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8

There isn't any unusual accent in that speech. What you're referring to, though, is intonation, and one of the things you're specifically referring to is called vocal fry. In vocal fry, the vocal folds are shortened and slack so they close together completely and pop back open, with a little jitter, as the air comes through. That popping, jittery effect ...


4

None: you cannot pick up an accent from a dictionary. You can only pick up an accent from listening to it. There’s far, far, far more to an accent than its phonology alone, let alone that part of its phonology readily expressible in IPA. Note also that most dictionaries at best use phonemic transcriptions, not phonetic ones. A phonemic transcription will ...


4

As mentioned in the comments, every language has its own inventory of sounds. English has a relatively high number of different sounds, and many of its sounds are rare in the languages of the world (the English "r" sound, for example, is very uncommon). When a word is borrowed into a new language (or a new dialect), it sometimes gets absorbed into the ...


4

I think the text you saw referenced was probably Comma Gets a Cure. This text has words from all of John Wells's lexical sets, which were designed to encompass variation between standard British "Received Pronunciation" and standard "General American," two of the most well-known dialects of English. Wells's lexical sets don't include the fern/fir/fur ...


4

The conventions of popular song in the English language since the mid-twentieth century have led to the dominance of what's been called a mid-Atlantic accent. The general belief is that the prevalence of extended, possibly distorted vowel sounds aren't really compatible with British accents as spoken, even by singers. The exceptions are very noticeable and ...


4

I will defer to someone who can provide more explicit references, but I'm going to say "yes, it is mostly consistent", for two reasons: "J. C. Wells: Accents of English" (by John C. Wells, the famous British phonetician), in summarizing the phonetic features of the various major accents of English, mentions word stress only twice: In the West Indies, "...


3

In general two-word names of places, squares, people and roads of various descriptions take stress on both words. In the following list, the stresses are marked with a preceding apostrophe: 'Kings 'Road 'Kings 'Avenue 'Kings 'Crescent 'Kings 'Cross 'Kings Em'bankment 'Kings 'Drive 'Kings 'Lane. The exception to this rule is roads or addresses with the ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


3

From my experience the Australian accent is not identical across the entire continent. The differences between the regions are not quite as obvious as you'd notice between regions in a country like the USA, but they certainly still exist. I would characterise the Australian accent as being distinct in three regions: The East Coast, The West Coast and "The ...


3

With regard to the concept of 'correctness' of individual language elements, there are two competing views and these two views will affect how to differentiate varieties. There is describing scientifically what is out there, what people actually say and how their individual way of speaking can be categorized with others, and then there is systematizing ...


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Listen to recordings from librivox.org AFTER having read the script. Many of the audio books on librivox you can find in a written form on ProjectGutenberg. If that is still to difficult, use audio material that is intended for beginning learners of the English language.


2

I'll answer as honestly as I can. My comments imply no criticism, just what I hear. There are several aspects to recognising an accent. Whether or not you are a native speaker Clearly you are not a native English speaker. You have an accent that corresponds to no native accents. You are not as fluent as a native speaker and your vowels are accurate but ...


2

He/she felt linguistically discriminated or to be precise accentually discriminated. The condition is called accentism. Linguistic discrimination is the unfair treatment of an individual based solely on their use of language. This use of language may include the individual's native language or other characteristics of the person's speech, such as an ...


2

Self conscious: Defined by Merriam Webster as: "uncomfortably nervous about or embarrassed by what other people think about you..." I've used the phrase in a sentence to make the phrase clearer. "She rarely spoke up in meetings because she was self-conscious about her accent."


2

Are you looking for Communication accomodation theory? Specifically: convergence - Convergence refers to the process through which an individual shifts his or her speech patterns in interaction so that they more closely resemble the speech patterns of speech partners. ... People use convergence based on their perceptions of others, as well as ...


2

You will almost never hear the word 'posh' used within the U.S., except in reference to Victoria Beckham in a bar trivia question about her nickname in the Spice Girls. But I will assume you're referring to a more distinctive style and dialect by people of the upper-class. First, there is a language difference. Speaking in more formal and proper English ...


2

Great question. Yes, English has many varieties, but as far as I know only two of them are normally taught in a classroom context: British English (assuming Received Pronunciation) and American English (assuming General American). To make a decision, ask yourself: Which version will be more useful to me? (Professionally, travel-wise, etc.) Which ...


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At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


2

Where enunciation is not critical, pronunciation will always tend to elide words or omit consonants, or both. What does that mean? will, where stress is not important, always tend to What's that mean? or Wad's that mean? and will probably end up as Wassa' mean? The glottal stop which replaces the terminal -t on that is likely to be retained, but only as a ...


2

This question is problematic in that it confuses German and Germanic. As others have pointed out, German is just of many Germanic languages. While German is the most conservative among the West-Germanic languages (the others being English, Dutch, Afrikaans, Yiddish and Frisian), Icelandic has a strong reputation as the most conservative North-Germanic ...


2

To answer your questions as simply as possible: Does Bender speak ‘proper’ American English? Does he have an American accent? Yeah. Pretty much. Are there any features in Bender's speech which suggest that English is not his native tongue? No. Not really. Further comments that you might find helpful: Benders voice is fairly distinctive. It ...


2

It sounds like a standard stage singer's accent to me. One thing to remember is that opera and stage singers must enunciate words differently from "normal people" in order to both "project" and be understandable to the audience. The accent isn't necessarily in emulation of anything so much as a necessary modification of the voice to be heard and understood ...


2

There are several factors that make /ˈpɛpəmənt/ an unlikely phonemic representation of "peppermint." Vowel must be (fully) unstressed to be reduced In general, only unstressed vowels can be reduced. In theories that distinguish multiple levels of stress in English words, we can narrow it down even further: only fully unstressed vowels can be reduced. ...


1

Yeah, it's just "What does that mean" all elided together. There should be a detectable difference between an elided "what does" and "what is", something phonetically like "wutuz" vs. "wutiz".


1

First this is in no way official. To me it's not a emphasis on lane as much as it is a lack of emphasis on street. I think it comes from two distinct points. First consider the question "What street do you live on?" If you lived on 1st Street you would say either "1st Street" or just "1st". If is very common to say just "1st" and omit the street in ...


1

This is purely speculation, but I suggest that the difference (if it in fact exists - and with the question having firmly planted the Beatles in my consciousness I can't be sure) is due to the rarity of "lane" vs "street". I suspect most speakers would stress "lane" to make sure that the hearer understands that it is not, in fact, "Penny street".


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Having lived in and around Liverpool in the past but not being a native, I thought Andy Burnham sounded more Mancunian than Liverpudlian. Maybe his parents were from Manchester? He's definitely a 'northerner.'


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I'm English and I occasionally mistake some Irish accents for American until I listen very carefully Irish Catholics According to the Dictionary of American History,[10] approximately "50,000 to 100,000 Irishmen, over 75 percent of them Catholic, came to United States in the 1600s, while 100,000 more Irish Catholics arrived in the 1700s." ...


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While it's possible that you might find some such connection, I very much doubt it, for two reasons. First, while there were undoubtedly dialects in earlier forms of the language, few of the details of modern pronunciation can go back beyond the Great Vowel Shift in the 15-17th centuries. Secondly, there is remarkably little evidence of Celtic influence ...


1

These may describe the condition, rather than the person who might feel anxiety that they're being judged; that their accent is seen as a "qualifier" of social status: Sociolinguistic discrimination; Linguistic profiling; Ethnocentrism; Linguicism; Classism; Cultural bias; Socioeconomic stereotyping; Dialectical stigmatism; Patois prejudice; class ...



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