New answers tagged

0

Sounds like you're describing an escorted girl or daughter. es·cort verb iˈskôrt/ accompany (someone or something) somewhere, especially for protection or security, or as a mark of rank. "Shiona escorted Janice to the door" synonyms: conduct, accompany, guide, lead, usher, shepherd, bring, take; drive, walk "he escorted ...


-2

Wrong question. There is no logic in written language. All the rules come after the fact.


0

Doesn't fit, for me. My immediate assumption is that this has been prepared by somebody whose English is not very strong.


1

His criticism is inconsequential. Inconsequential : of no significance : unimportant "Inconsequential." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 28 June 2016.


2

Trivial — ODO adjective 1. Of little value or importance "huge fines were imposed for trivial offences" "Trivial" would satisfy your sentence. Keep in mind the difference between something seeming trivial and actually being trivial.


1

It's a simple adjective-noun phrase, grammatically equivalent to saying "We have red hair". Free means "Unrestrained" and "will" means "choice" or "choices" in this context. There's really nothing more complicated than that. It's equivalent to saying "We have unrestrained choices", ie "We can choose to do whatever we want." It's not a compound.


2

Children and/or animals who "perform" for attention are often described as "a (little) ham." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ham


-1

Adjective describes a state of being, therefore "permitted" is an adjective. Here it describes the state of the man, who is not permitted. He is a not-permitted person.


13

Could be a non-sequitur. Per MW: a statement (as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said This is from Latin, and literally it means: "it does not follow."


0

How about "indifferent" or "oblivious", neither of which has the dark element you are looking for, but may actually reflect the district's true perspective on these teachers? Or, at the other end of the darkness scale, how about "nefarious", implying intentional evil, or "malevolent" or "malicious", implying intentional harm? In between, how about "...


0

I'd go for irreducible, "not reducible; incapable of being reduced or of being diminished or simplified further".


0

I try to get to the root of the problem. The root of any problem exists as the basis for all resulting and related things and issues. The root of a word is the basis of its evolution and usage in our language. Mathematically, a root is a component of an amount, part of a denominator, a multiplicand. The root is elemental


0

Often, a good antonym for compound is irreducible: Not able to be reduced or simplified (Oxford Dictionaries) Another word you might consider is simple, although it does have other meanings that might make it too vague for your purposes: Composed of a single element; not compound. (Oxford Dictionaries)


4

I think that the word atomic, which is often otherwise used in a physical sense, should be used here. atomic a·tom·ic /əˈtämik/ adjective of or relating to an atom or atoms. "the atomic nucleus" Chemistry(of a substance) consisting of uncombined atoms rather than molecules. "atomic hydrogen" of or forming a single irreducible unit or ...


-1

"Simplex" is another one that would work. "Simplex" derives from the same root as "simple," but is used more exclusively in the technical sense of being irreducible in form. I think "simplicity" is the noun form of both. It can be used to mean, "Freedom from division into parts."


0

Suffix -ed: Etymology From Middle English -ed, from Old English -od ‎(adjective suffix), from Proto-Germanic -ōdaz. While identical in appearance to the past participle of class 2 weak verbs, this suffix was attached directly to nouns without any intervening verb. Compare also Latin -ātus. Used to form adjectives from nouns, in the sense of having ...


0

Well if you really want to keep with the word animosity, it seems there is actually a word you can use (although I hadn't heard of it until 2 minutes ago and hostile is certainly a better word): animose (via thefreedictionary.com): Full of spirit; hot; vehement; resolute.


1

Animosity is also hostility. As such, hostile is the adjective you want in this case.


1

You could say successor and predecessor, meaning one who succeeds another, or is succeeded by another, respectively, with the verb "succeed" meaning "to replace, or follow on from" here. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/succeed http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/predecessor http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/successor Note that you ...


0

To answer your question very simply, fastly is unfortunately not a word! According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the proper adverb is simply fast. He ran as fast as he could. You could of course use "quickly" instead. You also might want to consider changing "riding" to "moving," simply because to ride is a transitive verb. Best of luck to you! —...


0

Small talk is the most common label I know off. :informal, friendly conversation about unimportant subjects Also to consider: chitchat : friendly conversation about things that are not very important


2

I think ferocious is a good descriptor here, and I often hear it in sporting contexts ('a ferocious slam dunk' or 'a ferocious slap shot'): very fierce or violent; very great or extreme


1

You could use the term edge count. It's slightly more compact than "number of edges". We thus compare two networks with the same edge count. We thus compare two networks that have equal edge counts. Edge Count The edge count of a graph g, commonly denoted M(g) or E(g) and sometimes also called the edge number, is the number of edges in g. In other ...


0

I have anxiety and I'm often very nervous around people I'm not familiar with. I find that "anxious" usually refers to a person who worries a lot about internal fears and issues, whereas the "nervous" person would be more afraid about the outside world. I can relate to both.


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self-effacing Meaning of self-effacing as stated by Google dictionary : tending to make oneself, one's actions, etc, inconspicuous, esp because of humility or timidity; modest


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As a climber, caver, and geoscientist, the lack of a commonly-used antonym for "steep" is a constant frustration! No appropriate word exists and frankly it's a big gaping hole in the English language. In geoscience, we use "low-angle" to refer to an outcrop or formation that is not steeply dipping (read about strike and dip for more on this). There is an ...


3

A: I cleared the exam. B: That's great "Great" is an adjective here; it is subjective predicative complement of the verb "be". It's called 'subjective' because it is ascribing the property of being "great" to the subject "that", which happens to be anaphoric to the preceding sentence. In other words A's utterance is the antecedent for B's "that", which ...


2

understated — M-W Avoiding obvious emphasis or embellishment "The actor's understated interpretation of the lead role is surprisingly compelling"


6

Modest — M-W Unassuming in the estimation of one’s abilities or achievements "Despite the magnitude of her work, I find Kate surprisingly down to earth and genuinely modest about the achievements she will leave behind when she hands over the reins on her 65th birthday."


1

Unaffected has the most attractive flavor as the opposite of pretentious, just as "free from affectation" would counter "drenched in pretense." Of course, "unpretentious" is an exact opposite, but its use could come across as staid or boring, or lazy, should one have occasion to express both characteristics next to or too near each other. Then again. there'...


0

scatterbrained (Of a person) disorganized and lacking in concentration.


1

This is called a resultative construction. You can look at the Wikipedia page or a detailed reference grammar for more details. In linguistics, a resultative is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as predicates of sentences, and are ...


14

Genuine (M-W) is mentioned by the OP, but there is an alternate definition which makes it more appropriate than other dismissed terms: free from hypocrisy or pretense


2

Though an answer has already been accepted (and Princeton University's Cognitive Science Lab interface, "WordNet," agrees with the choice of unpretentious as an antonym of pretentious), I would offer the following for those who might prefer to avoid the use of the prefix -un in this context for stylistic reasons: Because pretentious involves claiming a ...


3

Given its frequent usage of late, I'm surprised authentic (Merriam-Webster.com) hasn't been mentioned. 5 : true to one's own personality, spirit, or character


4

self-deprecating adjective 1. belittling or undervaluing oneself; excessively modest.


9

unaffected (dictionary.com) - 1. free from affectation; sincere; genuine: The man showed unaffected grief at the death of his former opponent. 2. unpretentious, as a personality or literary style.


33

down-to-earth, defined by Merriam-Webster informal and easy to talk to practical and sensible unpretentious -- Example: surprised to find the movie star so down–to–earth


4

Notorious might sound good in such context. Here's what Oxford American Dictionary says for "notorious": famous or well known, typically for some bad quality or deed.


6

upfront straightforward; frank Fits your second sentence as "...refreshingly upfront." Source: American Heritage® Dictionary


2

I know you're looking for an adjective, but maybe disparaged or derided would work as transitive verbs. From Merriam-Webster: disparage: verb, dis·par·age \di-ˈsper-ij, -ˈspa-rij\ : to describe (someone or something) as unimportant, weak, bad, etc.; transitive verb: to lower in rank or reputation : degrade to depreciate by indirect means (as ...


6

You might call this person infamous: well known for some bad quality or deed. "an infamous war criminal" synonyms: notorious, disreputable; legendary, fabled, famed "an infamous train robber" wicked; abominable. "the medical council disqualified him for infamous misconduct" synonyms: abominable, outrageous, shocking, ...


4

Perhaps easygoing (MW) adjective relaxed and informal It could work with your example sentence: The film lacked nuance and was refreshingly easygoing.


5

Why not disreputable ? Not respected or trusted by most people; having a bad reputation


33

Will unpretentious work? Not attempting to impress others with an appearance of greater importance, talent, or culture than is actually possessed: a friendly and unpretentious hotel in spite of his fame he was thoroughly unpretentious 1.1(Of a place) pleasantly simple and functional; modest. (Oxford Dictionaries Online)


2

I like the phrase "fickle weather" and use it myself for this exact purpose, but it's perhaps a bit more literary than saying "changeable weather", which also works well and will be understood by everyone (whereas 'fickle' is a lower frequency word than 'changeable' and it's not obvious what it means from its root). "Unpredictable weather" also works, but ...


1

You might consider saying "Many famous churches line this street." or "This street is lined with many famous churches." line [verb] Stand or be positioned at intervals along: ‘a processional route lined by people waving flags’


1

It's a roundabout answer, but OP asked me to post this. Nonkilling — Wiktionary adjective (not comparable) Not engaging in killing. noun ‎(usually uncountable, plural nonkillings) 1. A precept or worldview that affirms the possibility of a society where killing is absent. 2. Lack of killing; permitting to live. The knight with a no-kill ...


-1

Try not to end a sentence with a preposition (in this case, the preposition is 'on). I think the best option is probably: "This is a street which has many famous churches on it."



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