Hot answers tagged

5

The package arrives tomorrow. We leave for Hawaii tomorrow. We often use the present simple for scheduled events, events that appear on timetables, itineraries and calendars. In other words we use it for events whose occurrence is viewed as already firmly fixed for a specific time or date. This is why the sentences above are fine. When we use the ...


5

No, do not say "or else." Saying "or else" at the end of a sentence veils a threat. It doesn't mean "otherwise," it means that you are telling him to make the suggestion or you're going to either hurt him or kill him even. So let's not threaten murder. If you want to say it to mean "otherwise," write it as follows: "Kindly suggest if you agree to ...


3

The NP answer is correct. Your objections to it are no good. The Pandora's box argument doesn't make sense -- just because an adverb immediately precedes a noun and there is nothing else in the NP, this doesn't mean the adverb modifies the noun. That is what your argument assumes, and it is just not so. In such cases, the adverb modifies only the NP and ...


2

It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost. There are two reasons that sentence one is not good. The first is grammatical, the second is semantic. When we use the degree adjective as in this way, the adjective it modifies must occur before a noun phrase with an indefinite article: *It's as good watch as the one I lost. ...


2

Since "swipe" is the established idiom and is briefer than the alternative (which, in addition, doesn't sound immediately English - it is gramatically correct, but the wording isn't habitual, it's not a recognizable idiom), I recommend going with "swiping over it".


1

"Then" introduces an implication of previously stated conditions. "Therefore" introduces the conclusion of an argument that depends on previous statements. Ordinarily, conclusions and implications correspond, but not always. Compare If pigs had wings, then they could fly. Pigs have wings. Therefore, they can fly.


1

Both of these types of 'splitting' are perfectly understandable, and therefore acceptable. (I just did one.)


1

I just noted, in my 1966 U.S. government Selective Service form, the following phrase - "this form is to be prepared annually, or oftener as appropriate..."


1

For your example, I suggest you go with your gut. Further and Farther have been used interchangeably for years, even by the experts in English. From Quick & Dirty Tips .com: Wherever possible, use “farther” for physical distance and “further” for metaphorical, or figurative, distance. It's easy to remember because “farther” has the word “far” ...


1

There's a subtle difference in common usage: "Looks realistic": The observer is fully aware the object is not real. "Looks real": The observer believes the object is, or at least could be, real.


1

In the one hand, this is very simple. There is a trend in US advertising to drop the LY adverbs and use the adjective instead. That would not be acceptable in a formal essay but it's OK in advertising as it reflects the way people talk. Play Fair, instead of play fairly. But, on the other, there are amusing things like: Think Big, which is not an example of ...


1

The work is mostly Kim's. The work is mostly mine. The victory was almost Kim's. The victory was almost hers. Not every adverb that appears before a noun phrase is modifying that noun phrase There are two issues here. The first is that because an adverb happens to occur before a particular word, it doesn't mean it is modifying it. If an ...


1

On the face of it, your sentences 1 and 2 seem extensionally identical -- that is, each is true if and only if the other is true. So I don't know whether I can find an answer. But I'll discuss it. Syntacticians think about sentence structure in a peculiar way -- a way that traditional grammarians usually do not think about it. Syntacticians take sentence ...


1

Of those three my choice goes for tremendously excited. Why? To be honest it is my gut feeling, and the ngram shows it is by far the most popular choice of the three. But now I’m going to engage in a bit of ex-post rationalization. Utterly and completely are synonyms; utterly is more emphatic. So my feeling is utter and complete work best with things that ...



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