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9

Both instances are OK grammatically. In 'You sold the car?' she asked incredulously. 'incredulously' is an adverb, the asking is modified in being unbelievable. In 'You sold the car?' she asked, incredulous. 'incredulous' is an adjective, modifying the person. She is what is incredulous.


6

tl;dr: Certain kinds of words and phrases can in English function equally well as nouns as they can adverbs. Whether you prefer to call them nouns acting like adverbs or adverbs acting like nouns is a matter of religion only, since they are still doing the same job no matter what you call them. The job they are doing is a deictic one, described at the ...


5

Adverbs versus Adverbs TLDR: The word real is a modifier which — like very — works as an intensifier. Just like very, real can function not only as an adjective but also as a special kind of “adverb”. It’s an adverb that does not work on verbs. As an adverb, it can only intensify other modifiers, and usually adjectives at that: it does not intensify ...


3

The key is in this passage: [Adjectives are] words that modify nouns, and [adverbs are] words that modify other categories (categories of words or of larger constituents). Here, only is modifying a "larger constituent"—namely, a noun phrase (NP). You have given examples where the noun phrase consists of one word, but if you replace the noun phrase with ...


2

There are in general four positions where an adjective appears in a sentence: (1) the attributive position: The old car wouldn't start. (2) the postpositive position (rare): He was driving on the hard shoulder, not the motorway proper. (3) the predicative position: He was getting old. (4) in an absolute construction (as here): 'You sold the car?' she ...


2

Just a standard noun-adjective-adverb construction. A snob (noun) is snobbish (adjective), and behaves snobbishly (adverb). same as: A child (noun) is childish (adjective), and behaves childishly (adverb).


2

It's the output of the English syntactic rule, transformation, or alternation There-Insertion. There-insertion takes as input a sentence with one of a large set of verbs, and generates as output a sentence meaning the same thing, but having a dummy there as subject. The original subject is moved to a position after the first auxiliary verb. A commotion ...


2

It is not an adverb, nor a locative of any sort, but a 'dummy' pronoun, without reference. Its sole function is to act as the subject of a sentence asserting the existence of the 'complement' of the verb BE - as you suggest, it is the idiomatic way of expressing "A restaurant around the corner is".


2

If you're thinking about the slogan—especially in the context of the product name—then the advertising agency responsible for the slogan has done its job. Advertisers have long aimed for the sweet spot in their target audience's psyche where a form of usage slightly rankles but doesn't prompt immediate dismissive ridicule. Previous winners in this game ...


1

In Three days? I think that it is not nearly enough time. 'nearly' is premodifying the quantifier 'enough' and needs to immediately precede it. But in Three days? I think that it is simply not enough time. 'simply' is not modifying 'enough' (or indeed much else): it's a pragmatic marker (probably marking the speaker's exasperation). It sounds ...


1

Immidiately is an adverb [of time], and just as the tag summary mentions, the position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective. According to English grammar, if you want to have the adverb at the beginning rather the end of a sentence, it must be placed before ...


1

Stuart: Ooh, Sheldon, I’m afraid you couldn’t be more wrong. Sheldon: "More wrong"? Wrong is an absolute state and not subject to gradation. Like wrong, so is absolute. "So much" means literally "exactly this much", and you cannot be "very exactly" anything. Stuart: Of course it is. It’s a little wrong to say a tomato is a vegetable, it’s ...


1

In general, when someone says they feel bad, it's expressing an emotion. The confusion here is due to the fact that feel is both an action verb and a linking verb. A quick test on whether a verb is linking or an action verb is the am test. In this sentences, you can replace feel with am. "I feel bad" becomes "I am bad" Since you can make the verb ...


1

From the Wikipedia article on 'Comparative': ... monosyllabic adjectives generally form their comparative form with -er in English, whereas polysyllabic adjectives prefer to use more. That is to say, adjectives with one syllable will usually use "-er", and anything else will use "more". So you would expect the comparative form of "fun" to be "funner", ...


1

Paid is used adjectivally in this case, not as a verb. The question is, what do you want professional(ly) to refer to? If you mean it is a professional engagement, it refers to the noun engagement, so you use the adjective. I would use a comma in this case between professional and paid, by the way. (Good point in the comment, twodave!) If you mean it is ...


1

I think that in practice, most people would simply use the verb 'scrutinize' instead of saying 'watch with scrutiny', which accordingly doesn't sound very idiomatic to me. That being said, 'scrutinizingly' does exist; it means 'in a scrutinizing manner'. You could say of your research, "In the course of my analysis, I had to carefully scrutinize the TV ...



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