Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

53

asinine : of, relating to, or resembling an ass (also extremely or utterly foolish), M-W. In perspective: aquiline - eagle asinine - donkey bovine - cattle cancrine - crab canine - dog cervine - deer corvine - crow equine - horse elapine - snake elaphine - red deer feline - cat hircine - goat leonine - lion leporine - rabbit, hare lupine - wolf ...


35

Your demand for a "not so loud word" makes me think of - tenuous. If something is tenuous it's thin, either literally or metaphorically. Tenuous comes from the Latin word tenuis, for thin, and is related to our word tender. (vocabulary.com) Tenuous arguments won't win any debate tournaments. Usage examples.....


34

You might be thinking of vicarious; in particular: "felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others". (M-W)


30

A common term for what the OP describes is, "Her complexion was flawless." (a Google search for flawless complexion returned about 1,110,000 results) flawless adjective: without any blemishes or imperfections; perfect. "her brown flawless skin" synonyms: perfect, unblemished, unmarked, unimpaired


18

Other words often used in connection with complexion are: A radiant complexion adjective 1 emitting rays of light; shining; bright: the radiant sun; radiant colors. 2 bright with joy, hope, etc.: radiant smiles; a radiant future. www.dictionary.com and also... A clear complexion (which the OP mentions, but possibly alludes to a ...


14

As other answers have pointed out, asinine is an adjective relating to donkeys. In addition, donkeys are also equine. Equine means relating to the horse family, which happens to include donkeys as well as asses and zebras. The small contribution of this answer here is to provide a list of animals and corresponding animal adjectives with the -ine suffix. ...


12

It has become more capacious adjective 1 Capable of holding much; spacious or roomy: a capacious storage bin. www.dictionary.com


12

I proffer, without actually specifying any color- Fresh, glowing, healthy, lovely, perfect. She had dark and abundant hair, so glossy that it threw off the sunshine with a gleam, and a face which, besides being beautiful from regularity of feature and richness of complexion.


10

Insubstantial (MW), inadequate, implausible, dissuasive, impotent. I suppose it depends on how polite you are trying to be. Hope this helps. insubstantial Merriam Webster : not large or important : not strong or solid : not real : not made of a real substance


9

Genital is the adjectival form: adjective Relating to the human or animal reproductive organs: ODO From Women's Sexual Function and Dysfunction: Study, Diagnosis and Treatment, by Irwin Goldstein, et al: The vascular nature of genital tissue lends itself to many parallel comparisons from the already established field of ...


9

It sounds to me like they're stalwart - combining both the meanings of "valiant" and "firm, steadfast and uncompromising" (reference). Often used in the phrases stalwart friend and stalwart supporter.


7

You are looking for Platonic: of, relating to, or characteristic of Plato or his doctrines: the Platonic philosophy of ideal forms. (Dictionary.reference.com) Platonistic: (adjective) rare: pertaining to or characteristic of or in accordance with Platonism.


7

Then, too, one might claim that the person in question was blessed with an “exquisite” complexion. exquisite adjective: 1. extremely beautiful and, typically, delicate. "exquisite, jewel-like portraits"; synonyms: beautiful, lovely, elegant, fine; see, Google


6

Platonic -proper adjective of, relating to, or characteristic of Plato or his doctrines. the Platonic philosophy of ideal forms. (This word platonic refers to the writings of Plato, an ancient Greek philosopher who wrote on the interesting subject of love- vocabulary.com) If Shakespeare is the proper noun, Shakespearian is the proper adjective. ...


6

OK. I think the singular article is used because in each of your examples the plural nouns make up a single unit of time. The same structure would be used with other units of measurement: a weighty three bags of coal a full ten bottles an arduous eighty kilometres In such case, the unit of measurement is the noun phrase which includes the ...


6

A tangential argument (formal) having only a slight or indirect connection with something Oxford Learner's Dictionaries Also, sometimes one can clearly express polite incredulity, and get away with it, by using the word interesting.


5

untenable (adj.): (especially of a position or view) not able to be maintained or defended against attack or objection 'This argument is clearly untenable.' ODO As auditors, you should be able to use this term without causing offence on a personal level. It gives you an opportunity to raise points of concern and to consider possible solutions.


5

This may be less likely to cause offense, since it doesn't address the quality of the argument as much as it says what was in the argument wasn't enough. insufficient not having or providing enough of what is needed


5

The donkey (equus africanus asinus) is one of the Equidae (horses), which are in the order Perissodactyla (odd-toed ungulates) which are, yes, Ungulates (hoofed), and the ungulates are Mammals. as people have said. So donkeys are in all of these groups, and we could refer to them indirectly by using the name of any one. But there is only one term to use ...


5

It doesn't entirely relate to people who affect wealth - but the French word poseur has become acceptable in English to describe one who behaves in a manner as to impress others. The OED description and examples since the mid-19th century are: A person who deliberately adopts a particular attitude or pose; a person with an affected or pretentious style or ...


5

tenacious adjective tending to keep a firm hold of something; clinging or adhering closely. "a tenacious grip" synonyms: firm, tight, fast, clinging; More not readily relinquishing a position, principle, or course of action; determined.


4

Any noun can be used as an adjective — consider fence post, door hinge — although some are more common than others. Capstone would be unusual; a more regular adjective might be supreme or crowning. Using a slightly unusual turn of phrase is a good way of drawing attention to it. Celebrating a failure with a word like capstone strikes me as being a rather ...


4

Sounds like your character is resolute. The word connotes both bravery and conviction.


4

I think beautiful would be the most suitable adjective to indicate that the complexion is... beautiful. (if you don't want to say just plain good). As it appears in William Hogarth's The Analysis of Beauty, written with a view of fixing the fluctuating ideas of taste: a beautiful complexion Google Ngram might give an idea with the wildcard search also ...


4

"Vine-covered" is a compound adjective, so--grammatically--it functions as a single word adjective does just as "blue" or "red" or "broken" would also describe the porch. It might help to rearrange the sentence in your mind by asking the question "what are the attributes of the porch?" which yields the response "the porch is covered in vines." Just as if it ...


4

A person's capacity to reason well is amongst their most important virtues, so if you use anything that definitely means her arguments are worthless or unimportant, it may come off as insulting. More importantly, just because an argument is poor or weak, does not mean its invalid or inconsiderable. "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, ...


4

I think you'll find that "genital" is already an adjective. Relating to the human or animal reproductive organs: the genital area


3

I like words which use a negation of a positive term for this, because they acknowledge that the argument was trying to be whichever adjective you're negating. So, unconvincing, immaterial, insufficient, unpersuasive, inconclusive. You're saying it falls short, not that it was terrible. (falls short itself is a good phrase, but you wanted a single word.) ...


3

The term bountiful means Large in quantity; abundant: the ocean provided a bountiful supply of fresh food Oxford Dictionaries Online Similarly, abundant (abundant in) Having plenty of something: the riverbanks were abundant in wild plants In both cases, the connotation is both volume and a positive quality.


3

I had a Donkey, that was all right, But he always wanted to fly my Kite; Every time I let him, the String would bust. Your Donkey is better behaved, I trust. A problem with other answers here is that many donkeys are not a bit asinine. In modern English usage, the application of that word to 'personages with long ears' has been overwhelmed by its ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible