drank like a particularly parched fish who'd just been on a camel ride with the hotel holiday resort and hadn't brought any change, where the only available water was for sale by grinning tour guides. or He wearily examined the (beverage, water?) to check it wasn't a mirage, and once certain, with a wave of relief ...


1

I concur with the many answers that choosing a different verb is better-suited in this case to convey the desired nuances. I particularly like "to quaff," which I picture as a very hasty (and messy) kind of drinking, imho fitting of the desired adverb "ravenously". Depending on the mood of the drinker, I would go with "he quaffed ...


1

drouthy (scot, thirsty or dry) dehydrated parched I would be more inclined to suggest parched as a solution, though I would personally use drouthy. Dehydrated serves the same purpose but I'd use it to narrate more specifically.


1

How about some derivative of drench? Since parched speaks of the absence of fluid, and ravenous more of the actual present consumption of food, I would think drenched (or drenchedly/drenchally if there exist such words) would be better...as it speaks more of the present consumption of and saturation with fluid.


1

This is from Google's Thesaurus. 'Finally' is identified as having four meanings. Some of the synonyms proposed seem quite ancient to me - 'by and by', 'at length', etc. finally ˈfʌɪnəli/ adverb adverb: finally 1. after a long time, typically when there has been difficulty or delay. "he finally arrived to join us" synonyms: eventually, ultimately, in ...



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