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-1

Ford F-150 is the official full name of the car (make + model). Grammatically speaking, it is a compound proper noun: I own a Ford F-150. F-150 is an abbreviated version of that name: I own an F-150. So is Ford in the following statement (although the designation could refer to any Ford motor car, not just an F-150): I own a Ford. In your ...


1

Since my excessively heavy dictionary (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th Edition) is already out, I might as well see what it has to say on the subject. evoke tr.v. evoked, evoking, evokes 1. To summon or call forth: actions that evoked our mistrust. 2. To call to mind by naming, citing, or suggesting: songs that evoke old memories. 3. To create anew, ...


0

To add to the fray - Narrow can be used to contrast with wide; thin cannot. At least two dimensions are involved. Thin can be used to contrast with thick; narrow cannot. One dimension is stressed, even though it is the other dimension(s) that are qualified by the adjective. A line or a string can be more or less thin/thick. We think of a line as ...


2

'evocative' (adj.)--tending or serving to evoke (to bring to mind or recollection). e.g., 'this place evokes memories of happier years.' Provocative' (adj.)--serving or tending to provoke, excite or stimulate. e.g., a very attractive woman wearing a black, backless dress with deep decolletage I would find extremely provocative. But It wouldn't stir up past ...


1

You can provoke thoughts and actions, but you generally evoke only thoughts/memories.


9

Having mulled this over in my head for a bit, I finally came—through the help of @starplusplus’ comment—to a distinction which I think holds up quite nicely in the vast majority of cases. There will always be odd ones out that are just completely idiomatic and do not hold up to logical scrutiny (many, in fact—this is language we’re dealing with), but the ...


5

The words are similar, but usually not inter-changeable. Thin is an adjective that describes an object's characteristic width or depth: "This pencil is thin; that pencil is not." "This type of pasta is thin; the other is not." "The mattress is thin and lumpy." "We use thin-film technology in the production of solar cells." Narrow is an adjective that ...


0

To address part of your question/s, thin refers to depth and narrow to width. As an example of the rule, a ribbon would always be considered to be thin (not thick), but could be narrow or wide as to its width. A road could be thin or thick with regard to its paving--but I doubt that is the dimension your daughter is trying to identify. When describing the ...


0

Atypical is by far the most common of the three, as confirmed in a Google ngram search, so that would be my suggestion. Untypical is apparently most often used in the phrase "not untypical". Another Google ngram search supports this. See also this Ask the Editor response.


1

I might say one of these: "This is the lethal error." "Here is the critical error." "Here is the fatal error."


0

“To be possessed of” in the sense “to be in possession of” is listed in the OED, art. “possess” 9, with a fair number of citations ranging from 1440 to 2002. It is thus certainly not incorrect, perhaps no longer idiomatic, quite possibly (in a modern context) ironic.


1

Consider decisive. According to Merriam-Webster, causing something to end in a particular way : determining what the result of something will be Similarly, critical. Also from M-W crucial, decisive: a critical test


2

Consider using the adjective causative.


2

Heterogenous can suggest the idea of a very diversified audience: composed of parts of different kinds; having widely dissimilar elements or constituents; not homogeneous.


1

better-than-expected is an adjective itself (as hyphenated) and it sums up "better than expected". used to describe results , profits , etc. that are higher than it was thought they would be: The company has reported better-than-expected second quarter results. Source: http://dictionary.cambridge.org Also, better than expected (without ...


4

I think you could use the word surprising, which has one definition of "unexpected." So, your sentence would be: The progress was surprising. I think that the word progress itself implies something positive. Therefore by saying that the progress was surprising, you imply that the result was both good and exceeded your expectations.


1

What about PANDORA'S BOX? It's often used in English for this sort of thing -- depending on the exact shade of meaning you want. Hope it helps.


1

There is outstanding: Standing out among others of its kind; prominent. Superior to others of its kind; distinguished. And excellent: exceptionally good; extremely meritorious; superior possessing outstanding quality or superior merit; remarkably good. Edit: And extraordinary: exceptional to a high degree; noteworthy; ...


0

I think incredible or unimaginable may convey a strong idea of something that went beyond what was expected. beyond belief or understanding; unbelievable marvellous;


-2

The progress is achieved far beyond our expectation.


1

Exceptional progress was exceptional.


1

If you want a word to warn of danger of usage, I would recommend dangerous or perilous. From Merriam-Webster online, Dangerous adj. involving possible injury, harm, or death : characterized by danger and Perilous adj. full of danger


0

If their projects have enough range, and they do it with poise and creative flair, then likening them to a rennaisance (wo)man might do the trick. The Wikipedia page for it redirects to polymath, which may be less suitable in your case because it connotes more about natural aptitude for different subjects than their ability to multitask.


1

There is a concept called work-life balance which is the result of balancing all the different aspects of life. And the person who achieves this is called a work-life balancer colloquially. Work–life balance is a concept including proper prioritizing between "work" (career and ambition) and "lifestyle" (health, pleasure, leisure, family and spiritual ...


1

I can't think of a word to describe this but saying "(The person's name) juggles (his/her) work, study, family, and hobbies with grace/poise/great success" is more than adequate.


2

Industrious. Ambitious. Assiduous. Productive. Hardworking. Hyperactive. There is no word that specifically captures the exact notion you are describing, that is why we use sentences composed of multiple words to express nuanced ideas. The words provided above could fit your needs depending on context.


0

Apparently, the generic wonder woman - a woman who can be a successful wife and have a professional career at the same time Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex has made it to compound-noun status. There doesn't seem to be a male equivalent ...


-1

The examples you give have the answer. Where it is a matter of a name (e.g. of a species or product) use the noun construction: bottle-nose dolphin. When it is not, use the verb construction: red-haired girl.


0

I would say that an adaptable system has the capacity be deployed differently in different locations. A flexible system can react to different stimuli.


3

In the example you have given, maximum would be the right word: Use underflow to set the maximum possible value of the data type used. Maximally is usually found as an adverb that modifies an adjective, such as maximally efficient.


4

It does mean that he's a nice guy. Look at the context. The piece is on an author's website, and is talking about an adaptation of one of his books. In the previous sentence, Spacey has paid the author a compliment with, "'this wouldn't have been possible without the brilliant material it was based on". Calling him "kind" is acknowledging that fact.


3

So says the dictionary. However, for practical purposes, to say that someone is "nice", sometimes (of course depending on the context) may be just an euphemism to say that he/she is not attractive :-) http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=108804781


6

I am assuming the question was something along the lines of "What colour do you like?" The answer "I like the colour blue" means that the colour you like, in general, is blue. The answer "I like the blue colour" implies that there was a given choice of certain colors and you chose the one which is blue (as if you where choosing from colour swatches). ...


0

I would use adequate: as much or as good as necessary for some requirement or purpose; fully sufficient, suitable, or fit. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com/adequate For example, there is software adequacy testing that defines a through test of an application and is used to reach a confidence level that the software will just function enough ...


1

"[the software model] is sufficiently detailed"


1

Consider the term elegant. According to ODO it can mean (Of a scientific theory or solution to a problem) pleasingly ingenious and simple: the grand unified theory is compact and elegant in mathematical terms


0

Condensed. may also coney the idea: To reduce the volume or compass of. To make more concise; abridge or shorten. A condensed version of a piece of writing/book ect. Also an abstract: A statement summarizing the important points of a text. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com


2

Something that's is brief enough to get the message across, without being overly "word-ey", or verbose, could be described as "succinct", or "concise". i.e, "Explain as best you can, in a [succinct/concise] manner". Concise is probably used more in common language, though.


1

You should add a hyphen whenever you're using a compound adjective for a noun that is being used as a single descriptor for the noun. For example in the phrase you provided, graded-reading is a single descriptor all together for the noun books, and saying graded books, or reading books separately, won't make sense to imply what you mean. So, yes, you must ...


3

If the books are about reading that is graded then yes, you can use a hyphen (probably what you need). If the books are about reading and the books themselves are graded don't use a hyphen. Also, check out ell.


1

If you’re interested in phrases that have the same meaning, how about “cast in concrete”?  It expresses the idea of something that is straightforward to establish upon creation, but difficult to modify thereafter. Computer geeks might recognize the acronym WORM, which stands for “write once, read multiple”.  This was used to describe the paradigm of writing ...


-3

All wrong. Crack comes from the American term "crackerjack" shortened to "crack" meaning a person of excellence in sports or otherwise


1

I generally think of medium as being of some sort of the middle of a static range, (statistically it is defined as the value halfway between the mininum and maximum values), such as being of medium height, while intermediate is about the middle of a process such as the intermediate level music examinations are what you would have to pass through to get from ...


0

There is no difference. Google Ngrams shows that "susceptible to" has gradually been replacing "susceptible of" over the last 200 years, and I suspect that in another 50 years "susceptible of" will probably be gone. If there were a difference, "susceptible of" couldn't have gone from being 98% of the uses in 1800 to being 8% of the uses today. British and ...


0

in my opinion, an awful lot is used in the sentence to counter-argue something. For example: A: I don't want to go to the park; it's probably empty now. B: But I see an awful lot of people there.


0

Repair - for those that should be fixed. NFG - for those that are No F*ing Good any more, but could be salvaged from.


1

If you want to create a word (borrow from Latin): emendanda - literally "things which are needed/intended to be fixed".


1

A number of the suggestions would fall outside a common vocabulary, and therefore would fail in terms of communicating the desired meaning. I do like the suggest of "deliberate" (as adjective, not verb). It implies giving the matter due consideration, and providing a calm decision.


2

I think the clearest, shortest way to say it is For Repair



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