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The replies made so far mentioned that the narrator might be Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, German, French, Swiss, Belgian, Austrian, Russian or Czech. Someone also guessed Eastern Europe. As the poster of this question, I knew where the narrator came from since in the beginning. The narrator is actually me. The reason I didn't want to disclose that ...


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As mentioned in the comments, every language has its own inventory of sounds. English has a relatively high number of different sounds, and many of its sounds are rare in the languages of the world (the English "r" sound, for example, is very uncommon). When a word is borrowed into a new language (or a new dialect), it sometimes gets absorbed into the ...


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None: you cannot pick up an accent from a dictionary. You can only pick up an accent from listening to it. There’s far, far, far more to an accent than its phonology alone, let alone that part of its phonology readily expressible in IPA. Note also that most dictionaries at best use phonemic transcriptions, not phonetic ones. A phonemic transcription will ...


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I think the text you saw referenced was probably Comma Gets a Cure. This text has words from all of John Wells's lexical sets, which were designed to encompass variation between standard British "Received Pronunciation" and standard "General American," two of the most well-known dialects of English. Wells's lexical sets don't include the fern/fir/fur ...


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In general two-word names of places, squares, people and roads of various descriptions take stress on both words. In the following list, the stresses are marked with a preceding apostrophe: 'Kings 'Road 'Kings 'Avenue 'Kings 'Crescent 'Kings 'Cross 'Kings Em'bankment 'Kings 'Drive 'Kings 'Lane. The exception to this rule is roads or addresses with the ...


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Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


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The conventions of popular song in the English language since the mid-twentieth century have led to the dominance of what's been called a mid-Atlantic accent. The general belief is that the prevalence of extended, possibly distorted vowel sounds aren't really compatible with British accents as spoken, even by singers. The exceptions are very noticeable and ...


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From my experience the Australian accent is not identical across the entire continent. The differences between the regions are not quite as obvious as you'd notice between regions in a country like the USA, but they certainly still exist. I would characterise the Australian accent as being distinct in three regions: The East Coast, The West Coast and "The ...


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Are you looking for Communication accomodation theory? Specifically: convergence - Convergence refers to the process through which an individual shifts his or her speech patterns in interaction so that they more closely resemble the speech patterns of speech partners. ... People use convergence based on their perceptions of others, as well as ...


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This question is problematic in that it confuses German and Germanic. As others have pointed out, German is just of many Germanic languages. While German is the most conservative among the West-Germanic languages (the others being English, Dutch, Afrikaans, Yiddish and Frisian), Icelandic has a strong reputation as the most conservative North-Germanic ...


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Self conscious: Defined by Merriam Webster as: "uncomfortably nervous about or embarrassed by what other people think about you..." I've used the phrase in a sentence to make the phrase clearer. "She rarely spoke up in meetings because she was self-conscious about her accent."


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He/she felt linguistically discriminated or to be precise accentually discriminated. The condition is called accentism. Linguistic discrimination is the unfair treatment of an individual based solely on their use of language. This use of language may include the individual's native language or other characteristics of the person's speech, such as an ...


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I'll answer as honestly as I can. My comments imply no criticism, just what I hear. There are several aspects to recognising an accent. Whether or not you are a native speaker Clearly you are not a native English speaker. You have an accent that corresponds to no native accents. You are not as fluent as a native speaker and your vowels are accurate but ...


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The dialects of present-day English can be seen as the continuation of the dialect areas which established themselves in the Old English period. The following extract can help: HISTORICAL OUTLINE: The dialectal division of the narrower region of England into: 1) a northern, 2) a central and 3) a (subdivided) southern region has been ...


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Listen to recordings from librivox.org AFTER having read the script. Many of the audio books on librivox you can find in a written form on ProjectGutenberg. If that is still to difficult, use audio material that is intended for beginning learners of the English language.


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Great question. Yes, English has many varieties, but as far as I know only two of them are normally taught in a classroom context: British English (assuming Received Pronunciation) and American English (assuming General American). To make a decision, ask yourself: Which version will be more useful to me? (Professionally, travel-wise, etc.) Which ...


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You will almost never hear the word 'posh' used within the U.S., except in reference to Victoria Beckham in a bar trivia question about her nickname in the Spice Girls. But I will assume you're referring to a more distinctive style and dialect by people of the upper-class. First, there is a language difference. Speaking in more formal and proper English ...


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At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


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To answer your questions as simply as possible: Does Bender speak ‘proper’ American English? Does he have an American accent? Yeah. Pretty much. Are there any features in Bender's speech which suggest that English is not his native tongue? No. Not really. Further comments that you might find helpful: Benders voice is fairly distinctive. It ...


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Where enunciation is not critical, pronunciation will always tend to elide words or omit consonants, or both. What does that mean? will, where stress is not important, always tend to What's that mean? or Wad's that mean? and will probably end up as Wassa' mean? The glottal stop which replaces the terminal -t on that is likely to be retained, but only as a ...


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Yeah, it's just "What does that mean" all elided together. There should be a detectable difference between an elided "what does" and "what is", something phonetically like "wutuz" vs. "wutiz".


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First this is in no way official. To me it's not a emphasis on lane as much as it is a lack of emphasis on street. I think it comes from two distinct points. First consider the question "What street do you live on?" If you lived on 1st Street you would say either "1st Street" or just "1st". If is very common to say just "1st" and omit the street in ...


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This is purely speculation, but I suggest that the difference (if it in fact exists - and with the question having firmly planted the Beatles in my consciousness I can't be sure) is due to the rarity of "lane" vs "street". I suspect most speakers would stress "lane" to make sure that the hearer understands that it is not, in fact, "Penny street".


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It's not you. It's... well, it is you, but it is the same for everybody. Foreign languages are foreign. They have all different words and grammar and when words or syntax are sort of the same, even then the meaning can be annoyingly slightly different. And pronunciation of sounds (accent) is similar. You can obviously understand those who speak your ...


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This podcast sheds light on the issue: http://radiowest.kuer.org/post/speaking-american-speaking-utahn It is an interview with two language experts. They talk about regional accents in general, but focus on Utah specifically. Interestingly enough, according to the folks in this episode, most of the things that people identify with being unique to Utah are ...


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The Dictionary of American Regional English uses a region called "Utah". You can investigate the features of that region on that web site. (Subscription required. Perhaps you library has one.)


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If what you are trying to emphasize is the fact that you're proud, then yes, stress the word "proud" a little. Like you said in the second paragraph, if your intention is to distinguish between the people involved, stress the "I" and "you".


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Technically, it is called speech imitation ability. The person who has this ability is called a good mimic also. Speech sound imitation is a pivotal learning mechanism for humans. Vocal imitation provides a basis for acquisition of both languages and musical systems. Some people, on the other hand, are adept at vocal imitation and make a living ...


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I don't understand what "picking an accent" means. Probably you intend 'picking up an accent', in other words being able to imitate it. This is a talent of mimicry.


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Two possibilities spring to mind: Diglossia A situation in which two languages (or two varieties of the same language) are used under different conditions within a community, often by the same speakers. The term is usually applied to languages with distinct ‘high’ and ‘low’ (colloquial) varieties [...]. [Oxford & Wikipedia (for the socioluingistic ...



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