7
votes
0answers
40 views

How does the pronunciation of 'the' vary in British English?

In the months leading up to the UK Referendum, I've heard the phrase "the E.U." thousands of times, and I've noticed that nearly all media-speakers pronounce it as /ðəʔiːjuː/. My memory, and my old ...
7
votes
0answers
220 views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
5
votes
0answers
89 views

A word to describe a couple conjoined at the earbud

Considering how common it is, I would think that we need to create a word for a couple that is conjoined at the earbuds, as in I couldn't find an appropriate word in the Urban Dictionary.
5
votes
0answers
86 views

Historical frequency of parenthetical plural(s)

Seems to me that parenthetical plurals have been increasing in recent years. Is there any way to accurately measure this? Google Ngram Viewer seems like a method, but the use of parentheses, first ...
3
votes
0answers
42 views

Neologism meaning “Having-an-opinion-despite-having-no-idea-what-you're-talking-about”

I remember encountering a word (it was a neologism, not a popularly accepted word) that meant something like "having-a-strong-but-completely-uninformed-opinion". It might have been the related idea of ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

Orange “is the new” black!

The expression "is the new" is often used to introduce a comparison between two things, where the latter has actually replaced the former in terms of popularity. The only reference I could find for ...
3
votes
0answers
114 views
+50

A question about “but not” as coordinating conjunction

So I was reading an article or something, and there was a sentence that quite intrigued me. a. You can turn everybody against you, but never your boss. "But never" is used as a coordinating ...
3
votes
0answers
83 views

What's the first known use of 'Crabs in a Barrel'

I'm looking for the first known use of the phrase to describe human behavior, i.e. Pulling successful people back down to crowd level.
3
votes
0answers
47 views

What's the word for the use of the wrong prefix or suffix?

For example if someone said unliterate instead of illiterate or discluded instead of excluded? Is there a word for this kind of grammatical error?
3
votes
0answers
34 views

Past Perfect and Until

In the book which I use to prepare for the IELTS exam they have the following sentence: " The situation remained unchanged for the next two years until more universities were opened." I do not ...
2
votes
0answers
16 views

'Prevaricate' as a synonym for 'vacillate'

There's a lot of motivation here. It boils down to a two-part question: is the usage of 'prevarication' as a synonym for 'vacillation' common, acceptable, and/or preferable; and is there any reason ...
2
votes
0answers
17 views

Evidenced “in” or “by”?

Which version is correct? ...plus proven ability to collaborate with people from culturally diverse backgrounds is evidenced in his success in the US, Europe and Asia. ...plus proven ability to ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Part of speech in a sentence

In the sentence: " I let him take the pen ... are the mentioned functions correct? I = subject let = main verb him = indirect Object take = the second verb (bare infinitive) the pen = Direct ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

“It's hard to find a good path to taking this mission on”. Why “taking”

So the sentience is "It's hard to find a good path to taking this mission on", I wonder why it is "to taking it on" not "to take it on", is "taking" using as a gerund? Can I say "It's hard to find a ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

The origin of the verb “has” (the verb “have” for third-singular person)

From what I know, in Simple Present, all verbs are followed by -s/es if the subject is a third-singular person. Such as makes, matches, buys, and studies. I also know that if the verb is have, it ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

What linguistic structures appear in conditional statements?

I am working on natural language processing and seek to determine if a given sentence is a conditional statement - ex: If I go to the store, then I will spend money. I would have gone to the store, if ...
2
votes
0answers
58 views

Word related to physical attraction of smoking?

A long while ago I happened upon a trivia website that mentioned there's a word related to the act of smoking being attractive -- either that smoking is becoming of a certain person, or that a certain ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

“Act in a certain way” or “act a certain way”

When I should put "in" after the verb "act"? I occasionally see some don't put "in" between "act" and "a certain way". Example: "But you must act in a certain way, so that you can appropriate what ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

What should you call your siblings who are each others' twins?

If you had a twin of the opposite sex, you would say "X is my twin [brother/sister]". It's understood that you are one of the two twins. But if you had two siblings who were twins of each other, and ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Reported Speech: preference for using that after say/tell

A student of mine has stated (based on her experience watching films and TV shows) that, when using Reported Speech, Americans will more often use 'he said that X' or 'he told us that X' whereas ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

Can 'more' be used before a present participle?

I'm wondering if this usage is grammatically correct, because I remember it being used in such a way but can't find any instances using google. Here's an example of what I'm talking about: I was ...
2
votes
0answers
48 views

Stress pattern changes with noun and verb homographs: exceptions to the rule

We all know that words that can be used both as nouns and verbs have a different stress pattern: http://www.wordstress.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Stress-Pattern-Change-noun-verb-pairs.pdf As a ...
2
votes
0answers
48 views

How did 'however it may be' ⟹ 'but'?

[ OED: ] Etymology:  < HOW adv. + EVER adv. 8e. In senses 2, 3, however is the relic of an original subordinate clause (like those of sense 1), such as ‘however this may be’. ...
2
votes
0answers
77 views

Origins of “schoolboy error”

In the UK, at least, we use the term "a schoolboy error" to mean a simple or foolish mistake. Oxford has it as: British informal A very basic or foolish mistake. It is used very frequently ...
2
votes
0answers
69 views

The influence of non-native speakers on the English language

I can’t lay my hands on the reference, but David Crystal has reported an increase in the use of informations by native speakers, as a result of its use by non-native speakers. The OED has 59 citations ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

Midnight Cowboy quote that I can't understand

In Midnight Cowboy, Dustin Hoffman's character (Rico) says: "You can't scratch yourself without getting a bellybutton up the old kazoo there." This was when he was talking about going to ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

Use of “trying to” in place of “wanting to” in the US

Is the use of "trying to" in place of "wanting to" occurring nationwide or regionally? What is its prevalence and when did it start? I'm in my late 20s and live in New England. In the past 2-3 ...
2
votes
0answers
104 views

Does “mouse” in the computer sense come from nautical slang?

Computer "mouse" is an English term known and used worldwide. Reference about its origin appears to suggest that the term, which obviously refers to the shape of a small mouse, may actually come ...
2
votes
0answers
56 views

Of the translations of the gambler

What follows is a few sentences from two existing translation of The Gambler by FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY. At first,I must say ,I don't want by any means to take PEVER and VOLOKHONSKY part. In my view ,...
2
votes
0answers
105 views

Is there a solid reference/rule on when not to put article after 'of'

I have not found any articles or documentation on this, the only thing close to it is this Zero article after "of" in "a change of place" thread which only has a single answer ...
2
votes
0answers
56 views

Connotation of a sentence in a listening material from TPO

(Here for the original audio source (MP3 file). The part in question begins approximately at 2'18'') This conversation is an excerpt from one listening material in a TPO (TOEFL Practice Online) test, ...
2
votes
0answers
230 views

“Para” and “Paras” vs “Paragraph” and “Paragraphs”

I find people using "para" for "paragraph" and "paras" for "paragraphs", even in formal English. See the example sentence: In para 2 of the plaint, the plaintiff has stated that he is entitled ...
2
votes
0answers
128 views

What would you call this angle?

In painting (as well as in photography, I suspect) there's full face, profile, half-profile, and three quarters. Here's an example demonstrating three of the four (Portrait of Charles I, the one that ...
2
votes
0answers
112 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Another word for a single line of trees on a hilltop, as seen from a distance

There's definitely a single word that is used to describe, when seen from a distance, a single row of trees on a hilltop. I searched quite a bit but am unable to find the word.
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Confusion with capitalization and hyphenation of a title

I am excited to post my first question in English StackExchange! I am working on a programming language with falls under the term of "domain-specific language". I want to use this term in the title "...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

“You Guys” or “You, Guys”

O.K., simple rules of using a comma before and after the vocative case state tjhat you write, for example, What do you, Mark, think about the book? But what about “you guys” / “you, guys”? Or, for ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

As teacher is to student, research guide is to what?

If X is Y's research guide, Y can say "X is my guide." So how does X say in one word" Y is my ..... ? A clarification - In my part of the world, in an educational context, a guide is someone who is ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Origin of the term “fun fact”

Where does the term "fun fact" originate?-- namely, not with the compositional meaning but rather with the idiomatic usage to introduce some sort of unusual, esoteric, absurd or otherwise "...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Chinese character “denoting” or “used to denote” black color?

How to say the following phrase correctly: a Chinese character denoting OR used to denote black colour? Context Furthermore, due to the etymological analysis of a Chinese character denoting black ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Does this adverb prepositional phrase modify the adverb, or vice versa?

The McGraw Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage (pg. 42) gives "We got there late in the evening" as an example of an adverb prepositional phrase ('in the evening') modifying an adverb ('late'). ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Is it correct Information Technology Investment(s) Management

I should translate my thesis and I am wondering which sentences is right for title? Information Technology Investment(s) Management Management of Information Technology Investments Managing ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Use of 'here' as a noun, a PA or perhaps an adverb

"Here it is." What's going on with this? If I say "It is here", 'here' is plainly a PA. If I say "Here I am", 'I' is plainly the subject. (Because if it was the object, we would have to say "Here is ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

number of morphemes in “liver”

So I've recently been researching into what morphemes are (new concept for me as of last week), and have been asking questions regarding to my understanding as they arise across several different ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Neither A nor B

As a native speaker, the basic usage of "neither" and "nor" are perfectly clear to me. However, natives may suffer from colloquial usage sounding more normal than formal grammar. I definitely have ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

What is a word for “returning a feeling”

"You don't have to remind me of that every time, son. This isn't our first mark, and it won't be our last," Dr. Evans replies. Rhea understands what this is now. It's how Dr. Evans imagines it will be ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

“He is no different than you and I” or “He is no different than you and me”

I have no difficulty in normal cases knowing whether to say "you and I"or "You and me." But this situation confuses me. On one hand, I can justify I by saying there is an implied "are" at the end: ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Is “of all” an adverb in “She behaved the worst of all” & “She is the worst of all”?

"the worst" in "She is the worst of all" is superlative adjective. "the worst" in "She behaved the worst of all" is superlative adverb. My question is: What is the function the "of all"? Is it an ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Origin of the phrase “Dissent among the ranks”

I've said this plenty of times myself and have heard it elsewhere, but I did some minor research online and found nothing to indicate I got the phrase from somewhere particular or anything. Does ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Ways of saying that “you can get A at a cost of B”

It is impossible to be perfect on everything. Sometimes if we want to do well in A, we cannot do well in B at the same time. I do know the phrase "at the cost/expense of", which can be applied to the ...

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