Hot answers tagged

13

As stated in the comments (courtesy of @PeterShor): "The object of the verb is 'a posthumously recognised young writer'. And although she stopped being a writer when she was killed, she has never stopped being "a posthumously recognized young writer." It follows that the correct form of the original sentence is, as originally quoted: Anne Frank is a ...


6

In the United States, Canada and Australia, primary and secondary education together are sometimes referred to as K-12 education, and in New Zealand Year 1–13 is used. The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession. -Wikipedia Education As @ab2 kindly affirmed K-12 ...


5

"Bilingual" describes someone who is versatile in two languages. If you want to describe someone who has mastered multiple languages, you could call them a "polyglot", although this is properly "someone who speaks 5 or more languages." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyglot_(disambiguation)) Also relevant is the word "biliterate," simply meaning "able to ...


4

I'd say that the sentence is equivalent to saying "Anne Frank is/was the following things: posthumously recognised, and a young writer". She definitely "was" a young writer - she's not a young writer now. To say that someone is/was "posthumously recognised" has two potential meanings: either A) she now has the status of being "posthumously recognised"....


3

This is called learning by rote. A kind of learning style that isn't really learning but repeating exactly as you were told. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rote_learning.


3

The noun for this is "polyglot". "Polyglotism or polyglottism is the ability to master, or the state of having mastered, multiple languages." "Multilinguist" is a synonym for this.


3

Those are generally referred to as traffic signs or road signs: signs erected at the side of or above roads to give instructions or provide information to road users. The earliest signs were simple wooden or stone milestones. Later, signs with directional arms were introduced, for example, the fingerposts in the United Kingdom and their wooden ...


3

The adverb is only modifying the first clause. The members concealed their identities (and thus their membership in the KKK from those they dealt with on a day-to-day basis) by wearing masks at all public KKK events. In the current construction of this sentence, the adverb would only modify both clauses if the conjunction were "or" instead of "and." The ...


3

You have already identified the key detail here: Alex did not shrug. Therefore, anyone reading this passage will assume that "also" applies only to taking a look around. If you wanted to make it extra clear, you could add a comma. "Jim also took a look around, and shrugged."


3

It is grammatically correct in this sentence, but there are conditions where it would be grammatically incorrect. The "more" in your example is modifying the verb "cover," whereas I believe you're reading it as modifying the adverb "later." "More" is clarifying the comparative degree of the verb (we will cover it in more detail than we just covered it now), ...


3

Sterile (adj.) not able to produce children or young I believe "scientifically sterile generations" means that those generations are not able to produce science. That is not exactly the same as those generations having nothing to contribute to science. You can contribute to science, without producing science. Older generations can produce science, and the ...


2

Note that traffic sign is a general-purpose term that includes hazard warnings, speed limits, etc. A sign telling you which road to take to get somewhere (or telling you where you'll end up if you continue on your present course) is more specifically called a... signpost - sign giving information such as the direction and distance to a nearby town, ...


2

"hardly any" is a negative counterpart to "only some", and the latter is analyzed by McCawley in The Syntactic Phenomena of English as an adverb used to compare or contrast its focus, here "some". The placement of "only", and I suppose this "hardly" as well, is governed by the rule that the adverb must be a syntactic modifier of some constituent which ...


2

When a single adverb -- I'm not going to get into adverbial phrases because you didn't ask about them -- introduces a sentence, appearing in advance of the subject and verb of the main clause, the rule is to follow it with a comma. The exception to this rule is when the adverb is also being used somewhat conjunctively. Example: John went to the store ...


2

What are are asking for is very complicated, and not really about grammar. There is not going to be a straightforward rule to determine the 'correctness' of any phrase generated in this way. You haven't even clearly stated what you mean by 'correct'. Let's assume for now that your base word is always a noun. English has the concept of a 'noun string', which ...


1

I think you might find "compulsory education" works for you. What it means depends on the region you're in but it literally means "required education" - or the years of education required by government. Compulsory education refers to a period of education that is required of all persons and is imposed by law. Depending on the country, this education may ...


1

It is called secondary predicate. Most of your sentences are End-State Secondary Predicates. Here is the link with more detailed explanations. http://www1.icsi.berkeley.edu/~kay/bcg/II-Pred.html


1

(I’m not sure if I’m repeating, agreeing, or disagreeing with what Edwin’s answer says… but I have some different points, too.) There are various types of elements that can be used to modify nouns: possessives (arguable whether they modify or merely determine), other noun phrases acting as adjuncts, adjectival phrases, and verb phrases, to name a few. Each ...


1

A compound noun is a noun (though it might consist of two orthographic words); some modern dictionaries have adopted the practice of labelling even open compounds 'noun': school bus n. A publicly or privately owned vehicle {AHDEL} They treat other compounds similarly: bottle green n. A dark to moderate or grayish green. bottle-green adj. ...


1

Using doubtless can make a sentence sound like it is in need of a new set of shock absorbers but it is efficient and correct and can even bring about a little subtle levity. For those who feel that it sounds just plain wrong, compare it with another -ly-less adverb, regardless. I've never observed anyone write or say "regardlessly."


1

It seems to me that there is a very slight difference between the original version ("on-line operation") and the modern use ("to go online"). In 1950, being "on-line" meant that a device was working over a line of communication ("on the line" as someone else pointed out). Now "being online" describes a full user experience, and not just the method by which ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible