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6

I think you need the word "idiolect". Please read this wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiolect


4

We have a tendency to think that speakers of languages that have a similar consonant phoneme must pronounce it in the same way, but this is not so. For example, both Czech /p/ and /English /p/ are unvoiced labial stops, but the prevocalic English /p/is aspirated, and the Czech is not. As a result, Czech speakers producing the word pan with an initial Czech ...


4

Perhaps one of the voice characteristics you are describing is timbre the characteristic quality of sound that distinguishes one voice or musical instrument from another or one vowel sound from another: it is determined by the harmonics of the sound and is distinguished from the intensity and pitch While certain aspects of voice may be statistically ...


3

His accent is consistant with the dialect spoken by natives of the Appalachian Region of the U.S. Commonly spoken by individuals from NW Georgia, W NC/SC, VA, E TN, & SE KY. JDnTN I'm with you 100% it is a pretty authentic accent, my granddad, & all of his brothers sound much like Raine,& Use similar wording/idioms. I'm from NC btw. My question ...


2

It's hypercorrection. Germans can pronounce the English 'v' just fine, they happen to write it as 'w'. So the freshman English learner from Germany will pronounce (using English orthography/pronunciation) 'water' as 'vawter'. They'll then start to associate the 'v' sound with a mistake. So the sophomore reasoning, which results in fixing some problems, ...


2

Speaking as a voice consultant, I distinguish between 'voice quality' and 'voice use'. Voice quality is the sound or timbre of a person's voice: raspy, breathy, nasal, etc - which is a product of how a person combines the 3 things needed to produce a vocal sound: breathing, the sound source and resonators/articulators. Voice use is the amount of vocal ...


2

A few accurate statements above, ie Australian is a blend of accents from all parts of the British Isle although admittedly it has a more east London sounding twang than anywhere else in Britain, but let me expand on that. Firstly there is no such thing as a British accent per say. The accent in the north east of England is as different from say Oxford in ...


2

People need to communicate. Our human desire to communicate is so intense, we experience it as a need. A language is a set of rules that helps people communicate. NOUN 1 [MASS NOUN] The method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and conventional way: Emphasis mine. Unifying ...


2

Is it possible that say 100 years ago, the Tangier Island population spoke with the more distinct Cornish accent something closer to their early ancestors who migrated from Cornwall. An uneducated ear may have thought it to be Elizabethan english, not what Shakespeare wrote in his plays or sonnets, but what the every day person from Elizabethan England ...


2

I stumbled upon an article today and was reminded of the term I was looking for. "speech accommodation" And some interesting reading on the matter. Accommodation most often takes the form of convergence, when a speaker chooses a language variety that seems to fit the style of the other speaker.


2

I doubt there is really a completely neutral British English accent. There almost always small give aways in an individual's speech which carry influences of both region and class. Having been born and brought up in Solihull, a south-eastern suburb of Birmingham, I grew up able to speak with a West Midlands accent and alternatively with a supposedly neutral ...


2

As John Lawler notes in the comments: No. English spelling is not made to represent Modern English vowels, and deviating from standard spellings merely introduces more randomness. The closest you can achieve is to completely alter the spelling to similar to CoolHandLouis' answer.


2

A few examples of things I've noticed (especially in Cache Valley) are: pronouncing the word "deal" and "real", "peel", etc. as "dill", "rill", "pill" etc. ....similar for the words "really" ("rilly") and "dealer" ("diller") pronouncing the word "our" the same way most pronounce "are" pronouncing words like "light", "right", "bright", etc. as "loyt" ...


1

Emphasis always depends on context, so clean answers are not possible without more of the dialog. 1) If you are beginning a conversation, it would be "How do you do?" with more emphasis on "do" than on "how". If you are reciprocating the same statement from someone else, emphasis would be on "you". 2) This one depends on what you thought you had heard ...


1

Currently a Utah resident and have been for 25 years. (don't judge me :-P) But I can confirm that I catch myself frequently stating "mountain" as "moun'ain", Layton as "lay'on". However, I have never vocalized "creek" as "crick" (though it seems to be about 50% of those I've come across) or "Mormon" as "Marmon". I personally would say that the Utah ...


1

It's probably incorrect to assume that the British accent hasn't changed since the USA was founded. It makes sense that different, divergent accents emerged over time. Whether the British used to sound American, or the American used to sound British; or more likely some combination of the two, it makes sense that distinct differences emerged over time. What ...


1

Foyle is a steadfast, serious man -- a grammar school boy who has risen through the ranks of the police force to become a respected detective chief superintendent. 1: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/mystery/foyleswar/whoisfoyle.html The character is middle-class and has a middle-class accent: He might contend not just with spies, criminals and rogue officers but ...


1

I am from Connecticut originally and moved to the Midwest. I grew up with it as "on"t. I always thought "ant" was a mispronunciation. After moving, all people I've encountered said, "ant". Upon research, I found out that Eastern VA and the North east (particularly New England) say "on"t whereas the rest of the country "ant" is standard. Both are ...


1

"Ant" is actually how Northerners say it. In the Southern USA - especially in Virginia and The Carolinas, it is pronounced the proper way : AW-NT "AW-NT" is Southern, not Northern. "Ant" is Yankee.


1

This site at the British Library has a collection of different regional accents, some recent and some recorded several decades ago: http://sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dialects/ Some of the older ones, made c. 1918, are quite difficult for a modern Brit to understand, and the recording quality can be poor too: ...



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