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Sexual Risk Reduction program is one of the frequently implemented programs in college campuses. is the only correct one. "implemented" is a past participle, a verbal form, even though here it's used attributively. Now, let's think about the meaning of: frequent, implemented program = program that is frequent and is implemented [kind of strange] ...


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Your first question is: What is the problem with adverbs? There are in fact three main problems. The first problem is that they are often unnecessary. This is what Zinnser in On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction (p68) writes: Most adverbs are unnecessary. You will clutter your sentence and annoy your reader if you choose a verb ...


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It starts with your original sentence: It is one of the mostly used methods in ... Mostly means that it is used more in (...) than somewhere else, but the construction of the sentence is not very nice. I'd expect to see This method is is mostly used in ... I think you mean to say: It is one of the most used methods in ... Now, you can simply add ...


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As for adverb position, there is nothing wrong with "so badly injured". As a matter of fact it sounds more natural than "injured so badly", which is not wrong. e.g. "His essay was so badly written/written so badly that I had to ask him to rewrite it." I wouldn't use "must" in the past tense, and would add a possessive adjective at the beginning of the ...


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Perhaps of interest: Studies in Early Modern English - Page 245 Dieter Kastovsky - 1994 They were: cruel vs. cruelly, exceeding vs. exceedingly, excellent vs. excellently, extraordinary vs. extraordinarily, full vs. fully, might vs. mightily, pure vs. purely, singular ... occur well before the introduction of normative grammars in the ...


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Yes, this is a correct usage. My reading is: "We are all a pixel that is imperatively significant, part of the ever intricate mosaic of life." or: "We are all a pixel that is significant in an imperative /way/manner/, part of the ever intricate mosaic of life." See it at work in all these examples at Google Books: "in an imperatively" About 749 results ...


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orthographically-inept (or challenged) comes to mind An orthography is the methodology of writing a language. It includes rules of spelling, hyphenation, capitalization, word breaks, emphasis, and punctuation.Wikipedia


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Both Royal Mail in the UK and US Postal Service use "overseas" stamped packaging and envelopes for sending postage to another country. The mail services of all other European countries including the Russian Post use "abroad" stamped packaging and envelopes.


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Still Frequently though it should either read "most frequently", or perhaps, to keep it vaguer, Sexual Risk Reduction programs are a frequently implemented program in college campuses... or, most concise… Sexual Risk Reduction programs are frequently implemented in college campuses...


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Nearby in the sentence implies "close at hand or adjacent". From TFD.... nearby, adj. talking about short distances. If something is near, near to, or close to a place or thing, it is a short distance from it. I live in Reinfeld, which is near Lübeck. I stood very near to them. When near and close have this meaning, don't use them immediately in ...


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Throw the ball hard means 'throw it with high velocity, using as much power as you can muster'. Throw the ball fast, means 'be quick about picking it up and throwing it'.


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In the Original Poster's examples we see the following types of phrase carrying out different types of function: A woman fell 50 feet down a cliff. (preposition phrase; Complement of the verb) The project was finished 10 days ahead of the schedule. (preposition phrase; Adjunct) Emma is 10 years older than Sophie. (adjective phrase; Predicative Complement) ...


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First of all, in a language forum, put laziness aside and capitalize the first word in a sentence. For it bothers us. OK? "Wet" is a gradable notion, even if an object can or can't have it. Thus, I have no problem with seeing it associated with a qualifier like "very." If you're not sure, try a search at Google Books (not vanilla Google) "the floor is ...


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These are both equally grammatical, and identical in meaning; either would be acceptable in a formal situation. The only thing I would suggest is changing "prevention knowledge" to knowledge of prevention.


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It sounds as if the function is calculated for five points between each two points, or at five points along the line connecting each two points. But we don't know whether the points at which the function is calculated are evenly distributed along that line. If so, it would be good to say so. In any case, "amidst" is much too vague for such a mathematical ...


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As per this study, it has been found that overuse of adverbs can distract the reader and detract academic writing. Another resource is this one. Here are 50 adverbs to avoid in academic writing. And here's a site showing examples of how you can replace adverbs with better words.


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The positioning of also before a form of be sounds very rarified, at least in conversation, nowadays. English Page advises not to use it [reformatted]: Also ... PLACEMENT "Also" comes after "to be." Examples: I am also Canadian. I was also there. ... Often, context and especially intonation will disambiguate (EP's ...


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The appearance and behavior of notwithstanding are pretty odd—and they seem odder the more you look at the word. In the first place, withstand doesn't mean, as you might suppose from adding with to stand, "stand with," but rather "stand against." In this respect, the with- component functions like the with- in withdraw ("draw against") or in withhold ("hold ...


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The Cassell Guide to Common Errors in English (p251) would agree with you. It states: There is a tendency to combine 'more' (or some other comparative) with 'rather than' in such a way as to upset the grammar. Among the examples the CGCEE lists is this one: 'The German appeal for an armistice was put to President Woodrow Wilson in the hope it ...



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