New answers tagged

3

It's both. Or, it's either or. There is really no way to syntactically say for sure in a sentence whether a passive participle is acting as a predicative subject complement or whether it is part of a passive verb construction. Whether to interpret devastated here as an adjective or the matrix verb depends entirely on the semantics of the sentence. If it's ...


-1

The Wikipedia article on treading water has some terms for this, and whilst some imply person in the water can swim, dog paddle implies poor if any swimming ability. More experienced swimmers often find their own method of staying above the surface. These techniques often involve sculling, flutter kick, and other unofficial techniques of staying above ...


0

When desperate, an individual has been said to "thrash the water to foam." Less desperation will allow one with some presence of mind to flail, flounder, founder, and possibly fail in a struggle to survive drowning and suffocation.


3

To flounder might be a suitable word. From Google: Flounder struggle or stagger clumsily in mud or water. "he was floundering about in the shallow offshore waters". (To do it successfully would probably be treading water).


3

You are looking for (to) float: to stay on the surface of a liquid and not sink: An empty bottle will float. You can float very easily in/on the Dead Sea because it's so salty. (Cambridge Dictionary)


3

Sterile (adj.) not able to produce children or young I believe "scientifically sterile generations" means that those generations are not able to produce science. That is not exactly the same as those generations having nothing to contribute to science. You can contribute to science, without producing science. Older generations can produce science, and the ...


0

Poor educational system is a singular countable noun and therefore needs a determiner -- in your case I think a. Also, the last part (able just to regurgitate) has a nonconventional word order. I would suggest the following: "... such a poor educational system produces a scientifically sterile generation that is only able to regurgitate."


-1

Anxiety appears to me to be a Psychological Disorder. Nervousness, on the other hand, seems to me to be caused by being overstimulated by the environment surrounding you at the time. This could be mental caused by requirements of the task at hand. Emotional caused by, perhaps, the illness of a loved one. Physical caused by the need for endurance, such as ...


0

I would say that they're different and can mean very different things. It depends on the context. For the quote you provided an educational resource could be things like books, supplies for the classroom, and various other resources that aid the learning process or make it possible to educate. An education resource could be something quite different. It ...


0

Really all this required was a quick google; 'classic vs classical' returns a Grammarist article from which I now quote: Classical has a few narrow definitions, including (1) of or relating to the ancient Greeks or Romans, (2) of or relating to a peak stage of a civilization, and (3) of or relating to European orchestral music of the late 18th and early ...


6

In the United States, Canada and Australia, primary and secondary education together are sometimes referred to as K-12 education, and in New Zealand Year 1–13 is used. The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession. -Wikipedia Education As @ab2 kindly affirmed K-12 ...


1

I think you might find "compulsory education" works for you. What it means depends on the region you're in but it literally means "required education" - or the years of education required by government. Compulsory education refers to a period of education that is required of all persons and is imposed by law. Depending on the country, this education may ...


0

"It is used when someone is uncomfortable of meeting someone else; they fear something and overthink. So they try to avoid meeting or seeing people." furtive Oxford dictionaries Attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive popular phrase: furtive glances


0

Example Sentences: When images of scenes that normally trigger strong emotions were shown to him he was stone-cold. His face was stone-cold despite the [sad] news just relayed to him. stone-cold The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Unfeeling, insensible, as in That sad story left her stone cold. This analogy was already used by ...


1

Some suggestions (from here, plus one of my own): animating enlivening quickening, rousing stimulating vitalizing vivifying


3

All the girls in your examples are being escorted. escorted: Adjective (not comparable) With or having an escort. escort: noun The definition of an escort is something or someone who accompanies a person or thing, often for security or protection.


4

Generally speaking, "underlying" means it's there, causing an effect on other variables, but you may not be able see it directly, while "latent" usually means that it is present in an inactive form and may become active at some point. However, in the domain of statistical analysis it seems like the two words may be closer in meaning: Latent variable - "....


0

I think you are looking for something like this: count something on the fingers of one hand: Used to emphasize the small number of a particular thing: you can count the exceptions on the fingers of one hand More example sentences: Throughout the eighteen years of Conservative government, the total number of Cabinet ministers with children ...


0

Memorization is also a term you could use for what you describe. Dictionary.com defines it as follows: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/memorization verb (used with object), memorized, memorizing. to commit to memory; learn by heart: to memorize a poem. verb (used without object), memorized, memorizing. to learn by heart: I've always been ...


3

This is called learning by rote. A kind of learning style that isn't really learning but repeating exactly as you were told. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rote_learning.


3

It seems like there are two questions here - words that do not incite negative emotions like anger or fear, and words that are not justifiable cause for those emotions. "Benign", alwayslearning's answer, satisfies the second but not the first - since, I think, there fundamentally are two concepts suggested here. As for the other, if you're avoiding ...


4

Check if this works for you: From MW dictionary: benign: not causing harm or damage


3

The noun for this is "polyglot". "Polyglotism or polyglottism is the ability to master, or the state of having mastered, multiple languages." "Multilinguist" is a synonym for this.


5

"Bilingual" describes someone who is versatile in two languages. If you want to describe someone who has mastered multiple languages, you could call them a "polyglot", although this is properly "someone who speaks 5 or more languages." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyglot_(disambiguation)) Also relevant is the word "biliterate," simply meaning "able to ...


0

I would say fixedly. It means to maintain the eyes unwaveringly focused on a subject. But now Pasha was staring fixedly at the floor--and at one specific spot.


1

It is called secondary predicate. Most of your sentences are End-State Secondary Predicates. Here is the link with more detailed explanations. http://www1.icsi.berkeley.edu/~kay/bcg/II-Pred.html


0

Spellbinding- adj- Holding one’s attention completely as though by magic; fascinating. Entralling- adj- Capturing and holding one’s attention; fascinating. Transfix- verb- (usually be transfixed) Cause (someone) to become motionless with horror, wonder, or astonishment. Those three are the first to come to mind. (sorry cannot post more than three links, ...


1

Since quota has only a noun form, I guess we need to go with a synonym for the adjective form. See if the adjective form of ration works: rationed - Adj. 1. rationed - distributed equitably in limited individual portions


2

One relatively common viewpoint seems to be that racist and sexist are actually always nouns used as "attributive nouns" (or possibly as appositives). I.e. "a racist tradition" means "a tradition associated with racists" in the same way that "a family tradition" means " a tradition associated with families/with a family." Somebody mentions this explanation ...


0

"'ol" can be used to mean "old", when used on its own, but with "big" it has a different meaning: when used in conjunction with "big" like this, "'ol", is an intensifier. You're not saying that the tree is old. It's closer in meaning to saying that the tree is "very big". People might say "big ol' bear" etc, "big ol' rock". They're not talking about ...


2

Note that traffic sign is a general-purpose term that includes hazard warnings, speed limits, etc. A sign telling you which road to take to get somewhere (or telling you where you'll end up if you continue on your present course) is more specifically called a... signpost - sign giving information such as the direction and distance to a nearby town, ...


3

Those are generally referred to as traffic signs or road signs: signs erected at the side of or above roads to give instructions or provide information to road users. The earliest signs were simple wooden or stone milestones. Later, signs with directional arms were introduced, for example, the fingerposts in the United Kingdom and their wooden ...


1

famed etymonline etymology "much talked about," 1530s, past participle adjective from fame "spread abroad, report" (v.), c. 1300, from Old French famer, from fame "reputation, renown" (see fame (n.)). As you can see, since famed derives from a past participle, its usage is more specialized than famous, as famed is best used for historical places, ...


1

The word I would use would be "tragicomic" or "tragicomical." Both are adjectives that describe the combined elements of tragedy and comedy. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/tragicomic


3

awakening dictionary.com adjective--1. rousing*; quickening *(rousing meaning to bring out of a state of sleep, unconsciousness, inactivity) Wiktionary adjective--Rousing from sleep, in a natural or a figurative sense; rousing into activity; exciting; as, the awakening city; an awakening discourse; the awakening dawn. revitalizing ...


4

It's not exactly the same, since it has meanings other than just non-drowsy, but you can probably use: invigorating: adj. making one feel strong, healthy, and full of energy. When talking about a soporific in terms of the noun, a drug that makes you drowsy, the opposite of that would be a stimulant, so you may also be able to use stimulating as an ...


0

The technical term for this is phatic. From Dictionary.com: denoting speech used to express or create an atmosphere of shared feelings, goodwill, or sociability rather than to impart information.


2

What are are asking for is very complicated, and not really about grammar. There is not going to be a straightforward rule to determine the 'correctness' of any phrase generated in this way. You haven't even clearly stated what you mean by 'correct'. Let's assume for now that your base word is always a noun. English has the concept of a 'noun string', which ...


0

Famed is a synonym of famous. The difference between famed and famous is that famed is having fame; famous or noted while famous is well known. Sydney is famous/famed for its opera house [http://the-difference-between.com/famous/famed][1]


0

You may want to try quarantined (definition # 4 at MW): a state of enforced isolation I see it used in a similar sense on reddit.


3

Ineffective and Useless respectively. From M-W: Ineffective: not capable of performing efficiently Useless: having or being of no use As in: Fire is strong against steel. Ice is ineffective against steel. Poison is useless against steel.


1

If you wanted a (perhaps too obscure) cinematic reference you could call them a Zelig, or perhaps refer to them as Zelig-like, after the 1983 mock documentary "Zelig" by Woody Allen. The film follows the eponymous Leonard Zelig, (the "human chameleon") who is unassuming and un-noteworthy other than his ability to change appearance and behaviour to fit his ...


0

In this context, "to ventilate" means to cause air to circulate, while "to vent" means to provide with an opening or openings (vents) through which air can pass. So a "ventilated brake" is a brake through which air is forced to circulate while a "vented brake" is one that has been provided with openings through which air can pass. I have also seen the term "...


1

Sadly, I must confirm your suspicions - headstrongness is in fact the correct term, as defined in OED: The quality or state of being headstrong; wilfulness, obstinacy; waywardness. Luckily, OED does offer three other suggestions - two have been given already by other users, but obstinacy is defined as The quality or condition of being obstinate; ...


0

Source Wherever and whenever it has been tried – including in the ultimate totalitarianism of Stalin’s Soviet Union – prohibition has proved to be a signal failure, causing not just sizeable revenue loss to the exchequer but also giving rise to an entrenched bootlegging mafia.


1

(I’m not sure if I’m repeating, agreeing, or disagreeing with what Edwin’s answer says… but I have some different points, too.) There are various types of elements that can be used to modify nouns: possessives (arguable whether they modify or merely determine), other noun phrases acting as adjuncts, adjectival phrases, and verb phrases, to name a few. Each ...


1

A compound noun is a noun (though it might consist of two orthographic words); some modern dictionaries have adopted the practice of labelling even open compounds 'noun': school bus n. A publicly or privately owned vehicle {AHDEL} They treat other compounds similarly: bottle green n. A dark to moderate or grayish green. bottle-green adj. ...


1

EDIT: I've misread the question. The OP wants to know about the rule (or possibly the role?) of "or" in the example sentences. I'll leave this answer anyway. I don't think there is any rule, written or unwritten which I can refer you to. But from knowing a little something about binomials when two or more words are listed, normally the polysyllabic ...


3

prudent, defined by The Free Dictionary as: Careful or wise in handling practical matters; exercising good judgment or common sense: a prudent manager of money. (emphasis added) Characterized by or resulting from care or wisdom in practical matters or in planning for the future: a prudent investment (emphasis added) Someone who lives below ...


3

The word I would use is solvent, though this is perhaps a slight stretch of its dictionary definition. Oxford dictionaries online defines solvent as: Having assets in excess of liabilities; able to pay one’s debts. By this definition one could be "solvent" if one is steadily losing money but still has a large amount of capital remaining. Defining it ...



Top 50 recent answers are included