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76

Insidious is probably your best bet, adjective proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with very harmful effects. (Google) but you might also consider treacherous, which has the same connotation of remaining hidden and doing damage unexpectedly: adjective 1. guilty of or involving betrayal or deception. 2. (of ground, water, conditions, ...


53

asinine : of, relating to, or resembling an ass (also extremely or utterly foolish), M-W. In perspective: aquiline - eagle asinine - donkey bovine - cattle cancrine - crab canine - dog cervine - deer corvine - crow equine - horse elapine - snake elaphine - red deer feline - cat hircine - goat leonine - lion leporine - rabbit, hare lupine - wolf ...


52

Elusive adjective difficult to find, catch, or achieve. (Google) Or, more fun and more negative: Sneaky adjective 1. furtive; sly. (Google)


39

"Having to explain every minute detail" is not explicit in the definition of the word, but it is the sort of behavior you might expect from someone who patronizes: speak to or behave toward someone as if they are stupid or not important other people. That particular meaning works with the verb form (patronize) and adjective form (patronizing). ...


35

You might be thinking of vicarious; in particular: "felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others". (M-W)


35

I can't think of a good phrase for this, but if you are looking for descriptors, the two that come to mind are condescending and belittling. Though these don't specifically incorporate this person's perception of the lack of knowledge of those he is belittling, at least they describe the resulting behavior.


16

Eponymous does work in your blanks. ODO gives two definitions for eponymous: (of a person) giving their name to something. (of a thing) named after a particular person. The second sense works for you, since the book and the song are things named after a particular person (or band).


16

Obscure is a possibility hard to perceive not readily seen inconspicuous or unnoticeable However, this would work better if it's a bug that's difficult to reproduce, rather than a bug which is difficult to find the cause of. Ref: dictionary.reference.com


14

As other answers have pointed out, asinine is an adjective relating to donkeys. In addition, donkeys are also equine. Equine means relating to the horse family, which happens to include donkeys as well as asses and zebras. The small contribution of this answer here is to provide a list of animals and corresponding animal adjectives with the -ine suffix. ...


13

The first word that comes to mind is arrogant. People who actively interfere with other people's jobs - typically because they don't think they're doing a good job - are commonly called micro-managers. In the political arena, I'd call such a person intelligent, as activists are typically astounded by the almost unbelievable ignorance of the masses, which ...


12

Maybe you're looking for the Dunning-Kruger effect? "The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their ineptitude. Conversely, highly ...


11

penultimate or next-to-last or second-to-last. Ultimate means last, penultimate means next-to-last. That can refer to latest instead of last, but I guess that is what you are after here, since your example seems to suggest chronological access. Last can mean many things, but next-to-last always refers to, well, the thing that is prior to the last one, ...


11

Objectively, the inconsistency between rendering national proper names as adjectives (British and Canadian) and using a state proper name (Colorado) as is in the same syntactical position is difficult to justify. But in the United States, there is a very strong tendency to reserve use of the adjective form of a state name for situations specifically ivolving ...


9

antepenultimate - Two before the last. Penultimate is just before the last. Before the penultimate is antepenultimate. Some shells will allow you to use the up arrow to recall the last command, so I call antepenultimate, up-up-up.


8

Hadeocentric As Earth to Gaea gives geocentric and Jupiter as Jove gives jovicentric, so too does Pluto to Hades give hadeocentric. Hades was the Greek god of the underworld, the Roman Pluto. The word hadeocentric is based on the pattern of choosing Greek prefixes for words like heliocentric, geocentric, areocentric — which, for whatever reason, have won ...


7

The term trivial comes from mathematics, where it is essentially a technical term with a relatively precise meaning. The etymology of the term is said to have started with the way university studies were organised in the Middle Ages. trivium (taught first): grammar logic rhetoric quadrivium: arithmetic geometry music astronomy. So we can assume ...


7

Why not just say previous but one (or previous bar one)? I find it self-explanatory (in analogy to last but one). Google gives me quite a lot of hits in exactly the requested sense. Example: The core principle of renku is “link and shift”. “Link” signifies that each verse links somehow to its predecessor and “shift”, by contrast, means that each new ...


7

You may need something like the one before last: Do X to go to the last [or previous] directory; do Y to go to the one before last. Here's an example: The two last chapters, which were not covered in the course proper, are perhaps less easily accessible: the one before last because it is rather technical, the last one because it requires some ...


7

What about pontifical? Google defines it as characterized by a pompous and superior air of infallibility.


6

I don't see what's wrong with "eponymous" Collins even use a similar example to yours. Eponymous, adjective 1) (of a person) being the person after whom a literary work, film, etc, is named ⇒ "the eponymous heroine in the film of Jane Eyre" 2)(of a literary work, film, etc) named after its central character or creator ⇒ "the ...


5

The donkey (equus africanus asinus) is one of the Equidae (horses), which are in the order Perissodactyla (odd-toed ungulates) which are, yes, Ungulates (hoofed), and the ungulates are Mammals. as people have said. So donkeys are in all of these groups, and we could refer to them indirectly by using the name of any one. But there is only one term to use ...


5

I don't know of any commonly used terminology, but to specify this with ordinality you could use first antecedent (for cd -), second antecedent (cd --) and so on. In the context of bash, you could perhaps go for second last history entry (cd --) etc, though since you seem to limit this to cd commands that is not quite right either. Second last directory ...


5

A know-it-all? Doesn't literally fit your definition, but does imply it, as someone who is convinced that they know everything and have all the answers is by extension likely to think that everyone else doesn't.


5

Most of your examples are invalid. The last one is a fixer-upper: Young news reporter. Cold orange juice. Tall palm tree. Economic and linguistic barriers.


5

pernicious One adjective that comes to mind is " pernicious ". Pernicious : having a harmful effect, especially in a harmful or subtle way.


4

"Vine-covered" is a compound adjective, so--grammatically--it functions as a single word adjective does just as "blue" or "red" or "broken" would also describe the porch. It might help to rearrange the sentence in your mind by asking the question "what are the attributes of the porch?" which yields the response "the porch is covered in vines." Just as if it ...


4

lexical Relating to the words or vocabulary of a language (Oxford) ...eschewing of lexical obfuscation


4

Perhaps bloviating. Oxford Dictionaries Online defines bloviate as Talk at length, especially in an inflated or empty way. Or maybe grandiloquent Pompous or extravagant in language, style, or manner, especially in a way that is intended to impress Oxford


4

No; the adjective influential applies to the person or thing that exerts the influence, not the person or thing being influenced: Having great influence on someone or something: her work is influential in feminist psychology [ODO] For the meaning your friend seems to want, a good English expression might be something like “I follow your ...


4

"Not harsh" is a subjective quality. So I would try to frame "harshness of criticism" as a quality that is defined by a third party, rather than a quality that is defined by you (Party A) or them (Party B). I tried to give [Party A] an appropriately delicate, well-intentioned critique. You could then expound on that: This critique was not ad ...



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