5
votes
0answers
129 views

Expectaltee: A person who expects something

The word of the day: † expectaltee, n. Obs. rare. A person who expects something. [OED] You might ask how on the earth expectaltee is a word. Well, apparently it is a word but the origin is ...
3
votes
0answers
25 views

Do reflexive verbs often evolve into intransitive usage?

With the relatively recent proliferation in the number and variety of genders that our contemporaries willingly proclaim themselves to be or belong to, a new intransitive sense of the verb identify, ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

US English use of 'motivate'

In US English, is it acceptable to use the word 'motivate' in the following context? We motivated the decisions regarding... I believe that it is OK in South Africa but not in the UK.
2
votes
0answers
59 views

What is the meaning of 'Austenian'?

Yesterday evening the other half and I took a delightful drive into the countryside about 30 miles away, and sat for a while in the Hampshire village of Chawton (whilst listening on the car radio to ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Difference of “I am just an ABC” vs “I am but a XYZ”

As far as I (non-native speaker) can tell, these two sentences have the same meaning: I'm just a humble merchant I'm but a humble merchant However I wonder if there is some subtle ...
2
votes
0answers
68 views

Differences between “in a list” and “on a list”

Generally speaking, is there any difference between saying "in a list" vs. "on a list"? There's already a similar question, but that was about one specific example with a specific answer; if ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Noun & verb agreement

in the sentence "Fourteen of the bones make up the face and jaw." is "Fourteen" singular or plural? The preceding sentence is "The skulls of every human being have 22 bones." The grammar book I'm ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Usage of loss or losses (for undesirable heat produced)

I am working in the field of electrical engineering where losses may appear due to for example and in short, pulsating magnetic fields in magnetic materials (Core losses) or electric current (Copper ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

What is the diferrence between “minute by minute” and “minute after minute”

I am not a native speaker therefore I would be grateful if someone could explain me what is the diferrence between "minute by minute" and "minute after minute". Thank you.
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What does “the networked listened” mean in regard to NBCUniversal’s decision to break off relations with Donald Trump?

There was the following passage in the Vanity Fair (June 30) article reporting that NBCUniversal announced that they would put an end to their relationship with a new Presidential candidate, Donald ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Question about the details in meaning between gerund and to-infinite

Consider the following multiple-choice question: The supervisors were asked ______ tasks to new employees so that they could be trained to do them properly. A. Delegate - infinitive B. To ...
1
vote
0answers
101 views

Meaning of the term “empty use” in the context of modal verbs

I'm reading a book titled Comprehensive High School English Grammar & Composition. The author, who is Indian, says this on the use of the modal verbs can and could: Can is used to express ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

“The problem is who can we get to replace her” vs. “The problem is who we can get to replace her”

"The problem is who can we get to replace her" vs. "The problem is who we can get to replace her" Which one is correct and why?
1
vote
0answers
38 views

past progressive with always

Hi^^ I'm a student learning English. I learned in a class that either present or past progressive can be used to express a negative reaction to a situation. The explanations on the lecture note ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

How common is the 'object-subject-verb' construction?

E.g. from Wiki: I hate oranges, but apples I'll eat! or He's not very interesting, but her I would like to know! I understand it is a form only used for emphasis, but how common is it? Is it ...
1
vote
0answers
74 views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

How does the present participle work in a sentence like “He is seven feet tall, making him the tallest person in the room.”

I am unsure of what usage the present participle uses in a sentence like "He is seven feet tall, making him the tallest person in the room." I checked the wikipedia article for participles ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

How to use conjunction in an object clause?

Is it OK to use comma space followed by "whereas" in an object clause like the following sentence? Experiments showed that H and K cells were highly sensitive to sugar, whereas P cells were ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

Article before “two” with intervening adjective?

Consider the following sentence: (1) The project will include Alice, Bob, and an expected two new hires. This sounds correct to me; it means we are expecting to hire two new people and will put ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

Is “…that he doesn't even know where is” grammatical?

I was recently invited to a party by a Facebook friend. I asked him where the party was happening, and he said he couldn't remember the address. While texting someone else about the experience, I ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Spelling etymology of “-il[l]” words

I've noticed that modern English seems to have a very strong bias to spell verbs which end with "-(consonant)-il" with double "l", i.e. "-ill". The overwhelming majority of such verbs (like to will, ...
1
vote
0answers
60 views

Confused about the use of “to” in a quote

The former Manchester United star has now hit a record 25 La Liga hat-tricks and has 45 goals this term to lead Lionel Messi by three in the race for the Pichichi. I am confused as to the ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Definition of racism inconsistency?

For some dictionaries, such as the Oxford one, racism requires that prejudice/discrimination based on the belief that a race is superior/inferior. But I can't find this requirement anywhere for any ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect ...
1
vote
0answers
68 views

How is this structure named in English grammar? (main clause + object + -ing form)

I've been hearing this sentence structure for a while, so i wanted to learn about it but couldn't find specific information on the internet since i didn't know how this structure was named in English ...
1
vote
0answers
340 views

(Joke) Batchers Vs. Butchers

Here's the script from Inside No. 9 Nana's Party You can get them quite cheap now, can't you? It's all Marks's, actually. Apart from the ham, which I got from the local batchers. From ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

'plight' (as 'predicament'): How did 'to fold' evolve to mean a predicament?

Of the two dichotomous noun homonyms 'pledge', below I ask only about that derived from Latin. For the homonym derived from Proto-Germanic , please see this. [Etymonline for 'plight (n.1)' ] ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

Is there a nuance in meaning between 'non-managed' and 'unmanaged'?

Context: I am writing about 'devices not managed by professionals' and debating the subtleties between non-managed devices vs. unmanaged devices
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Etymology: 'to commit'

I was researching the etymology of 'commission {noun}' which just diverts you to: commit (v.) late 14c., "to give in charge, entrust," from Latin committere "to unite, connect, combine; to ...
1
vote
0answers
84 views

Accuse someone of having manners

I came across the following sentence in a book, and I'm not sure of its meaning. The quote is: “It would be rude to refuse a gift,” Blake said, eyes cast over her [Weiss'] head towards Cinder, ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

Usage of “Vanessa” in Open All Hours

In the episode "Duet for solo bicycle" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCnc8hUPuPU&t=4m22s Albert Arkwright says - "No need to get all Vanessa about it." 00:04:00 I made progress last night ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

to switch up, to change Up - why are these now taking the preposition up?

Does anyone know the root of the emergence of usage of the preposition "up" with the verbs "to switch" and "to change"?
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Pronunciation of “thank” using ð (voiced th) instead of θ (unvoiced th)

Both my younger siblings pronounce "thank" using ð, voicing the "th". I have never heard any other native speaker pronounce it this way. Both my parents, my older sibling, and I all pronounce "thank" ...
1
vote
0answers
80 views

What's the meaning of “I+verb+not+object1+the less, but+object2+more”?

What's the meaning of: I verb not object 1 the less, but object 2 more. Example: I love not man the less, but Nature more.. I've searched Google about the meaning of it, but unfortunately ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Does 'fever' share an etymology with 'fervent, fervid, or fervour'?

The ODO entry for 'fervent' recommends to: Compare with fervid and fervour. I did read Etymonline's entry for 'fever' which doesn't explicitly answer this, but I think that I'd need to know ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

'mawkish' : What's 'exaggerated or false' about maggots?

mawkish {adjective} = Sentimental in an exaggerated or false way [Etymonline:] 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot" (see maggot). Sense of "sickly sentimental" is ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Structure “Training by someone and someone jointly”

I am composing a news heading. Is this heading understandable? Training [or whatever you'll choose] by the first party and the second party jointly I mean that the training is being organized and ...
1
vote
0answers
378 views

Determining if “than” is used as conjunction or preposition

"than" can be used as a conjunction and as a preposition. I want to be able to tell for any given sentence containing "than" which grammatical function it has in that sentence. My current ...
1
vote
0answers
118 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

Origin of “kill the ghost”, “killing the ghost”

A British friend of mine who used to work with us came back from London for a short visit to the town.Before going back home again he showed me photographs of the town beach and hotel saying he came ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Can I use the plural form when stating the possession of just one item?

If I want to say I have something without emphasis on the quantity, are both of these sentences ok? I have an apple. I have apples. (I may just have one apple.)
1
vote
0answers
143 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with st

In EModE you normally would add -st or -est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end in -st or -est? ...
1
vote
0answers
121 views

Is there more monosyllabic lexis in the English Language than polysyllabic lexis?

In terms of words in the actual dictionary are there more monosyllabic words or more polysyllabic words?
1
vote
0answers
84 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
1
vote
0answers
128 views

Affricate variations in English: t͡s d͡z?

the T between vowels change to t͡s in some english speakers? Usually when I heard "What's, that's" or similar constructions, where the T come with S, I always consider like a t͡s, so I really don't ...
1
vote
0answers
82 views

What are the terms for same meaning phrases that only differ in having a preposition?

I don't know sentence structure terminology much, however, provided with these two sample phrases, that mean the same thing. Refrigeration of Food Food Refrigeration My questions are, in the ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Present perfect continuous

I want to know about origin and duration and present perfect continuous change into past simple,by using origin and duration. For example, she started playing the trumpet two years ago. ...
1
vote
0answers
111 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

“Somewhere” - is it really a pronoun?

Is it? If it is then why is not listed in the major dictionaries? LDOCE, Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster: No
1
vote
0answers
263 views

Diagramming Sentences with Causative Verbs and Predicate Adjectives

So I was recently relearning how to diagram sentences, but I ran across a sentence that had a causative verb and a predicate adjective and I had no idea how to diagram it. This is my best guess, but ...

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