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1

I think you're looking for "handheld". handheld : designed to be used while being held in your hands Merriam-Webster reference


0

I am surprised nobody suggested 'sparse' as an alternate word. Thinly dispersed or scattered


2

When shortened forms become idiomatic, it may be better not to try to identify parts of speech within them. I had more cups of tea than Harry [had] [cups of tea]. No problem with classifying Harry as a noun (phrase) (though 'they did' reduces to 'them' nowadays). ... I had more cups of tea than [I] [had] [cups of] coffee. Again, no problems. ...


0

"Disperse" is a suitable adjective; the opposite of "dense".


1

The question is whether you mean to say that the number of customers is more than the usual number (adjective) or that you had more customers than you usually have (adverb). So either is correct. Practically speaking, they amount to the same thing. We (in AmE, and per David Pugh, in BrE as well) tend to use the shorter form "usual", and not dwell on this ...


0

There is no doubt in my mind that most British people will say "I had more customers than usual", and not use the adverb. The theory of it I shall leave to my betters.


1

'I moved closer.' Here closer is a comparative adjective functioning as a complement of the verb move. It does not describe the process of moving, it describes the subject, I, at the end of the moving process. As such we could regard it as a type of locative complement. These types of complement are nearly always preposition phrases or adjectives. ...


0

emollient From http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/emollient: Attempting to avoid confrontation or anger; calming or conciliatory. "At the local carabinieri station, an officer was more emollient: ‘By the end of the month everything should be resolved."


5

This is a form of metonymy using adjectives as what are called transferred epithets. Nordquist, in Grammar.about.com gives a good overview, including the definition A figure of speech in which an epithet (or adjective) grammatically qualifies a noun other than the person or thing it is actually describing. Also known in rhetoric as hypallage. ...


0

The person or group is stonewalling (WordWeb on line), evading the problem, question, or contact.


0

The adjective for such people is "rash" or, as mentioned by FF, "reckless". Both words mean "careless to the point of irresponsibility". rash - (adj) " acting without due consideration or thought" TFD e.g. Their rash actions resulted in a serious accident that could have killed someone. Don't be rash about this decision. Take your ...


4

'reckless' was suggested by @FumbleFingers in the comments. reckless: utterly unconcerned about the consequences of some action; without caution; careless


0

One often says that such a person, group etc. is "in denial". But they don't have to have caused it themselves.


2

Closer in this sentence is the comparative of the adverb close. close (adv.) at or to a short distance or time away [M-W]


0

I've found another option: cavil "raise irritating and trivial objections; find fault with unnecessarily" adjective form: "cavilling"


0

You could say "diesel fuel and the engines that utilize it," though I would suggest that repeating the word diesel is actually less awkward.


0

The sentence you have now is actually correct — "diesel" is distributed to both "fuel" and "engines." However, you're right that some people might read it as referring to all engines, so you might want to stick to using both adjectives if your objective is absolute clarity.


0

Only a lawyer could misunderstand "diesel fuel and engines", because they're paid to misunderstand. Likewise "diesel engines and fuel" – that must mean all fuel, they will say. But if you're trying to craft lawyer-proof text, I take your point. I don't think anything is proof against such perversity, and the hyphen suggestion is nonsense, so maybe you'd ...


2

Well, I think grammarians are going to have various opinions, but the Oxford English Dictionary thinks these are both nouns. Or, more precisely, they are adjectives used as "absolute" constructions which omit the noun they reference implicitly, somewhat similarly to a process where we use an adjective as a substantive, like referring to the weak when we mean ...


0

Jennifer: "too high expectations" does not work for me, for reasons which have more to do with my ear than with adjectives modified by adverbs. Given that 'overly high expectations' and 'unrealistically high expectations' work fine, it may be because the 'too high' construction is a tautology: obvioulsy we should not have expectations that are too high ...


1

The concept you're looking for is "gamification". Gamification is the use of game thinking and game mechanics in non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems and increase users' contributions. Gamification has been studied and applied in several domains, with some of the main purposes being to engage (improve user engagement, physical exercise, ...


0

"You should not place too high expectations on your children" seems perfect. "You should not place too high an expectation..." would also mean the same thing. However, "Too pretty a waitress" isn't the same as "the waitress is so very pretty". It has a subtle connotation that a waitress this pretty, could be in a better career, say modelling or something ...


2

In short is an idiom, and idioms cannot be broken down to into their constituents. From oxford The same goes for in brief


5

TL;DR US and USA are not adjectives: they are nouns that can potentially be used attributively, with the same meaning as the corresponding adjectives (if such exist). Headlinese has slightly different rules, but in normal, non-Headlinese language use: USA is not used attributively because it is an abbreviation of a compound country name (United States of ...


2

If I'm constrained to a hyphenated expression I'd probably go with a getting-to-know-you break, after the song from The King and I. But I think the more ordinary way of expressing this would be something like We broke for a mixer, to get to know the new members. It's an American use: Collins, def. 2. Broke might be adjourned, if the session was the ...


-1

I would have thought... "You should not place too high an expectations on your children." "We were forced to cancel the boat trip due to too windy conditions." "Having too strict a set of rules is not recommended." ...but then I am no expert ;)


1

The original construction for singular is "too pretty of a day", etc. I expect that helps make the answer very simple. She went to Hollywood with too high of expectations.


-1

Fine is the same as good! There is no difference! So if your teacher says your essay is fine, you should have 100 percent right to get an A+ on it!


0

A sentence fragment that begins "Excellence in .... " is retailing/marketing cant. It implies "You can expect excellence in {something} from us" or "We are known for excellence in {something}".


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single-minded adjective Having or concentrating on only one aim or purpose: the single-minded pursuit of profit ODO


0

hyperfocused hyper- + focused Adjective hyperfocused (comparative more hyperfocused, superlative most hyperfocused) Extremely focused; unwavering "While Brown distracted the usually hyperfocused Mangini, safety Kerry Rhodes and linebackers Eric Barton and Jonathan Vilma grabbed a cooler of Gatorade and surreptitiously assumed ...


2

Depending on the context, three other words come to mind to describe a person departing from and organization: Retired has strong connotations of concluding a career, but it also has a general sense of departure: : withdrawn from one's position or occupation : having concluded one's working or professional career Merriam-Webster Dismissed ...


1

You could say "leaver", although I've only heard the term in the context of those who abandon school: school-leavers. And it's exactly what the Cambridge dictionary cites. "Departed" seems good enough for me in this situation too, even though it's usually used for people who have died. The Free Dictionary even cites a phrase with the term leaver: A ...


5

If he has already left, he is gone: adjective [PREDICATIVE] 1 No longer present; departed: If you are not using a predicative expression, absent might work better: Not present in a place, at an occasion, or as part of something: For a more permanent departure, parted: [NO OBJECT] 2. (also be parted) Leave someone’s company: or ...


1

mmmmm hand drip coffee....mmmmmm By starting the phrase with the noun, they are indicating that they provide excellence, or are known for their excellence. This is a stronger statement than just saying "Excellent Hand Drip Coffee" because it suggests that someone somewhere believes it already, and gives them some reputation.


0

To my ear, your sentence is totally fine. 'Late' to mean 'deceased' is a much less common usage and no one is going to be confused.


0

You may use assiduity. When you do something with assiduity, you really focus your attention on it. If you work with assiduity on a research paper, you're sure to get an A. Successful businessmen all make great use of their assiduity to get what they want and do their best work. Your Question: The word should apply to a person focused on an activity. ...


-1

Unswerving might work in that context.


-1

Over the last couple of centuries we have apparently become less cautious, but "huge caution" was never much used. The phrase which springs to mind in the quote you provided is "extreme caution", and n-gram seems to agree ...


2

Common by itself can mean either prevalent[Oxford, sense 1] or shared[Oxford, sense 2]. Occurring, found, or done often; prevalent: salt and pepper are the two most common seasonings Shared by, coming from, or done by two or more people, groups, or things: the two republics' common border However, in expressions like ...


0

I believe this can be described as a conditional statement, or just as an adjective - conditional.


1

I nominate skeleton. The supporting framework, basic structure, or essential part of something: the concrete skeleton of an unfinished building (No exterior) the skeleton of a report (No exterior) [From Oxford]


2

In the case of a tree, I might use the term denuded. denuded adj without the natural or usual covering; TFD By the way, this is not really an antonym of hollow, because what you're looking for is not really an antonym, per se. It's more like a mirrored state, or a complementary state. The antonym of hollow would be filled or full or any of several ...


0

I guess the word you are looking for is marrow. However, I don't know if it suits the example you gave. I'd rather say naked or bare.


1

You can say that you have the core or heart of something.


0

Huge can be used with mass nouns, it is just not generally associated with the term caution (see Ngram). Of exceedingly great scope or nature: the huge influence of the Hellenic world. (AHD) Ngram huge caution - Ngram huge caution vs huge influence You are right in saying it sounds odd becauce huge in the sentence is actually used to suggest ...


0

First of all: This is a highly sensitive political and sociological issue in Finland, so thread lightly whichever terminology you choose. Keep in mind that there is also a Finnish minority in Sweden. Swedish Finn or Sweden-Finn would denote a Swedish citizen speaking Finnish, while Finland-Swede would be the term for the group you refer to. In Swedish ...


2

Probably, indecipherable. At the heart of this adjective is cipher, which means "code". Something that's indecipherable can't be understood. If you can't figure out the meaning of something, it's indecipherable. (vocabulary.com) an indecipherable message or font.


3

This isn't exactly what you're looking for, but it will help get the idea across. The mail has poor contrast differences in colour or in light and dark, used in photographs and paintings to create a special effect ...and therefore is illegible. difficult or impossible to read [Oxford] As for your requirement, the best I could come up with ...


0

I don't think its necessarily wrong, but I don't thing its very euphonic, either. If I were writing it, I'd go with "can be integrated with...".



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