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0

I would always use 'draughty' myself for the currents of cold air definition - like you I've been wrong-footed by the spelling checker online many times! I think it's extraordinary that despite our region there is no option for an English language setting as opposed to American.


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There's a Scottish slang word 'gallus', pronounced 'gaallus'. It means much the same as chutzpah but is used as an adjective. That might work - even the spelling looks appropriate.


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The individual is a donaldtrump. The word's recently come into much wider use. One word, no spaces; a noun. (i.e., "That bloviating donaldtrump hasn't told the truth in years!" or "I'd trust a used car salesman before I'd take that donaldtrump's word for anything.")


2

That person sounds ballsy : aggressively bold : gutsy, nervy Definitely slang and somewhat vulgar, it is definitely not to be used in formal writing or conversation with most people beyond your friends.


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temerity, audacity, hardihood, effrontery, nerve, cheek, gall, chutzpah mean conspicuous or flagrant boldness. temerity suggests boldness arising from rashness and contempt of danger . audacity implies a disregard of restraints commonly imposed by convention or prudence . hardihood suggests firmness in daring and defiance . effrontery implies shameless, ...


1

In BrE you could use cheeky, especially in a more humorous context: slightly rude or showing no respect, but often in a funny way You're a cheeky little miss! Apologize at once. Or alternatively to have/got the cheek, which I think is even closer to what you're after and does not carry a humorous connotation. behaviour or talk that is rude and shows ...


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I can think of no better English word than "brazen", posted by Avon. The word I would use, however, is chutzpadik, a variant of "chutzpah" mentioned by Marconius. It's a Yiddish adjective. For example, I might say: "Did you hear that Cosby is suing his accusers? Can you believe how chutzpadik he is?!"


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Conjugation is for verbs. "Sex" (male and female) is a characteristic of living things. "Gender" (masculine and feminine), the association of words with one sex or the other (or neither) is a characteristic of words in some languages. Except for pronouns, English doesn't assign a gender to to words, i.e., the language doesn't have different forms for ...


2

You might try he's got a nerve to do that or got some nerve to do that. nerve (noun) the rudeness to do something that you know will upset other people. [+ to infinitive] She's late for work every day, but she still has the nerve to lecture me about punctuality. That man has some nerve! He's always blaming me for things that are his fault. ...


2

Perhaps the person is acting entitled. More commonly, for the pejorative sense, the noun form, entitlement is used The belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment: no wonder your kids have a sense of entitlement [AS MODIFIER]: this entitlement mentality is completely out of control Oxford Dictionaries Online Also, ...


4

You could say that they have brass neck A type of behaviour where someone is extremely confident about their own actions but does not understand that their behaviour is unacceptable to others. Cambridge Dictionary In your example: He's got a brass neck; he asked me for $100! Alternatively, you could use the synonymous term effrontery. ...


-1

As an alternative , you could say that this person has spunk. As in , Jimmy's got spunk to override the experimental sequence initiated by the Boss.


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I would say such a person was brazen ˈbreɪz(ə)n adjective 1. bold and without shame. (Google) For the example given: He’s brazen; he asked me for another $100! or more effectively: He’s a brazen [expletive]; he asked me for another $100!


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I would call this person audacious (adjective) or say that he/she has chutzpah (noun). The word "audacious" can be in a positive or negative fashion, so the speaker can use tone of voice to determine which one is meant. This sort of subtlety lends a certain intimacy to conversations. According to the Cambridge dictionary, audacious means: audacious ...


1

Some writers attempt to work around these sorts of ambiguities by using hyphenation to denote compound modifiers. For example, one might say "dark-polka-dot necktie" to clarify that "dark" modifies "polka dot", rather than "necktie". If this approach seems less than universal, that's because it is. When and whether such constructions are used seems to ...


1

I don't see why one reading should necessarily exclude the other. For example, I could be an [old book] [collector] or an [old][book collector]. So it seems reasonable to me that we could have a [dark polka dot][tie] or a [dark][polka dot tie]. In both of the examples above book and polka dot are nouns modifying other nouns, so do I not concur that blue must ...


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It depends on the context. For instance in video games, the usual term is simply overpowered. Otherwise, you might consider effectively omnipotent, or maybe unstoppable - again, it really does depend on when and why you are using the word.


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Somewhat similar is largeish: reasonably large, quite large. - yourdictionary.com or indeed, as you've mentioned, biggish: somewhat big - merriam-webster.com the -ish suffix has a softening effect.


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Having shopped in a variety of structures, including the early strip-type shopping malls in the US, the later fully enclosed ones in the US, Mexican markets with hundreds of separate stands all under one roof, French hypermarchés (where the floor managers wore roller skates) and more recently Walmarts in the US and Mexico, my answer is, you could probably ...


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Ordinal: of or relating to a thing's position in a series Source: Google "ordinal definition" I don't know what Google's source for definitions is.


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A row is basically a group of something arranged in a line. A row of houses. A row of seats. It rained for five days in a row. Hence, a good word to describe something relating to a row would be linear.


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A livery /ˈlɪvəri/ is: a uniform, insignia or symbol adorning, in a non-military context, a person, an object or a vehicle that denotes a relationship between the wearer of the livery and an individual or corporate body. Often, elements of the heraldry relating to the individual or corporate body feature in the livery. Alternatively, some kind of a ...


0

Juste milieu, the golden mean, is the the antonym of what you seek and as such something like ultra-milieu should confer the sense that it is an amount in excess.


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goof–off: "a person who avoids work or responsibility.." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/goof-off It is more common to use goof off as a verb "Jim goofs off and we have to do his work." The source cited above says that the first recorded usage was in 1953.


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"Slacker" has the sense of someone who doesn't do work until compelled to (e.g. By the boss's presence). Where a "shirker" would like to avoid the work entirely, a slacker is perfectly capable of doing something but chooses not to at the moment. Here's one of the definitions from Urban Dictionary: "someone who is very lazy, doesn't do their work until the ...


1

The behaviour you are describing would be considered typical of a disloyal employee according to the following definition: Most employers share a concern that employees may be disloyal. Disloyalty of course spans a wide spectrum, from merely intentionally failing to perform tasks, accepting benefits personally that rightfully belongs to the ...


2

They were obviously quite _____ to watch. thrilling content The adjectives thrilling and content are different types of adjective. In the OP's examples, these adjectives are complements of the verb BE. Importantly, both of these types of adjective can be followed by infinitives. thrilling to watch content to watch Notice that these ...


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wide is okay to describe a store. However, if you are trying to convey the idea that it is wide relative to its depth, you could say wide but shallow store Or wide, shallow store


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The question is very badly posed. Unless "they" is defined, either answer is correct. Acrobats are thrilling to watch. Border guards are content to watch. The text book author is incompetent.


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It's a bit confusing, since I can think of two ways to read this sentence: "I heard a loud cheer from the tent in which the acrobats were performing. They were obviously quite thrilling to watch." Who were thrilling to watch? The acrobats. To watch the acrobats was a thrilling experience. "I asked my friends if they wanted to jump into the pool with ...


1

It's an ambiguous question, and the right word depends on the point of view: is this describing the watchers or the watched? If you're talking about how the watchers feel, you need "content," which describes how people feel. "Thrilling" means inducing excitement. The TV show is thrilling; the people are thrilled to watch it. If you're talking about how ...


1

Nouns Modifying Other Nouns Your question is unclear. If you are asking whether the noun is modifying another noun, then the answer is yes — but you knew that already or you would not have used the word “qualifying”. Modifying and qualifying are equivalent here. If the question is whether a noun that modifies another noun thereby becomes an ...


0

In the example you give, the answer is Yes for the reasons you give. In many cases this is even more noticeable to English speakers, e.g. The Black Mountains, Wales The Snowy Mountains, Australia Incidentally, in Spanish, 'sierra' means 'mountain range so there is a certain amount of redundancy'. Nevertheless you are describing which mountains you mean ...


0

The word pedantic can mean "ostentatious in one's learning," always showing off and lording it over others who are less knowledgeable. Actually, "lording it over," might not be too bad.


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You want to say: that the criticism was not harsh, not intended to malign sb Since you are in a pickle with the management, it seems that what was intended and what was perceived are two different things. To clarify your intention, well-intended is a great choice (offered by Robert). What went wrong was a misunderstanding which you can't blame on the ...


0

I'm reading your question... I'm looking for a way to describe someone who thinks everyone is incompetent (i.e. doesn't know anything) and always has to explain every minute (small) detail because his perception of the person's competence is that it's very low (thinking the person is not that smart). ... and I'm thinking I know people like ...


0

Unkind or unsupportive. I'll add a few thoughts about the awkward situation you find yourself in. If you didn't mean to start a fight, then it might be good to try to help the offended party calm down and start looking at things more rationally. -- But without being defensive, aggressive, or conciliatory. It can help to begin by validating the person's ...


3

Exal's useful reference to Wikipedia gives us a big clue: [Demonyms are] unofficial terms used to designate the citizens of specific states and the District of Columbia. A demonyn refers to a citizen of the state, which is distinct from the report's origin in Colorado. Although the report might have been produced by one or more Coloradans, the report ...


11

Objectively, the inconsistency between rendering national proper names as adjectives (British and Canadian) and using a state proper name (Colorado) as is in the same syntactical position is difficult to justify. But in the United States, there is a very strong tendency to reserve use of the adjective form of a state name for situations specifically ivolving ...


0

According to Marriam-Webster's dictionary, Coloradan and Coloradoan are both real words. Despite this, nouns can still be used as adjectives. So, it would be up to personal preference whether to use the noun or the adjective.


0

If the subject of your criticism was merely another’s work product, then you could (possibly) claim that your critique was an objective and fair appraisal, intended constructively and certainly not meant to be slanderous or defamatory. If, however, your criticism also included reference to the author of the work product, then you might add that it was ...


2

I suggest using specifically to qualify your criticism. Given that the administration/management will have heard the professor's side of the story, you may get some credit for admitting it was criticism: I specifically criticized ______, intending only to point out _________, not to in any way demean [your professor]. It's hard to build a case for you ...


4

"Not harsh" is a subjective quality. So I would try to frame "harshness of criticism" as a quality that is defined by a third party, rather than a quality that is defined by you (Party A) or them (Party B). I tried to give [Party A] an appropriately delicate, well-intentioned critique. You could then expound on that: This critique was not ad ...


2

He was very blank, where it would be completely clear that it includes the viewing other people as incompetent and going into extreme detail. I'll offer a few ideas to choose from: Dismissive, superior, egotistical, domineering, disdainful, dismissive, narcissistic, asshole (sorry -- this one is not an adjective), dogmatic, supercilious, overbearing, ...


1

I'd call them a scorekeeper. A scorekeeper is: : a person who records the official score in a game or contest (Merriam Webster) However, it's used often in interpersonal arguments. For example, in this Art of Manliness article: But like all couples, we occasionally have arguments. And a good percentage of them used to be over who was taking ...


1

didactic (adj.): (mainly disapproving) intended to teach, especially in a way that is too determined or eager, and often fixed and unwilling to change 'a didactic approach to teaching' Source: CDO (i) intended to teach, particularly in having moral instruction as an ulterior motive (ii) in the manner of a teacher, particularly so as to appear ...


0

No, it is not redundant. Here's an approximate continuum: I am beginning to get [x, an adj]. one was not at all [x], but is now edging (somewhat slowly) toward being [x] I am becoming [x]. means, as you point out, that one is not yet [x] (maybe not at all [x]) but is moving toward being [x] (maybe slowly, maybe quickly.) I am {becoming/getting} a little ...


0

Paraphrased: "difficult to escape because of its physical construction but without the sense that there are actually people there guarding it or that existing architectural measures are in active use." This is a contradiction. It's difficult to escape Alcatraz because of its geographical location. Any other means would be of the architectural measures ...


0

I believe it is redundant from a grammatical perspective. However, "becoming increasingly [adjective]" might be used by a native speaker who wishes to convey a feeling that the process is at an early stage or who wishes to defuse the impact of a negative statement somewhat. Compare "I am increasingly unhappy with you" and "I am becoming increasingly ...


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If you have a concept of automatic renewals, and you are discussing their frequency, you should use neither a comma nor and: The system enables frequent automatic renewals. In this case, the relationships between the adjectives and the noun are different. On the other hand, if renewals may or may not be frequent or automatic, the relationships been ...



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