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52

Frugal characterized by or reflecting economy in the use of resources ~ Dictionary.com By being frugal, he's able to make his box of pencils last a very long time. Economical avoiding waste or extravagance; thrifty: ~ Dictionary.com He is economical by nature. He can make a box of pencils last a year.


35

thrifty ˈθrɪfti adjective 1. using money and other resources carefully and not wastefully. he had been brought up to be thrifty and careful (oxforddictionaries.com)


24

How about delicate? Mealy-mouthed (from @Josh61 's answer) conveys what you want more precisely, but delicate has that soft negative connotation. fragile; easily damaged; frail. From dictionary.com A alternative if you don't like delicate could be squeamish: easily nauseated or disgusted. From dictionary.com


22

efficient I have one friend who's incredibly efficient. He extracts full value from everything; nothing goes to waste in his life. He won't even trash a pencil until it's too small to hold.


20

I would say such a person was brazen ˈbreɪz(ə)n adjective 1. bold and without shame. (oxforddictionaries.com) For the example given: He’s brazen; he asked me for another $100! or more effectively: He’s a brazen [expletive]; he asked me for another $100!


20

Use of adjectives rather than adverbs in such constructions is common. The adjective modifies not so much the verb as the verb’s subject. Such adjectival predication is by no means confined to such more or less copulative verbs as be and seem, but works with more active verbs as well. Thus New Hampshire’s license-plate motto, which is ...


17

I proffer, sparing: avoiding waste (vocab.com) not using or giving a lot of something (MW) “a sparing father and a spending son” “sparing in their use of pencils”


15

"Thrify", "frugal", and even "economical", while good answers to this question, unfortunately have come to carry negative connotations, in that they're often seen as euphemisms for "cheap", "stingy", or "miserly". "Provident" is another antonym of "wasteful". It is defined by Merriam-Webster as "making provision for the future : prudent" and as "frugal, ...


13

I would call this person audacious (adjective) or say that he/she has chutzpah (noun). The word "audacious" can be in a positive or negative fashion, so the speaker can use tone of voice to determine which one is meant. This sort of subtlety lends a certain intimacy to conversations. According to the Cambridge dictionary, audacious means: audacious ...


11

To rule supreme is something of a "fixed collocation", meaning rule unchallenged... supreme - highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief. (Source) To rule supremely (a relatively uncommon usage) would mean rule exceptionally well... supreme - very ​great, or the ​best. (Source)


10

You used to be able to use elder simply as the comparative degree of old, and indeed Shakespeare himself did so. But no, you cannot now say that someone is elder than another person. The OED has marked this use as obsolete via their ‘†’ sigil: That has lived or existed longer; senior, more advanced in age. † a. Formerly used (both of persons ...


9

"tender" has the connotation of being gentle and soft. "Oh, you French people are so tender, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." tender (adj) marked by, responding to, or expressing the softer emotions, showing care.


9

One of the senses of precious may work: Affectedly dainty or overrefined: precious mannerisms. {AHDEL} though this obviously covers an affected attitude. If the person is genuinely soft, the dialect term nesh would often be used conversationally in the UK: nesh adjective dialect (Especially of a person) weak and delicate; feeble ...


9

Predicative Complements Many verbs take a Predicative Complement. This is a phrase that fills a special slot set up by the verb, one that portays either the Subject or the Object. Here are some examples: She was elected treasurer. The elephants were ecstatic. The made me furious. She felt warm. In the sentences above, the word treasurer portrays the ...


6

I think mealy-mouthed may fit in your context: Afraid to speak frankly or straightforwardly: mealy-mouthed excuses. (ODO)


6

sentimental: having or arousing feelings of tenderness, sadness or nostalgia, typically in an exaggerated or self-indulgent way (Defn. 1.1) [Source:ODO] weakly emotional; mawkishly susceptible or tender (Defn. 3) [Source: Dictionary.com]


5

How about resourceful? As in "mark usually has all things electronic, he's quite resourceful that way."


5

This slide is too cluttered. This slide is too busy. This slide makes me feel claustrophobic. I also like dense, which was proposed in a comment.


5

Dainty and Prissy come to mind. Weak, Babies, Cowards would also definitely fit. Cowards would have historical context as the general view of the French by Germans of that time period. These of course are more straight insults instead of just implied ones. Pussyfooted would also fit, though I am unsure how insulting this is historically. MW: pussyfoot ...


4

You could say that they have brass neck A type of behaviour where someone is extremely confident about their own actions but does not understand that their behaviour is unacceptable to others. Cambridge Dictionary In your example: He's got a brass neck; he asked me for $100! Alternatively, you could use the synonymous term effrontery. ...


4

In the case of pencils, the is a device called a "miser" that allows one to use a pencil even when it is very small


4

Apparently the term for this, at least according to the U.S. government, is "protocol gift". From the homepage of the U.S. Department of State's "Protocol Gift Unit": The Protocol Gift Unit within the Office of the Chief of Protocol serves as the central processing point for all tangible gifts received from foreign sources by employees of the ...


4

The positional nature of English grammar gives your two sentences different structures in spite of the similarity of their wording. To see this, let's look at a similar pair of sentences that have the same structure: 1a. The busy duck was diving for food. 2a. The duck was diving busily for food. (Ignore the slightly awkward placement of "busily" in ...


4

I think squeamish is the adjective you're looking for, as in: "Oh, you French people are so squeamish, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." Now whether or not there's a German word for squeamish might create a problem, but if you're writing in English, you'll get your point across appropriately. If it were a loutish ...


3

"Elder" and "eldest" are still used for family members and can stand comfortably on their own without "child" or "sibling" specified - eg "Jane is the elder" or "Harry is the eldest". Compared to non-siblings: "Harry is the oldest member of the team". The only "thing" use of elder I remember is when we speak of the "Elder Edda" from Iceland, but that ...


3

Conjugation is for verbs. "Sex" (male and female) is a characteristic of living things. "Gender" (masculine and feminine), the association of words with one sex or the other (or neither) is a characteristic of words in some languages. Except for pronouns, English doesn't assign a gender to to words, i.e., the language doesn't have different forms for ...


3

Actually, the noun doesn't appear before the adjective in your sentences. In robot soccer, the word robot is a noun which acts as an adjective for soccer. The phrase means soccer for robots. If you compare this to the other phrase, soccer robot, you'll see that the same logic applies. The word soccer now acts as an adjective and modifies robot. The phrase ...


3

Can anyone see the irony in this? By the very nature of using this word with someone, the user implies they are "better" than the person they are talking to. I find this hilarious. I am a black American who is a Canadian resident. A police Constable called me "uppity" because I had the unmitigated gall to tell her that I did not want my child left at a ...


3

I would call that person an optimizer.


3

A conversationalist: conversationalist n a person who enjoys or excels in conversation [ Collins] {discussion n. Consideration of a subject by a group; an earnest conversation. [ AHDEL] }



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