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6

It is an old bugaboo of the grammar police that in any pairing of an adjective with its -ly-suffixed adverb -- safe, safely; slow, slowly -- the (nominal) adjective must never be used as an adverb. You may ignore this prescription. As the OED quaintly puts the case for "safe": "Chiefly (now only) with quasi-advb force with verbs of coming, going, bringing, ...


4

In British English the correct usage is to use the adverbial form to modify a verb. If someone wrote “we drove safe from London to Edinburgh” I would edit it to “safely”, first making sure that they had not stolen a safe and mistakenly omitted the definite article. No doubt there are those who would argue hotly (argue hot? Don't make me laugh!) that this ...


3

Been is the past participle of Be so I've never been is as grammatical as I'm not. The object is omitted as it is understood from context. Q: "Are you in France now?" A: "No, I'm not, and I've never been." Q: "Are you tall?" A: "No, I'm not, and I've never been." In the most technical sense, I'm not sure whether omitting the object of a to be verb can be ...


2

Drive safe is along the lines of 'fare well', it is a pretty generic platitude. Drive safely is an instruction, you are telling the person to not speed, not run red lights etc. Which you want to use depends if you think the driver is likely to cause a crash or just want to let them know that you like them being alive. An Englishman living in Australia ...


2

Based on your offered example sentence, you don’t actually want an adverb here at all. Rather, you want the corresponding adjective derived from the noun pixel. So simply add ‑ed, either this way: The colour of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue pixelled, but from proper viewing distance the colours produce a ...


1

From Eugene Lyons 1938 book Assignment in Utopia about covering Stalinist USSR: It was clear on the larger objectives but fuzzily obscure on details. Like so much of the economic planning of which he spoke, the counterrevolutionary planning seemed grandiose in blueprint but unrealized in practical application. From Wallace Stegner's The Big Rock ...


1

Contrariwise is not Just old-fashioned, It was (very likely) invented to fit Tweedledum and Tweedledee who have been fished out of a nursery rhyme where they fight over a rattle, and are odd little kids. But take your choice: vice versa "Tweedledum said Tweedledee had started the fight and vice versa." "Tweedledum said Tweedledee had started the fight; ...


1

Contrariwise draws attention to itself and so runs a risk of distracting the reader or listener from your message. In most contexts when you might want to use contrariwise I'd probably say on the other hand.


1

Yes, I think it does sound old-fashioned, however this is purely subjective. That from my experience the word isn't used often in conversation indicates this. An alternative and more popular phrase would be on the contrary.


1

In the version of British English that I speak, it would be the adverbial form - "Drive safely."



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