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0

Some subtle differences here, depending on the tone you're going for: - Controvertible: Arguable; debatable. - Equivocal: Allowing the possibility of several different meanings, [...] especially with intent to deceive or misguide; susceptible of double interpretation. - Obscure: Not clear or plain; ambiguous, vague, or uncertain. - This ...


0

A subjective question can be answered in many ways.


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The ambiguity there is perfect. To clear it up, one should revise it to either such documents, goods, articles[,] and cargoes as are time-sensitive (if the time-sensitivity is shared by all), or goods, articles, cargoes[,] and time-sensitive documents (if only the documents are time-sensitive). (The bracketed commas are so-called Oxford or ...


1

As mentioned in one of the comments, "altruistic" seems to be the word you're looking for. altruism (noun) "feelings and behavior that show a desire to help other people and a lack of selfishness" e.g. "I ​doubt whether her ​motives for ​donating the ​money are altruistic - she's ​probably ​looking for ​publicity." MW Depending on ...


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Stormy : indicative of or characterized by storms; tempestuous: stormy seas. also, turbulent a characterized by turbulence; tempestuous: turbulent waters. Rough: Characterized by violent motion; turbulent: rough waters. The Free Dictionary


0

I think you could use complaisant, charitable, altruistic, humane, accommodating, and maybe liberal or compassionate. Those would be pretty good.


0

A person who does what they say they will do is a person who honors their commitments and keeps their promises. So I would describe such a person as honorable and trustworthy. If you want to go a bit exotic use mensch, which is a Yiddish term meaning a person of integrity and honor. mensch Someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character. ...


0

If someone can be described as 'credible', I guess you could assume, we can believe what he/she says to be the truth. Going a bit further, maybe we could also assume that when he/she says something will be done by him/her, then that will be done by him/her definitely.


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Maybe dependable conveys what you want? Definition of dependable in English: adjective Trustworthy and reliable: 'a dependable supply of cold beer' 'the most valuable and dependable of America’s allies' 'Growth tends to be mundane with the main attraction being dependable cash flows and reliable dividend payments.' 'Pierre was the head ...


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Consistent may convey the idea: agreeing or accordant; compatible; not self-contradictory: actions consistent with his views. The Free Dictionary


1

Maybe reliable or trustworthy?


-1

I'm going to try to explain the difference. Feudal refers to some well-known feudal system from historic times. Feudalistic would describe something else, which the author feels is similar to an established historic instance of feudalism. If you feel that a social system amounts to feudalism, then you could say that it is a feudalistic system.


1

If you want an alternative to productive, you could use efficient. Unfortunately, efficiency can have more than one meaning when talking about languages, as it can refer to how many resources the compiled programs need, or how fast they run, but context can make this clear.


2

Hope this table clarifies the usage. Note that in these examples, words smaller and greater perform two functions whereas less and lesser perform one function each. It is incorrect to say 3 is lesser than 5.


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Feudal also means, "Absurdly outdated or old-fashioned" while feudalistic refers exclusively to a feudal system of lords and serfdom


-1

I suspect this has to do with the popular title Supreme Ruler, assigned to someone with absolute authority over a wide domain. In this case, to rule supreme doesn't directly translate to "rule in a supreme manner", but to "rule under the title of Supreme", and merely implies supremeness by that title.


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Predicative Complements Many verbs take a Predicative Complement. This is a phrase that fills a special slot set up by the verb, one that portays either the Subject or the Object. Here are some examples: She was elected treasurer. The elephants were ecstatic. The made me furious. She felt warm. In the sentences above, the word treasurer portrays the ...


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To rule supreme is something of a "fixed collocation", meaning rule unchallenged... supreme - highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief. (Source) To rule supremely (a relatively uncommon usage) would mean rule exceptionally well... supreme - very ​great, or the ​best. (Source)


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Use of adjectives rather than adverbs in such constructions is common. The adjective modifies not so much the verb as the verb’s subject. Such adjectival predication is by no means confined to such more or less copulative verbs as be and seem, but works with more active verbs as well. Thus New Hampshire’s license-plate motto, which is ...


2

Take the sentence, Order and method ruled supreme in his life. We would expect, Order and method ruled supremely in his life. Now look at the sentence, Order and method were supreme in his life. That looks correct. I suggest that the original sentence is shorthand for, Order and method ruled[, and were] supreme in his life.


0

Although it is not a direct synonym, the work pathetic would work quite well in that instance. It implies a deep level of disdain, which it looks like you are trying to convey in your sentence.


0

"Oh, you French people are so soft, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." My favourite word here would be mushy. Definition of mushy in English: adjective (mushier, mushiest) 1 Soft and pulpy: 'mushy vegetables' 2 informal Excessively sentimental: 'a mushy film' 'Unfortunately, it seems as if he has a ...


1

How about "effete"? It's not an exact synonym for soft, but it strongly suggests weakness and irresoluteness. Probably more suited when addressing a male though, since one of the connotations is effeminacy. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/effete effete adjective ef·fete \e-ˈfēt, i-\ lacking strength, courage, or spirit ...


0

'Soft' seems perfect here, but let me mention the relatively obscure/ dialect word 'nesh'. Its main current meaning is "sensitive to cold", i.e. not sufficiently hardy to cope with the English weather. However, it does also have a use in terms of being timid or generally weak. It has been deemed fit to deserve its own Wikipedia page.


1

My spouse, who is German, offered Weichei (soft-boiled egg). (Note, if you don't speak German, it might look a little less weird if we pretend there's a hyphen: Weich-ei. Literally, soft egg.) I also looked at the all-English thesaurus for synonyms for wimp. I've picked out some words that I am hopeful are authentic for that time period (but I can't ...


4

I think squeamish is the adjective you're looking for, as in: "Oh, you French people are so squeamish, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." Now whether or not there's a German word for squeamish might create a problem, but if you're writing in English, you'll get your point across appropriately. If it were a loutish ...


3

If the speaker wants to imply that the listener is overly docile and caring. Perhaps verging towards being "girly" and cowardly then the noun sissy could well work. Oh, you French people are sissies, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with. The fact that the German shopkeeper is saying this to a young French woman would make ...


6

Dainty and Prissy come to mind. Weak, Babies, Cowards would also definitely fit. Cowards would have historical context as the general view of the French by Germans of that time period. These of course are more straight insults instead of just implied ones. Pussyfooted would also fit, though I am unsure how insulting this is historically. MW: pussyfoot ...


0

I am by now means an English major so I don't know the right terms. I will do my best to explain what I see. In the first sentence, "20 meters" adds to the the existing adjective which is "thick" and all of that together characterizes the "It". And you can remove it. It's thick Same exact meaning (but with less detail). In the second example ...


0

How about flaccid: flac·cid lacking force or effectiveness. "the flaccid leadership campaign was causing concern" synonyms: lackluster, lifeless, listless, uninspiring, unanimated, tame, dull, vapid "his play seemed flaccid"


3

Not sure if these are what you are looking for but "Limp", and "Shush" are what popped into my mind after first reading? :)


1

Why are you looking for a "soft" way for a person to tell people to not talk in "soft" ways? The shopkeeper may be telling the person to not talk "softly", but he's sure not fitting the part himself. Let the crude-ass shopkeeper be a crude-ass shopkeeper and call the person a pussy. "Oh, you French people are such pussies, just say that you're looking for ...


0

euphemism 1. the substitution of a mild, indirect, or vagueexpression for one thought to be offensive,harsh, or blunt. 2. the expression so substituted: “To passaway” is a euphemism for “to die.”. I believe euphemistic works


6

sentimental: having or arousing feelings of tenderness, sadness or nostalgia, typically in an exaggerated or self-indulgent way (Defn. 1.1) [Source:ODO] weakly emotional; mawkishly susceptible or tender (Defn. 3) [Source: Dictionary.com]


1

"Refined" or "genteel" would work. "Genteel: Characterized by exaggerated or affected politeness, refinement, or respectability". http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/genteel. Originally "genteel" was used in a good sense, but in the 20th century it became ironic or deprecating. Or, the German could use the French equivalent "gentil", ...


0

Probably not quite negative enough, but “you […] people are so vague, just say [what you mean and mean what you say] that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with" could work. Vague/adjective/#5: (of persons) not clear or definite in thought, understanding, or expression: (Dictionary[dot]com)


1

Milky From Oxford Dictionaries Online, not the OED: informal , dated Weak and compliant: ‘they just talk that way to make you turn milky’


9

One of the senses of precious may work: Affectedly dainty or overrefined: precious mannerisms. {AHDEL} though this obviously covers an affected attitude. If the person is genuinely soft, the dialect term nesh would often be used conversationally in the UK: nesh adjective dialect (Especially of a person) weak and delicate; feeble ...


9

"tender" has the connotation of being gentle and soft. "Oh, you French people are so tender, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." tender (adj) marked by, responding to, or expressing the softer emotions, showing care.


25

How about delicate? Mealy-mouthed (from @Josh61 's answer) conveys what you want more precisely, but delicate has that soft negative connotation. fragile; easily damaged; frail. From dictionary.com A alternative if you don't like delicate could be squeamish: easily nauseated or disgusted. From dictionary.com


7

I think mealy-mouthed may fit in your context: Afraid to speak frankly or straightforwardly: mealy-mouthed excuses. (ODO)


-1

Envious is very good, but it doesn't seem to go far enough for your situation. I think, then, you'll have to use more than one word. Perhaps Sociopath or psychopath will help you show how far the envy is taking the person. The sociopath lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, ...


0

It starts off idly enough.... The final part of it is where it gets interesting.... (You had an idle interest in the first part of the program.) Idle: [only before noun] without a good reason or real purpose It was only from idle curiosity that she opened the book. (macmillandictionary.com)


1

The Holy Bible - a.k.a. "the Bible" - is the proper title of a specific book; it has also gained a generic use meaning any comprehensive owner's manual or handbook, in which case it is not to be capitalized, e.g. "the investor's bible." The adjective for references to the Bible had always been capitalized - Biblical - conforming to standard rules of English ...


0

I suggest malevolent (adjective): (adj.) Wishing evil or harm to another or others; showing ill will; ill-disposed; malicious: His failures made him malevolent toward those who were successful.


1

You're describing someone who is envious. envy a feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to another's advantages, success, possessions, etc. Some see this as the same as being jealous. jealous resentment against a rival, a person enjoying success or advantage, etc., or against another's success or advantage itself. However, a ...


0

I don't know what would you call that individual (misanthrope? Doesn't capture your description completely) but you could say that the person has a "crab mentality". It accurately and wonderfully presents what you want to convey about the person's behavior. According to Wikipedia Crab mentality, sometimes referred to as crabs in the bucket, is a ...


-1

Tyrannical 1.) of or characteristic of a tyrant. 2.) unjustly cruel, harsh, or severe; arbitrary or oppressive; despotic. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/tyrannical?s=t Domineering 1.) inclined to rule arbitrarily or despotically; overbearing; tyrannical. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/domineering?s=t


-1

A saboteur is someone who breaks something in order to cause losses for his employer, enemy or competition. SABOTAGE [chapter heading] The title we have prefixed seems to mean "scamping work." It is a device which, we are told, has been adopted by certain French workpeople as a substitute for striking. The workman, in other words, purposes to remain on and ...


2

These are called collateral adjectives. You can read about them on Wikipedia and check out a list of them on Wiktionary.



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