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82

a. I love you and your bananas. b. I love you and you're bananas. This particular case depends on the your/you're coming after an independent clause followed by "and," since its feasibility depends on functioning either as a second direct object or as another independent clause. It also depends on the noun serving either as a thing that someone ...


42

This comes up a lot with cousin as many other languages have more words for different types of cousin than English, though not always in the same way as you say for the Chinese languages. Generally, we just say "cousin" unless it's particularly relevant. If it was relevant we might be happy enough that the subsequent her does indicate her being female. We ...


39

You might say they are thick-skinned, if the criticism is particularly harsh or undeserved. Assuming a more constructive environment, you could say something like receptive to criticism or open to feedback. If they actually try to alter their behavior to correct for past mistakes, you might go further and say they are responsive to criticism.


38

Forgive if there's some subtlety of grammar that I've missed, but I believe the following sentence works: I know your fine. I am aware of the amount of money that you have been fined. Alternatively: I know you're fine. I am aware that you are doing alright. In my opinion, both sentences would work better with a "that" inserted before ...


36

There's an old joke that goes like "A man walks into a psychiatrist's office. He's completely naked except that he's wrapped himself in Saran wrap. The psychiatrist takes one look at him and says 'well, I can clearly see your/you're nuts'."


26

Your right to believe what you want is important. vs You're right to believe what you want is important.


20

"I know your trouble." = "I understand the trouble you have." "I know you're trouble." = "I know that you are going to be a trouble (for me/us)."


19

If you are telling them what a third party said, they are humble - if you are criticizing them directly, they are receptive.


15

The first word that comes to mind is futile. fu·tile adjective \ˈfyü-təl, ˈfyü-ˌtī(-ə)l\ : having no result or effect : pointless or useless : serving no useful purpose : completely ineffective I've often heard and used phrases like "This was an exercise in futility." You could also say "It is futile to work on that fridge. It will ...


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13

Although this question almost feels like three questions in one, I will try to answer all three parts — and the general question concerning the whole sentence as well. book In the noun phrase book collector, the noun book is a noun adjunct, it is used attributively. A common way of expressing this is to say that book is used as an adjective, but this ...


13

Grammar is the difference between: knowing your shit and knowing you’re shit Both are correct, but obviously have very different meanings.


13

So why is well, an adverb, preferred over good, an adjective, when used with linking verbs? It's well as an adjective that is preferred over good as an adjective. Though that well is also an adverb is a factor in two ways. The first is that since good is sometimes used as an adverb, and this sense is considered incorrect, some of the cases where good ...


12

It could well be that you're looking for unedifying. From Collins: unedifying adjective not having the result of improving morality, intellect, etc [bolding mine] CDO satisfyingly gives the appropriate sense for the base word here: edify Verb UK (formal US) to improve someone's mind


12

Perhaps the word that you are looking for is Amenable http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/amenable?searchDictCode=all Or, if you want to show the person in a positive light, you mean he (or she) is an Accepting person or individual. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/accepting


8

Sisyphean. It means to keep doing something but being unable to get anything fruitful. It comes from the story of Sisyphus, who was cursed to eternally roll a boulder up a hill. As soon as the he'd near the top, the boulder would roll down, and he would have to go to the bottom and roll it up again. It is work with no result.


7

This is not just a gender issue. In English, cousin is incredibly non-specific (even when you take into account that first cousin is usually implied). When translating Chinese kinship terms to English, there is no escaping the loss of information without awkwardness — unless you are talking about your father, mother, husband, wife, son, or daughter. ...


7

Well is an adjective. well adjective (better, best) [predicative] In good health; free or recovered from illness [ODO] It just happens to have the same form as the adverb of good; and its comparative/superlative forms happen to be the same too. But it's an adjective.


6

By order of appearance, it's the word "her" that is redundant, but English doesn't have an appropriate gender-neutral alternative. That means that, strictly speaking, "female" provides information that is already available, albeit only later. Whether this should be considered redundant depends on whether that information is important, and whether it's ...


6

Spanish also makes this kind of distinction: prima and primo, between a female and male cousin. In English, we do not care about the gender unless it is relevant to the topic. Otherwise, why bother to say it? If I said "My female cousin got a new job today", someone might then expect to find out what my male cousin must be doing. It just sounds odd to a ...


6

Are you looking for "fruitless"? "unproductive"? fruitless (adj) - useless; unproductive; without results or success Dictionary.com producing no good results : not successful Merriam-Webster They made a fruitless attempt to find a solution. It would be fruitless to continue. another suggestion: uninstructive


6

See the list of synonyms at laconic here: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/laconic Laconic adj. Using or marked by the use of few words; terse or concise.


6

The adjective boisterous might well answer. OED offers “Abounding in rough but good-natured activity bordering upon excess, such as proceeds from unchecked exuberance of spirits”; Merriam-Webster makes it “very noisy and active in a lively way.”


5

Your toast! (...is getting very dark) vs You're toast! (Gotcha!)


5

I have heard people with this (highly desirable) character trait referred to as "egoless".


5

The right word choice depends as much on connotation as definition. You're inviting someone to converse, and your invitation is being declined. I get the idea that you feel you're being rebuffed, and you want a word to describe the mostly monosyllabic responses you get in that light. "Curt" comes to mind. It strongly connotes discourtesy. "Brusque" is a ...


5

I am drunk-, fast- and dumb enough that it just might work! Hanging hyphens are normally used to be parallel with a hyphenated compound (e.g. "ninetheenth- and twentieth-century writers"). There's no such hypenated compound after the conjunction and so this is very strange and hard to understand. I am drunk, fast and dumb enough that it just might ...


4

Reserved or reticent, may suggest the idea: Given to or marked by self-restraint and reticence: a reserved person. also secretive or tightlipped: not letting people see or know what you are doing or thinking. (from TFD) Discreet may be an expression close to what you seem to be looking for: Possessed of, exercising, or ...


4

But they are still fundamentally adjectives Here's where I disagree with the rest of your description, that I otherwise think is correct. If such a word is "fundamentally" anything (I'll come back to that "if"), it's fundamentally a noun: We think of it as a noun in the abstract. We can't inflect it like like an adjective because it isn't one (though ...


4

Use "watery" (Ref: Dictionary.com): 8. resembling water in fluidity and absence of viscosity: "a watery fluid." This is technically correct, easily understood, and quite often applies in more than one sense ("watery soup", for example). "Dilute" also applies in some contexts (Solutions, colloids, the aforementioned soup or honey).



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