4
votes
0answers
67 views

Hyphenation of tidally enhanced wind mass loss

I am correcting my thesis on stellar evolution, and I was wondering what the correct hyphenation of 'tidally enhanced wind mass loss' is. The meaning of it should be mass loss originating from a wind, ...
3
votes
0answers
110 views

A single vs a double consonant issue.

According to The Grammarist: till, until and 'til: Till, as a variant of until, is a preposition meaning up to the time of. Till—not ‘til, an unnecessary abbreviation—has been in the language ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

Non-standard British use of possessive “me”

Native North American speaker here. It's fairly common in certain British dialects to substitute "me" for "my" (Shiver me timbers) in informal speech. My impression is that some speakers mix the ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Should a phrase which is the subject of a sentence or paragraph be quoted?

From the Grammarist website: In a manner of speaking is an idiom that means the same as ‘in other words’ or ‘so to speak’. They've bolded the phrase which is the subject of discussion, but ...
2
votes
0answers
59 views

When to use 'al' in front of 'Qaeda'?

I've noticed over the years that certain publications use 'al' in front of 'Qaeda' in certain situations, and others do not. From the little I know, I understand that 'al' is the definite article in ...
2
votes
0answers
131 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
2
votes
0answers
870 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
2
votes
0answers
185 views

Do I so often encounter simple past for past participle (e.g., “I have went,” “what was did to her”) because of where I am or when?

Since moving to small-town northern Minnesota (USA) two dozen years back to teach English, I have noticed a lot of instances in spoken language where the simple past is used in lieu of the past ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

A sentence with double negative

I came across the following sentence in Kurt Vonnegut's book Slaughterhouse Five. "Trout would have gone upstairs if Billy hadn't asked him not to." If this sentence is considered independently, ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Is “cause” instead of “because” becoming Standard English?

Nowadays, I'm seeing a drastic increase in usage of cause in place of because, especially in written English. People are in such a hurry, that a statement like below passes off like Standard English: ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Is “…that he doesn't even know where is” grammatical?

I was recently invited to a party by a Facebook friend. I asked him where the party was happening, and he said he couldn't remember the address. While texting someone else about the experience, I ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Spelling etymology of “-il[l]” words

I've noticed that modern English seems to have a very strong bias to spell verbs which end with "-(consonant)-il" with double "l", i.e. "-ill". The overwhelming majority of such verbs (like to will, ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Use of Present Participle

I am trying to understand how to interpret the meaning of the following sentence, John arrived late to the airport, causing him to miss his flight I know that the present participle modifies the ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Confused about the use of “to” in a quote

The former Manchester United star has now hit a record 25 La Liga hat-tricks and has 45 goals this term to lead Lionel Messi by three in the race for the Pichichi. I am confused as to the ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

From Avocadoes to Asparagus, from kangaroos to koalas

What is the name of this literary saying? People use this figure of speech in order to express a wide coverage or variety of a certain class, such as vegetable species available in a market for ...
1
vote
0answers
126 views

Comma after a coordinating conjunction preceding a parenthetical at the start of the sentence

Although similar questions have been asked before, I am still not clear as to official or, at the very least, preferred position from punctuation rules point of view on comma after coordinating ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

Definition of racism inconsistency?

For some dictionaries, such as the Oxford one, racism requires that prejudice/discrimination based on the belief that a race is superior/inferior. But I can't find this requirement anywhere for any ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

Are there rules for pronunciation of words ending in “-ton”?

Here are 4 words ending in "_ton": Proton - /ˈprəʊ.tɒn/ Cotton - /ˈkɑt.n̩/ Mutton - /ˈmʌtn̩/ Wanton - /ˈwɒntən/ Even though the words end in -ton, the pronunciation varies. ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

How is this structure named in English grammar? (main clause + object + -ing form)

I've been hearing this sentence structure for a while, so i wanted to learn about it but couldn't find specific information on the internet since i didn't know how this structure was named in English ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Verb forms in “Feelin' Myself” (will.i.am song)

I have been somewhat fascinated by this song recently, for various reasons, including the peculiar lyrics. I am especially wondering about the usage of infinitive-like verb forms in several lines, ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Is “markets shares” correct?

I know that the common plural form of "market share" (the percentage of a market) is "market shares." However, I found a sentence containing "markets shares." In the last decade, several papers ...
1
vote
0answers
251 views

(Joke) Batchers Vs. Butchers

Here's the script from Inside No. 9 Nana's Party You can get them quite cheap now, can't you? It's all Marks's, actually. Apart from the ham, which I got from the local batchers. From ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

'plight' (as 'predicament'): How did 'to fold' evolve to mean a predicament?

Of the two dichotomous noun homonyms 'pledge', below I ask only about that derived from Latin. For the homonym derived from Proto-Germanic , please see this. [Etymonline for 'plight (n.1)' ] ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Groups coordinator, group's coordinator, or groups' coordinator?

I haven't been able to find the answer to this anywhere, which of them is right? I need to finish my CV and can't without knowing for sure. Thanks
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Is there a nuance in meaning between 'non-managed' and 'unmanaged'?

Context: I am writing about 'devices not managed by professionals' and debating the subtleties between non-managed devices vs. unmanaged devices
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Etymology: 'to commit'

I was researching the etymology of 'commission {noun}' which just diverts you to: commit (v.) late 14c., "to give in charge, entrust," from Latin committere "to unite, connect, combine; to ...
1
vote
0answers
75 views

Accuse someone of having manners

I came across the following sentence in a book, and I'm not sure of its meaning. The quote is: “It would be rude to refuse a gift,” Blake said, eyes cast over her [Weiss'] head towards Cinder, ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Usage of “Vanessa” in Open All Hours

In the episode "Duet for solo bicycle" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCnc8hUPuPU&t=4m22s Albert Arkwright says - "No need to get all Vanessa about it." 00:04:00 I made progress last night ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

How did French “cacher” divide into English “cache” and “cachet”?

I encountered Merriam-Webster's article on cache vs cachet (while researching another word). I understand it and other websites that broach the confusion caused by these two nouns, but none explain ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

to switch up, to change Up - why are these now taking the preposition up?

Does anyone know the root of the emergence of usage of the preposition "up" with the verbs "to switch" and "to change"?
1
vote
0answers
73 views

What is this wordplay called?

"For these people" "For those people" When you say "these", it sounds much more 'personal', especially when done in poetry. Is there a specific literary device to refer to this, or can you just say ...
1
vote
0answers
68 views

What's the meaning of “I+verb+not+object1+the less, but+object2+more”?

What's the meaning of: I verb not object 1 the less, but object 2 more. Example: I love not man the less, but Nature more.. I've searched Google about the meaning of it, but unfortunately ...
1
vote
0answers
119 views

Etymology: The root of the words 'real' and 'reality'

I wish to identify the oldest known root from which we derive the words 'real' and 'reality', et cetera. I got as far as determining the origin of the English words real and reality is Latin res, ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Does 'fever' share an etymology with 'fervent, fervid, or fervour'?

The ODO entry for 'fervent' recommends to: Compare with fervid and fervour. I did read Etymonline's entry for 'fever' which doesn't explicitly answer this, but I think that I'd need to know ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

'mawkish' : What's 'exaggerated or false' about maggots?

mawkish {adjective} = Sentimental in an exaggerated or false way [Etymonline:] 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot" (see maggot). Sense of "sickly sentimental" is ...
1
vote
0answers
78 views

The use of "were- should- had” at the beginning of sentences instead of “if”

Conditionals in English are usually formed by using if with normal word order; but for the three past (subjunctive) forms were, should, and had, it is also possible to express the conditional through ...
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Origin of “kill the ghost”, “killing the ghost”

A British friend of mine who used to work with us came back from London for a short visit to the town.Before going back home again he showed me photographs of the town beach and hotel saying he came ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Can I use the plural form when stating the possession of just one item?

If I want to say I have something without emphasis on the quantity, are both of these sentences ok? I have an apple. I have apples. (I may just have one apple.)
1
vote
0answers
117 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with st

In EModE you normally would add -st or -est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end in -st or -est? ...
1
vote
0answers
107 views

Is there more monosyllabic lexis in the English Language than polysyllabic lexis?

In terms of words in the actual dictionary are there more monosyllabic words or more polysyllabic words?
1
vote
0answers
78 views

The word “mine”: Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for “belongs to me” meaning, but still /main/ for “explosive”/“coal mine”?

I think I naturally distinguish these words: mine (ie "belongs to me") /maiŋ/ mine (ie "explosive" or "coal mine") /main/ I vaguely remember noticing this years ago, but I was only just reminded of ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
1
vote
0answers
124 views

Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...
1
vote
0answers
117 views

Affricate variations in English: t͡s d͡z?

the T between vowels change to t͡s in some english speakers? Usually when I heard "What's, that's" or similar constructions, where the T come with S, I always consider like a t͡s, so I really don't ...
1
vote
0answers
104 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

What are the terms for same meaning phrases that only differ in having a preposition?

I don't know sentence structure terminology much, however, provided with these two sample phrases, that mean the same thing. Refrigeration of Food Food Refrigeration My questions are, in the ...
1
vote
0answers
86 views

Using the subjunctive without “that”

One purpose of that is to “express a wish or regret.” Even so, can that be removed from the following sentence and still leave it OK? It is crucial that you be there before Tom arrives.
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Present perfect continuous

I want to know about origin and duration and present perfect continuous change into past simple,by using origin and duration. For example, she started playing the trumpet two years ago. ...

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