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0

Agrodolce is used in culinary language as sour and sweet. I think it also could mean sad and happy, an event that is both an ending and a beginning like high school graduation.


-2

Depending on context: alive alive adjective 2 a : still in existence, force, or operation : effective at least to a degree : not dead, defunct, or extinct : existent, active b : still in use : current to a degree : still exerting force or influence c bowls : in play : not dead d : still active in competition ...


0

I would use the term: multibrancher http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00371-005-0280-8 Subdivision method to create furcating object with multibranches


-1

Facile: done or achieved in a way that is too easy. This is a subtle usage of the word. Facile is a derogative way of saying something is easy, even if it has not yet been achieved.


1

There isn't one. In the technical context of the OP's full question there is no accepted single word technical term. Many of the words mentioned are great for general responses, especially in terms of the question title, but would be questionable usage in a more specific technical context. If this is referring to a tree graph structure specifically, it ...


-2

How come descendants hasn't come up? All of the "children" have ancestors therefore the ancestors have many descendants whether or not they are actually offspring.


0

Study frequencies at Google Books (not vanilla Google): "a Fiction Film and" About 4,180 results "a Fictional Film and" About 1,210 results I'm using "and" to force phrase termination and to avoid its use as a noun pre-modifier. I'd choose the first, as it also avoid the ambiguity pointed out by Peter Shor.


-1

Bespoke is indeed a popular British term for anything custom made. The word is (IMHO) over-used by academics and consultants there to refer to anything from a piece of engineering to a business process. In translating documents to American, I typically replace Bespoke with Custom.


-3

The correct grammar of a film club devoted to fiction would be the "Fictional Film Club" and you are correct. The creator of the club most likely didn't even know he had a grammar error! Not everyone has perfect grammar. Hope this helps!


2

Here are a few specialized constructions of this sort: We do not think it necessary to go. ("think it A" where "A" is an adjective) Some people do not think it important to be thrifty. (same as above) She did not wish him to think it possible. (same as above) I think it fair that ... (same as above) I thought it over carefully. ...


1

Philoprogenitive is the word. Having many offspring. [OD] Another option is multi-child and it is suitable for your context as well. Here is an example usage: The optimal algorithm is suitable for the cases when the given DFG has a small number of multi-parent and multi-child nodes. Real-Time Embedded Systems: Optimization, Synthesis, and ...


0

I would profer populous. full of residents or inhabitants, as a region; heavily populated. Unlike prolific or fecund, it doesn't imply that the populous object created the descendant entities. Instead, it has many. (As @Joe brought up in the comments on the OP, foster/adopted families can have many children, which is another situation where the family ...


2

For hierarchical data structures I use Bushy to indicate dense connections to child data. as opposed to Gangly to indicate sparse connections to child data.


0

With respect of the context being a data structure, just about any term is going to confuse - as a programmer for many years, I've never had a conversation with anyone or seen any written reference where a 'fertile' concept has been applied to a data structure. The structure itself is not 'fertile' - it has capabilities to have zero or more siblings and so ...


-2

Promiscuous? adjective 1. characterized by or involving indiscriminate mingling or association, especially having sexual relations with a number of partners on a casual basis. 2. consisting of parts, elements, or individuals of different kinds brought together without order. 3. indiscriminate; without discrimination. 4. casual; irregular; ...


0

You could always coin something. The Greek word polyteknos (πολύτεκνος) describes someone who is the parent of three or more children. Nobody will actually understand what you mean unless you define it, but there is a long tradition of importing Greek words into English. You will be in good company.


1

My suggestion would be to use rich and to introduce it's usage in your text by means of a definition e.g.: Definition (rich): A node with at least 3 children is called *rich*. While I can't find a single-word in english denoting "having (possessing) many children" there is a german word for it: kinderreich. This literally translates to rich in children. ...


7

A tree is a special kind of graph, so I'd go with the standard terminology for a graph, which is saying that your node has a high (or large) degree. You lose the parent/child metaphor, but I think your readers will understand you better.


0

Using the notion of “assigned” mentioned in your question, maybe “over-assigned”/”under-assigned” (like University dorm rooms sometimes are) would work since you're talking about things and not people. If “over/under” are too judgmental, maybe you could hyphenate “heavily-assigned” and “sparsely-assigned” and even throw in “unassigned” on the other ...


-1

Presumptuous or pretentious are two possible words to describe with.


4

I'd say: dense My reasoning is that a tree where each node has one child is a degenerate tree, from there I see that such a tree is "sparse". You're looking for the opposite of that, and an antonym of sparse is dense. Also there's some technical definition of "dense" to back that up.


17

Given what OP has described in the comments, I think branching node would be ideal. We're referring to a node which has branches. We could modify it to highly branching node to clarify we're specifically talking about nodes with a lot of branches.


10

Given that the structure you're trying to describe is a data tree, it would make sense to use a tree metaphor. You might try Burgeoning burgeoning begin[ning] to grow, as a bud; put[ting] forth buds, shoots, etc., as a plant Because the tree is specifically a data tree, Polyadic would also work. polyad A group consisting of an indeterminate ...


24

Your question seems not to be about a general family situation but about the technical situation with data structures in computer science. In the latter case, a binary tree is for internal nodes with two children, ternary for three. The generalization is then multiary for many children. Other, similar ways of saying this are _n- ary (for an arbitrary ...


17

Might not be quite correct but as a fellow programmer I would say Abundant Richly supplied; wealthy; possessing in great quantity. - From Wikipedia


-2

Given the edits to the original question: Prolix extended to great, unnecessary, or tedious length - Dictionary.com


13

In medicine, the adjective multiparous is used to describe a woman who has had more than one child. It is also used in biology to describe species that normally give birth to multiple offspring at once (like a litter of puppies).


47

fecund: producing or able to produce many babies, young animals, or plants - Merriam-Webster


64

Merriam-Webster gives prolific: 1 : producing young or fruit especially freely : fruitful The source is Latin proles meaning "offspring".


2

Syntactically, it is an adjective: only an adjective (or adverb) can follow that in this sense (= 'so', or 'as xxx as that'). But like Hot Licks, I can barely understand what it is supposed to mean, because soliciting as a description of an attitude or mental state makes no sense to me. I guess it is supposed to mean attractive or appealing, but I'm not ...


1

The word "undistinguishable" is not used in modern English. Nowadays we use the word "indistinguishable" instead. However, the word "undistinguishable" does appear twice in the collected works of Shakespeare (once in A Midsummer Night's Dream and once in A Lover's Complaint).


4

Some English verbs can be used in a verb + adjective structure. The copula, be, is obviously one (I am cold). Verbs used functionally purely as a link between the subject and an adjective (or noun: I am John) have been called link verbs by some, although some say this approach is unacceptably simplistic (see John Lawler's comments in the What are all the ...


2

This is use of the verb "Play" without an object Verb (used without object) To conduct oneself or act in a specified way: to play fair. www.dictionary.com


1

The that is redundant. You could do away with it. Otherwise it's fine. Wow, that was the most philosophical I-don't-care-you're-not-a-virgin explanation I've ever heard.


1

Just to follow up on the comments by Anonym, Cerberus, and John Lawler, here is the account of the prefix ad- in Michael Quinion, Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and Endings (2002): ad- Motion or direction to; reduction or change into; addition, increase, or intensification {Latin ad, to} Many loanwords from Latin containing this prefix took on a ...


1

A relic. Per dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/relic?s=t): "1. a surviving memorial of something past. 2. an object having interest by reason of its age or its association with the past: a museum of historic relics. 3. a surviving trace of something:"


0

You're kind of Metagaming. You're not cheating at the game though, since you made up the rules. If you want to expand the rules and say that the inherent difficulty of the quiz matters then you would have a low score.


2

I appears it is because of its etymology, from the genitive of abdomen, (and the French abdominal), abdominal: 1550s, from medical Latin abdominalis, from abdomen (genitive abdominis). (etymonline)


0

Cheesing is one that's gained popularity recently, particularly in the gaming community, but I think it can be applied to anything. It refers to exploiting the game in a way that goes against the spirit of the game, whilst still being technically not cheating or breaking any rules.


1

As an alternative to gaming the system, playing the system sounds more natural to me in British English. As well as exploiting a loophole in the rules, I'd like to offer creative interpretation of the rules and abuse of the rules. The International Obfuscated C Code Contest (a programming contest) offers a an award for "worst abuse of the rules" which was ...


0

A clause used by a former President of the United States to describe this approach to making a comment or a statement is, "legally accurate but not volunteering information."


0

Gaming As in Gaming the System. You technically following the rules but not the intent.


0

Easygoing. Seán is really easygoing and it would take a lot to phase him.


0

According to Dictionary.com, both "despicable" and "despisable" are acceptable, however "despicable" tends to mean deserving to be despised.


-2

Perhaps "Gaining an edge" or "Gaining an advantage".


1

Literal interpretation/bending the rules might also work. Roll a dice, the highest number wins. Player 1 rolls a six. Player 2 rolls a five. Player 3 takes out a 20 sided dice and rolls a 19. Player 3 is not cheating, since the rules don't state what dice to roll, but that's not what the rules intended.


4

Ever-changing adjective: ever-changing; adjective: everchanging constantly changing or developing. the key is adapting to the ever-changing conditions --Google search define operation (ever-changing)


1

The gaming term is that the game has a big replay value Replay value - wiki


-1

A Gentle Introduction to Complexity-based Cryptography. This is the canonical English expression for such a title.


0

My feeling is that adjectival noun are usually singular Right on How come some of the above examples that are in plural? Have you heard of "news" in singular? If i really want to emphasise "schools" or "companies", could I use the plural form as an adjective? Possible, but very reluctantly, check Google Books for precedents ...



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