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52

Hungry is to starving as thirsty is to parched. Parched : very thirsty - M-W


29

All of the team’s members are muscly men. It’s a macho team.


24

frayed: (of cloth) with threads in it that are starting to come apart (Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary) "It is not very good for your teeth once the bristles are bent or frayed in any direction." ("How to Reuse Old Toothbrushes" at WikiHow) Google image search for: frayed toothbrush Note: This adjective seems to be more commonly applied to ...


19

A one-word option is testosteronic, defined by Wiktionary as Relating to testosterone; characterized by aggressive masculinity. You can see some examples of actual usage at Wordnik. This way of forming an adjective would fit with testosterone's derivation, according to Wikipedia, from testicle + sterol + ketone (as a corresponding adjective to ketone ...


12

No, adjectives in English do not take the plural ending. Having said that, word categories are quite fluid in English, and some adjectives may be used as nouns, in which case (if they are count nouns) they will pluralise like any other noun. "Modal" is an example, though only in technical use (linguistics and programming). General examples are "blonde" ...


10

How about testosterone itself, i.e.: All of the team’s members are muscly men. It’s a testosterone team. English compounds allows you to use every noun as an adjective, if you so wish. Therefore, there is little, if no difference between testosterone team and testosterony team (to pick an example).


10

Consider, testosterone-packed packed: filled with a large amount of something M-W smashmouth characterized by brute force without finesse M-W


9

While "dying of thirst" is still a common expression, nowadays it's much more likely to hear someone say they're dehydrated. (US English)


8

I would call that toothbrush 'frazzled', or 'frazzled out', depending on how much of a colloquial tone I wanted--'frazzled out' being the more colloquial. 'Frazzled' is the adjective formed from the past participle of 'to frazzle': fraz·zle (frăz′əl) Informal v. fraz·zled, fraz·zling, fraz·zles v.tr. 1. To wear away along the edges; fray. ...


8

You could consider using testosterone-filled as an adjective. Using "-filled", you could make an adjective as defined in Collins Online Dictionary: (in combination) filled with the specified object: 'another sunshine-filled day', 'a fun-filled day out', 'flower-filled' and 'smoke-filled'. Actual usage: Every team needs a secret weapon. It’s ...


6

When "today's" is taken to be a possessive rather than a contraction of "today is", the construction "My today's breakfast" is not grammatical. It is possible to interpret it as meaning the same as "The breakfast I eat today", but this interpretation is only possible after a pragmatic re-interpretation. "today's" is not occurring in this construction as ...


6

In this scenario... Obsolete would tend to refer to something that is no longer needed because the need no longer exists. Redundant would tend to refer to something that is no longer needed because something else is performing that function now. The same need still exists, but something else is meeting it.


6

Idiopathic: Of unknown cause. Idiopathic specifically relates to disease, which addiction certainly is considered.


5

I'd call it his stunted arm... stunt - prevent from growing or developing properly (oxforddictionaries) Here's a typical example usage from The New Yorker (1980)... My mother took hold of his ankle, whitening her knuckles against his stunted leg. His left leg was short. It made every step a lunge.


5

It's a ballsy team. balls·y (bôl′zē) adj. balls·i·er, balls·i·est Vulgar Slang Bold or daring, often in a reckless or aggressive way. [From balls, testicles.]


4

I want to use this in my prose in a context as follows - "The condition of roads was "worse than mediocre" - what can be used here? The word you are looking for is poor. You can't do the job with only one word. You need to add at least a clause, for example: "the condition of the roads was poor because they had not been paved, but only ...


3

In a corpus of about 1.5 million words of poetry I found 214 instances of conjoined colours, where the colours were the 12 commonest colour terms in the U.S. frequency dictionary. Red and white occurred 12 times, and white and red 10 times. A 12 by 12 chart of all the possibilities exhibited a roughly symmetrical pattern of results with one exception: green ...


3

Scorning the unsupported answers given in the comments (although those may be correct, as far as they go, they're not complete), I'll suggest 'moderate': Not violent or subject to extremes; mild or calm; temperate: a moderate climate. [moderate. (n.d.) American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. (2011). Retrieved ...


3

I think you may use absorbed: To absorb: To occupy the attention, interest, or time of; engross: The problem completely absorbed her. The Free Dictionary he was too absorbed in his thoughts to hear me,


3

Personally, I think standard is as neutral as it gets. The word can mean average, usual or typical, but it can also mean up to standards. So, to me at least, it doesn't carry the same negative connotations as average or typical. dictionary.com definition adjective usual, common, or customary Her work is a standard narrative on this ...


3

I think that archetypal is neutral. very typical of a certain kind of person or thing. "the archetypal country doctor" OED I also think that in some contexts the word canonical would suit your needs. It doesn't exactly carry a connotation of quality or approval, but does mean that the subject is considered standard or orthodox. A canonical example ...


3

Consider threadbare (Of cloth, clothing, or soft furnishings) becoming thin and tattered with age (Of a person, building, or room) poor or shabby in appearance [ODO] I would also suggest worn-out[ODO sense 2] which is applicable for toiletries (toothbrush, shaving brush, razor etc..), clothing or furniture but may not be for gradually ...


3

I'm not a medical doctor, but I have come across the term undiagnosed condition. It is used in the following sense: An undiagnosed condition is one where someone experiences symptoms but does not have a formal diagnosis. - Brain and Spine Foundation Undiagnosed conditions can also be asymptomatic. The links relate more broadly to physical and mental ...


3

Some people consider more unique acceptable, especially informally, while others consider it wrong or ugly for the reason you suggested. Most style guides would advise against it. The choice is yours, as always. A quotation from Fowler's Modern English Usage (Burchfield ed.): It must, I think, be conceded that unique is losing its quality of being 'not ...


3

I think it is all about usages, that these kind of adjectives are gradable. For example, the meaning of unique is derived from latin unus 'one'. So, when its meaning is related to a mathematical concept it cannot be modified. But there is a second sense in unique meaning unusual or special, in this case it isn't related to the first sense i.e. being only ...


3

I'd go with the archaic adjective sequent, defined here as "following in a sequence or as a logical conclusion." You can't get any closer in etymology or connotation.


2

Discussing negative attributes of people is never polite no matter how you try. If I said that person is not very clever everyone would know that I meant they were stupid. The only way to be polite about another person's shortcomings is not to discuss them at all. If you can't say something nice about a person, don't say anything!


2

Yes, something can properly be called "more unique". It's easy to construct an example. You hold a contest asking for "unique barbecue ideas". A flying barbecue is unique. It has one differentiating feature. A flying barbecue that hums show tunes is unique. It has two differentiating features. The flying, humming barbecue is more unique than the flying ...


2

Yes, big can be used to describe a user who uses a program a lot. A second choice could be frequent which would be a bit more formal. A third choice could be heavy which, like big, would be a little less formal. If the person is an expert in all functions of the program they may also be called a Super User (hence one of the most popular sites on SE being ...


2

In some Western monotheistic apologetics, transcendent describes the nature of something (usually the divine) that exists beyond the physical world (usually the spiritual). The immanent describes how something transcendent manifests itself in the physical world.



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