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6

The very last is an expression commonly used. Examples: He was the very last person to arrive at the meeting. This is the very last piece available for sale.


5

Since you asked for an engineering application, consider: Over-engineered (adjective) unnecessarily complicated "systems are unreliable, manuals are impenetrable and products are over-engineered" Overengineering Overengineering (or over-engineering) is the designing of a product to be more robust or complicated than is necessary for its ...


3

The phrase older people is a euphemism for old people.


3

This is called a nominalization, the result of making a noun out a word that isn't a noun. In this case, the word is the adjective nice, and the resulting noun niceness is the quality of being nice. In English we do this by making a morphological (i.e., form) change, in this case by adding the suffix-ness. There are a number of ways to do this: ...


3

Depending on the context, perhaps fellow: "He was an amiable fellow". Using fellow intentionally avoids using 'boy', implying that the person isn't a boy or necessarily young. Likewise, I would think 'fellow' is too informal to describe an older person. Chap or gent could also work, as a child certainly isn't a "gent".


2

I'd say that the mirrors are all level. level [lev-uh l] adjective having no part higher than another; having a flat or even surface. being in a plane parallel to the plane of the horizon; horizontal.


1

Here are your two sentences with the correct use of articles, and I've tried to explain my reasoning afterwards. In fact, I only added the indefinite article "a" to "regional perspective" and the rest was already correct. The key to successful business development in this industry is understanding the market from a regional perspective as Canada is a ...


1

Immersed is the most fitting one I can think of that hasn't been mentioned. "Immersed in battle" lands me 3310 hits on google book search, though it isn't clear if they refer to it in a more literal sense. immersed involve oneself deeply in a particular activity or interest.


1

The question isn't actually about "the" before adjectives: it is about plural articles. Both examples are grammatically correct, though the first one is more likely to be what you mean. The first example uses the definite article "the" to indicate a specific set of fellow writers (possibly ones that were introduced before). The second uses the indefinite ...


1

The sentence I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful is grammatically correct. But it would be much more natural (and simple) to insert the adjectives before the noun described: I want to be smart and beautiful, like you. The simplest way of writing or speaking English is nearly always the best way.



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