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22

BEFORE a noun, "almost-finished' is better, since it emphasizes that 'almost' is qualifying 'finished', not 'report'. Not important in this case, but compare 'longest living animal' with 'longest-living animal'.


15

"almost-finished" is a compound adjective. It is the correct way to say "I am attaching an almost-finished version of the report". "almost finished" is not correct in this case. Here's a sentence where you would use "almost finished" without the hyphen: "I am almost finished with the work."


8

converse implication: only describes Y, I want an adjective that describes X and Y s 'relationship The adjectives (concepts) you need are necessary and sufficient and the concept you already know of "relationship betweem X and Y (usually P and Q in logic), that is "implication" In the quoted link you can see the possible combinations, the example you ...


6

Trepidation would emphasize the fear and anxiety: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 A feeling of fear or anxiety about something that may happen: ODO


5

Philoprogenitive is the word. Having many offspring. [OD] Another option is multi-child and it is suitable for your context as well. Here is an example usage: The optimal algorithm is suitable for the cases when the given DFG has a small number of multi-parent and multi-child nodes. Real-Time Embedded Systems: Optimization, Synthesis, and ...


5

If he has already left, he is gone: adjective [PREDICATIVE] 1 No longer present; departed: If you are not using a predicative expression, absent might work better: Not present in a place, at an occasion, or as part of something: For a more permanent departure, parted: [NO OBJECT] 2. (also be parted) Leave someone’s company: or ...


5

TL;DR US and USA are not adjectives: they are nouns that can potentially be used attributively, with the same meaning as the corresponding adjectives (if such exist). Headlinese has slightly different rules, but in normal, non-Headlinese language use: USA is not used attributively because it is an abbreviation of a compound country name (United States of ...


5

This is a form of metonymy using adjectives as what are called transferred epithets. Nordquist, in Grammar.about.com gives a good overview, including the definition A figure of speech in which an epithet (or adjective) grammatically qualifies a noun other than the person or thing it is actually describing. Also known in rhetoric as hypallage. ...


4

WORD FOR THE FEELING OF DREAD/COMPLACENCY THAT COMES WHEN STARTING SOMETHING NEW (some combination of dread, complacency and intimidation that causes a person to freeze--TAGS: [meaning] [word-choice] [adjectives] [vocabulary]) Due to the wording of your request all single-word answers must reference either the “intimidation” or the “inertia” factors of your ...


4

'reckless' was suggested by @FumbleFingers in the comments. reckless: utterly unconcerned about the consequences of some action; without caution; careless


3

This isn't exactly what you're looking for, but it will help get the idea across. The mail has poor contrast differences in colour or in light and dark, used in photographs and paintings to create a special effect ...and therefore is illegible. difficult or impossible to read [Oxford] As for your requirement, the best I could come up with ...


3

Unless a specific preexisting term is identified, I believe the neologism archophobia is in order: noun a morbid dread at the commencement of creative work Origin From the Greek ἄρχω meaning begin, make a beginning and φόβος, meaning panic flight, fear, object of terror Liddell & Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon Archophobia is ...


3

There is a phrase exactly for this situation: blank canvas paralysis. It is a fairly new coinage and it is originated in painting where painters can't start painting and keep staring at the blank canvas; but it can be applied to any situation. Whenever you are about to start something new, you risk ‘Blank Canvas Paralysis’, the inability to get started. ...


3

If are looking for a word to refer to something that has a single use, after which it is expended, I would use the word disposable or expendable. If you are looking, on the other hand, to a word that conveys the oppossite meaning of 'speedign up a reaction', then you may use retardant According to Collins ...


3

Food and firewood are examples of fuel. In addition to being the raw material for synthesis of complex living tissue, food is basically fuel for the production of energy, without which no chemical reaction would occur in the living organism. Thus, these consumables could, metaphorically, be referred to as fuel.


3

I would profer populous. full of residents or inhabitants, as a region; heavily populated. Unlike prolific or fecund, it doesn't imply that the populous object created the descendant entities. Instead, it has many. (As @Joe brought up in the comments on the OP, foster/adopted families can have many children, which is another situation where the family ...


2

Well, I think grammarians are going to have various opinions, but the Oxford English Dictionary thinks these are both nouns. Or, more precisely, they are adjectives used as "absolute" constructions which omit the noun they reference implicitly, somewhat similarly to a process where we use an adjective as a substantive, like referring to the weak when we mean ...


2

In short is an idiom, and idioms cannot be broken down to into their constituents. From oxford The same goes for in brief


2

Here are a few specialized constructions of this sort: We do not think it necessary to go. ("think it A" where "A" is an adjective) Some people do not think it important to be thrifty. (same as above) She did not wish him to think it possible. (same as above) I think it fair that ... (same as above) I thought it over carefully. ...


2

"Force of habit" seems to be the most general way to state it. behavior made involuntary or automatic by repeated practice Merriam Webster link As you mentioned in the comments, "conditioned" hits close to the same description, but to me it seems to imply it was done specifically to instill those habits. "Force of habit" does not carry the same ...


2

There isn't one. In the technical context of the OP's full question there is no accepted single word technical term. Many of the words mentioned are great for general responses, especially in terms of the question title, but would be questionable usage in a more specific technical context. If this is referring to a tree graph structure specifically, it ...


2

Lassitude might approach the feeling of mental paralysis: n. A state or feeling of weariness, diminished energy, or listlessness. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. From etymonline.com: early 15c., from Middle French lassitude (14c.), from Latin lassitudinem (nominative lassitudo) "faintness, ...


2

Probably, indecipherable. At the heart of this adjective is cipher, which means "code". Something that's indecipherable can't be understood. If you can't figure out the meaning of something, it's indecipherable. (vocabulary.com) an indecipherable message or font.


2

In the case of a tree, I might use the term denuded. denuded adj without the natural or usual covering; TFD By the way, this is not really an antonym of hollow, because what you're looking for is not really an antonym, per se. It's more like a mirrored state, or a complementary state. The antonym of hollow would be filled or full or any of several ...


2

Common by itself can mean either prevalent[Oxford, sense 1] or shared[Oxford, sense 2]. Occurring, found, or done often; prevalent: salt and pepper are the two most common seasonings Shared by, coming from, or done by two or more people, groups, or things: the two republics' common border However, in expressions like ...


2

Depending on the context, three other words come to mind to describe a person departing from and organization: Retired has strong connotations of concluding a career, but it also has a general sense of departure: : withdrawn from one's position or occupation : having concluded one's working or professional career Merriam-Webster Dismissed ...


2

If I'm constrained to a hyphenated expression I'd probably go with a getting-to-know-you break, after the song from The King and I. But I think the more ordinary way of expressing this would be something like We broke for a mixer, to get to know the new members. It's an American use: Collins, def. 2. Broke might be adjourned, if the session was the ...


2

Closer in this sentence is the comparative of the adverb close. close (adv.) at or to a short distance or time away [M-W]


2

When shortened forms become idiomatic, it may be better not to try to identify parts of speech within them. I had more cups of tea than Harry [had] [cups of tea]. No problem with classifying Harry as a noun (phrase) (though 'they did' reduces to 'them' nowadays). ... I had more cups of tea than [I] [had] [cups of] coffee. Again, no problems. ...


1

torpor noun a : a state of mental and motor inactivity with partial or total insensibility b : a state of lowered physiological activity typically characterized by reduced metabolism, heart rate, respiration, and body temperature that occurs in varying degrees especially in hibernating and estivating animals : apathy, dullness



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