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30

Is there a -times word for rarely? Geoffery Chaucer certainly thought so when in The Clerk’s Tale he whilom wrote: To that I nevere erst thoughte, streyne me. I me rejoysed of my liberte, That seelde tyme is founde in mariage. Ther I was free, I moot been in servage. As you see, old Chaucer wasn’t much of a speller. 😼 We would ...


13

So why is well, an adverb, preferred over good, an adjective, when used with linking verbs? It's well as an adjective that is preferred over good as an adjective. Though that well is also an adverb is a factor in two ways. The first is that since good is sometimes used as an adverb, and this sense is considered incorrect, some of the cases where good ...


8

I'm not so sure it modifies the verb. When you say what the hell is wrong with you?, it sounds more like it modifies what. But perhaps it is better to say the phrase is a disjunct that modifies the whole sentence or clause: it expresses the attitude of the speaker towards the clause as a whole, I would be inclined to think.


7

Well is an adjective. well adjective (better, best) [predicative] In good health; free or recovered from illness [ODO] It just happens to have the same form as the adverb of good; and its comparative/superlative forms happen to be the same too. But it's an adjective.


3

In speech, the intonation patterns and parsing rhythms of a native speaker would disambiguate one meaning from another. Below I am trying to reflect a rising accent on the word run, a pause with the em dash, and words spoken in fairly rapid succession with "walkfast": Bob will either rún — or walkfast. Those rhythms and tonal patterns would be in line ...


3

expressionless is modifing she, not stands, so it should be an adjective, not an adverb. It's equivalent to She's standing there and is completely expressionless. An example where you could use an adverb is: She's standing there completely effortlessly. The use of the adverb completely is irrelevant. An adverb can modify either an adjective or ...


3

The hell is, I believe, just a phrasal exclamation, used as an intensifier. It is used in "get the hell out of here" as a mock-adverb, but it can be a mock-adjective ("What the hell is this?") or mock-noun ("The hell you say!")


2

Turn slightly right is grammatical since as you said, 'slightly' is an adverb. However, most navigation apps I have used say Make a slight right. Which is also grammatically correct.


2

Agree can be used transitively without a preposition: this is typically in the context of formal negotiations, rather than when discussing opinions. So, you can agree a contract, or terms, or a price, or hours, pay, holidays, etc. To my (British English) ear, at least, to say "workers and employers can agree on holidays" might imply "however, workers and ...


2

Note that omitting the preposition means something different, and so it really depends what it is intended to mean. If they are agreeing about what days holidays should be, then yes, it needs an extra on. However, if it just means that holidays are the only times that they are ever in agreement, then you could use holidays adverbially, just as we do with ...


2

Adverbs ordinarily precede the adjectives or adverbs they modify, so that is why in your examples "completely" precedes the adjective "expressionless" or the adverb "expressionlessly", which it modifies. "Completely" can also modify a verb, in which case it can precede the verb it modifies: "They completely missed my point." However, it can also follow the ...


2

The adverbial group "the hell" is simply an intensifier often used after question words as in - What the hell are you doing here? expressing strong annoyance. It can be used in imperatives as in your example with the same function.


2

Sentences of the form Bob will run or walk fast. are genuinely ambiguous: it is not explicit which is meant. You might guess from context that the most likely intepretation is "Bob will run or Bob will walk fast" but equally "Bob will call or email me when he arrives" is of identical form but the context indicates the reverse case. The way the ...


1

"She stands there completely without expression." Avoids the awkwardness of two -ly words in a row and ensures that "without expression" correctly modifies "stands".


1

AHDEL (and Collins Cobuild) disagree with the dogmatic 'due to must be preceded by and followed by a noun phrase' It offers [bolding mine]: due to prep. Because of. Usage Note: Due to has been widely used for many years as a compound preposition like owing to, but some critics have insisted that due should be used only as an adjective. ...


1

It's not resolved in your first example, which really is ambiguous. Are you asking for some best way to resolve it by rephrasing? Anything that works.


1

This usage of agree, which takes a direct object instead of a prepositional complement is quite common, especially in British English. If you are taking an IELTS exam then you are quite likely to see it. Here is the entry for agree from Oxford Dictionaries Online: 2.1 [with object] Reach agreement about (something) after negotiation: 'if ...


1

A. As Jim said, you need to say "the internet"**. After fixing that, it leaves only 13, 14 and 15. (because all the ones with "last a few" or "past a few" are ungrammatical.) Note that in all instances you could, if you wish, shorten the sentence by saying simply "access" (yes, it is used as a verb) rather than "gain access to" **Note also that some ...


1

Just to expand upon Andrew's answer, which I upvoted, the following are all legitimate, grammatical uses of well/good. (I started to put these in a comment but it got too elaborate for the medium.) I feel well. [I am not sick.] I feel good. [I am feeling buoyant or optimistic.] I feel ill. [I am sick.] I feel bad. [I am sick or I have a ...


1

The phrase once in a blue moon might suit. It describes something that happens very rarely.


1

I would parse the sentence like this: Jack - noun (subject) is going - present progressive verb to have - infinite (functioning as an adverb modifying "is going") a car - object of infinitive of his own - prepositional phrase (functioning as an adjective modifying car)


1

As to your example: John rowed, and Jill walked, slowly. I agree with you that it could be interpreted as referring only to Jill's walking, or as referring to both. I would suggest that if you wish readers to parse "slowly" as referring only to Jill's walking, try this: John rowed; and Jill walked, slowly. If you wish to leave readers guessing as to ...



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