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6

It is an example of a [reduced] absolute phrase. The following from grammar.ccc.com: ABSOLUTE PHRASE Usually (but not always, as we shall see), an absolute phrase (also called a nominative absolute) is a group of words consisting of a noun or pronoun and a participle as well as any related modifiers. Absolute phrases do not directly ...


5

"What's there there?" is grammatical. Here's why. "There is a book." It means the existence of a book in a certain place, which is here not stated. "There is a book there." This means, "You got a book there (here, a place)." So the first "there" in your example is just about existence; the second the place.


3

You don't use "secondly likely", instead you use "second most likely". You may also use "most likely, less likely, and even less likely" for that, but I can't imagine a situation where you want to say this in front of the very girls you're categorizing, they might end up changing that sentence to "most likely got slapped by" EDIT: The above paragraph was ...


2

How about "burned out?" That's what I usually say.


2

I would offer directly. The idea of a connection usually means a continuous electrically conductive path. So you have a choice when making the connection between a direct (wired) connection and a wireless one. So, for your original sentence, I would word it this way: It does not matter whether you connect wirelessly or directly.


2

That sentence is perfectly fine. The two "there"s here are different type of word. The first is a type of Noun Phrase. The second is a Locative Preposition (some people think it's a Locative Adverb). It indicates a location. The first there is the Subject of the question. The second is a locative Adjunct ( - where Subject and Adjunct are different ...


2

The adv. appears grammatically correct in a technical sense, I suppose. OR.....no institution has affected human beings **so closely. => Use of 'this" is not flawed since it can be used to identify a specific person or thing close at hand or being indicated or experienced.


2

It is a participle phrase, with the verb implied. The sentence could be written He ran over to me, his delight [being] evident, and hugged me already. The phrase is used adjectivally to modify the pronoun He. It is very common to omit the participle being when the phrase includes both a noun (such as delight) and predicate adjective (such as evident). ...


1

The world was created in 7 days, or so the Bible says. is almost equivalent to The world was created in 7 days. At least the bible says so. You're implying that the Bible is the only source (or one of few sources) that says so, and that you're not convinced. The world was created in 7 days, as The Bible says. This means that we believe in ...


1

The world was created in 7 days, or so The Bible says. "Or so" is condescending, and implies that the Bible is wrong. If we were to be civil, we might say "The world was created in 7 days, according to the bible". The world was created in 7 days, as The Bible says. This is authoritative. The reader is led to believe "it is so". The Bible says ...


1

See @Arsen Y.M.'s answer for the correct way to write these sentences. However, he hasn't explained the distinction in their meanings. The phrase or so [someone or something] says usually means that the claim is being made by that source, but you don't necessarily believe it. E.g. The world was created in 7 days, or so The Bible says. The phase as [someone ...


1

Majority is overused, anyway. Best to restrict it to matters of voting. Usually, the word most works just fine. Instead of majoritatively, use mostly.


1

Yes, see: Wiktionary: Majoritively By means of a majority. (proscribed) Consisting of more than half (50%); predominantly. However, it certainly isn't a common word, and honestly, I don't see that it fits well in the example you gave. You might instead choose "usually", "frequently", "commonly" or "most often" instead.


1

"You would ask about the economy, I about the war" is a construct I have used and understood. It is not redundant -- until the listener says, "What?" The redundancy prevents the question. "Rather" and "instead" ARE redundant and I have likewise had some of my obsessive-compulsive children tell me so. But all of it is a matter of personal choice -- which ...


1

The word "actually", as used in this and similar contexts, is used to express some degree of unexpectedness or mild surprise. For example, consider the following: The dinner was quite good. The dinner was actually quite good. The first version simply comments on the quality of the dinner. The second version comments on the quality of the dinner, while ...


1

Majorily is not a standard English word. It might be slang, or it might be recently coined. For your first example, a better construction is "Most of the balloons were red, with a few blue balloons scattered about." If you were trying to suggest that the balloons were not solid colors, you would need a different construction. Your second example is ...


1

If the actual "non-wireless" option is ethernet, then use it: It does not matter whether you connect wirelessly or by ethernet. If the alternative is USB, then reference USB.


1

Perhaps "frayed"? I find "burned out" a bit informal.


1

You only need to move the perhaps by a few words. Done. "However, a better approach, perhaps, ..."


1

All are grammatical, and whilst the first and the last mean almost exactly the same thing, the middle one has a rather different meaning. Between the first and the last there is little to choose. In the first one is describing her state of tiredness, the last describes her feelings i.e of tiredness. The middle case - she usually tired after...school - ...



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