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The Wikipedia article on learning disabilities repeatedly uses "individuals with learning disabilities." In my opinion, this phrase does not sound cumbersome. It sounds better than "persons with learning disabilities." Further, it sounds fine when substituted into your sentence: The notion that individuals with learning disabilities simply need to ...


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Consider wilfulness. wilful: Having or showing a stubborn and determined intention to do as one wants, regardless of the consequences You may also find determination or some of its synonyms suitable, especially resolution and resoluteness. See these Ngrams for comparison: 1, 2.


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I have three suggestions. The first is digitally-incontinent incontinent, as defined by Merriam-Webster: a (1): lacking self-restraint (2): not being under control b: unable to retain urine or feces voluntarily Digitally-incontinent would mean an inability to control one's fingers as they type and then send into the world message after message ...


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Choir — M-W an organized group of persons or things From the expression "Preach to the choir (or converted)" — TFD Fig. to make one's case primarily to one's supporters; to make one's case only to those people who are present or who are already friendly to the issues. "There is no need to convince us of the value of hard ...


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It's definitely a matter of taste and context. Silly is usually negative, though could be neutral-to-positive describing a comedian, for example. Nervous is also negative in most situations. Talkative is closer to neutral, though (for my tastes) slightly negative. Serious is the most neutral of those words, though it has the negative meaning "lacking a sense ...


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Unacceptable smell - Repugnant


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You could call them a keyboard berserker. I just made that up. It's a riff on keyboard warrior. berserk adjective 1. violently or destructively frenzied; wild; crazed; deranged: He suddenly went berserk. noun 2. (sometimes initial capital letter) Scandinavian Legend.. Also, berserker. an ancient Norse warrior who fought with frenzied rage ...


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The verb "back" means something entirely than you think it does. The usual meaning of "to back" is to give support (financial, moral etc. ) to some cause. There is "to back away" meaning turning away and "to back off", there is "to back" meaning "covering the back of an item", wind can "back" (turn into a direction anti-clockwise, which is the opposite of ...


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We will be back soon and we'll be back soon are both correct. We will back soon is wrong because back is an adjective not a verb and thus needs to be introduced with a verb, such as be. Edit: We will back soon could actually be grammatically correct, but back would have to take on a different meaning when used as a verb -- "to support" or "advocate for," ...


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You can use the word judicious speaker in this scenario. As per vocabulary.com - Judicious comes from the same Latin word from which we get judge and judiciary, and not surprisingly a judicious decision is one that only comes after all sides have been weighed up and opposing points of view taken into consideration. Judicious decisions are never ...



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