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Asymmetry is the lack of any symmetry, while "dissymmetry" is the violation of symmetry. The map of Engalnd is asymmetric but a human face is dissymetric. But well... this is the usage in french!


2

There must be a lot of it around. mundane [Google Dictionary]: adjective 1. lacking interest or excitement; dull. "his mundane, humdrum existence" synonyms: humdrum, dull, boring, tedious, monotonous, tiresome, wearisome, prosaic, unexciting, uninteresting, uneventful, unvarying, unvaried, unremarkable, repetitive, repetitious, ...


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If you felt you were getting nothing out of the job, you could describe it as being uninspiring. If the work itself was so repetitive that it was making you bored of it maybe you could describe it as being tedious.


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Menial Merriam Webster's second definition menial: used to describe boring or unpleasant work that does not require special skill and usually does not pay much money A job could be menial.


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Consider uninteresting, it describes the task rather than your reaction to the task. The task cannot generate or sustain a worker's enthusiasm.


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I think you might look at synomyms for indifferent dispassionate unprejudiced nonpartisan impartial detached equitable neutral In particular indifferent and the first five alternatives have a prefix indicating the lack of feelings (either way) for whatever noun the adjective is being applied to.


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How about a state of merely being content? It seems as if you're looking for something that implies approval, but rather luke-warm approval. I'm content for others to eat meat.


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As it's been the actual accepted answer (see comments), I'll document it in an answer. People would usually very simply say: That's lame Which would mean in this case, according to Wiktionary: (slang) Failing to be cool, funny, interesting or relevant. It may be a bit offensive but I do believe it's the right choice in this context (you're not ...


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Sisyphean: denoting a task that can never be completed. Sisyphean Task: a task/chore/duty that is incessant or incessantly recurring, but futile. Aptly titled after the Greek mythological figure Sisyphus who was doomed to endlessly roll a boulder up a hill in Hades as punishment for chronic deceitfulness. His punishment proves futile in terms of completion ...


1

I'd like to point out that that tolerant and tolerating have somewhat opposite connotations. Do you actively have to put up with something, or by nature aren't bothered by it? I suspect you won't be able to find a perfect word (although I tried in my other answer). Do you know anyone who doesn't drink but doesn't find anything particularly wrong with it? I ...


3

In order: Prohibiting, disallowing, vetoing Objecting Condemn Dismissive Frown upon Unpreferred Tolerant Unbothered Ambivalent (also see thesaurus for synonyms) Considering Accepting (acceptable is likely the more natural use) Condoning (different flavor: active acceptance but possible disapproval) Preferring Wanting (and synonyms) Agreeing Approving ...


3

I don't know that it is possible to be fully neutral without dropping your perspective from it. As soon as you introduce yourself, you are automatically assuming a perspective against which a following statement will be compared, so absolute neutrality becomes improbable. Consider the difference between: Some people like the color blue. I tolerate ...


3

The term agnostic is often used to express such a sentiment. When applied to a non-religious context, it means someone who is uncommitted one way or another on a position. Regarding whether or not to eat meat, I am agnostic. Along the same lines is impartial, which means to treat all sides equally. I am impartial to vegetarians, although I am not ...


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The following words come to mind: Acceptable: just good enough, but not very good All right: satisfactory or reasonably good Convenient: suitable for the purposes and needs and causing the least difficulty


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Perhaps accepting. American Heritage offers these two definitions (among others) for accept To regard as proper, usual, or right: Such customs are widely accepted. To endure resignedly or patiently: accept one's fate.


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If I don't have an objection to something, I'd say: I'm okay with that. That's fine. It's acceptable.


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Multilingual: A multilingual person, in a broad definition, is one who can communicate in more than one language, be it actively (through speaking, writing, or signing) or passively (through listening, reading, or perceiving). More specifically, the terms bilingual and trilingual are used to describe comparable situations in which two or three languages ...


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If you know more than 3 languages, you are supertrilingual. (Which, of course, you can shorten to just being "super" :)


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quadrilingual: Able to speak four languages.


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Polyglot: person having a speaking, reading, or writing knowledge of several languages. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/polyglot


0

The phrase I am legend is a case of the use of legend as a collective noun. For example of such cases Legend has it that your orgasm lasts an hour. You are legend, in office-talk about your record. She is orgasm, because she makes every man in the office get an instant boner. She is honey, delectable and sweet. I am furniture to my boss. He uses the ...


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I'm sure a quick search of the definitions of mental illnesses will be helpful. Its worse when a person talks about how broke they are just to turn around and buy a new car. The decision to buy the car was done by one area of the brain(illogical subconscious side) while the other side (logical conscious side) can only complain about being broke since ...


3

Either works, but they have different meanings, and I am a legend is probably the one you want. Legend (Dictionary.com) means: 1. a nonhistorical or unverifiable story handed down by tradition from earlier times and popularly accepted as historical. 6. a collection of stories about an admirable person. 7. a person who is the center of such ...


0

What a horrible “dictionary”! That’s just saying that coruscate is an intransitive verb, so you can’t *coruscate anything. It has nothing to do with participial adjectives, like coruscating wit.


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Catmatic - all the way. Dogmatics follow rules irregardless. Catmatics are always open to a better, more fun and creative way. Cats Rule Mhisssss Bdrrrppp


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If you're thinking about the slogan—especially in the context of the product name—then the advertising agency responsible for the slogan has done its job. Advertisers have long aimed for the sweet spot in their target audience's psyche where a form of usage slightly rankles but doesn't prompt immediate dismissive ridicule. Previous winners in this game ...


0

The choice between what the poster describes as the adjective and noun forms for X in the phrase "X-born" may reflect the originating notion: "born a French national"/"born a native Texan" on the one hand, or "born in France"/"born in Texas" on the other. I've encountered both forms in different settings, but (at least in published writing) usage has ...


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Most commonly, when someone says you are "Country" Born... in other words, France-Born, Germany-Born, Britain-Born, that it is translated(for some odd reason) born French(citizen), born German, born British, but not necessarily in the respective countries(So French, German, or British citizens)....WHICH is different from French-Born, German-Born, ...


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A common way of describing the amount of space software takes up is to refer to its footprint. An app that doesn't take up much memory could be described as having a small footprint.


1

Here is the discussion of reliable and dependable in Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1942): A person or thing is reliable when one can count on him or it not to fail in doing what he or it is expected to do competently (as, she is a very reliable servant; one of the most reliable of our employees; a reliable washing machine), or to give or tell the ...


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I live in the desert heat island of Phoenix, Arizona. It doesn't seem very tropical or sandy-beached, but as far as "without permanent inhabitants", we do get a lot of Snow Birds in the winter from Chicago and Canada.


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I'd also like to point out that one of the other primary uses of critical (see here), "to express disapproving or judgmental comments" is more likely to have a qualifier. In this scenario, the qualifier is used to indicate the frequency or severity of someone's critiques, or the severity of a critique itself. But the qualifier on the "important" form of the ...


2

The adjective curious doesn't really match the idea of learning languages. Curious has the implications of asking questions. You could be curious about languages, but probably not about learning languages. (Unless you're curious about the study of language acquisition, but even then your sentence is odd because it has the quantified always.) I would say one ...


1

If all you want to say is that a rescue of five trapped people was effected, then I'd go with We rescued the five trapped people. We rescued the five people trapped sounds like you've left something off at the end. We rescued the five people trapped in the rubble. We rescued the five people trapped by the rising water. We rescued the five people ...


1

try "kafkaesque" "You don't give up, you don't lie down and die. What you do is struggle against this with all of your equipment, with whatever you have. But of course you don't stand a chance. That's Kafkaesque."


4

Satire is clearly the form. The adjective may be sardonic. The overall sense is cynical.


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Neither the positive nor the negative definition you provide for quixotic stands on its own: it’s the combination of the two that gives the word its unique meaning. Something quixotic is simultaneously ambitiously idealistic and hopelessly unrealistic. It’s not quixotic if it isn’t both.


2

Context, context, context! It all depends on the point of view of the person using the term. They could be admiring someone for doggedly fighting the windmills despite the overwhelming odds against winning, or they could be assigning the label of "fool" to someone who should just give up. As tchrist says...it's complicated.


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On the quixotic — and the Quijote Is quixotic positive or negative, you ask. An easy enough question to ask, aye. But to answer? To answer is something else. For it is . . . complicated. That’s because a tale as rich as El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha cannot be potted into a single sentence, nor sentiment. It does not admit a simple yes or ...


0

My impression is that "correct" denotes accuracy, while "right" denotes more of judgment or (but not limited to, a moral call). For example, the statement, "Two plus two equals four," is correct - it is not right, nor is it the right answer; it is the correct answer. Another example would be to say, "You are correct in your belief that the moon is not ...


1

From the Wikipedia article on 'Comparative': ... monosyllabic adjectives generally form their comparative form with -er in English, whereas polysyllabic adjectives prefer to use more. That is to say, adjectives with one syllable will usually use "-er", and anything else will use "more". So you would expect the comparative form of "fun" to be "funner", ...


0

As a more informal expression you may use: In the know: Possessing special or secret information.


1

There might be another word you can use, if you modify your sentence slightly. You could use: privy I am not (as) privy to stock insider information/facts/news as you are. Here, privy is an adjective that describes how well-informed/well-connected the other person is. Per Oxford Dictionaries: Privy to: Sharing in the knowledge of (something ...


2

You might use well-versed or phrases like completely informed, well-informed, or thoroughly informed. Expert is another possibility.


2

"Unforgettable" is a much stronger word. "Memorable" is a much safer word which would normally be selected in a polite thank-you note. Certainly there are cases where the stronger word is also approriate in polite thank-you notes, but the problem is that you don't want to seem to be using overstatement, which can make you appear insincere. "Unforgettable" ...


1

Unforgettable implies a more lively or physical experience, while memorable tends towards the more mentally stimulating experiences. Also, the former generally refers to a single moment, while the latter can refer to a longer period of time. For example, going to college can be memorable, while probably only a single day of class or night of partying could ...


0

Must be a bit late... This thesaurus could be helpful to dig into ideas and vocabulary. An entry for Ten-percenter.


0

Promoting an adjective to a noun is well-precedented ("Lonely are the brave", "The fast and the furious", "we happy few"), but demoting an adjective to an adverb is just ign'ant. (I am assuming that "cheat legal" is supposed to mean "cheat legally", not "cheat the legal [system/people/organizations]".)


0

I would go with trustworthy, meaning "able to be relied upon as a person of integrity".



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