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8

There isn't any unusual accent in that speech. What you're referring to, though, is intonation, and one of the things you're specifically referring to is called vocal fry. In vocal fry, the vocal folds are shortened and slack so they close together completely and pop back open, with a little jitter, as the air comes through. That popping, jittery effect ...


4

None: you cannot pick up an accent from a dictionary. You can only pick up an accent from listening to it. There’s far, far, far more to an accent than its phonology alone, let alone that part of its phonology readily expressible in IPA. Note also that most dictionaries at best use phonemic transcriptions, not phonetic ones. A phonemic transcription will ...


4

As mentioned in the comments, every language has its own inventory of sounds. English has a relatively high number of different sounds, and many of its sounds are rare in the languages of the world (the English "r" sound, for example, is very uncommon). When a word is borrowed into a new language (or a new dialect), it sometimes gets absorbed into the ...


4

The conventions of popular song in the English language since the mid-twentieth century have led to the dominance of what's been called a mid-Atlantic accent. The general belief is that the prevalence of extended, possibly distorted vowel sounds aren't really compatible with British accents as spoken, even by singers. The exceptions are very noticeable and ...


4

I think the text you saw referenced was probably Comma Gets a Cure. This text has words from all of John Wells's lexical sets, which were designed to encompass variation between standard British "Received Pronunciation" and standard "General American," two of the most well-known dialects of English. Wells's lexical sets don't include the fern/fir/fur ...


4

I will defer to someone who can provide more explicit references, but I'm going to say "yes, it is mostly consistent", for two reasons: "J. C. Wells: Accents of English" (by John C. Wells, the famous British phonetician), in summarizing the phonetic features of the various major accents of English, mentions word stress only twice: In the West Indies, "...


3

With regard to the concept of 'correctness' of individual language elements, there are two competing views and these two views will affect how to differentiate varieties. There is describing scientifically what is out there, what people actually say and how their individual way of speaking can be categorized with others, and then there is systematizing ...


3

In general two-word names of places, squares, people and roads of various descriptions take stress on both words. In the following list, the stresses are marked with a preceding apostrophe: 'Kings 'Road 'Kings 'Avenue 'Kings 'Crescent 'Kings 'Cross 'Kings Em'bankment 'Kings 'Drive 'Kings 'Lane. The exception to this rule is roads or addresses with the ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


3

I think you are referring to the Th-fronting: it refers to the pronunciation of the English "th" as "f" or "v". When th-fronting is applied, /θ/ becomes /f/ (for example, three is pronounced as free) and /ð/ becomes /v/ (for example, bathe is pronounced as bave). Unlike the fronting of /θ/ to /f/, the fronting of /ð/ to /v/ doesn't occur in any ...


2

Listen to recordings from librivox.org AFTER having read the script. Many of the audio books on librivox you can find in a written form on ProjectGutenberg. If that is still to difficult, use audio material that is intended for beginning learners of the English language.


2

I'll answer as honestly as I can. My comments imply no criticism, just what I hear. There are several aspects to recognising an accent. Whether or not you are a native speaker Clearly you are not a native English speaker. You have an accent that corresponds to no native accents. You are not as fluent as a native speaker and your vowels are accurate but ...


2

At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


2

You will almost never hear the word 'posh' used within the U.S., except in reference to Victoria Beckham in a bar trivia question about her nickname in the Spice Girls. But I will assume you're referring to a more distinctive style and dialect by people of the upper-class. First, there is a language difference. Speaking in more formal and proper English ...


2

Great question. Yes, English has many varieties, but as far as I know only two of them are normally taught in a classroom context: British English (assuming Received Pronunciation) and American English (assuming General American). To make a decision, ask yourself: Which version will be more useful to me? (Professionally, travel-wise, etc.) Which ...


2

Where enunciation is not critical, pronunciation will always tend to elide words or omit consonants, or both. What does that mean? will, where stress is not important, always tend to What's that mean? or Wad's that mean? and will probably end up as Wassa' mean? The glottal stop which replaces the terminal -t on that is likely to be retained, but only as a ...


2

It sounds like a standard stage singer's accent to me. One thing to remember is that opera and stage singers must enunciate words differently from "normal people" in order to both "project" and be understandable to the audience. The accent isn't necessarily in emulation of anything so much as a necessary modification of the voice to be heard and understood ...


2

To answer your questions as simply as possible: Does Bender speak ‘proper’ American English? Does he have an American accent? Yeah. Pretty much. Are there any features in Bender's speech which suggest that English is not his native tongue? No. Not really. Further comments that you might find helpful: Benders voice is fairly distinctive. It ...


2

This question is problematic in that it confuses German and Germanic. As others have pointed out, German is just of many Germanic languages. While German is the most conservative among the West-Germanic languages (the others being English, Dutch, Afrikaans, Yiddish and Frisian), Icelandic has a strong reputation as the most conservative North-Germanic ...


2

There are several factors that make /ˈpɛpəmənt/ an unlikely phonemic representation of "peppermint." Vowel must be (fully) unstressed to be reduced In general, only unstressed vowels can be reduced. In theories that distinguish multiple levels of stress in English words, we can narrow it down even further: only fully unstressed vowels can be reduced. ...


1

I'm also born and raised in Kalamazoo, MI. From my understanding of NCVS, I don't think I have it (can't entirely decide), but I'm sure my parents don't. Considering my friend group of people who are from the cities (excluding suburbs) of Chicago, Detroit, and New York (the Bronx), I find NCVS: very noticeable from New Yorkers not at all noticeable from ...


1

I don't think I've ever heard the "w" completely elided in "dwarf", but perhaps there might be some transitional process happening, as I do sometimes hear it pronounced "do-orf" (i.e. two syllables), especially by those who have a slower pace of speech. A bit like pronouncing "film" as "fil-um". "Quarter" is different: I pronounce it with the "w" when I'm ...


1

I think it is part of his flair, and part of what makes him popular. It's not common usage, but I believe it fits the documentary style quite well. It doesn't change the meaning, but it might help to change the emotional reception. Usually when people use first-syllable stress in the word elsewhere, they are demonstrating a counterpoint, a discrepancy ...


1

You can't figure out the stress on a word ending in -ative from the corresponding word ending in -ation. That's because, as far as I can tell, all words ending in -ation are stressed on the second-to-last syllable. (This is true of the word declaration; the stress on the first syllable is secondary stress, which often occurs two syllables away from the main ...


1

Yeah, it's just "What does that mean" all elided together. There should be a detectable difference between an elided "what does" and "what is", something phonetically like "wutuz" vs. "wutiz".


1

First this is in no way official. To me it's not a emphasis on lane as much as it is a lack of emphasis on street. I think it comes from two distinct points. First consider the question "What street do you live on?" If you lived on 1st Street you would say either "1st Street" or just "1st". If is very common to say just "1st" and omit the street in ...


1

This is purely speculation, but I suggest that the difference (if it in fact exists - and with the question having firmly planted the Beatles in my consciousness I can't be sure) is due to the rarity of "lane" vs "street". I suspect most speakers would stress "lane" to make sure that the hearer understands that it is not, in fact, "Penny street".


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With such high level of English that you have, you'd think you could be able to tell that yourself;) From what you have provided, though, I think it is a combination of both: German people would naturally mix up the 'V's and the 'W's and use a rhotic 'R' when pronouncing the letter 'R', but, personally, I have never seen a German pronounce the 'stio's as '...


1

Having lived in and around Liverpool in the past but not being a native, I thought Andy Burnham sounded more Mancunian than Liverpudlian. Maybe his parents were from Manchester? He's definitely a 'northerner.'


1

It is a standard what we call 'posh' Oxford accent. To me, though, it seems that he is a foreigner that is just very good at making accents - the way he speaks is very unnatural, and he often makes pauses that are just far too long. Again, though, this is only my opinion.



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