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29

Well an antonym of "rave" would probably be "pan". pan a harsh criticism but perhaps you really want notorious, notorious well-known or famous especially for something bad


26

From the quoted definitions at etymonline, I would suspect that you may be asking the wrong question :) If I look at the related words in other languages (dag, Tag) for day, it seems the final g has changed into a [j]. The same seems to have happened with (Dutch) leggen -> English lay. As it is normally pronunciation that defines spelling, and not the ...


25

Well the most common term I have heard without huge sexual connotations is ladies' man. 1) A Man who spends much time with women, or is in the constant company of them 2) A man who is able to pleasure women in most any manner 3) A Man who tends towards female friends, rather then male friends You can also go with playboy, but this hints at wealth ...


25

I'd like to offer chick magnet: a male who seems to attract good looking females easily; someone who has many female admirers. While Casanova, player, and playboy fit, they have a somewhat negative connotation (to me, at least) of having less regard for women; a chick magnet doesn't (to me) have that connotation. A puppy is a chick magnet! In 6 Ways To ...


14

Decadent can be used that way (marked by decay or decline). However, I would not think of that definition first (and it's quite a way down on the link; seeing as the far more common meaning is having low morals and a great love of pleasure, money, etc). Therefore, I think you want decrepit or derelict or blight or dilapidated. decrepit   adjective ...


9

Consider belittling to consider or speak of (something) as less valuable or important than it really is; disparage to cause to make small; dwarf Other possibilities are deprecating disparaging denigrating derogating SUPPLEMENT: There are also contumelious vituperative invective vitriolic However, each of these conveys at least a bit ...


7

It depends what aspect of their writing was being praised. If it's clarity, you might say articulate or lucid. If it's brevity, the art of saying the most in the least number of words, you might say economical or succinct. Or, if their manner of writing is vivid and poetic, you could call it eloquent or stylish.


7

wordsmith a person who works with words; especially : a skillful writer wordsmithery the craft or skill of a wordsmith Example usage: In short, his talents: expert wordsmithery , book knowledge, critical elan -- and an ability to crank out literary fretwork very fast. [Times, Sunday Times (2004)] There are phrases like "author ...


7

Yes, it is informal and idiomatic. It is both BrE and AmE. Though there's no confusion in meaning, the dates of origin differ. Wishy-washy means lacking in strength of character or purpose; ineffective; lacking in decisiveness; without strength or character; irresolute. Synonyms are namby-pamby, spineless, gutless and weak. It could also mean thin and ...


7

I believe this comes from established patterns in spelling. If a word ends in a consonant, you could add -ly. (Nightly, hourly, promptly, quickly, etc.) If a word ends a consonant + y, one changes the y to i and adds the ending (-ly, -ness, etc.) Ready -> readi +ly/ness. Greedy -> greedi +ly/ness. Happy -> happi + ly/ness. When y is preceded by a vowel ...


6

Urban Dictionary: Don Juan A Great Lover. A Great Friend. A man that gave many women sexual gratification. Sometimes people call friends or people who are smooth with ladies Don Juan. That jon, he's such a don juan. Wiki: Don Juan Don Juan is used synonymously for "womanizer", especially in Spanish slang, and is often used in reference ...


5

There is a loan phrase from French: succès de scandale (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) success of a play, book, etc, because of notoriety or its scandalous character [literally: success of scandal]


5

Condescending might cover it. But you can put people down in many different ways, ranging from the crude to the subtle. You can be put down by someone of no particular education or achievements who does nothing more than laugh at your accent, or make remarks about your weight, or some other perceived defect. Such a person might be called derisive or ...


4

There are absolutely gradations of maturity. That is why we use phrases like more mature, less mature, immature, etc. Typically, maturity is described in stages. For example, when describing physical maturity we use the Tanner Scale. There are also stages of psychological maturation as well. For example, Erikson's stages of psychosocial development. ...


4

The sentence is wrong in a few aspects. The subject is Sam, but after the "and" it is no longer Sam, because Sam was not extended, or was he? Consider this as an alternative Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then they were extended for the whole of France by Nino. Now the clause after the "and" has a new subject (they = ...


4

What you really want, is a Mack: Or a Playa / Player: They are often used interchangeably nowadays.


4

Apparently nobody has mentioned it yet, so I’ll put forth stud. The term stud comes from the animal-husbandry world where it refers to a male whose purpose is to mate with females and produce offspring. Likewise, male humans who are perceived to have “game” and be able to “score” easily with women are often dubbed studs.


3

Here are some more... critical: expressing adverse or disapproving comments or judgments; marked by a tendency to find and call attention to errors and flaws. Why Are Some People So Critical? - Harvard Business Review negative (not encouraging or approving or pleasing) people are often wearisome to be around: negative people are more likely to ...


3

We can know because grammar books define the parts of speech. An adverb (among other things) modifies a verb, expressing manner (e.g., gently). Adjectives modify nouns. In Love Me Tender, what is the subject, verb, direct object, and then what does that left-over word modify? Here's my take: Love me tender: subject (implied): you; verb: love; direct object: ...


3

The puppy lay in the ditch with a forlorn look on it's face. or The forlorn puppy was in a ditch and to depict the meaning of forlorn It looked like the puppy had been in the ditch for a while, he was lost, sad, lonely, totally without hope and utterly forlorn, I expect he would have just lain down to die had I not picked him up.


3

I would suggest "down-at-the-heel." down-at-the-heel: worn out from long use or neglect, dilapidated. One place to look might be this slightly down-at-the-heel town smack in England's center. Just a louse of a husband, who deposits her in a down-at-the-heel apartment building and then immediately abandons her. In consonance with "decadent," consider ...


3

Decadent is certainly used to describe objects; google (images) Decadent Dining Room, or Decadent Carrot Cake and you'll find plenty of results. It's notable almost all things described as decadent are opulent to the point of ostentatious; clearly not reflecting cultural decline but maybe reflecting moral decline : that someone would spend so much on ...


3

According to the old digital dictionaries I have available, "decadent" was associated with a state of decay. So I think it would be legitimate for you to use it the way you describe. However since the adjective is primarily used to describe moral decay, it would be interpreted as such, regardless of how you had meant it. So ignoring whether it is correct ...


2

It is a typical characteristic of colloqial AmE ( American English) to use the adjective form after a verb instead of the adverb with the ending -ly. And the probability is high that this use is due to German influence. In German normal adjectives after a verb have the function of an adverb; there is no special adverb ending. The position after a verb ...


2

It is an adverb because it should read: "Love me tenderly, love me slowly." Tenderly and slowly are both describing the verb love. Moden English usage frequently uses an adjectival form where there should correctly be an adverbial form. How many times have you heard this: He drove real slow. If you want to hear grammatically correct lyrics, you should ...


2

Leading is an adjective and can be used in a number of ways. In the first example, you are trying to say that he/she is the most important singer in China. In the second, you are trying to pick him/her from a list of best singers in China. Superlative means the highest form or quality of something. And the definition of highest could vary depending on ...


2

Consider punctilious very careful about behaving properly and doing things in a correct and accurate way Also consider meticulous scrupulous painstaking conscientious


2

Savage can be used as a noun an adjective or a verb for this purpose. to attack or criticize thoroughly or remorselessly; excoriate: a play savaged by the critics. A savage review


2

Since I was getting a bit caught up in trying to write out some fairly complex things in comments to @medica’s answer, I am going to write it all out in a full answer here. Basically, there is a more or less regular variation in some words between final -y and non-final -i- (sometimes -ie) in English orthography. That means that when adding various suffixes ...


2

You're not wrong, but "redundant" may be overstating in. Near synonyms perhaps. It is one of those double adjective structures so beloved of marketing people like new and improved. They want the rhythm of the phrase rather than the meaning. Etymologically, both words are French, where they are almost never used together in the way they are here. Fresh ...



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