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8

Both are possible, grammatical, and idiomatic, but "my email ID has changed" simply means that the ID is no longer the same, while "my email ID has been changed" puts more stress on the fact that someone is responsible for actively changing the ID.


7

The word is fête, not fete, and it is a transitive verb with many “active” citations in the OED: fête /feɪt/, v. Etymology: ad. Fr. fêter, f. fête: see prec. trans. To entertain (a person) at a fête; to feast; also, to give a fête in honour of, commemorate (some event, etc.) by a fête. 1819 Edin. Rev. XXXII. 221 ― He was in general too ...


5

Andrew Leach's explanation is sound as far as how you might go about doing this, but the answers all sound awkward and goofy. I think this points to a bigger point that you shouldn't do this. Consider the reasons for using passive voice. The whole idea of passive voice is inverting the emphasis between subject and object, so it just doesn't make a whole ...


5

The matter was reported to the commissioner. and The commissioner reported the matter. mean different things. To change to the active voice while retaining the meaning would be something like this: The commisioner received the report of the matter. This is a more verbose way to say it, and it is a more complicated and less natural ...


5

The question touches on several issues. Stated as it is, there's no single answer. However, many of the issues touched on are fairly well understood. First, terminology. Passive refers to a syntactic process only. It does not refer to meaning. Consequently one cannot "express the Passive voice by means of the active voice". Or by any means. Passive is not ...


5

"read" can be both transitive and intransitive and, depending on context, can have several meanings. MW - To answer you question in a more didatical way, I've selected the two meanings that seem to be confusing you: to look at and understand the meaning of letters, words, symbols, etc. I can't read what you have written. (transitive verb) I like to ...


5

No: this is not passive voice in any way whatsoever: This second usage of spiritual I do not approve of. This is merely object–verb–subject (OVS) ordering instead of subject–verb–object (SVO). It is the same grammatical structure as saying: I do not approve of this second second usage of spiritual. The subject is still I in both cases: it does ...


4

How about: Rewriting the Lagrangian in terms of the generalized coordinates α and ϕ yields ... It's active voice, but doesn't use "we", which I think is the underlying reason for using the passive voice in scientific papers.


4

But I was wondering why can't you say 'I was kept waiting by him' You can. In this regard the passive is more flexible, since you can either include the agent ("I was kept waiting by him" or leave it out ("I was kept waiting"). The active, since it has the agent as the subject, cannot do this. It must at the least have "Something kept me waiting" or ...


4

I'd go with #1. "Kicked through the window" is a very specific image, and breaking it up makes it less clear. (Think about it this way: The boys aren't through the window; the kicked ball was.)


4

I don't believe such a structure exists in English. If Adam's the subject of the sentence, you need a passive construction to capture the effect of something else on him.


4

You're right when you say that The commissioner reported the matter. Implies the commissioner was the one reporting the matter. It is only correct if the objective was to use the active voice. The active voice requires that the subject of the sentence is performing some action. Your original sentence, The matter was reported to the commissioner ...


4

To omit George and not use someone or somebody, I think you would probably need to use the passive voice: Henry's eyes were carved out. To omit George and use an active voice, you could try changing the verb. I'm not entirely sure of the context, but you could say something like: Henry suffered great violence to his eyes, wounds inflicted by a carving ...


4

Strictly speaking, a passive version of your imperative would be: School be gone to (by you)! However: pragmatically, this is not absolutely equivalent, because you are in effect 'commanding' the school rather than the person (but this is always the case with active/passive pairs: they will involve shifts in focus/emphasis/scope and are never ...


4

A suitable reference is English Practice. Where the verb is intransitive, as you note, the passive form is different. To create the passive, you need an object to turn into the subject of be. Active: Bring it home. Passive: Let it be brought home. Active: Please help me. Passive: Let me be helped. Passive: You are requested to help me. ...


3

They give the same meaning, but not the same emphasis. The active form foregrounds the data, while the passive form foregrounds the desired object.


3

The expression may well be found more often in the passive than the active, but that is not to say there is anything nonstandard about the active form. One of the characters in Jerome’s ‘Three Men In A Boat’ says Blest if it didn't quite take me aback. You could say that that was in a colloquial context, but that doesn’t make it nonstandard. The same applies ...


3

I was taught that whether to use active voice or passive voice depends on what you want to put the emphasis on. Sometimes it's the subject, other times it's the object.


3

Fete as a transitive verb means: (Chambers) To entertain at a feast To honour with festivities So you can't fete occasions, but you can certainly fete people. She feted her guests at the party. We have to fete our soldiers.


3

FOO uses addition to determine Y If you wish to use active voice, this is the best construction. "We" and other first-person pronouns are generally discouraged in academic papers. I think that giving agency to Foo makes it easier to write, but then my text becomes 'FOO does this ... FOO does that' and the page starts to look awkward. Perhaps it is ...


3

Well, if you're that bothered about avoiding personal pronouns, you can always say "The author", "The researcher" etc. It's really a matter of preference; not all scientists think there's anything terribly wrong with good old-fashioned words like "I" and "we"... You may also want to see if you can actually find a scientific study attesting to the perceived ...


3

The meaning is not the same. (And I think you mean "practical" instead of "pragmatic" as well.) This product is sold very well. That statement implies little about the product, and more about the person selling it. Nevertheless, it is poorly constructed and something a native speaker would not be likely to say. You could use the passive voice to say ...


3

As @ChrisSunami says, if a person judging or grading your paper says "this is the standard", then I'd follow that standard. You could find some authority that disagrees and argue about it, but what would you gain? Even if you forced the person to concede, he might then be annoyed with you and be looking for ways to mark you down. There's no point starting an ...


3

If you're committed to a single word, I would look at the reflexive verbs lull, quiet, or ease. Soothe would work. The resulting sentence would be something like, "I lull myself by the river." "She quiets herself by the river." But, if you want a single unreflexive verb, I would use unwind or relax (somewhat obvious). "I unwind by the ...


3

It's not particularly clear what GHWC is, but depending on its level of agency it might be able to "address problems" rather than have solutions to problems. "GHWC addresses the root causes of common problems." or "Many GHWC projects/employees/corollaries/statements address the root causes of common problems."


3

In order to interpret this sentence as passive voice, we have to assume there is an agent implied: This file is located here by someone. My guess would be that strict followers of Strunk and White would read the sentence like this, but I have my doubts about this interpretation. To locate something means that someone establishes the location, not that ...


3

Although you need some more practice in classifying English verbs by voice, you have spotted one of the reasons to use the passive -- placing the subject first when the acted upon party should receive the emphasis: The Affordable Care Act was passed by Congress in 2010. Here the ACA receives first billing as the subject of the passive voice "was ...


3

Constructions such as The book reads well. are classic examples of the mediopassive voice in English.


3

A text can ‘read itself’, yes. As others have pointed out, read can be either active or mediopassive (which maps roughly, but not exactly, to transitive and intransitive uses). But if it used mediopassively, the text that ‘reads itself’ has to be the actual subject; otherwise, you would use say instead of read. In your example, the subject it is a kind of ...


3

To understand the answer to your question you need to know that change is an ergative verb. Wikipedia defines ergative verbs as follows: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. So, in the sentence I have changed my ...



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