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5

Syntactically, it's a noun, but a restricted one: it only occurs in the plural, and only in the phrase "in cahoots [with]". (The OED gives some examples of its use in the singular, including in the meaning "a confederate"; but I think that is obsolete - the examples given are mid-nineteenth century). If you want to classify it, it must be an abstract noun, ...


4

No, a tangle is not necessarily anthropomorphism. A tangle is defined in Oxford Online as: A confused mass of something twisted together Where confused means: Lacking clear distinction of elements; jumbled: Describing a "tangle of bushes" does not require the bushes to have human qualities or suggest that the bushes have human qualities. There ...


4

It's both. Or, it's either or. There is really no way to syntactically say for sure in a sentence whether a passive participle is acting as a predicative subject complement or whether it is part of a passive verb construction. Whether to interpret devastated here as an adjective or the matrix verb depends entirely on the semantics of the sentence. If it's ...


3

To flounder might be a suitable word. From Google: Flounder struggle or stagger clumsily in mud or water. "he was floundering about in the shallow offshore waters". (To do it successfully would probably be treading water).


3

You are looking for (to) float: to stay on the surface of a liquid and not sink: An empty bottle will float. You can float very easily in/on the Dead Sea because it's so salty. (Cambridge Dictionary)


3

Sterile (adj.) not able to produce children or young I believe "scientifically sterile generations" means that those generations are not able to produce science. That is not exactly the same as those generations having nothing to contribute to science. You can contribute to science, without producing science. Older generations can produce science, and the ...


2

I think the word you're looking for is arbitrary. I'm not sure why you have a negative connotation with it, but I don't think most American English speakers do.


2

I don't know of any official terms for such a thing, but I'd recommend the likes of 'Stricken/struck', 'crossed-off' or simply struck through.


1

Yes, you can indeed use "alone" in this way and with no comma required. Here is a rather nice quote from Dragon Lord Messiah (Elijah Stone): "Yes. That is how I must remain. To truly be true to myself, I alone must stand, alone." Two uses of the word in one sentence (one predicative; one not)! :)


1

"It feels interesting" would make sense if you where describing something being touched. "It seems interesting" would be used when describing a thought, or idea.


1

(wanting to watch a movie) I think escapist (adjective) is as close as you're gonna get: Oxford dictionaries ADJECTIVE Providing or seeking distraction and relief from unpleasant realities, especially in the form of entertainment or fantasy: I was ready for a good escapist read the escapist desires of the moviegoing public as for ...


1

You use What as a Pronoun here What did you eat at home? You ask someone about which thing they ate


1

I'm thinking of unambiguous. The Free Dictionary defines this as the opposite of: Ambiguous: Open to more than one interpretation "Unambiguous" then should refer to the description of the task, not to the task itself.


1

there is only one way to do it and it's "unique" (meaning that it's specific for that situation only) unique: being the only one of its kind, characteristic only of a particular category or entity. "Such weather pattern is unique to coastal areas." "This is a unique opportunity." "Humans are unique because they have the capacity to choose ...



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