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Another possibility is ebullient: ebullience - Vocabulary.com Bubbly, loud, and enthusiastic: ebullience means "the quality of being cheerful and full of energy." synonyms: exuberant, buoyant, cheerful, joyful, cheery, merry, sunny, breezy, jaunty, light-hearted, in high spirits, high-spirited, exhilarated, elated, euphoric, ...


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You can say the woman is "rumbustious" ("Uncontrollably exuberant" - TFD) "rumbustiously outspoken" "rumbustiously spontaneous" Brian Donovan's answer, "boisterous", is a single word and fits better what you are looking for, though.


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I would describe the way the woman in the video expresses herself as emphatic: speaking or acting in a forceful way. forceful and definite in expression or action. (from W-W)


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The adjective boisterous might well answer. OED offers “Abounding in rough but good-natured activity bordering upon excess, such as proceeds from unchecked exuberance of spirits”; Merriam-Webster makes it “very noisy and active in a lively way.”


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I concur with Mr. Lawler, but I would recommend inserting the definite article, particularly in the second example. Please pay by the due date. Please pay by the date due.


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In spite of knowing the warnings against making assumptions, I'm going to base my answer on the following assumptions: 1 - That if she had said "Booked" and nothing more after you enthusiastically responded "Ok, see you then [Saturday] anytime!" you would have interpreted this to mean that she was arriving on Saturday; 2 - That your "specifying" that ...


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"To communicate effectively" is the preferred option, as it avoids splitting the infinitive. Splitting the infinitive means that a word intrudes between "to" and the verb (in this case, "communicate").


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I would mirror Cindy's answer: she provides two different pieces of information, an arrival day and a departure day, so neither overrides the other; the relative strength of "can" and "will" don't come into it. She does not say whether Monday is when she must depart her current location to reach your location, or when she must depart your location for some ...


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I'm not sure I understand where the problem is, but if she said she could make it on Saturday, then she meant to be at your place on Saturday. The later statement that she would leave on Monday comes after she has spent some time thinking about the plan, and has decided she has to leave her place on Monday in order to keep the appointment on Saturday, or ...


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Yes, it is used for non-humans, as in "the wolves prey upon the deer, watching for the young and the wounded". It can be used for non-living things: "He collected paintings, preferring the dour and the gilt-framed." I think not, as it would be impossible to tell the plural from the singular in this situation.


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Nongravid means not pregnant according to the Merriam Webster dictionary http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/nongravid


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You could say "[element/molecule X] has a high affinity for [element/molecule Y]".


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This being chemistry, unstable is commonly used in place of highly reactive. The Free Dictionary: Chemistry a. Decomposing readily. b. Highly or violently reactive. See also: Chemical stability


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This is Chemistry. Pyrophoric-adj.,capable of igniting spontaneously in air. (dictionary.reference.com) py·ro·phor·ic (pī′rə-fôr′ĭk) adj. 1. Spontaneously igniting in air.2. Producing sparks by friction. Origin-Pyrophoric entered English in the late 1700s from the Greek root pyrophóros meaning "fire-bearing." (etymonline.com) I couldn't find ...


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Would "volatile"be a possibility? That would be "reactive" in the sense of unstable, but might be relevant given your context.


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Unperturbed is not an adjective in that sentence. An adverb answers how an action happens or happened, or in this case how "he" continued. How did he continue? Unperturbed. Unperturbed can also be used as an adjective, specifically a participial: The unperturbed snail continued to inch along. Hopefully that clears up your confusion. Take away this: The ...


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AHDEL (and Collins Cobuild) disagree with the dogmatic 'due to must be preceded by and followed by a noun phrase' It offers [bolding mine]: due to prep. Because of. Usage Note: Due to has been widely used for many years as a compound preposition like owing to, but some critics have insisted that due should be used only as an adjective. ...


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Owing to and because of are interchangeable; they are slightly different from due to, since the latter is preceded and followed by a noun phrase. he vomited because of eating rotten food he vomited owing to / on account of eating rotten food his vomit is due to the eating of rotten food


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"The differences are too profound for them to continue to meet", or "The differences are too stark for them to continue to meet", or "The differences are too pronounced for them to continue to meet", or "The differences are too great for them to continue to meet".


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The closest word for your meaning is divisive - a statement or belief that alienates people.


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Due to the fact that the English adjective has no endings for gender, case and numerus (singular/plural) it can become unclear when used without noun. So the system is to use adjective + noun or adjectve + one/ones when the noun is dropped. There are only two possibilities to use the adjective (adj) without noun or one/ones. 1 the beautiful, the sublime, ...


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I would say -ness is a suffix that can be added to any adjective. The corresponding German suffix -nis can also be added to verbs or nouns, e.g. zeugen or Zeuge + nis gives Zeugnis. Astonishingly, if read backwards, English -ness gives -sen. I think it is connected with German sein (to be) and the idea of illness would be "the ill-being (das Krank-Sein). ...


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If your goal is to reduce the repetitive wording, you could use an alternate construction, like: I am sufficiently drunk, fast, and dumb that it just might work!


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Taciturn. adjective (of a person) reserved or uncommunicative in speech; saying little. synonyms: untalkative, uncommunicative, reticent, unforthcoming, quiet, secretive, tight-lipped, buttoned-up, close-mouthed


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I am drunk-, fast- and dumb enough that it just might work! Hanging hyphens are normally used to be parallel with a hyphenated compound (e.g. "ninetheenth- and twentieth-century writers"). There's no such hypenated compound after the conjunction and so this is very strange and hard to understand. I am drunk, fast and dumb enough that it just might ...


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Removing the first and second "enough" wouldn't necessarily change the meaning. Given the context of "drunk" - which is an unusual word to use in a positive way - the general assumption would be that "enough" applies to all three items. Edit: Also, the dashes would be unnecessary in your example, because of the natural assumption.


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"It's not a primarian interest" He means that when he writes the lyrics for a song, his main objective is not to insert hidden jokes, although he admits he does that too. Edit - "primarian" is not a word you can find in mainstream dictionaries, but it's been used colloquially (correctly or not) by some people to mean "primary" (of chief importance, ...


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"Monosyllabic" is often used for a person who deals in one word answers: technically it refers to words of a single syllable, but if is often extended to include single word, or curt, answers.


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See the list of synonyms at laconic here: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/laconic Laconic adj. Using or marked by the use of few words; terse or concise.


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"not very talkative" might fit.


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The right word choice depends as much on connotation as definition. You're inviting someone to converse, and your invitation is being declined. I get the idea that you feel you're being rebuffed, and you want a word to describe the mostly monosyllabic responses you get in that light. "Curt" comes to mind. It strongly connotes discourtesy. "Brusque" is a ...


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"tight-lipped" "closed-mouthed" "reticent"


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This is interesting! First, we are looking for a word that describes the trait of welcoming and being open to criticism. Accepting, receptive, open-minded, criticism-tolerant, all convey the meaning, but only "criticism-tolerant" is self-contained in the sense that no further words need to be added to link to "criticism". (I recall that the words I used with ...


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I'd say a good term would be: open minded. Not necessarily because of the strict dictionary definition, but because in these days it takes an uncommon open-mindness and inner strength to tolerate or even welcome criticism. Those looking at a negative connotation of "tolerate criticism" are "modern days thinkers", who have been teached a destructive approach ...


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It depends very much on whether the criticism is destructive or constructive. Some people find reason to destructively criticize anything. Suppose the leader of some country finds THE cure to cancer, not just one kind of cancer, but the cure to all cancers. Someone from an opposing political faction in that country is inevitably going to find fault with ...


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I would call the quality "equanimity," especially if the criticism were harsh or unfair. "When the critic wrote that the chef's soup might have been previously used as window cleaner, the chef reacted with suprising equanimity, saying 'He's right - I wasn't on my game that night.'"


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It seems, from the top two answers here by Brett and Oerkelens, that the functions and parts of speech of this sentence are two completely different types of thing . So, we can have nouns, for example, functioning as subjects, objects or temporal adjuncts (read "adverbials"). It should be possible therefore to do an analysis of the sentence solely in terms ...


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Other than "egoless" (suggested above), the best term I could think of was "unpretentious".


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Taking Oxford Dictionaries as one available for free: You’re more than due for a vacation uses 1.2(Of a person) having reached a point where the thing mentioned is required or owed: Hence: You have spend too much time not on vacation, and it is about time you took one. But You’re more than due a vacation uses 1.3(Of a thing) ...


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Abstract The example expression can be redistributed in the following structure: [Subject][Verb][Object][Modifiers] Each phrase serving one of the above mentioned purpose is further sub-divided in to individual parts of speech. Result Description Structure of an expression can be deduced by understanding the following: Meaning Grammar ...


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People sometimes misunderstand the intentions of others; to be a critic isn't necessarily to have a degrading opinion of others. Think about movie critics for example, it is possible to give a good review, but their profession is to detail the good, the bad, and the ugly. To be of critical, or skeptical, nature is not necessarily to give detrimental ...


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As there isn't a specific context given, I'm going to suggest a self-explanatory term: criticism-tolerant. It is a neologism and not a common word but everyone would understand. I thought about it first but someone had already thought about it before me as it is used in a few sources. Two of them are as below: If criticism were an object, some people ...


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Maybe malleable. You might see this word about someone being mentored.


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I have heard people with this (highly desirable) character trait referred to as "egoless".


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A wild-goose chase. I was under the impression that the OP was looking for a noun (phrase).


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Something occurred to me just after I answered. I also know some people who 'nod and agree' all the time and never defend their position. I would call these people easy going or yes people. See here:


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Some people I know are open to criticism and really welcome it. I have heard such people been referred to as genuine intellects or true academics. I accept criticism all of the time, but sometimes defend my position. When I do accept criticism, I would call myself the learner, the the critic, the teacher. What is the context?


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Perhaps the word that you are looking for is Amenable http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/amenable?searchDictCode=all Or, if you want to show the person in a positive light, you mean he (or she) is an Accepting person or individual. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/accepting


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I'd like to suggest two words. The first one is a variation of the word "Imagination", more specifically "Imaginative". Because [this word] conveys positive emotions and, hopefully, invites the user to try things. It hints that the limit is the imagination of the user. The second one is a variation of the word "Open" or "Openness" but this takes context ...



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