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22

In my experience as an American: We do use the word delicious fairly often. It is not at all unusual or strange. Its use compared to the more general words "good" and "great" is dependent on context. For example, if my friend asked me "how's the food?" and I enjoyed the food, I'd more likely use "it's good!" or "it's great!" and reserve "it's delicious!" ...


17

Broken. For the other box, working. If you are in the USA, you'll want something more complicated sounding. So: inoperative. Operative.


15

A young person who demonstrates wisdom and maturity beyond their years is often called an old soul. It comes from the belief that some reincarnated souls retain a measure of the wisdom and character developed in previous incarnations. These days, even those who don't share in the actual belief find use for the phrase in normal conversation. I'd be perfectly ...


13

He sounds like a fuddy-duddy one that is old-fashioned, unimaginative, or conservative [Merriam-Webster] The term is not limited to children, but is often applied to someone who seems old beyond their years. You also might consider fogey an extremely fussy, old-fashioned, or conservative person (esp in the phrase old fogey) [Collins] In this ...


12

The lad you speak of has an anachronistic perspective. Anachronistic may seem to be a stretch here, but when you think about it, an anachronistic perspective (attitude, outlook, way of looking at things) is a perspective that is somehow out of order chronologically. Very often we think of anachronistic thinking as backward-looking, from the perspective of ...


12

Sclerotic--an inability to adapt. 'That boy Tim is a sclerotic kid--age 13 going on 65.


11

I do not often use delicious myself, but neither do I consider it unusual or "foreign" in any way. It may not be that popular in your friend's circles, but the Corpus of Contemporary American English has twice as many results for delicious as it does for tasty and yummy combined. The relative numbers are not very different from those in the British ...


11

The alliterative phrase 'cool, calm and collected' fits quite well, but if you want a single word, perhaps equanimous fits the bill. It's the adjective form of equanimity: calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation. Samuel Johnson defined it as: evenness of mind, neither elated nor depressed


10

As I native North American English speaker, I would colloquially refer to the person you described as old-school. Meriam-Webster defines that term as: old-school typical of an earlier style or form based on a way of doing things that was common in the past using or supporting traditional practices So for example: Joey is ...


9

Having mulled this over in my head for a bit, I finally came—through the help of @starplusplus’ comment—to a distinction which I think holds up quite nicely in the vast majority of cases. There will always be odd ones out that are just completely idiomatic and do not hold up to logical scrutiny (many, in fact—this is language we’re dealing with), but the ...


9

"Born middle-aged" is a phrase I have heard applied to such people (including myself, actually). There are plenty of matches on Google for that phrase. The OED says that "middle-aged" can be used for "resembling a person in middle age", so you can interpret the phrase in that sense.


8

Philosophical is close to what you are asking for. rationally or sensibly calm, patient, or composed. If someone is philosophical, the person has the characteristics of a philosopher: Characteristic of a philosopher, as in equanimity, enlightenment, and wisdom. A detailed explanation from vocabulary.com: To be philosophical is to stay ...


7

My son was like this when younger, and his Scoutmaster remarked once that he appeared to be working on his Running-for-the-Senate merit badge.


7

"Born too late" is a moderately common phrase, as popularized by Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem "Miniver Cheevy": ... Miniver loved the days of old     When swords were bright and steeds were prancing; The vision of a warrior bold     Would set him dancing. [...] Miniver Cheevy, born too late, ...


7

"Imminent" and "impending" should suffice. You can also say "in a jiffy" if it's gonna be real quick. Pronto is another good, though informal, word meaning "quick".


7

You could label the box with any of the verbs fix, mend, fix up, repair, service, etc. Edit: For a box with items in good working order, consider OK and good. For a box with items beyond hope, consider shot (“(colloquial) Worn out or broken”) and parts. You could have a box labeled OK, a box labeled Fix, and a box labeled Shot. Source for quotes and ...


6

Ford F-150 is the official full name of the car (make + model). Grammatically speaking, it is a compound proper noun: I own a Ford F-150. F-150 is an abbreviated version of that name: I own an F-150. So is Ford in the following statement (although the designation could refer to any Ford motor car, not just an F-150): I own a Ford. In your ...


6

I am assuming the question was something along the lines of "What colour do you like?" The answer "I like the colour blue" means that the colour you like, in general, is blue. The answer "I like the blue colour" implies that there was a given choice of certain colors and you chose the one which is blue (as if you where choosing from colour swatches). ...


6

Names of languages are always capitalized in English, unlike in some other languages. This is true whether the name of the language is part of a compound or not.


6

Though not used very often, in fact, very rarely, there does exist an adjective for "etiquette", as described here and here etiquettal English[edit] Adjective[edit] (rare) Of, or pertaining to, etiquette. However, for all practical purposes, you're better off using terms like "well-mannered". Check out the definition of the term from the ...


6

I think wise may convey the meanings you are describing: Having the ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; sagacious: a wise leader. Exhibiting common sense; prudent: a wise decision. b. Shrewd; crafty. Having great learning; erudite. Provided with information; informed. Used with to: was wise to the politics of the ...


5

It does mean that he's a nice guy. Look at the context. The piece is on an author's website, and is talking about an adaptation of one of his books. In the previous sentence, Spacey has paid the author a compliment with, "'this wouldn't have been possible without the brilliant material it was based on". Calling him "kind" is acknowledging that fact.


5

The words are similar, but usually not inter-changeable. Thin is an adjective that describes an object's characteristic width or depth: "This pencil is thin; that pencil is not." "This type of pasta is thin; the other is not." "The mattress is thin and lumpy." "We use thin-film technology in the production of solar cells." Narrow is an adjective that ...


5

If I may submit a couple of Ngrams for comparison. Corpus: British English Corpus: American English I was not surprised to see that the usage of the word 'delicious' more or less follows the same trend between both lexicons corpora. I was a little surprised to see that the term is slightly more popular in American usage than across the pond. I cannot ...


5

Both instances are OK grammatically. In 'You sold the car?' she asked incredulously. 'incredulously' is an adverb, the asking is modified in being unbelievable. In 'You sold the car?' she asked, incredulous. 'incredulous' is an adjective, modifying the person. She is what is incredulous.


5

I'm going to suggest nostalgist. It seems like there is no word that covers both being young and nostalgic, but nostalgist conveys the idea in the context. You can use nostalgic as an adjective also, as in a nostalgic person. Nostalgist is the noun version of nostalgic but urbandictionary mentions that it is used among young people and includes regional ...


4

I think you could use the word surprising, which has one definition of "unexpected." So, your sentence would be: The progress was surprising. I think that the word progress itself implies something positive. Therefore by saying that the progress was surprising, you imply that the result was both good and exceeded your expectations.


4

According to OED, the only "valid" adjectival derivative of etiquette is... etiquettical - relating to etiquette; observing or prescribed by etiquette ...for which the most recent of their six citations is... 2008 National Post (Canada) (Nexis) 10 May (Weekend section) 2 "None of this would have happened had he done the etiquettical thing" ...


4

Since no one seems to have hit it yet, let me offer adroit. The Free Dictionary says it "implies ease and natural skill, especially in difficult or challenging situations."


3

In the example you have given, maximum would be the right word: Use underflow to set the maximum possible value of the data type used. Maximally is usually found as an adverb that modifies an adjective, such as maximally efficient.



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