New answers tagged

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Inconsequential: adj. Lacking importance.


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This question needs more specifics to answer properly. Overlook has several senses. In the sense of 'look over' ("this room overlooks the ocean') you could use 'dramatic' or 'scenic' to say it is worth overlooking. In the sense of 'choose not to see' ("we will overlook your persistent lateness") you could use 'unimportant' or 'trivial'. In the sense of ...


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Negligible conveys the meaning you are referring to: of little consequence as to warrant little or no attention : trifling a negligible error (M-W)


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Inconspicuous things are easily overlooked. Inconspicuous Not clearly visible or attracting attention - ODO


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I thought to supplement the other excellent answers with more information about the PIE root *ghel-. This website lists more derivatives, but references p 29, The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots by Calvert Watkins, on which the entry ghel-2 lists many more derivatives an so is too long to reproduce here; so I quote only the underlying ...


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People exercising everyday are healthy. This implies that "people" are healthy while exercising everyday, but not necessarily when they stop exercising. People who exercise everyday are healthy. This is more idiomatic. But "everyday" is an adjective/adverb, whereas you really want a noun as the object of "exercise". So it should be: People ...


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I think "People who exercise every day are healthy." is the correct wording. Also, note that it's "every day", not "everyday."


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Though not an adjective, I think jargon could work also. This website provides a few examples of jargon used in literature: http://literarydevices.net/jargon/.


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The language used in poems can be as varied as language itself. The poem can draw from one, several, or many registers. A sonnet about love can have a metaphor that uses the vocabulary of seafaring, or banking, say, or the vocabulary of planting and harvesting. A dramatic work, in which characters speak, can be as varied in its diction as the characters it ...


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The most simple, brief, to-the-point option would be formal language. If you're looking for something more colourful, consider the following. Cultured language is a good antonym of standard or colloquial language: "As a consequence, socialist realism portrayed common people as speaking in formal, cultured language. In this sense, socialist realism was a ...


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Although it is perhaps not as much of a sociological description you might be looking for, I like the adjective quaint for your example. A father giving away his daughter has a wholesome connotation. It means there is a father in the picture, and he cares enough to be at the wedding. Because of the vast degree of nationalities and customs in western ...


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In a corpus of about 1.5 million words of poetry I found 214 instances of conjoined colours, where the colours were the 12 commonest colour terms in the U.S. frequency dictionary. Red and white occurred 12 times, and white and red 10 times. A 12 by 12 chart of all the possibilities exhibited a roughly symmetrical pattern of results with one exception: green ...


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I think that the term that fits the context you are describing is patriarchal: Patriarchal Traditional Marriage: The orthodox view of sexual ethics has been in the context of the patriarchal traditional marriage of the past few millennia -- a relationship of ownership and domination of a husband over his wife. Remnants of traditional marriage are ...


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A slightly lighthearted word for this situation is dishevelled (def. 2). My toothbrush has become dishevelled. From Wiktionary: dishevelled (of a person) With the hair uncombed. (by extension) Disorderly or untidy in appearance. Synonyms messy, scraggly, tousled, unkempt, untidy


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I would call that toothbrush 'frazzled', or 'frazzled out', depending on how much of a colloquial tone I wanted--'frazzled out' being the more colloquial. 'Frazzled' is the adjective formed from the past participle of 'to frazzle': fraz·zle (frăz′əl) Informal v. fraz·zled, fraz·zling, fraz·zles v.tr. 1. To wear away along the edges; fray. ...


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Consider threadbare (Of cloth, clothing, or soft furnishings) becoming thin and tattered with age (Of a person, building, or room) poor or shabby in appearance [ODO] I would also suggest worn-out[ODO sense 2] which is applicable for toiletries (toothbrush, shaving brush, razor etc..), clothing or furniture but may not be for gradually ...


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frayed: (of cloth) with threads in it that are starting to come apart (Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary) "It is not very good for your teeth once the bristles are bent or frayed in any direction." ("How to Reuse Old Toothbrushes" at WikiHow) Google image search for: frayed toothbrush Note: This adjective seems to be more commonly applied to ...


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In technical terms among the software developers, business analysts and database administrators, the term referenceable could be used to describe a data element that can be linked in some way to another piece of data, by means of some shared data key, and therefore something that can be used; It is a field that is able to be referenced. Examples can be ...


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As @FumbleFingers commented, the word "nasty" is loaded with the same sexual connotations as "wicked," "filthy," "dirty," and "kinky" these days... As an alternative, you might want to consider mean. mean: cruel, spiteful, or malicious: a mean boy who liked to make fun of others. AHD She was the meanest girl I ever saw.


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If you google the meaning of this word, you will find its meaning like: - not kind, very bad or very angry or violent. So, if you were going to describe a little girl as a nasty girl, you could say: - she has always been a nasty girl to her parents. I hope you got it. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/pt/dicionario/ingles/


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Yes, though context can provide additional implications - whether you mean nasty to imply disgusting and lacking in cleanliness, or malicious and deliberately mean, or another variant. One of the other terms you suggest would sound more natural. The Destiny's Child song carries complex implications about the woman's attitude to sex, using the other lines in ...


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I would say this is a dictionary problem. If you tend to create your own word formations you have to consult the dictionary to see whether your formation is really what speakers have agreed on. It would really be a study of its own to show the problems of this kind of word formation. I have only tried compound nouns with either noun or gerund as subelement. ...


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In a competitive context, you might call it one-upmanship. If you're referring to the person doing it for social acceptance just because his friend(s) did it, it's peer pressure. Without the social acceptance aspect, we simply have the neutral term peer influence. Here's a paper on it from a web search.


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Since this question is still floating around in the Unanswered Questions queue a month after it was asked, I'm going to suggest three adjectives that may be somewhat relevant to the meaning that the poster wants to capture: antiheroic, involuntary, and expedient. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this entry for the noun antihero: ...


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Those whom grew up speaking or around one of the romantic languages like Spanish will often use the [most] and [more], which are superalative and comparative adverbs, because they don't have the comparative, superlative morphemes: [mas bonita] is [more pretty]. I recently spoke to some linguistics students who said that at a conference, someone presented a ...


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Though grammatically both friendlier and more friendly are correct. But formally since friendly is a 2- syllable word, more friendly is more acceptable. However, if we go by figures, Google's survey for published works can help you. ...


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How about a universalizer? Those who universalize typically make sweeping generalizations.


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Generalizator --> someone who generalizes Terminator --> someone who terminates Generator --> someone who generates Short sighted or narrow minded would maybe come to mind. More the former than the latter.


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The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style (2000) says: Other variant adjectives, though, are merely duplicative. Typical examples are extendable, extendible, and extensible. The first of these is now prevalent in AmE (though labeled obsolete in the OED). Extensible was, through the mid-20th century, the most common form, but today it trails ...


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What about generalisor to describe someone who generalises?


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The obvious answer would be: Prejudiced: having an unreasonable dislike of or preference for somebody/something, especially based on their race, religion, sex, etc. Synonyms: narrow-minded, bigoted, intolerant Biased: having a tendency to show favour towards or against one group of people or one opinion for personal reasons; making ...


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This is an intriguing example where an ambiguous adverb serves less well than incorrect grammar. Live curiously is correct but ambiguous, as seen at Macmillan: curiously – adverb in an unusual and interesting way in a way that shows that you want to find out about something Live curious incorrectly modifies a verb, live, with an ...


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Consider the following three examples: Plenary, meaning full. This occurs in two common phrasings. The first is plenary session of some convocation, which is open to all attendees and the second is a plenary indulgence of the Catholic Church, an act which removes all punishment for confessed sin. (In contrast, a partial indulgence removes only some ...


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In the one hand, this is very simple. There is a trend in US advertising to drop the LY adverbs and use the adjective instead. That would not be acceptable in a formal essay but it's OK in advertising as it reflects the way people talk. Play Fair, instead of play fairly. But, on the other, there are amusing things like: Think Big, which is not an example of ...


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Hungry is to starvation as Thirsty is to "Dehydration'


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Idiopathic: Of unknown cause. Idiopathic specifically relates to disease, which addiction certainly is considered.


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You need to be aware that often starving is used in a hyperbolic sense, and not its literal meaning that indicates malnourishment. eg. Man I'm starving! I haven't eaten since breakfast! The equivilent I would suggest here is parched. Man I'm parched! Do you have any water? If you are looking for a equivilent term to the literal starving: eg. ...


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I'm not a medical doctor, but I have come across the term undiagnosed condition. It is used in the following sense: An undiagnosed condition is one where someone experiences symptoms but does not have a formal diagnosis. - Brain and Spine Foundation Undiagnosed conditions can also be asymptomatic. The links relate more broadly to physical and mental ...


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The word we use here (UK) is gasping gasp 1.3 (be gasping for) British informal Be desperate to obtain or consume; crave: 'I'm gasping for a drink!' http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/gasp gasping Adjective. British. Spoken. very thirsty ...


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Hungry is to starving as thirsty is to thirsting assoiffé adj (qui a très soif) thirsty, thirsting adj Il fait très chaud, les animaux sont assoiffés. It's very hot, the animals are very thirsty. WordReference (Oxford) English-French Dictionary "thirsting animals" Google Books "thirsting rats" Google Books


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While "dying of thirst" is still a common expression, nowadays it's much more likely to hear someone say they're dehydrated. (US English)


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Hungry is to starving as thirsty is to parched. Parched : very thirsty - M-W


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Everything in the universe is unique, therefore nothing is truly unique, therefore uniqueness can only be thought of in shades of grey. My car is unique. No other car in the world has a right fender dented quite like it, or a leaky valve cover with precisely the same pattern of oil down the side of the motor. But nobody is scrambling to buy my unique car ...


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My two cents: It's a tug of war between literal meaning and understood meaning. In other words, the word unique may literally describe one thing only, but I think most people understand what "more unique" means. At the same time, there are a variety of synonyms you can plug in, such as remarkable, exceptional and singular. So instead of saying "more ...


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To say something is more unique than something else is not correct. Unique means one of a kind. Something either is unique or it isn't. It's a "yes or no", "all or nothing", "true or false" kind of term. For example, if you were to say "the Earth revolves around the Sun", that would be "true". If you then said, "the Moon revolves around the Earth and the ...


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This use of 'not very' is weasel wording and is deliberately disingenuous. I upvoted the answer saying if you can't say something nice, say nothing; but if you must discuss appearance negatively, then there are more polite and less vicious synonyms for ugly.


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Both; louder and more loudly are the same as loud is also an adverb not always an adjective. Example: Can you speak louder, please? in this case 'louder' modifies 'speak.'


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I think it is all about usages, that these kind of adjectives are gradable. For example, the meaning of unique is derived from latin unus 'one'. So, when its meaning is related to a mathematical concept it cannot be modified. But there is a second sense in unique meaning unusual or special, in this case it isn't related to the first sense i.e. being only ...


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Some people consider more unique acceptable, especially informally, while others consider it wrong or ugly for the reason you suggested. Most style guides would advise against it. The choice is yours, as always. A quotation from Fowler's Modern English Usage (Burchfield ed.): It must, I think, be conceded that unique is losing its quality of being 'not ...


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Yes, something can properly be called "more unique". It's easy to construct an example. You hold a contest asking for "unique barbecue ideas". A flying barbecue is unique. It has one differentiating feature. A flying barbecue that hums show tunes is unique. It has two differentiating features. The flying, humming barbecue is more unique than the flying ...



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