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0

It might be idiomatic to use a linking verb, for example, Every sever is less loaded. You can convey the sense of the load being spread among more servers with: The new servers we brought on line have distributed the server load. There are many examples of reducing the server load, for example, How To Reduce Server Load Of Your WordPress ...


0

It seems that loaded is a commonly used adjective that refers to the load of a server, see for example this book. There are also algorithms to find the Least Loaded Server


4

There are lots of ways of talking about starting cars. Except for (1) and (2), these are fine. There is an English grammar rule being violated in (1) and (2). Native speakers know it, because they follow it, but they usually can't state it. Non-native speakers need to be taught the rule, however, because it's not obvious. When a noun modifier consists of ...


0

Safe means that the condition is protected. Car safety = safety belt, airbar, etc. Secure means only people allowed by the owner are able to access it. Car security = lock, alarm, gps tracking, etc. Secure means it cannot be stolen. Like passwords, or money. Safe means it cannot be destroyed. Like health.. Or a painting is safer in the right conditions, ...


0

I agree with Tim Lymington's appraisal, it was the first thing that came to mind -"motherf**king", which was softened to "motherloving". That's still offensive by its connotations if not the hard language in it. Therefore "everloving" is a further softening of the phrase. This is, of course, conjecture, but I'm happily convinced by it :)


1

During that acrimonious period during the divorce process my now ex-husband called me uppity. We are both white but my outrage came from my understanding of the origin of the word and how that meaning would apply to the husband/wife relationship. To me it clearly meant that he considered himself my superior and my inferior status entitled me to nothing ...


0

I find the word "slithering" can be used as an adjective although it is rare but it certainly is descriptive of "snake-like".


0

"Educational System" is a class of system. An "Education System" is an instance of the class. "Person" is a class. "John" is a person.


0

Educational - means something that educates, and it is an adjective Education - is a noun. When used with objects as a determiner it means related to or about education. In your concrete example education system refers to the schools, universities, etc. - the system consisting of different bodies that provide education. Though educational system can also be ...


0

How about "Real destinations"? It is an antonym of virtual.


9

The word tacky is used when describing the 'grippiness' of golf grips (which are, as it happens, made of rubber), especially when it comes to the 'stickiness' of the rubber compound, as opposed to the roughness of the surface.


0

If it is the physicality of the entities that you wish to underline, rather than the type of location (i.e. a type of building or place) then you are looking for a word that is the opposite of 'virtual' and synonymous with 'physical'. The only suitable word I can think of is 'Actual', as in "Actual Locations" which could work quite well as a list title if ...


0

From dictionary.com, definition 2b... premises - a building together with its grounds or other appurtenances Some people only use this term (always plural in this sense) for commercial properties, but just as a landlord can evict a tenant from the premises, I see nothing wrong with a tenant or homeowner evicting an uninvited guest from the premises ...


1

Rubber is 'tacky'. I like the word tacky. It's kind of tacky like blue tack or the soles of your 'tekkies' (slang word for running shoes in Afrikaans)...


1

The first word that comes to mind without trying too hard is chafing. Perhaps you could also try abrasive. While they are not perfect matches for rubber to describe the equivalent of slippery to oil, it is a close match.


0

If you don't mind something a little recondite, you could try herpolhode. According to Goldstein in Classical Mechanics, this word originally meant snake-like, from which it was pressed into service with its current meaning:- A herpolhode is the curve traced out by the endpoint of the angular velocity vector ω of a rigid rotor, a rotating rigid body. ...


3

Unslippery is certainly a possibility, but I don't like it. Commercial products such as deck paints tend to use terms such as "non-slip" and "slip-resistant".


74

The "obvious" answer is grippy — the ability to grip a surface well. It is less commonly used than slippery, but it is a proper word.


3

Comments thusfar (including the OP's) seem to confuse friction with rheology. A slippery substance is one with low viscosity, not a low coefficient of friction. A coating of oil makes surfaces slippery because the oil deforms easily and permanently under small shear (i.e., sliding) stress. Rubber deforms only slightly, then returns to its original shape, so ...


15

As has been mentioned in comments, "sticky", "adhesive" might fit. But the truth is rubber isn't naturally sticky or adhesive. It does have a high "coefficient of friction" though. That's why it isn't slippery. In non-technical terms, we can say rubber is nonslippery or skid-resistant.


9

The word slippery implies very little friction. You want a word that implies a lot of friction, which creates a "gripping" sensation. To that effect, I couldn't find any simple, commonly used words. Frictive is one, which literally means "friction-y". CarSmack suggested "rubbery", but "rubber is rubbery" seems redundant.


2

I think the best adjective is "snakelike" as used by Jack London 'The huge, snakelike body coiled and uncoiled about its prey.' or "He received no applause, and he squirmed through the ropes, snakelike, into the arms of his seconds"


1

There is a discussion of this question on this blog post: http://studioblog.envato.com/freelance-vs-self-employed/ and while that author doesn't find a difference in the Webster's definitions, there is one. The different is also mentioned here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=677080 in the fourth post. In my understanding, whereas the terms ...


3

You shouldn’t expect the average unstudied English monoglot to know the word, but the OED gives as the primary sense of the adjective colubrine: Of, belonging to, or characteristic of a snake or serpent; snake-like. One citation for that sense is: 1883 P. Robinson in Harper’s Mag. Oct. 708/1 The colubrine impossibility of springing off the ...


0

A different and probably better example could be This is a car more fast than fast-selling. (Made for speed but few people want to buy.) The benefit of more rather than the comparative form faster is too obvious here. There are contexts where more and most are useful irrespective of whether the word itself has its own comparative and ...


0

IN the 100 most common more + adjective citations in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, there is only one single-syllable adjective, real, and that has two syllables for many speakers. More fun appears in the list, but many of the citations are for the noun. So, the construction is not common, but Quirk et al note in their Comprehensive Grammar of ...


3

In your example sentences more is being used as a determiner not as a comparative. The meaning is: Today there are more cars that are fast, and not Today there are faster cars. There is in fact one context in which more is sometimes used in the comparative of single-syllable adjectives, namely as an alternative to the repetition of the adjective in ...


8

My humble Pocket Oxford Dictionary says simply: snaky. If you want to describe someone in a negative way, perhaps treacherous would do the trick.


-1

If you are talking about a mindset, maybe still could be what you are looking for? I think it can incorporate fearlessness and hopelessness, but only if they are also at peace with the situation they are in. How because there is no more stress, it is actually a relief, even if it means death since there is nothing more to be afraid of. still - undisturbed ...


1

Desperate implies being both fearless and hopeless in the right context. Because you can become fearless and reckless out of despair if you lose all your hope. Having lost all hope; despairing. careless of danger, as from despair; utterly reckless http://www.thefreedictionary.com/desperate


-1

A soldier. Specifically, a Marine. Not exactly what you're looking for but your edit only makes me think of this: "The only hope you have is to accept the fact that you're already dead. The sooner you accept that, the sooner you'll be able to function as a soldier is supposed to function: without mercy, without compassion, without remorse. All war depends ...


1

Agnostic (in non-religious usage) properly means that one has not or cannot come to an opinion on a matter. There are many reasons for that, and indifference is only one of them. Another would be an insufficiency of evidence, or a contractual prohibition of favouritism.


2

The OED lists its principal meaning as the religious one: A person who believes that nothing is known or can be known of immaterial things, especially of the existence or nature of God. Distinguished from atheist n. The meaning that your colleague is adopting is described by the OED as an 'extended use' of the term. See below. In extended use: a person ...


1

It sounds like the fellow in question is thinking of the term as it has been used in the software industry (unfortunately, IMHO) for several years. Example: "The new app is platform-agnostic." This means that the app will run regardless if you are (for example) a Mac or PC user, or a Windows 8 or WindowsXP user.


0

The formal Greek word for snake-like is ophioides, a compound of ophis and eidos (form). In English this becomes ophioid, similarly to words like asteroid, sigmoid (sigma-like or S-like) etc.


0

Quixotic Per the Wordsmyth: Exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical.


-2

brave: He is a brave man. courageous, heroic, intrepid ...there is probably a large list of possibilities in a thesaurus for this. This doesn't really cover hopeless because it would seem that these adjectives I listed are a natural quality of a person. It isn't really diagnosed and cured as the word hopeless suggests. You may have to write it out, as an ...


0

Agnostic someone who is doubtful or noncommittal about something eg: Though I am agnostic on what terms to use, ...


-2

No sir! The word gnostic is the root of agnostic, and that has all to do with religion--not to do with indifference. Occasionally (rarely), the word agnostic is used to describe a non-committal attitude, but it really doesn't fit in your example sentence. To see why you need to look up the definition of gnostic. From Merriam-Webster: the thought and ...


4

It sounded very strange to me, but the online Merriam-Webster gives this as one of its definitions for agnostic: a person who is unwilling to commit to an opinion about something , and it also lists the word as an adjective. So, "I am agnostic as to whether we go with A or option B" appears to be acceptable.


0

well, "sad" and "disappointed" do not describe the subject. they describe the action of feeling, sad or disappointed. a person feels sad he does not have a quality that is sadness. sadness comes and goes.


8

Reptilian wasn't mentioned. Serpentine is good but doesn't have the negative connotation.


16

A word derived from the Latin for snake, anguis, is anguiform. Having the shape of a serpent or snake; snake-shaped. [OED] A word which resembles bovine is anguine. Of or resembling a snake or serpent. [OED]


21

Phrontistery has a list of suitable words: ophic of, like or pertaining to serpents ophidian of or like a snake ophiomormous snakelike ophiomorphic shaped like a snake OED has ophiomorphic Having or resembling the form of a serpent; snakelike, and gives its etymology as deriving from ancient Greek ὄϕις serpent


0

Yes. You can meaningfully call them that. Here is one example of that use: (Description of a bug): When you revoke access to a team[,] followed repositories still show up in the master list. (I added the comma as a correction to the referenced text.)


62

Serpentine is the snake equivalent of bovine. of or resembling a serpent (as in form or movement) Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/serpentine Serpent - synonym of snake Wikipedia : Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes ... All modern snakes are grouped within the suborder Serpentes in ...


2

I would use these terms: on time event: This concert is an on time event. Patrons arriving late will be allowed to take their seats during intermission. anytime event: The after party is an anytime event. Guests are free to come and go as they please during the party.


2

You use the word "punctual" to describe how you should arrive, so perhaps the word could be extended to describe the event itself. A concert or play is a "punctual event", while a fair or gala could be a "flexible event".


-1

I can't post comments yet, so I'm leaving an answer that would probably fit better as a comment. Participles and gerunds are called nominal forms in some languages because they have such syntactical functions as nouns, adjectives and adverbs do. Compare Hitchhiking is not allowed in the U.S. and Animals are not allowed inside. for a present ...


0

Anime or emo. The top layers of my hair is somewhat like that. People always tell me my hair is emo or that of an anime character, I agree.



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