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3

So says the dictionary. However, for practical purposes, to say that someone is "nice", sometimes (of course depending on the context) may be just an euphemism to say that he/she is not attractive :-) http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=108804781


6

I am assuming the question was something along the lines of "What colour do you like?" The answer "I like the colour blue" means that the colour you like, in general, is blue. The answer "I like the blue colour" implies that there was a given choice of certain colors and you chose the one which is blue (as if you where choosing from colour swatches). ...


0

I would use adequate: as much or as good as necessary for some requirement or purpose; fully sufficient, suitable, or fit. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com/adequate For example, there is software adequacy testing that defines a through test of an application and is used to reach a confidence level that the software will just function enough ...


1

"[the software model] is sufficiently detailed"


1

Consider the term elegant. According to ODO it can mean (Of a scientific theory or solution to a problem) pleasingly ingenious and simple: the grand unified theory is compact and elegant in mathematical terms


0

Condensed. may also coney the idea: To reduce the volume or compass of. To make more concise; abridge or shorten. A condensed version of a piece of writing/book ect. Also an abstract: A statement summarizing the important points of a text. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com


2

Something that's is brief enough to get the message across, without being overly "word-ey", or verbose, could be described as "succinct", or "concise". i.e, "Explain as best you can, in a [succinct/concise] manner". Concise is probably used more in common language, though.


1

You should add a hyphen whenever you're using a compound adjective for a noun that is being used as a single descriptor for the noun. For example in the phrase you provided, graded-reading is a single descriptor all together for the noun books, and saying graded books, or reading books separately, won't make sense to imply what you mean. So, yes, you must ...


3

If the books are about reading that is graded then yes, you can use a hyphen (probably what you need). If the books are about reading and the books themselves are graded don't use a hyphen. Also, check out ell.


1

If you’re interested in phrases that have the same meaning, how about “cast in concrete”?  It expresses the idea of something that is straightforward to establish upon creation, but difficult to modify thereafter. Computer geeks might recognize the acronym WORM, which stands for “write once, read multiple”.  This was used to describe the paradigm of writing ...


-3

All wrong. Crack comes from the American term "crackerjack" shortened to "crack" meaning a person of excellence in sports or otherwise


1

I generally think of medium as being of some sort of the middle of a static range, (statistically it is defined as the value halfway between the mininum and maximum values), such as being of medium height, while intermediate is about the middle of a process such as the intermediate level music examinations are what you would have to pass through to get from ...


0

There is no difference. Google Ngrams shows that "susceptible to" has gradually been replacing "susceptible of" over the last 200 years, and I suspect that in another 50 years "susceptible of" will probably be gone. If there were a difference, "susceptible of" couldn't have gone from being 98% of the uses in 1800 to being 8% of the uses today. British and ...


0

in my opinion, an awful lot is used in the sentence to counter-argue something. For example: A: I don't want to go to the park; it's probably empty now. B: But I see an awful lot of people there.


0

Repair - for those that should be fixed. NFG - for those that are No F*ing Good any more, but could be salvaged from.


1

If you want to create a word (borrow from Latin): emendanda - literally "things which are needed/intended to be fixed".


1

A number of the suggestions would fall outside a common vocabulary, and therefore would fail in terms of communicating the desired meaning. I do like the suggest of "deliberate" (as adjective, not verb). It implies giving the matter due consideration, and providing a calm decision.


2

I think the clearest, shortest way to say it is For Repair


0

I would go with save and strip Phones that can be saved go in the save bin, others go in the strip bin to be stripped down into component pieces.


3

sage wise, judicious, or prudent: sage advice. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sage


6

You could label the box with any of the verbs fix, mend, fix up, repair, service, etc. Edit: For a box with items in good working order, consider OK and good. For a box with items beyond hope, consider shot (“(colloquial) Worn out or broken”) and parts. You could have a box labeled OK, a box labeled Fix, and a box labeled Shot. Source for quotes and ...


0

I like "wise" and "philisophical", as two of the suggestions above, but having re-read your examples, I feel "phlegmatic" comes closer to the emotional state you refer to in the examples. I believe it conveys the "emotionless" state which connects both examples.


2

For the box of things that should be repaired you could use Salvage salvage transitive verb : to save (something valuable or important) : to prevent the loss of (something) "salvage." 2014. In Merriam-Webster.com. Retrieved July 8, 2014 http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salvage But this definition of salvage might be better salvage — n 2. a. ...


0

I would suggest "reparanda", based on words such as "agenda" meaning "things requiring to be discussed", "Referenda" meaning "things requiring to be referred" and "memoranda" meaning "things requiring to be remembered" from the Latin gerund or gerundive.


17

Broken. For the other box, working. If you are in the USA, you'll want something more complicated sounding. So: inoperative. Operative.


2

"To be" would make the form of the adjective that you want; in this case "To be repaired" or for a shorter one, "To be fixed", but as far as I know, English doesn't have that kind of structure to provide the adjective you want with a suffix or so.


1

I'd like to suggest professional; while it strictly means someone who does a given task for pay (i.e. a professional), it is commonly used to refer to describe an act that is done with skill and composure, particularly when those things are difficult to come by, and by extension is used to describe a person who does this. It is used in this capacity even if ...


1

Particularly consider level-headed, which was briefly mentioned in two other answers: (idiomatic) Sensible; rational; possessing sound judgment. Usage notes: Often having the connotation of remaining calm, composed, and careful, of not acting out of reflex or excessive emotion. Synonyms: calm, deliberative, stable Several phrases or hyphenated ...


3

No, Zack. You shouldn't do that. Not even in "literary" English. Moreover, "life" in English (even the "literary" kind) is neither "she" nor "he".


1

Perhaps "zen" would work? It's not necessarily related to Zen Buddhism, the word has taken on a meaning of its own in Western languages.


4

Since no one seems to have hit it yet, let me offer adroit. The Free Dictionary says it "implies ease and natural skill, especially in difficult or challenging situations."


1

Collected Level-headed Vulcan Phlegmatic Unperturbed


1

Competent and capable each describe someone with experience and skill who can steadily get done what needs to be done without getting sidetracked by distractions and emotion. Less competent and capable people are more readily diverted from their objectives. com·pe·tent adjective \ˈkäm-pə-tənt\ : having the necessary ability or skills : able to do ...


8

Philosophical is close to what you are asking for. rationally or sensibly calm, patient, or composed. If someone is philosophical, the person has the characteristics of a philosopher: Characteristic of a philosopher, as in equanimity, enlightenment, and wisdom. A detailed explanation from vocabulary.com: To be philosophical is to stay ...


11

The alliterative phrase 'cool, calm and collected' fits quite well, but if you want a single word, perhaps equanimous fits the bill. It's the adjective form of equanimity: calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation. Samuel Johnson defined it as: evenness of mind, neither elated nor depressed


6

I think wise may convey the meanings you are describing: Having the ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; sagacious: a wise leader. Exhibiting common sense; prudent: a wise decision. b. Shrewd; crafty. Having great learning; erudite. Provided with information; informed. Used with to: was wise to the politics of the ...


-1

There really is a significant difference, and I have had to learn this in order to do my job marking metal tools. Read how they describe these differences at the following site - there are no "opinions", just technical explanations: http://www.pannier.com/learning/about-laser-marking/laser-marking-methods.html [BTW: this is not my brand of laser equipment, ...


0

Actually initiative as an adjective can be found in dictionaries as shown below. I'd say that is not a common adjective and initiatory, introductory or initial are valid alternatives. Of or relating to initiation. Used to initiate; initiatory. of or concerning initiation or serving to initiate; initiatory. Examples: initiative - ...


0

Imo, I will choose illicit over illegal when the fact that an act that is being carried out in secret is key to my message. I think that comes across stronger than merely calling the action illegal, even tho being illegal is likely to relegate the act "to the shadows." If I don't want to waste the readers' time making that conclusion, it's likely because I ...


2

I suggest the word turpid, an adjective which refers to things foul, base, wicked, morally depraved. For example: Don't camp; that's turpid. Turpid derives from the same Latin root turpis ( ugly, unsightly; foul, filthy; or cacophonous, disagreeable; or (figuratively) base, infamous, scandalous, dishonorable, shameful, disgraceful) as does the ...


3

Singing is a present participle in the case (following @tchrist ’s suggestion) of “I hear children singing.” It would be a gerund, i.e., serving in lieu of a noun as direct object of verb hear, if you got rid of the children: “I hear singing.” But in “I hear children singing,” the direct object of the verb is ...


0

At the risk of sounding simplistic, I suggest that cognitions are variegated, in soup-to-nuts fashion. You can be thinking about how to "solve for X" one minute, and the next minute about what's for lunch. And so it goes. Why, then, cannot one have a bemused cognition? I wouldn't be surprised if humans can detect a bemused expression on someone's face ...


-2

I find many words in dictionaries have a definition (necessary: definition follows), but others do no (unnecessary: not necessary) as we see here I still have to look up the word necessary to find out what not necessary means. Using the word nonsense as another example I will show sense (has definitions) but nonsense (has definitions but they are not ...


1

That feature will be added in an update coming soon. I guess coming soon would be called an adjectival phrase.


0

I may be missing part of the question, as dialog about it seems to have been deleted, but: urgent immediate priority   or    high-priority critical


0

The U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual (PDF), in multiple contexts throughout Section 12 (“Numerals”), gives the following examples of correct usage: the 1-mile road 6-inch guns four-room houses 5-foot-wide entrance seven-story building 8-year-old wine So, while I can’t find a rule that actually spells this out, they seem to favor a hyphen ...


0

"This is a 1000 square-foot room." The Associated Press style guide has a section on dimensions. Although it doesn't directly say, the examples online show no hyphen between the number (or units) and what is being measured. You should spell out the units entirely. There is no central authority on how to write proper English, so there may be other ...


0

It's a bit narrow in it's usage, but sandbagging could describe the rather annoying (but otherwise typically rules-abiding) behavior of someone not putting effort into playing a game "properly", or otherwise intentionally under-performing (resulting in their team losing, or the opposition not finding enjoyable competition).


7

"Imminent" and "impending" should suffice. You can also say "in a jiffy" if it's gonna be real quick. Pronto is another good, though informal, word meaning "quick".



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