New answers tagged

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Based on comments, the answer would be self-aware, pragmatic, or wise.


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Leech a person who stays around other people and uses them for personal gain "they are leeches feeding off the hard-working majority" adj. leech-like Parasite a person or thing that takes something from someone or something else and does not do anything to earn it or deserve it "She's a parasite who only stays with him for the money." ...


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Non-sea salt sulphate, as non-sea is an adjective describing the salt and is independent of the "non-sea" (salt sulphate). Well, at least unless my chemistry knowledge is not non-existent, which it shouldn't be.


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The question isn't actually about "the" before adjectives: it is about plural articles. Both examples are grammatically correct, though the first one is more likely to be what you mean. The first example uses the definite article "the" to indicate a specific set of fellow writers (possibly ones that were introduced before). The second uses the indefinite ...


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This is called a nominalization, the result of making a noun out a word that isn't a noun. In this case, the word is the adjective nice, and the resulting noun niceness is the quality of being nice. In English we do this by making a morphological (i.e., form) change, in this case by adding the suffix-ness. There are a number of ways to do this: ...


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The sentence I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful is grammatically correct. But it would be much more natural (and simple) to insert the adjectives before the noun described: I want to be smart and beautiful, like you. The simplest way of writing or speaking English is nearly always the best way.


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The very last is an expression commonly used. Examples: He was the very last person to arrive at the meeting. This is the very last piece available for sale.


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The phrase older people is a euphemism for old people.


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Since you asked for an engineering application, consider: Over-engineered (adjective) unnecessarily complicated "systems are unreliable, manuals are impenetrable and products are over-engineered" Overengineering Overengineering (or over-engineering) is the designing of a product to be more robust or complicated than is necessary for its ...


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For software, the word we would use is bloated. It's easy to see how software gets bloated, and bureaucracy, but how does one arrive at such a situation in engineering?


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Depending on the context, perhaps fellow: "He was an amiable fellow". Using fellow intentionally avoids using 'boy', implying that the person isn't a boy or necessarily young. Likewise, I would think 'fellow' is too informal to describe an older person. Chap or gent could also work, as a child certainly isn't a "gent".


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I have heard programming languages described is minimal or minimalist. I bring up programming languages because describing a programming language as minimal versus terse would be two very different things. To my ears, a terse language implies one that takes few keystrokes to achieve a result (likely requiring short, but numerous, keywords), where as a ...


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I don't think it is used as an adjective. There is no example available in Ngram for the expression you are suggesting: "proceeding event". Adjectives normally used would be "next" or "following". Proceeding: It is a verb and a noun.


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Perhaps 'transfixed', though it doesn't have the entire meaning. Mary was focussed on her task.


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inhabited inhabit When you inhabit a place, you live there. When actors inhabit their roles, they seem to become the characters, no longer actors reciting their lines. It is like they live the life of the character. Vocabulary.com


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I'd say that the mirrors are all level. level [lev-uh l] adjective having no part higher than another; having a flat or even surface. being in a plane parallel to the plane of the horizon; horizontal.


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Immersed is the most fitting one I can think of that hasn't been mentioned. "Immersed in battle" lands me 3310 hits on google book search, though it isn't clear if they refer to it in a more literal sense. immersed involve oneself deeply in a particular activity or interest.


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Here are your two sentences with the correct use of articles, and I've tried to explain my reasoning afterwards. In fact, I only added the indefinite article "a" to "regional perspective" and the rest was already correct. The key to successful business development in this industry is understanding the market from a regional perspective as Canada is a ...


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Let's not deal with nomenclature in grammar for a moment unless the "grammatical justification" you're looking for is just some name tags such as 'adjective', 'determiner', etc. I hope you aren't, because that's not what's important. What's important is the meaning of the word 'another', I think. As Araucaria said, another means "an other," and it used to ...


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There is no real evidence apart from the convention of writing it that way, that the string another is one word. It is two words written together as one: an and other. If you look at it that way, the problem becomes easier to set out. English will only allow one central Determiner in a noun phrase. These are words like a(n), the, some, my, any and so forth. ...


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Saying another after their is a bit like saying "next" when you haven't even started. You need a first before you start on a second. Use another only when adding to some other thing. You're both right. Another is a possessive pronoun and a determiner. determiner A determiner (also called determinative) is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs ...


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Malevolent and negligent come to mind malevolent 1: having, showing, or arising from intense often vicious ill will, spite, or hatred "Malevolent." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. negligent 1 a : marked by or given to neglect especially habitually or culpably 1 b : failing to exercise the care expected of a ...


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It's difficult to find a single adjective here that conveys both sentiments. I would suggest using the words "predatory", "propensity" and "swindling". It's not the shortest way to convey what you're looking for, but I think it works. You could structure you sentence like this: "Mr. Smith, a predatory attorney with a propensity for swindling the elderly, ...


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My first attempt: "Mr. Smith was a senility profiteering attorney who duped my Dad into signing over his assets by having him change his legal paperwork to make Mr. Smith his POA." In this case, you may be trading off word economy, grammar, interpretation, and most importantly, impact. I assume impact and emotional effect is the sole purpose of making ...


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My intuitive response to the above question is to consider that the difference between the meaningfulness of "melancholy" vs. "melancholic" has everything to do with speaker's context and the social distancing and/or intimacy of register, rather than adjective-ness or noun-ness. My first encounter with the the word "melancholy" was in 1972 (I was four) as ...


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More common in this instance would be to use species as a noun adjunct - maintain species diversity. There is a difference in usage between special (adj) and species (adjunct). And then there is the problem of confusion regarding the sense of special. See the quote below on regulations concerning species of special concern. Increased Flexibility via ...


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That would be special. Constituting or relating to a species. 'The seven dark spots is a special property unique to Coccinella septempunctata.' It was asked before on http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=2142703 References: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/special#Adjective http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/special


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I'd call it polite conversation. It's difficult to find good references for this use, which is a bit idiomatic. Polite conversation can also be a literal thing, and you can find plenty of advise on how to conduct polite conversation at parties etc. The alternatives tend to be dismissive regarding the lack of heft, and there is no reason to be dismissive ...


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If you were describing the salt, it would be sea salt or non-sea salt. As you're making the whole of non-sea salt into a compound adjective, (as a pendantic Brit) I agree with you & would say that the entire compound adjective should be hyphenated, for clarity amongst other reasons, hence I suggest non-sea-salt sulphate. It may be more 'ugly' but it's ...


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How about abstract? If you look at: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/abstract Under full definition and in part b, it talks about how abstract means difficult to understand.


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I've just stumbled upon this having had cause to research the word myself. It's not something that I'd use myself as I think it sounds clumsy and, as has already been demonstrated here, there are better alternatives. But, I'd argue that it is a perfectly valid word. An ngram viewer search shows it (and 'ununderstood') in use for the last 200 years with ...


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This is a distinction without a difference. Anything that is properly "used as an adjective" is an adjective. Participles, which may serve as adjectives or nouns, are a type of verbal. Verbals also include gerunds, which function as nouns, and infinitives, which can function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. In no case do verbals function as verbs. In your ...


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I would see ageing as an adjective (in form of a present participle). And OALD also says it can be used as adjective (only attributive before a noun). But ageing can also be a noun meaning the process of growing old. But in your example the noun doesn't fit. The spelling can also be aging (AmE, BrE). ...


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I am a Women's Studies graduate. The reasoning of feminist writers is simple: "women" are human beings who are gendered female. Non-human animals (e.g. sheep, cows, pigs) and some physical objects (e.g. ships, countries) can also be gendered female in the English language (e.g. "Titanic's maiden voyage began shortly after noon on 10 April 1912 when she ...


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It's a slang term, but in this case it means broken or defective. Adjective busted ‎(comparative more busted, superlative most busted) (slang) Broken. Source: Wiktionary.org It should also be noted that the term 'internal radar' here is used in the figurative sense: Noun radar ‎(countable and uncountable, plural radars) ...


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All the comments are trying to find a grammatical reason for "women characters". There is none. "women characters" comes from the same people who coined "herstory". (See Wikipedia, herstory) The difference is that herstory is witty and women characters is clunky. The Wikipedia article on the Amazons refers to them as woman warriors. In Greek ...


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Perhaps a more natural example will illustrate the syntax. Consider the preparation for painting a wall: [1] I scraped the wall bare. [2] I barely scraped the wall. In [1], bare is an adjectival complement describing the condition of the wall. When I'm done, I end up with a bare wall. In [2], barely is an adverb telling us the manner in which I did ...


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Teflon would work in some situations. It refers to the non-stick characteristics of PTFE (trade named Teflon). characterized by imperviousness to blame or criticism: a Teflon politician. Dictionary.com The term is often applied to politicians who run into trouble with scandals or faux pas. In the 1980s Mafia figure John Gotti was nicknamed the ...


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renewed - give fresh life or strength to


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Scarcity: insufficiency or shortness of supply; dearth. (Dictionary.com) ...on the scarcity of female astronomers..


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paucity paucity1 1. Smallness of number; fewness. 2. Scarcity; dearth: a paucity of natural resources. "I am writing a story on the paucity of female astronomers..." 1 American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt ...


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Comeback itself works as an adjective, if you rephrase the sentence to avoid duplicating it. Some professional sports leagues have a "Comeback Player" award to recognize players who overcame a period of injury or poor performance. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Football_League_Comeback_Player_of_the_Year_Award ...


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I like bouncebackability It has connotations in sport. It perhaps appropriate.


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Resilient The Resilient man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing the game winning shot.


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Emboldened Emboldened, the man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing a game winning shot.


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Renascent (rising again as to new life and vigor, from Wordnet) (or revived)


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rejuvenated: Make (someone or something) look or feel younger, fresher, or more lively Oxford Dictionaries.


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Indomitable Something indomitable can't be beat. People described as having indomitable spirits don't need pep talks or protein shakes; their strength comes from within. -- vocabulary.com While typically associated with 'spirit' it works well in your sentence. The indomitable man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing the game ...


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Can the word order change slightly? Unperturbed, the man came back, worked harder, then succeeded after missing the game winning shot.



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