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The phrase "I wish for a rest now" could be interpreted to mean that at the present time (ie, "now") you are wishing for a rest (presumably beginning immediately, if not sooner), or it could be interpreted to mean that you have a wish that at the present time ("now") you were resting. The difference in the two meanings is certainly subtle, and, some would ...


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I agree that "now" modifies "a rest". To make grammatical sense of it, we can assume that "a rest" is the remnant of an understood verb phrase "(to take) a rest". (I don't know where the "for" comes from.) I am led to this analysis by considering a similar construction, "I wish for an immediate rest." Evidently, "immediate" could not go with "wish", ...


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McCawley, in TSPE, offers a theory of adverbs in which adverbs differ in type according to the category of the phrase they modify. In his theory, time adverbs, like "when" in your example, are V'-modifying adverbs, which can sometimes be promoted to S-modifying adverbs. (With the possible exception of degree adverbs, clausal adverbs don't modify words, but ...


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The past or present participle of many verbs may act as an adjective; such an adjective may take the -ly suffix to be employed as an adverb. Prof. Sartorius' lectures interest me. They are so interesting. He speaks interestingly. Grichuk's voice broke. He spoke in a broken voice. He spoke brokenly. But creating new words this way is ...


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I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. The word now is a preposition (intransitive prepositions like now are thought of as adverbs in traditional grammar). This preposition phrase functions as a modifier in both noun phrases and verb phrases. It is a temporal adjunct, meaning it gives us information ...


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"... I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest"." It doesn't. Here's why: What you're doing now is wishing, which is the verb. Although "rest" can function as a verb, it's a noun here, as it is "a rest". Once you realize the above, you will be able to see why "now" doesn't modify it. But if you believe an adverb (such as "now") can modify a noun, then ...


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I would say that in terms of meaning we tend to associate 'now' with 'rest' in that sentence. In terms of grammar we are constrained to making the adverb 'now' refer to 'wish'. The reason is that you cannot use 'now' as an adjective. You cannot say "I want a now rest." However you can say "I want a rest now." which in terms of grammar is equivalent to "I ...


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Sometimes with interrogatory sentences, the best thing to do is rearrange it into something declaratory. In this way, it is often easier to understand the sentence structure. You did last see him when. In this way, it is much easier to see that when is an adverb modifying "see". It's also easier to make out the subject and other pieces of sentence ...


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Personally, I don't like either sample of the 'slowly driving'. To me, these two sentences seem broken, without flow. The word 'could' should be removed because either you saw it or you didn't see it, etc. I would say: "I saw a beautiful landscape, as I drove slowly down the lane ..." or flip these clauses. Either way, the thought and image are more ...


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"When" is an adverb of time, referring to the verb "see" - In other words, modifies it. In your example, it's an interrogative adverb, meaning "at what time".


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1) I believe all five are syntactically correct (under my own personal command of the English language). 2) Only I gave him $1. I was the only person to give him $1. This might suggest that there was a situation in which others might have also given $1, but didn't. "He was begging for a dollar to use in the vending machine, but people passed him by. ...


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As explained, Bugger is a verb. Your question will be valid with any sentence like bad indian passport. In this example, bad will not be adjective of 'indian' or 'passport' but for whole 'indian passport' as this whole term is a noun here, not individual words.


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Salil, thank you for the context. Here's the conversation, I would have expected: Indian: Do you Americans need a visa to go to the UK? American: No, just a passport. How about you? Indian: My passport isn't good enough. I have to get a standard visitors visa as well. Bugger the Indian passport. "Bugger" is slang for committing anal sodomy and ...


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As quoted, and lacking additional context, I take it for a verb (meaning 'sodomize' or sim, q.v.) not an adjective. In either case it would seem to indicate contempt, whether for India, passports, or Indian passports.


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There is a limited and relative short list of adjectives with -ly as in stately, elderly, deadly, otherwordly, friendly, brotherly -ly was originaly a suffix that formed adjectives from nouns and other word classes. This suffix is connected with the adjective like. Today -ly is used as suffix for adverbs of manner. It is no use forming new adjectives ...


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I can think of a few examples of adding -ly to a verb and getting an adjective (comely, maybe shapely), adding -ly to a noun and getting an adjective (portly), or adding -ly to an adjective and getting another adjective (sickly), but I don't think there's a rule behind it, and I certainly wouldn't stick -ly onto verbs haphazardly and expect an adjective.



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