16
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0answers
1k views

Graphotactics of possessive: the true reason for the apostrophe

I have some hypotheses for English graphotactics: 〈w〉 and 〈y〉 are optional positional variants (i.e. allographs) of 〈u〉 and 〈i〉, respectively, in digraphs that correspond with diphthongs or vowels: ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

Do both sides of the conjunction need to align with the next part of the sentence?

If someone can improve my title, please do. I seem to be missing some vocabulary. I was writing an SO answer and ran into something that has always bothered me. Consider the following sentence: ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

Is this grammatically correct? “More often than not, I work on teams where I share a pool of work with other colleagues”

"More often than not, I work on teams where I share a pool of work with other colleagues." Is "where" the correct conjunction? Is it correct to use "teams" (plural) in former part of the sentence ...
2
votes
0answers
57 views

When to use 'of' to denote possession?

When is it appropriate to use 'of' in sentences like the following? The image occupies two album spaces. vs. The image occupies two spaces of the album. or Press the red window button ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Is it “kelly pool” or “Kelly pool”?

Kelly pool is a "cue sport" played on a pool table like billiards, snooker, and other variants of pool. But which is more accepted? Capitalised or not? Or are both OK?
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Question about “between” vs. “among” - generic group or distinct members?

I have read Grammar Girl's excellent post on the difference between "between" and "among", but I've run into a scenario that has confused me. I used the sentence "Compare heights between these ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Passengers heard 'screaming' - who was doing the “hearing”?

Passengers heard 'screaming' I feel this phrase could be interpreted in two ways: 1) The passengers could and did hear screaming (from someone else). 2) Someone else could and did hear the ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Working with a group that uses acronym for title, is it standard to place a “2” to indicate double letters above or below indicated letter?

Work with a group that has no standard for placement of "2" after "W" (indicating 2 W's in acronym title)--above or below? Is there a standard?
1
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0answers
54 views

From patriotic chauvinism to male chauvinism

Chauvinism is a term of French origin that: in its original meaning, refers to an exaggerated patriotism and a belligerent belief in national superiority and glory. a contemporary use of ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What's the meaning of “I+verb+not+object1+the less, but+object2+more”?

What's the meaning of: I verb not object 1 the less, but object 2 more. Example: I love not man the less, but Nature more.. I've searched Google about the meaning of it, but unfortunately ...
1
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0answers
30 views

where did the term…falling down on the job come from?

What is the origin of Falling down on the job? what did it originally mean?
1
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0answers
19 views

Adverb modifier within prepositional phrase

I need help understanding the rule for the word "possibly" in the following sentence: "This investigation was initiated due to an alert on an internal monitoring system for possibly structured cash ...
1
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0answers
42 views

Etymology: The root of the words 'real' and 'reality'

I wish to identify the oldest known root from which we derive the words 'real' and 'reality', et cetera. I got as far as determining the origin of the English words real and reality is Latin res, ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

The “noun as adjective” is singular. Always?

According to these rules - Noun as Adjective, the "noun as adjective" is singular. So we can write .NET Framework Class Library, here the Class word is adjective and is noun and therefore is singular. ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Does 'fever' share an etymology with 'fervent, fervid, or fervour'?

The ODO entry for 'fervent' recommends to: Compare with fervid and fervour. I did read Etymonline's entry for 'fever' which doesn't explicitly answer this, but I think that I'd need to know ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

'mawkish' : What's 'exaggerated or false' about maggots?

mawkish {adjective} = Sentimental in an exaggerated or false way [Etymonline:] 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot" (see maggot). Sense of "sickly sentimental" is ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Do “Care to do something” and “Would you care to do something” sound equally polite?

Today on one of other stackexchange sites I've been reached with following comment: "Care to add some references for your claims?". This sounds to me not only formal but a bit rude, so I've ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Run-on sentence vs tag

I was recently called out for writing the following. I understand perfectly, thank you. Since ‘thank you’ can be taken to be an independent clause, this would seem to be a run-on sentence. It ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Is there anything awkward in saying “ Prince Charles is now a husband”?

In my English class today my prof gave us a sentence: Prince Charles is now a husband. He then told us to find out if there is anything wrong with this sentence as our homework. Undoubtedly, ...
1
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0answers
41 views

'-ing' form of verb a noun

Is this sentence correct: Categorizing could help them to concentrate and to get better results. Instead of Categorization could help them to concentrate and to get better results.
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Word stress in the phrase: I'll get it

I think the phrase: "I'll get it" can change its meaning based on which word is stressed. I'll get it to communicate I'm the one who will pick up the phone. I'll get it when someone insists and ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Do we use 'competent' to indicate the person or body responsible for something?

EU texts often refer to the 'competent body', 'competent department or 'competent official', meaning the body, department or official that is responsible for the activity in question. For example: ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Can the pronoun “one” precede the thing it is referring to in a sentence?

I give an example so you understand right away what I'm asking. Does the following sentence sound right: Users are parts of not only the one being discussed right now, but the already-mentioned two ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Should I capitalize “bible” in “the Christian Bible”? “the Discordian Bible”?

"The Bible" is typically used to refer to the collection of holy books of the Christian faith. It's a proper noun and it gets capitalised. However, "bible" can also be used as a common noun, in ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Origin of the phrases “out back” and “out front”?

I'm going through the Song of Ice and Fire books, and although it's mostly written in what appears to be British English, very occasionally Americanisms sneak in. One example that I just noticed is ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Indefinite article before an adjective in form [number]-[something]

Which one of these is correct? We use two-stage compilation process. We use a two-stage compilation process. The second looks more formally correct, but feels strange. Perhaps this is better? ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Another or/nor usage question

Both sound OK, but the phrase with nor seems more emphatic. Are both correct? "An examination that was performed greater than 30 days prior to patient services cannot be utilized nor updated." vs. ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Why are “dynamic” and “deontic” modalities so called?

It is said that there are three types of modality: deontic, epistemic and dynamic. Here are sample sentences for each type of modality: (1) You can stay as long as you want. [deontic] (2) ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Should 'in-principle' be hyphenated?

Is it correct to say, 'your loan has been approved in principle' or 'your loan has been approved in-principle'.
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Do people in Colorado typically say “attorney” or “lawyer?”

I'm interested to know if people in the Colorado area say attorney or lawyer more frequently.
1
vote
0answers
60 views

Origin of “kill the ghost”, “killing the ghost”

A British friend of mine who used to work with us came back from London for a short visit to the town.Before going back home again he showed me photographs of the town beach and hotel saying he came ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Can I use the plural form when stating the possession of just one item?

If I want to say I have something without emphasis on the quantity, are both of these sentences ok? I have an apple. I have apples. (I may just have one apple.)
1
vote
0answers
93 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with st

In EModE you normally would add -st or -est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end in -st or -est? ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

Is there more monosyllabic lexis in the English Language than polysyllabic lexis?

In terms of words in the actual dictionary are there more monosyllabic words or more polysyllabic words?
1
vote
0answers
68 views

The word “mine”: Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for “belongs to me” meaning, but still /main/ for “explosive”/“coal mine”?

I think I naturally distinguish these words: mine (ie "belongs to me") /maiŋ/ mine (ie "explosive" or "coal mine") /main/ I vaguely remember noticing this years ago, but I was only just reminded of ...
1
vote
0answers
80 views

Descry, Espy, Spot, Spy

I know as a general rule that no two words are identical in meaning and use. I was wondering if I could get help in understanding the different meanings and uses of descry, espy, spot and spy. I know ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

wrecking vs wracking vs wreaking

What I understand so far: Wrecking - to trash/destroy/be destroyed Wracking - to be tortured, possibly from variant of "rack". http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=wrack also seems to mention ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

Affricate variations in English: t͡s d͡z?

the T between vowels change to t͡s in some english speakers? Usually when I heard "What's, that's" or similar constructions, where the T come with S, I always consider like a t͡s, so I really don't ...
1
vote
0answers
138 views

Looking for an Equivalent to the AWL for Academic Idioms

Coxhead developed and evaluated something called the "Academic Word List" for English Language Learners. This is a list of (supposedly) the most common "academic" terms to be used by students from ...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
1
vote
0answers
88 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

How should author-names of work-by-multiple-authors be ordered in APA reference?

In APA reference, how should the names of the authors of a work-by-multiple-authors be listed? Alphabetically, in the order as they appear/are listed chronologically in the article, or what? ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

What are the terms for same meaning phrases that only differ in having a preposition?

I don't know sentence structure terminology much, however, provided with these two sample phrases, that mean the same thing. Refrigeration of Food Food Refrigeration My questions are, in the ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Using the subjunctive without “that”

One purpose of that is to “express a wish or regret.” Even so, can that be removed from the following sentence and still leave it OK? It is crucial that you be there before Tom arrives.
1
vote
0answers
668 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Detection of dangling modifier

Sentence that needs correction : "For building vocabulary skills, students should try to speak and write new words in appropriate contexts, rather than merely memorizing definitions". How is ...

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