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Learning disabilities could be caused by a lot of reasons. If it is caused by slow cognitive development, you could consider using "mentally challenged" which is a euphemism for mentally retarded or disabled [Dictionary.com]


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Dyslexic / dyslexia. Dyscalculic / dyscalculia. Dysgraphic / dysgraphia. Dyspraxic / dyspraxia. Unless the disability is specific, I don't know a word for that. But there's "learning-disabled persons" on Google and a lot of scholarly articles using such terms. In the right contexts, LD can be used, for example, from ldaamerica.org "75% – 80% of ...


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The Wikipedia article on learning disabilities repeatedly uses "individuals with learning disabilities." In my opinion, this phrase does not sound cumbersome. It sounds better than "persons with learning disabilities." Further, it sounds fine when substituted into your sentence: The notion that individuals with learning disabilities simply need to ...


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Byzantine of or relating to Byzantium, the Byzantine Empire, or the Eastern Orthodox Church. (of a system or situation) excessively complicated, typically involving a great deal of administrative detail. "Byzantine insurance regulations" Google Byzantine convoluted (especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and ...


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The context is tricky, because the role of manager designate is an interim role, but at the same time is not necessarily held by someone who will be superseding or is standing in for someone else. You usually would not ask someone to contact a manager designate, but would ask them to contact the manager, who would then if the circumstance arose designate the ...


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Kludgy or Kludgey, from Collins awkward or makeshift and poorly designed The Free Dictionary defines the noun kludge as A system, especially a computer system, that is constituted of poorly matched elements or of elements originally intended for other applications. A clumsy or inelegant solution to a problem TFD says that the origin of ...


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Your question is pretty broad, but it reminds me of the term manic pixie dream girl: Manic Pixie Dream Girl (MPDG) is a stock character type in films. Film critic Nathan Rabin, who coined the term after observing Kirsten Dunst's character in Elizabethtown (2005), describes the MPDG as "that bubbly, shallow cinematic creature that exists solely in ...


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The etymology of the term is different from what you are suggesting, I don't think it is a misnomer: Allergic (adj.) : 1911, from allergy + -ic; perhaps modeled on French allergique (1906). allergy (n.) : 1911, from German Allergie, coined 1906 by Austrian pediatrician Clemens E. von Pirquet (1874-1929) from Greek allos "other, ...


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Free spirit noun, usually singular a person who does what they want with enjoyment and pleasure and does not feel limited by the usual rules of social behaviour Cambridge Dictionary


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I suggest Blithe joyous, merry, or gay in disposition; glad; cheerful: Everyone loved her for her blithe spirit. without thought or regard; carefree; heedless: Note that gay'is used in the sense of Older Use. having or showing a merry, lively mood:


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Sycophant praising people in authority in a way that is not sincere, usually in order to get some advantage from them http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sycophantic


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You can use the adjective "Tabulated" form. In a typical tabulated form, keys and values are used. "Key" is the identifier for a "value" corresponding to it. In a tabulation, as in systematic data arranged through spreadsheets, keys are either implicit or explicit. In the example quoted in the question, "Age", "Name", "Occupation" etc. are keys, and "20", ...


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This (what your friend said, not your post) is a fundamentally confusing style of question: any choice of "yes" or "no" will potentially cause confusion, although in this case most people would say "No, it's not available" if it isn't in fact available, and if it is available would be a bit confused about how to answer. If anyone ever asks me a question ...


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Sometimes, English doesn't seem to work logically. An indefinite article is supposed to be placed before a singular noun or noun phrase. A month is a long period. *A two months is a long period. (Ungrammatical) But depending on how you perceive two months, you can treat two months as a singular unit (quantity of time) as in: Two months is a long ...


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There is actually a noun for this: ingrate. It's now a little archaic, but you'll see it in writing pre-1900. I don't think it's your meaning, but someone who "doesn't appreciate the good things they have" because they don't understand them or don't choose to value them is often called a Philistine. You can use adjectives, of which ungrateful is the most ...


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I can't help but notice a similarity between sentences containing the construction you've isolated (indefinite + adjective + unit of measurement) and sentences containing collective or group nouns like 'committee'. They both can appear with indefinite articles in singular and plural contexts, for example: It was an amazing two days. [singular] They were an ...


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The person the OP describes is self-centered, as defined at Merriam-Webster concerned solely with one's own desires, needs, or interests The Free Dictionary says: engrossed in self; selfish; egotistical


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Are you looking for the term "hypocrite" as you mentioned the one who shows love and care, but within just someone who entirely opposite to that.


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He's selfish. "Someone who is selfish only thinks of their own advantage:" The judge told him: "Your attitude shows a selfish disregard for others." http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/selfish


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try tribe or tribesmen. It expresses that they are connected in some way but it doesn't necessarily imply ever having an established relationship


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Consider candidate A person or thing regarded as suitable for or likely to receive a particular fate, treatment, or position Oxford Dictionary Online (The downside is possible association with politicos we may not like during this election season)


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"Flatter" does not always mean that the compliments are insincere, so your response will often be taken to mean that you are sincerely flattered by the praise you've received. If you wish no ambiguity, then by all means express yourself directly using terms whose meaning will not be misunderstood. @MaxB offers one; others might include "Thank you. I ...


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"Overdemanding" would be an option. Means "excessively demanding."


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One normally uses textual to indicate that something is written, for text is normally written.


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Literal means 'pertaining to letters of the alphabet.'


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You could try 'scribal' - of or relating to a scribe... 'Scriptal' does not, unfortunately, seem to exist!


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smell of the lamp You have — say — toiled over a work with immense effort, working late into the night to revise and polish and perfect your creation. The end of all your efforts is likely to be a work with the vitality and freshness of a three-day-dead rat. from Michael Quinion's World Wide Words blog. link to article It tends to apply to the ...


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The first one sounds grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound natural – but only because that's way too much sugar to put in coffee.    ;-) Using equal generally means there is the same amount, probably by volume. So, a better example might be: There is an equal amount of sugar and flour. if I was making a cake and needed two cups of ...


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Yes, there is a correct word order for adjectives. Hunger is not an opinion. It is a state. A feeling. A sad hungry Man.For grammar purpuses it is an adjective of Quality. Adjectives of quality can be placed after the verbs. The man seemed tired and hungry. or The tall tired hungry man climbed the massive mountain. The clever curious cat found a mouse. ...


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How about using "indefinitely delayed"? That way you communicate that there is some issue (and hence indefinite delay) without actually specifying it.


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The word you are looking for is "pensive".


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Fair enough That's reasonable; I agree. For example, "I'll wait just one more day.-Fair enough, you've been very patient."


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It's a one word statement: Touché ! used to admit that someone has made a good point against you in an argument or discussion: "You say we should support British industries, but you always drink French wines." "Touché."


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Perhaps "itemised" , since the description of Jane has been "broken down into constituent parts". The properties or attributes which describe Jane have been itemised.


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If you are looking for adjectives, I suggest "summarized", "brief", "concise" or "compact". summarize - to make a summary or make a summary of. "here you can see a summarized review of..." "please, prepare a summarized record of..." "I'm going to present a summarized overview of..."


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I would have said, "easy on both the lettuce and onions." Or to use your wording, "Can you give me a little of both lettuce and onions." It's the use of the word "both" that denotes you mean to include the two of them together in the same context. Alternatively, you could use the word "little" in front of each: "Can you give me a little lettuce and a ...


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Depends on where you put the comma, or pause, in your speech pattern: Could you give me a little lettuce, and onions? Or Could you give me a little lettuce and onions? That said, some people have difficulty picking up the intotations (and therefore the meaning) of other peoples' speech, so to be overly clear, I'd simply specify something like ...


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Where n-gon refers to any number of sides, x-gon refers to some fixed number of sides. "x" is understood to be single valued throughout. It works for most things, but I'd explain it once in the article anyway.


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isomorphism, which has already been suggested, which means a one-to-one correspondence between two mathematical sets; especially :  a homomorphism that is one-to-one.


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Isomorphic meaning having the same form is a possible answer, as long as this is not taken to imply "having the same size" when applied to lengths. I can imagine in referring to a collection of polygons of different numbers of sides and different sizes, that one could say "color all isomorphic polygons in one color, using different colors for different ...


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In American English, either seductive or deceptive would be all right, depending on which attribute of the snake you wanted to highlight. I would use seductive if you want to focus on the appeal of the apple, but deceptive if you want to refer to the snake's dishnonesty. Deceptive: intended to make someone believe something that is not true likely ...


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Maybe contentious? likely to cause disagreement or argument exhibiting an often perverse and wearisome tendency to quarrels and disputes


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I use the word provocative for anything that will evoke differing amounts of acceptance or spark heated discussion. Often, under these circumstances a moderation of views is called for to allow some settlement of "issues."


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One word? Probably not. A word which comes close (but does not receive a cigar) is sanctioned. To fit your purposes, I guess you'd need to add the word possible (or a variant of possible, or a word which indicates the possibility of such as sanction). A flagged post could possibly become a sanctioned post. Or, A flagged post may become a ...


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Another adjective that might fit is blithe. Merriam Webster defines it thus: "Showing a lack of proper thought or care : not caring or worrying."


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This person is ineffectual (adj), which The Free Dictionary defines as: Lacking forcefulness or effectiveness; inadequate or incompetent: an ineffectual ruler; ineffectual in dealing with a problem Sentence (made up) In a high pressure situation, an ineffectual person will either freeze or will make random stabs at doing something, anything, but ...


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Not really an answer in the case that the person actually knows he is misleading someone. But that can be horribly difficult to tell sometimes. If it is the case that the person honestly thinks he is knowledgeable and trying to help by showing his knowledge, you could say he has climbed mount stupid. It is a phase in learning when confidence has grown much ...


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Title is the noun and titular is the adjective, as you know and (subjectivity warning!) I would encourage using adjectives as adjectives and nouns as nouns*. There is, however, precedent for using the noun-noun construction. Since the 1960s use of titular hero has declined while title hero has increased. This perhaps follows the use of title hero which ...


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Try nonplus - It means (noun) A state of bafflement or perplexity : quandary (adjective) caused to be at a loss as to what to think, say, or do. Also, consider another noun Quandary which is a synonym of perplexity It means A situation in which you are confused about what to do



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