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Neural is the adjective for nerve and neuronal is the adjective for neuron. Neural means dealing with nerves or the nervous system. Neuronal means dealing specifically with neurons.


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This is nothing to do with adjectives. It is about two different noun-modification patterns. In the Media field, field is a common noun, and Media serves as a modifier in the noun phrase. It is parallel with huge numbers of expressions such as the corner house, and the television programme. In the field Media, Media is effectively a proper noun (the ...


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I would say he's amiable. This suggests he is approachable and easy to talk to.


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"Sounding board" is a commonly used phrase. For example, "Bob used Jack as a sounding board" means that Bob was comfortable describing problems to Jack. It also means that Bob could safely describe his opinions to Jack, before presenting his opinions to potentially hostile audiences. In other words, Bob finds Jack to be easy-to-talk to, and helps Bob ...


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English has names for light blue. You just may not know them. The most common is cyan, like the open sky at sea level. Cyan is a very important color because it is one of the three primary colors in the CMY color model. English words for light blue include celeste, cyan, watchet, fesse, pervenche, periwinkle, and zircon — plus others less common. English ...


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Maybe I've misunderstood the situation, but I am puzzled as to why you would be writing directly to the family of your business partner rather than addressing it to the partner (with a mention of their family). Certainly, I think that would be unusual in Britain and the US. If you wanted to explicitly include the partner's family in your New Year letter, I ...


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I think kindred would do. It means: one's family and relations.


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It can be seen in military terminology, presumably originally from lists to make related items appear together when sorted alphabetically, e.g. 'meals, ready-to-eat' (MREs), 'airman, basic', 'sergeant major'. See also this question: when-can-an-adjective-be-postposed


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Sociable is an alternative, and one that I'd use. Although it doesn't specifically imply that they're easy to talk to, it does connote that they're comfortable in all social situations. "Have you talked to the new guy yet? He's very sociable." You could also use social in this way. "willing to talk and engage in activities with other people; ...


1

A person who is easy to talk to and is approachable is- 'affable'. Affable is an adjective. Source- English Oxford Dictionary and internet search. The word is derived from the latin word-"affābilis".


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The loosely related word congenial comes to mind; adjective (of a person) pleasing or liked on account of having qualities or interests that are similar to one's own. Congenial does of course imply a specificity to oneself rather than a more generalized 'easy-to-talk-to-ness', on account of mutual interests. Source


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Half the responses here have included "friendly" in their definitions. I'd propose it as an actual answer.


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In this usage, "phonetics" is simply a singular noun, much like "mathematics" or "physics". In addition, English doesn't have "plural adjectives". And, yes, your sentence makes sense and is grammatically correct. If you are writing this for an expert audience, you might want to consider a word that more precisely conveys your meaning, but a general ...


5

While Affable is clearly the most precise match... Personable is often used as a synonym and is still in general use. per·son·able adjective \ˈpərs-nə-bəl, ˈpər-sə-nə-bəl\ : friendly or pleasant in manner : easy to get along with source


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The word contemporary perhaps? belonging to or occurring in the present. It's not exactly an opposite, but may still be more fitting depending on the context - it's not trendy, but still sufficiently 'modern' to be considered 'normal'.


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I think @DavidRitcherby has it correctly; trendy is not the same as trend. Trend implies a growing consensus that this is the best approach (whereas trendy is something the elite adopt), the OP sentence uses trend rather than trendy so the suggestion is that in 2014 SOA went from a bleeding edge technology to one that had gained a lot of credibility, which ...


1

Vulnerable 1 comes to mind when you say "they can ask stupid questions fearlessly." Brené Brown's 2 extensive research has captured a contemporary sense of vulnerability: "Vulnerability is not weakness, and that myth is profoundly dangerous. Vulnerability is the birthplace of invitation, innovation and change...Vulnerability is our most accurate ...


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An intellectual, a philosopher, a thinker.....


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Empathetic people connect deeply with the folks around them. ADJECTIVE Showing an ability to understand and share the feelings of another: ORIGIN from Greek empatheia from em- 'in' + pathos 'feeling' Here is how it might apply at the office: His empathetic response defused the emotional bomb ticking in the office. Compassionate is the ...


3

Cogitative is a fancy way of saying to think hard about. a cogitative woman who was given to long silences... My pick on synonyms: meditative, pensive, reflective, ruminative, thoughtful Related Words: serious, philosophical (philosophic); analytic (or analytical), preoccupied.


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In the US we often use the expression, "Still waters run deep" to describe someone who is unusually quiet and seems to be always lost in thought. The single word philosopher is also used (often in a somewhat sarcastic way) to refer to a contemplative person, or someone who remains silent while others are in a lively or heated discussion: "Your baby is so ...


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I'd offer retro. You have trendy clothing and retro clothing - both are stylish, but the latter is from a previous era. of or designating the style of an earlier time: retro clothes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retro_style


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Indolent and lackadaisical are both excellent adjectives to describe the material appearance of your friend's expenditure of effort. But what strikes me about your description is the dichotomy in fundamental motivation. There is a certain type of student (arguably the majority in higher education) who are very good at doing school work simply because they ...


0

Again not an adjective, but you might also say that such a person "invites confidences."


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I happen to have a different take on the entire statement, I might be completely off the mark here. (In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 can become ______ in 2015 The first part of the statement, (In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. it gives me the idea that SOA ...


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contemplative (merriam-webster online) adjective given to or marked by long, quiet thinking a contemplative person who likes to go on solitary walks the contemplative life of the monks at the abbey Synonyms broody, cogitative, meditative, melancholy, musing, pensive, reflective, ruminant, ruminative, thoughtful See also: contemplative (ODO) ...


21

I would probably choose "approachable". You almost used it in your "Edit" paragraph, and I think it describes exactly the concept you're describing.


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Affable: (from TFD) Easy and pleasant to speak to; approachable. From Etymonline we gain insight into the reason "Affable" might work to describe "people who are easy to talk to": late 15c., from Old French afable (14c.) from Latin affabilis "approachable, courteous, kind,friendly," literally "who can be (easily) spoken to," ...


3

This isn't an adjective, but a very common English expression would call the person in question a good listener. It implies everything you're trying to describe above, about the person being very "talk to-able". Unfortunately, it's not a single word, but it is short, and very common.


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$0.02: But what is trendy in 2014 can become the norm in 2015.


4

I suggest the word bonhomous which means possessing an approachable disposition; very easy to talk to. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/bonhomous http://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/bonhomous http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bonhomie


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Conversational could be a generic adjective to describe a person who is easy to talk with. ADJECTIVE Consisting of or relating to conversation: "Her conversational demeanor convinced the boss to promote her." ORIGIN from Latin conversationem "act of living with," past participle stem of conversari "to live with, keep company with," ...


1

Part One Hungry is here used as an adjective. In the case of the verb be, it takes substantives (nouns or pronouns) or adjectives in its predicate complement, NOT adverbs. You cannot say “I am *soon.” or “I am *often.” as complete sentences with a period/full stop following: both those are wrong. This is because you cannot use an adverb to modify be any ...


0

I would say the story had an unsatisfying ending. This gives no connotation that the story is incomplete in any official way, just that it fails to satisfy one's personal subjective sense of how it should have ended. A google search of "unsatisfying ending" yields many results that conform to your requirements. Here is a list of books with 'unsatisfying ...


1

Since you are using trendy as a shorthand for "not widely adopted", my suggestion would be to change trendy to merely trendy. This primes the reader that trendy is the more negative of the two words, i.e. being mainstream or common or whatever word you insert into the blank is more desirable than being trendy.


0

In addition to "commonplace", "classic", and "normal" (which other posters have suggested), you might also consider "old-hat" or "just another tool in the toolbox". "Old-hat" has connotations of "something recognizable, comfortable, and easy-to-use" rather than "the opposite of what is in fashion". "Passé", "old-school", and "old fashioned" have the ...


1

How about "staid" defined by http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/staid as of settled or sedate character; not flighty or capricious.


0

passé. adjective 1. no longer fashionable, in wide use, etc.; out-of-date; outmoded. (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/passe) That is the antonym I'd use for "trendy"... but it doesn't appear to be what you're actually looking for. "Old-School" might fit your needs better. Or "commonplace".


6

If without a negative connotation I think the word classic is appropriate.


1

It should be better written as a/the free-of-charge financial aid. It does not matter if it is a definite, indefinite or free of any article preceding the phrase. Usually, it is a good practice to hyphenate a phrase, when the phrase itself becomes an adjectival/adverbial phrase. Examples of adjectival phrases free-of-charge: Do you think you can simply ...


2

The most idiomatic usage of 'free of charge' is at the end of a sentence. "I'll allow you to stay free of charge." "The cigars are free of charge." The phrase is rather clumsy outside of advertisements. In place of 'free of charge,' there are single word alternatives with equivalent meanings. Complimentary and gratis work well. The word 'free' is also ...


5

Normal. "(In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 can become normal in 2015" If I could impose some stylistic changes, I might phrase the sentence as follows: "(In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 may merely be normal by 2015" The ...


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If you're not looking for outmoded or unfashionable, I suggest "commonplace". Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 can become commonplace in 2015" commonplace (adj) - an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new. Merriam-Webster


6

I think standard may fit the context suggested: commonly used or supplied; "standard car equipment", "a standard service".


2

The fact that 'misper' is an acknowledged (if slang) shortened form of 'missing person', as shown in Wiktionary misper English Noun (plural mispers) (police slang, term of art in private investigations) a missing person shows that compounding is accepted for this concept. Though the 'rules' can be rather arbitrary; (5) I want a baked ...


2

Some dictionaries (OALD, Cambridge, Collins) have entries for missing person as a noun. Consequently, missing is not considered an adjective here. According to these dictionaries, the correct plural form is missing persons.


1

The difference between missing persons and missing people would be that missing persons means that the individuals that are considered here as persons are missing. Where it shows individuality. But missing people is more like a group of people missing. Hence I would say that "Missing person" would not be considered as a phrase and "Missing" here would be ...


3

There is wayworn as a single word. (also way-worn). The usage of the word has declined in recent decades but there is still contemporary usage. [See: Google Ngram] worn or wearied by travel: She was wayworn after the long trip. [Dictionary.com] OED lists the figurative usage also: fig. 1848 Thackeray Vanity Fair liii. 478 ...


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Enervated - means exhausted or worn out Languid means drooping The child was enervated after a long drive in the car. The child seemed languid after a long hard day of visiting relatives Websters dictionary


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Road fatigue and the more general term travel fatigue describe the adverse effects of travel on one's system. From Wikipedia: Travel fatigue is general fatigue, disorientation and headache caused by a disruption in routine, time spent in a cramped space with little chance to move around, a low-oxygen environment, and dehydration caused by limited food ...



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