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60

In several online games and metaverses such as Second Life and Minecraft this is known as griefing. Simply, behaving in a way that causes others grief or upset. This may not be in the OED yet but it is here.


17

Broken. For the other box, working. If you are in the USA, you'll want something more complicated sounding. So: inoperative. Operative.


15

I'd probably call them a saddo, and then maybe a spoilsport. Spoilsport is quite a loose term, and I would use it simply because they are spoiling the sport. It should be immediately understood if you said: "Don't be a spoilsport, dude." Both killjoy and party pooper could also be substituted for spoilsport. In response to all of the activity and ...


14

In a tabletop setting, we would call that kind of player "powergamer" (when it's more skillfully using the rules to maximise some effect) or "munchkin" (when it's hurting fun for everyone else). So I suppose those terms might work; say "don't camp, it's powergaming". A less games-focused term might simply be "cheap".


13

poor sport fits well. It is also the opposite of good sport. someone who exhibits improper behaviour during a game, whether winning or losing Spawn camping (urbandictionary): in gaming, when one camps (or remains in one position with the intent to obtain multiple kills) the spawn point (or location where players re-enter the game) often ...


11

If you are happy with the connotations of ungentlemanly or unsportsmanlike, while preferring to keep it gender-neutral and less clumsy, consider unsporting. This is not online-gaming specific; some of the existing answers (especially griefing) cover that better.


11

The alliterative phrase 'cool, calm and collected' fits quite well, but if you want a single word, perhaps equanimous fits the bill. It's the adjective form of equanimity: calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation. Samuel Johnson defined it as: evenness of mind, neither elated nor depressed


9

Having mulled this over in my head for a bit, I finally came—through the help of @starplusplus’ comment—to a distinction which I think holds up quite nicely in the vast majority of cases. There will always be odd ones out that are just completely idiomatic and do not hold up to logical scrutiny (many, in fact—this is language we’re dealing with), but the ...


8

Those players are engaging in gamesmanship, which is "the practice of winning a game or contest by doing things that seem unfair but that are not actually against the rules".


8

Philosophical is close to what you are asking for. rationally or sensibly calm, patient, or composed. If someone is philosophical, the person has the characteristics of a philosopher: Characteristic of a philosopher, as in equanimity, enlightenment, and wisdom. A detailed explanation from vocabulary.com: To be philosophical is to stay ...


7

"Imminent" and "impending" should suffice. You can also say "in a jiffy" if it's gonna be real quick. Pronto is another good, though informal, word meaning "quick".


7

You could label the box with any of the verbs fix, mend, fix up, repair, service, etc. Edit: For a box with items in good working order, consider OK and good. For a box with items beyond hope, consider shot (“(colloquial) Worn out or broken”) and parts. You could have a box labeled OK, a box labeled Fix, and a box labeled Shot. Source for quotes and ...


6

I am assuming the question was something along the lines of "What colour do you like?" The answer "I like the colour blue" means that the colour you like, in general, is blue. The answer "I like the blue colour" implies that there was a given choice of certain colors and you chose the one which is blue (as if you where choosing from colour swatches). ...


6

I think wise may convey the meanings you are describing: Having the ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; sagacious: a wise leader. Exhibiting common sense; prudent: a wise decision. b. Shrewd; crafty. Having great learning; erudite. Provided with information; informed. Used with to: was wise to the politics of the ...


5

The words are similar, but usually not inter-changeable. Thin is an adjective that describes an object's characteristic width or depth: "This pencil is thin; that pencil is not." "This type of pasta is thin; the other is not." "The mattress is thin and lumpy." "We use thin-film technology in the production of solar cells." Narrow is an adjective that ...


5

The definitions aren't really contradictory. What fiat means is that something is established via an executive decision. What gives it force is solely the authority of the governing body. It doesn't have to be logical or natural or intuitive or fair. Therefore a) it is usually established by a formal decree and b) it might be completely arbitrary --two ...


4

I think you could use the word surprising, which has one definition of "unexpected." So, your sentence would be: The progress was surprising. I think that the word progress itself implies something positive. Therefore by saying that the progress was surprising, you imply that the result was both good and exceeded your expectations.


4

It does mean that he's a nice guy. Look at the context. The piece is on an author's website, and is talking about an adaptation of one of his books. In the previous sentence, Spacey has paid the author a compliment with, "'this wouldn't have been possible without the brilliant material it was based on". Calling him "kind" is acknowledging that fact.


4

Gaming the system (also referred to as gaming the rules, bending the rules, abusing the system, milking the system, playing the system, or working the system) can be defined as using the rules and procedures meant to protect a system in order, instead, to manipulate the system for a desired outcome.


4

Since no one seems to have hit it yet, let me offer adroit. The Free Dictionary says it "implies ease and natural skill, especially in difficult or challenging situations."


3

In the example you have given, maximum would be the right word: Use underflow to set the maximum possible value of the data type used. Maximally is usually found as an adverb that modifies an adjective, such as maximally efficient.


3

If the books are about reading that is graded then yes, you can use a hyphen (probably what you need). If the books are about reading and the books themselves are graded don't use a hyphen. Also, check out ell.


3

So says the dictionary. However, for practical purposes, to say that someone is "nice", sometimes (of course depending on the context) may be just an euphemism to say that he/she is not attractive :-) http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=108804781


3

It is true that ODO's entry is not particularly helpful. OED has a discrete entry for just this case, though: A. adv. 1. c. Placed after the name of a person or thing to whose presence attention is called: = Who or which is here, whom you see here. Parts of speech, particularly of ancient words like this which have many uses all slightly different, ...


3

I use the word exploiting or exploitative for cases like that. As in the player uses an exploit: a valid move which makes the game not enjoyable for most people. Powergaming or min-maxing is a common term for people who twist rules to get ahead, but it's not applicable to something like spawn killing. It's more for RPGs with character builds that don't make ...


3

For algal mosquito nurseries like that, you can either use regular words or fancy ones. But one word that might try there is pungent; it’s somewhat in the middle, neither too strong nor too weak, neither too casual nor too formal. Normal words, some rather casual icky funky grody yucky frowzy ripe rank dank rotten, rotting unsound gone off vile Fancier ...


3

Singing is a present participle in the case (following @tchrist ’s suggestion) of “I hear children singing.” It would be a gerund, i.e., serving in lieu of a noun as direct object of verb hear, if you got rid of the children: “I hear singing.” But in “I hear children singing,” the direct object of the verb is ...


3

No, Zack. You shouldn't do that. Not even in "literary" English. Moreover, "life" in English (even the "literary" kind) is neither "she" nor "he".


3

sage wise, judicious, or prudent: sage advice. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sage


2

Something that's is brief enough to get the message across, without being overly "word-ey", or verbose, could be described as "succinct", or "concise". i.e, "Explain as best you can, in a [succinct/concise] manner". Concise is probably used more in common language, though.



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