Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

*I got them all correctly. (ungrammatical) I got them all correct. I'm assuming here that the Original Poster means that his answers to the question were correct (sentence (1) would be grammatical if the meaning was entirely different). In order to understand why we need to use correct here, and why correctly is wrong, we need to understand the ...


4

In a related question, John Lawler has suggested Quantifier as the designation for each: In linguistics and grammar, a quantifier is a type of determiner, such as all, some, many, few, a lot, and no, (but not numerals)... that indicates quantity. The Wikipedia article recognizes the difficulty of analyzing quantifiers in natural language: The ...


3

If you are talking about your success rate: I answered them all correctly. I got them all correct. If you are talking about a successful transmission receipt: I received them all correctly. I got them all correctly. It is because of the malleable nature of the meaning of the verb to get that both of these sentences are grammatically correct. ...


3

Fail fast is grammatically correct because the word fast can be used as an adverb. The word faster can also be used as an adverb, so Fail faster is also valid, but unnecessary in this case. Fail is a verb, so any modifier of it must be an adverb (as opposed to an adjective). For instance, Fail bad is invalid, since bad is an adjective. Fail badly is ...


2

Among friends I'd just say "controllèdly". You might also try something like "The bomb's detonation was controlled."


1

Go down the corridor Does not actually imply going straight, it may mean navigating corners or bends, much like: Follow the corridor. If someone says: Go straight... They usually mean it literally, avoiding any turns or corners.


1

An adverb doesn't change the tense of the verb. I walk in the park. I rarely walk in the park. I swam to the raft. I quickly swam to the raft. In your sentence, "We had a fight and never spoke again", the reason speak is in the past is because it agrees with a verb in the past which places the action of speak in the past. Never has nothing ...


1

Looking up "true independent of" and "true independently of" in Google searches shows that though both occur, the former usage predominates. There is a similar picture with "valid independent/ly of", though these are not as common. The phrase following true/valid is certainly modifying [the statement in] the independent clause, A is true. This means that ...


1

The Cassell Guide to Common Errors in English (p251) would agree with you. It states: There is a tendency to combine 'more' (or some other comparative) with 'rather than' in such a way as to upset the grammar. Among the examples the CGCEE lists is this one: 'The German appeal for an armistice was put to President Woodrow Wilson in the hope it ...


1

It is a word, and several writers have used it (see e.g. the citations at https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nuancedly). But it's not common and not recorded in most dictionaries; many native speakers perhaps (for whatever reasons) consider it ungainly.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible