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47

Polyglot: person having a speaking, reading, or writing knowledge of several languages. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/polyglot


28

Multilingual: A multilingual person, in a broad definition, is one who can communicate in more than one language, be it actively (through speaking, writing, or signing) or passively (through listening, reading, or perceiving). More specifically, the terms bilingual and trilingual are used to describe comparable situations in which two or three languages ...


20

Slavering - defined as to let saliva run from the mouth source - google's dictionary.


10

analytical: skilled in or using analysis especially in thinking or reasoning deliberate: characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration characterized by awareness of the consequences judicious: having, exercising, or characterized by sound judgment A few more options: rational, prudent, sensible.


8

I would suggest meticulous. Meticulous suggests that someone is gathering information to ensure that all details and options are covered. This can be a result of acting methodically or otherwise.


7

The word slobbering comes to mind. More often used to describe the drooling of a dog but is perfectly acceptable for the picture given.


7

Perhaps accepting. American Heritage offers these two definitions (among others) for accept To regard as proper, usual, or right: Such customs are widely accepted. To endure resignedly or patiently: accept one's fate.


7

Why not irresistible not able to be resisted or refused; overpowering [Collins]


6

class-conscious see class consciousness (Wikipedia) … used … to refer to the beliefs that a person holds regarding their social class or economic rank in society, the structure of their class, and their class interests [emphasis added] see also: social climber A person who is eager to gain a higher social status. [ODO]


5

If you know more than 3 languages, you are supertrilingual. (Which, of course, you can shorten to just being "super" :)


5

quadrilingual: Able to speak four languages.


5

Like many phrases which, from a logical, let's-treat-English-as-algebra perspective, are redundant (not tautological), "willfully disingenuous" is, from a linguistic perspective, merely emphatic (adding emphasis, underscoring, making sharper or clearer ... sorry, I'm being redundant here ). In other words, "willful" here isn't being used to mean ...


5

This kind of word is an eponymous adjective. Wikipedia has a pretty comprehensive list of English eponymous adjectives. (The list includes many eponyms who are not writers, but as most persons worthy of distinction by such an adjective expressed their influence through writing, most on the list are authors of a kind.) This list includes Shavian as relating ...


4

I'd use circumspect. adj. watchful and discreet; cautious; prudent: circumspect behavior. [R H K Webster's]


4

Rigorous - "scrupulously accurate, manifesting rigor, done carefully and with a lot of attention to detail" - Usage:"He is rigorous in his control of expenditure". Painstaking - "expending, showing, or involving diligent care and effort" Usage: "she was always painstaking about her work." Exhaustive- "comprehensive in scope; thorough: an exhaustive ...


4

Unstoppable (Dictionary.com) (adjective) that cannot be stopped or surpassed; unbeatable Uncontrollable (Dictionary.com) (adjective) incapable of being controlled or restrained


4

Some variant on counter could work: I believe it to be bad policy for a game to have a move that cannot be countered. Uncounterable moves make for bad games. For any move, there should always exist a countermove.


4

The first sense given by AHDEL for desirable is: adj. 1. Worth having or seeking, as by being useful, advantageous, or pleasing: a desirable job in the film industry; a home computer with many desirable features. Notice that there does not even need to be anyone actually desiring say a job in films or bells and whistles on their computer for this ...


4

In formal writing, esp., in the fields of programming, linguistics, the word non-final is already in use. On Stackoverflow (java): What is (a) non-final variable? In René Kager, A Metrical Theory of Stress and Destressing in English and Dutch (Lingistics) -- Google Books: … if the rightmost stress is on the final syllable, the primary ...


3

In order: Prohibiting, disallowing, vetoing Objecting Condemn Dismissive Frown upon Unpreferred Tolerant Unbothered Ambivalent (also see thesaurus for synonyms) Considering Accepting (acceptable is likely the more natural use) Condoning (different flavor: active acceptance but possible disapproval) Preferring Wanting (and synonyms) Agreeing Approving ...


3

I don't know that it is possible to be fully neutral without dropping your perspective from it. As soon as you introduce yourself, you are automatically assuming a perspective against which a following statement will be compared, so absolute neutrality becomes improbable. Consider the difference between: Some people like the color blue. I tolerate ...


3

The term agnostic is often used to express such a sentiment. When applied to a non-religious context, it means someone who is uncommitted one way or another on a position. Regarding whether or not to eat meat, I am agnostic. Along the same lines is impartial, which means to treat all sides equally. I am impartial to vegetarians, although I am not ...


3

If you felt you were getting nothing out of the job, you could describe it as being uninspiring. If the work itself was so repetitive that it was making you bored of it maybe you could describe it as being tedious.


3

If I don't have an objection to something, I'd say: I'm okay with that. That's fine. It's acceptable.


3

A cover is a new recording of a previously recorded song.


3

Either works, but they have different meanings, and I am a legend is probably the one you want. Legend (Dictionary.com) means: 1. a nonhistorical or unverifiable story handed down by tradition from earlier times and popularly accepted as historical. 6. a collection of stories about an admirable person. 7. a person who is the center of such ...


3

The choice between what the poster describes as the adjective and noun forms for X in the phrase "X-born" may reflect the originating notion: "born a French national"/"born a native Texan" on the one hand, or "born in France"/"born in Texas" on the other. I've encountered both forms in different settings, but (at least in published writing) usage has ...


3

The commonest way of employing a verb as an adjective with an active sense—that is, with the sense that the noun modified is something which performs the action of the verb—is to use the present participle: the -ing form: This book has been described as degrading to Western culture. Likewise, the commonest way of employing a verb as an adjective with a ...


2

"lightning" is primarily a noun and you can use it in a formula such as "as quick as lightning" or shorter "quick as lightning". In this special case we have an even shorter formula "lightning quick", in which the noun was placed before the adjective quick. In German we have the same formulas: schnell wie der Blitz - "quick/fast as the flash" (translation ...


2

I'd like to point out that that tolerant and tolerating have somewhat opposite connotations. Do you actively have to put up with something, or by nature aren't bothered by it? I suspect you won't be able to find a perfect word (although I tried in my other answer). Do you know anyone who doesn't drink but doesn't find anything particularly wrong with it? I ...



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