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51

It is used to emphasise the bad words: holy: (from TFD) (Informal) Used as an intensive: raised holy hell over the mischief their children did. I think this is an interesting comment: Things holy were once referred to Medieval times in oaths and blaspheming, such as "s'blood" (god's blood) etc. Many cultures worst swear-words are formed ...


13

Three of the most central origins of curse words are excrement, sexual acts (or organs), and blasphemies (sacred words used inappropriately). Although blasphemies are now considered mild in most contexts, in more religious times, they were considered much more shocking than they are now. As expressions lose their shock value, they need to be intensified to ...


12

In That would be telling, there is not enough information to distinguish a noun from a gerund. Telling could be either one in this sentence. Which is, incidentally, a fixed phrase, so it's irregular. Gerunds act like nouns, but they have verbal powers, like the power to take a direct object. Real nouns, that have made it all the way from verbhood, have the ...


11

It has to do with the order of the adjectives. For example, consider this sentence: Happy nine men walk into a bar. Both nine and happy are adjectives, but we are really intending nine to describe the happy men, not happy describing the nine men. I don't know if there's a specific term for this, but certain adjectives, like numbers, get special ...


6

The participle telling "that tells [something], that expresses [something]" has turned into an adjective meaning "expressive, revealing". This can be seen in what is clearly the adjectival use: For a telling tale of the ways in which women in England deployed campaigns for indigenous women's rights to their own ends see [book] ... — Source. A ...


5

He looks like he's scheming, to me.


5

Grammatically wrong. Your first (valid) example of "The bag is black" uses 'black' as an adjective. It would also be valid to say "The bag is black coloured"; here the word 'black' is used as a noun modifier for the adjective 'coloured'. Also idiomatic would be "The bag is black in colour" ('black' as adjective, 'colour' as noun). "The bag is [or has] a ...


5

I think the main problem with Additional nine features were added has to do with adjective order. As you pointed out, you can say nine additional features (because that's in the right order). *Additional nine features is in the wrong order and is therefore incorrect. Ordinarily, your friend would have a point: You generally can't use the indefinite article ...


4

No, it's not correct. Quiet in "Be quiet" is an adjective. Adjectives in English are not inflected for number, and the same word is used whether or not it's describing [addressed to, here] one person or more than one.


4

"Most tawdry since" is a perfectly reasonable qualifier, comparing this instance to all others since the cited time or incident. Microsoft Word's rules are applied rather mindlessly, and are often inappropriate for real-world writing. Take them as suggestions to be considered -- and possibly rejected -- NOT as expert advice. Or turn them off entirely, ...


4

You could use controversial. Per Merriam-Webster: controversial adjective : relating to or causing much discussion, disagreement, or argument : likely to produce controversy Examples of Controversial Abortion is a highly controversial subject. a decision that remains controversial He is a controversial author. Some other ...


3

I think you are looking for: The new technique will be applied incrementally in a series of small projects culminating in ...


3

Although the term argumentative can be used here, the more common term for this type of work is discursive writing. Here's a definition the adjective discursive from Merriam Webster: 1 a : moving from topic to topic without order : rambling 1 b : proceeding coherently from topic to topic 2 : marked by analytical reasoning ...


3

I don't like Joe's answer for two reasons. First, "The weight of A is high, compared to its counterparts." begs what the absolute magnitude should be for this to be used, i.e., at what point is the weight of something "high". Second, high usually describes height; and heavy describes weight. It doesn't make sense to say "it weighs higher" or anything like ...


3

Green was the apple on the table. This is an example of subject-dependent inversion. There are many types of inverted sentence. This one has a very specific pattern which makes it very different from others. Looking at the three sentences, it would be easy to think that the structure of the three sentences were completely unrelated: The apple on the ...


2

I believe this is just a case of a prepositional phrase in which the preposition is implied, rather than stated outright: ...line of performance apparel is perfect for any race, [from] 5k to 50k. It's not incredibly formal, but I doubt it would be flagged as an error in most contexts.


2

*The bag is black colour This sentence is ungrammatical. The reason is that colour is a singular countable noun. Singular, countable nouns in English must have a determiner: *I have pen I have a pen/ the pen /my pen/ this pen/ one pen/ John 's pen / which pen/ any pen So you can say: The bag is a black colour or you could use the adjective ...


2

The adjective argumentatious is less influenced by the far more common sense of argumentative. It is also far less common, but is given by say Dictionary.com. I'd be tempted to use the compound argument-based. Check how it is used in this article say by the North-West University.


2

It is correct to use argumentative writing in your example. Here argumentative means using reasoning.


2

Prohibited is a form of the verb prohibit: it is the past participle. In both sentences it is used in the same way. We can read both sentences as a passive construction, when we feel that the agent (in this case, the authorities or some such thing) are somehow relevant. However, if the agent was relevant, I suspect the author should have mentioned it: ...


2

Experiential is indeed a word with the general meaning you are looking for, but empirical, which Google defines as "based on, concerned with, or verifiable by observation or experience rather than theory or pure logic," is probably a better fit for the context you provided. Empirical evidence is a frequently used phrase in the worlds of science and ...


2

Have a look at the BNC/the British National Corpus. For "poorer" BNC has 879 examples. For "more poor" only 8, and they are of the type "There are more poor people in + place".


2

An older, more widespread expression used to exclaim surprise (up until the Eighties) was "Holy cow!": Holy Cow! dates to at least 1905. The earliest known appearance of the phrase was in a tongue-in-cheek letter to the editor: "A lover of the cow writes to this column to protest against a certain variety of Hindoo oath having to do with the vain use of ...


2

"On premises" is based on a legal term meaning "on the premises" by which a party establishes ownership of real estate. Because of the longevity of real estate, different legal systems may have been in place during the time of ownership; thus "premises" may be used to argue who is the rightful owner. "On Premise" is incorrect. "On premises" is a compound ...


2

Profanity used to be synonymous with blasphemy and in many cultures, it still is (the French "bodel de...", blood of, is acceptable so long as you don't finish it with "Dieu", God. Indeed, I have heard older people expressing surprise with "Holy", followed by actual Christian references and then feeling shocked at themselves. Instead, to get around the ...


2

You should never use sacred to mean that it uses a lot of time and infrastructure. Other than simply using expensive, you could also use costly.


2

This use of "Holy" with swear words is a case of euphemism. It was once considered more offensive to say "Holy Christ" when there was no actual intention to call on the name of Christ. Hence, lesser forms were used, such as "Holy hell/crap/shit." Euphemism has been used as long as we can tell to allow someone to say something that is otherwise offensive. ...


2

Yes, it is ok to rearrange the sentence as per your example. It is called an inverted sentence. From Wikipedia: An inverted sentence is a sentence in a normally subject-first language in which the predicate (verb) comes before the subject (noun). As @Anonym commented, the comma in the third example is superfluous. Inverting the sentence structure ...


2

Generally this would just be called cultural discrimination. There are more specific words for some of the special cases: If it wasn't an isolated incident and someone makes a habit of doing this, particularly if they were vocal or opinionated about it, they might be called judgmental. If the opinions are particularly egregious violations of societal norms ...


2

A less strong noun, useful for either sex, is charmer. He could be a charmer because he is intelligent, considerate, a good listener, or even because he is a musician.



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