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He/she felt linguistically discriminated or to be precise accentually discriminated. The condition is called accentism. Linguistic discrimination is the unfair treatment of an individual based solely on their use of language. This use of language may include the individual's native language or other characteristics of the person's speech, such as an ...


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Self conscious: Defined by Merriam Webster as: "uncomfortably nervous about or embarrassed by what other people think about you..." I've used the phrase in a sentence to make the phrase clearer. "She rarely spoke up in meetings because she was self-conscious about her accent."


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I'm English and I learned Spanish with a Castilian (central Spanish) accent from a CD. The CD was specifically about pronunciation and not about vocabulary. Answer Even though my Spanish is not very good, people consistently remark on my Spanish (rather than Latin American) accent. It must be weird for native speakers. Because my accent is so good they ...


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Are you looking for Communication accomodation theory? Specifically: convergence - Convergence refers to the process through which an individual shifts his or her speech patterns in interaction so that they more closely resemble the speech patterns of speech partners. ... People use convergence based on their perceptions of others, as well as ...


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From my experience the Australian accent is not identical across the entire continent. The differences between the regions are not quite as obvious as you'd notice between regions in a country like the USA, but they certainly still exist. I would characterise the Australian accent as being distinct in three regions: The East Coast, The West Coast and "The ...


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As mentioned in the comments, every language has its own inventory of sounds. English has a relatively high number of different sounds, and many of its sounds are rare in the languages of the world (the English "r" sound, for example, is very uncommon). When a word is borrowed into a new language (or a new dialect), it sometimes gets absorbed into the ...


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Having lived in and around Liverpool in the past but not being a native, I thought Andy Burnham sounded more Mancunian than Liverpudlian. Maybe his parents were from Manchester? He's definitely a 'northerner.'


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I'm English and I occasionally mistake some Irish accents for American until I listen very carefully Irish Catholics According to the Dictionary of American History,[10] approximately "50,000 to 100,000 Irishmen, over 75 percent of them Catholic, came to United States in the 1600s, while 100,000 more Irish Catholics arrived in the 1700s." ...


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While it's possible that you might find some such connection, I very much doubt it, for two reasons. First, while there were undoubtedly dialects in earlier forms of the language, few of the details of modern pronunciation can go back beyond the Great Vowel Shift in the 15-17th centuries. Secondly, there is remarkably little evidence of Celtic influence ...


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These may describe the condition, rather than the person who might feel anxiety that they're being judged; that their accent is seen as a "qualifier" of social status: Sociolinguistic discrimination; Linguistic profiling; Ethnocentrism; Linguicism; Classism; Cultural bias; Socioeconomic stereotyping; Dialectical stigmatism; Patois prejudice; class ...


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Two possibilities spring to mind: Diglossia A situation in which two languages (or two varieties of the same language) are used under different conditions within a community, often by the same speakers. The term is usually applied to languages with distinct ‘high’ and ‘low’ (colloquial) varieties [...]. [Oxford & Wikipedia (for the socioluingistic ...



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