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9

A sentence requires a subject and a predicate. A predicate is a verb plus whatever other elements make up a verb phrase. In this case, the subject, clearly, is I, while the predicate is the verb describing the state or action of the subject. In this case, that is want, in a transitive capacity. Everything after that is the direct object of want, a noun in ...


4

It is hard to tell for certain which part of speech this usage of the well represents. If you search very hard in dictionaries, you may be able to find the correct definition of this word listed under its use as an adverb. However, what these dictionaries will not tell you is that this meaning of the word well, meaning something like to a considerable ...


4

We have a single word for that: feasible. That which can be carried out with reasonable effort, given the resources available, is said to be feasible. In legal documents, there are degrees of commitment and promise. When the person making the promise wishes to hedge and not offer absolute guarantees, he invokes the phrase "best efforts" and variants ...


3

I want to get to know you better. There are three non-auxiliary verbs, so there are three clauses. want is the present tense verb of the main clause get is the untensed verb of the infinitive complement clause that's the object of want know is the untensed verb of the infinitive complement clause that's the object of get. As for the rest, I is ...


3

If the adverb applies to the verb specifically, as in I loved her passionately then no comma is required. If the adverb applies to the adjective from which it is separated (in your examples, many and long), a comma would be preferable. Your first example means How many employees work here, roughly? and without the comma, the sense is that the ...


2

To express a sentiment like "I was expecting these to be better than the others, but they're <more better> than i was expecting", you would say that they are even better. You actually say that they were "even better" in your question, so it sounds like you already know the answer to your own question?


1

No, there is no auxiliary or modal verb; they are all lexical verbs. "Want" is the main clause verb. The other two verbs, "get" and "know", head subordinate non-finite clauses embedded within the main clause. I want [ to get [to know you better]]. I would treat your example as a catenative construction. The term ‘catenative’ is derived from the Latin word ...


1

You can, but as pointed out in the comments you need to keep the temporal aspect or it changes the meaning of the sentence. In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as first discovered by Cartier. This would parse as Cartier having been the first person to discover that the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as another place which ...


1

The basic structure of In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as when they were first discovered by Cartier. is Subject (the Magdalen Islands)     Copular-Verb (are)     Predicate Complement (isolated) The predicate complement is an adjective, modified by an adverbial phrase of ...


1

Grammatically sound? Yes. What's troublesome? Just a bit ungainly. No actual mistakes. Suggested rewording [words in square brackets are superfluous]: "We are pleased to update you on our progress**,** and also propose an [new] idea that would speed up our product launch [into the market] and generate revenue. Add comma after "progress" to break up the ...


1

"Correct/Incorrect", with parenthetical notes showing connotations. Correct: He has already finished his homework (He's quick.) He has finished his work already (He's quicker than expected.) He has been sitting there for two hours already (He's either determined, or very comfortable.) Incorrect: He has been already sitting there for ...


1

Someday, being a firefighter is my aspiration as·pi·ra·tion ˌaspəˈrāSH(ə)n/ noun a hope or ambition of achieving something. "he had nothing tangible to back up his literary aspirations" synonyms: desire, hope, dream, wish, longing, yearning; aim, ambition, expectation, goal, target "his greatest ...



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