Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Palatal vowels (i), semivowels (y), and liquids (r) often influence the sound of preceding consonants, a process called palatalization. This is most obvious with dental consonants like t and s, which typically become tch and sh. For example, train often sounds like tchrain. Palatalization is consistent for some English forms, like the shun sound of the ...


4

According to the Pacific Rim wiki, Stacker Pentecost was born in Tottenham, London, and holds British citizenship. I don’t know the movie at all, but the wiki also says he is the head of the Hong Kong Shatterdome, so perhaps his native British English has simply been influenced somewhat by Hong Kong’s colonial English accents.


4

You're absolutely right, there is a subtle sh sound. I've just tried it myself and I can detect different positions of my mouth and tongue as I say str words, compared to words beginning simply with s (excluding sugar and sure of course) and other s and consonant clusters. I have no knowledge as to whether this is more marked in different regions, but I ...


4

Perhaps one of the voice characteristics you are describing is timbre the characteristic quality of sound that distinguishes one voice or musical instrument from another or one vowel sound from another: it is determined by the harmonics of the sound and is distinguished from the intensity and pitch While certain aspects of voice may be statistically ...


3

It is very difficult to remove an accent, whether foreign or regional, after puberty, without the aid of intense speech therapy/training. But without intense training, the trick is to, well, exaggerate what you think is the local accent you're trying to copy. Even though it may sound funny to your own ears, it'll turn out to be closer to locals than you ...


3

His accent is consistant with the dialect spoken by natives of the Appalachian Region of the U.S. Commonly spoken by individuals from NW Georgia, W NC/SC, VA, E TN, & SE KY. JDnTN I'm with you 100% it is a pretty authentic accent, my granddad, & all of his brothers sound much like Raine,& Use similar wording/idioms. I'm from NC btw. My question ...


3

I am originally from Adams County and went to school with lots of working class Chican@s and poor whites who speak with what I call the "Denver" accent. Each of the four counties surrounding Denver have--as far as I can tell--distinct accents. Dougco sounds the most like GenAmerican and is very proper ('cause they rich) and Jeffco is also pretty ...


3

In my opinion, the words Wat, daen, daen oot would suggest a Scottish accent. The sentence Oi taught i heard Sengen sounds very Irish because of the lack of "h" proceeding "t". I actually think the accent being portrayed is a West Country accent. The words dain't, Marster and loik most definitive do not sound Irish and don't really sound Scottish (try ...


2

I was acquainted once with a fellow who had undergone a laryngectomy. He used an electrolarynx when speaking, and his Lancashire accent was quite unaffected. I concluded from this that vocal pitch has little to do with accent (or, strictly, I suppose, little to do with a Lancashire accent).


2

I doubt there is really a completely neutral British English accent. There almost always small give aways in an individual's speech which carry influences of both region and class. Having been born and brought up in Solihull, a south-eastern suburb of Birmingham, I grew up able to speak with a West Midlands accent and alternatively with a supposedly neutral ...


2

Speaking as a voice consultant, I distinguish between 'voice quality' and 'voice use'. Voice quality is the sound or timbre of a person's voice: raspy, breathy, nasal, etc - which is a product of how a person combines the 3 things needed to produce a vocal sound: breathing, the sound source and resonators/articulators. Voice use is the amount of vocal ...


2

As John Lawler notes in the comments: No. English spelling is not made to represent Modern English vowels, and deviating from standard spellings merely introduces more randomness. The closest you can achieve is to completely alter the spelling to similar to CoolHandLouis' answer.


1

Foyle is a steadfast, serious man -- a grammar school boy who has risen through the ranks of the police force to become a respected detective chief superintendent. 1: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/mystery/foyleswar/whoisfoyle.html The character is middle-class and has a middle-class accent: He might contend not just with spies, criminals and rogue officers but ...


1

I copied my answer from ELL here, because you seem to be watching this page at the moment. One way is to focus on the sound, rather than the words. A technique I found especially useful is to try to transcribe something non-English. For example, you can challenge yourself to transcribe the lyric of some song that you are sure its lyric is easy to find on ...


1

Understanding a particular accent comes along when our ear is not trained for it. So, the more you listen to that accent, the more you get trained for it. You are already on the right path. Keep watching movies/videos. You can start listening to songs and may be start following a particular band. Start watching videos of important people from your field. ...


1

This site at the British Library has a collection of different regional accents, some recent and some recorded several decades ago: http://sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dialects/ Some of the older ones, made c. 1918, are quite difficult for a modern Brit to understand, and the recording quality can be poor too: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible