5
votes
0answers
97 views

Term for phrases which are synonymous as a whole but antonymous on a literal reading

Is there a term of phrases where there are multiple ways to say the same meaning (that is, the phrases are synonymous), but on the surface, the structure of at least some of the phrase components have ...
3
votes
0answers
49 views

Which he doesn't or does?

Here's the context: A dying man has guilt, and one of the voices in his head is claiming he will experience hell, if he dies with it (the guilt). One voice hints that 'hell is a hoax', and the other ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

Variety of English used by the Romantic poets| -eth/-s for the third person singular in particular

I have recently been reading poetry by John Keats and Rabindranath Tagore. Both these poets, being active in the 19th century, by which time I think English was quite as it is today, wrote still in ...
3
votes
0answers
89 views

Meaning of “Mythical Distance”

In this sentence With the break-up of the Roman Empire and the rise of Christianity, Europe saw India recede into a mythical distance Is mythical distance an idiom? What does it mean?
2
votes
0answers
19 views

what is the Forty-five day escrow?

I want to make sure this English sentence. A: When are these people moving in? B: Forty-five day escrow. A: That’s like three months from now. In this sentence, B said it's 45 day ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

“Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.” What does this sentence mean?

Do your best to be lucid. ("I see but one rule: to be clear", Stendhal.) Simple sentences help. Keep complicated constructions and gimmicks to a minimum, if necessary by remembering the ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

Of the translations of the gambler

What follows is a few sentences from two existing translation of The Gambler by FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY. At first,I must say ,I don't want by any means to take PEVER and VOLOKHONSKY part. In my view ...
2
votes
0answers
89 views

“If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?

I am reading The Code of Hammurabi translated by Robert Francis Harper. Many times there are sentences in the format "if one do this, some action shall be done". Here's an example: If a son strike ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Classification: usage in the marine community

I recently heard "classification society" in a conversation - I thought it's an organization that classify or sort things somehow. My friend later explained a classification society is actually a ...
2
votes
0answers
59 views

How did 'how' + 'ever' = 'however' ⟹ 'but'?

[ OED: ] Etymology: < how adv. + ever adv. 8e. Qualifying a sentence or clause as a whole: For all that, nevertheless, notwithstanding; yet; = but at the beginning of the sentence. ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

Is there a solid reference/rule on when not to put article after 'of'

I have not found any articles or documentation on this, the only thing close to it is this Zero article after "of" in "a change of place" thread which only has a single answer ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Could you explain the differences among voiced stop, voiceless unaspirated stop & voiceless aspirated stop?

Look at this picture for explaining various mechanics of pronunciation with the vocal cords. Source: wikimedia commons I don't understand it much. Here is what I understood -voiced stop: your ...
2
votes
0answers
87 views

How do I pronounce the combination of a regnal name/number and a dynasty name?

I know how to pronounce a regnal name with a regnal number after it, like Elizabeth I ("Elizabeth the First") or Charles IV ("Charles the Fourth"). But sometimes I see the regnal name/number followed ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Connotation of a sentence in a listening material from TPO

(Here for the original audio source (MP3 file). The part in question begins approximately at 2'18'') This conversation is an excerpt from one listening material in a TPO (TOEFL Practice Online) test, ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

In which etymology

Why do we say "In which" in many formal essays and documents? I never understood this. The definition for which on Merriam Webster is "being what one or ones out of a group". Why is it that we have ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

What is another phrase for one stop shop?

I am writing a small description and need a phrase to highlight a range of services. Is there another phrase for "one stop shop" which is both catchy and apt?
1
vote
0answers
18 views

What is the phonetic realization of a sequence of “voiced-voiceless” or “voiceless-voiced” obstruents of the same place of articulation?

What is the phonetic realization of a sequence of "voiced-voiceless" or "voiceless-voiced" obstruents (especially sibilants) of the same place of articulation? For example, /zs/ as in "Mrs. ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Where should “just” go when describing possibility?

Which is the grammatically correct way to write this sentence? Ask, we may just have what you are looking for. Ask, we just may have what you are looking for.
1
vote
0answers
23 views

“On holiday” vs “on the holiday”

Which of them should I use? I go to the club on holiday. I go to the club on the holiday.
1
vote
0answers
60 views

How to say “As crucial as it is, it's surprising to…”

As a non-native English speaker, I'm trying to improve variety in my writing. For this particular, I want to express my feeling of surprise toward something that I always considered critical but ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

'lead to someone doing something' OR 'lead to someone's doing something'

Under the entry lead (v.), Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (5th edition) lists: lead to someone doing something example: His actions could lead to him losing his job. However, ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

certain (humorous) quote about revision of an organization’s bylaws

I’m looking for a certain (humorous) quote that goes something like: “The demise of an organization begins when it revises its bylaws.” After 15 minutes of googling for it, I have given up and am ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Have any words experienced sustained frequency growth greater than the word “sustainable”?

XKCD comic 1007, "sustainable", has indicated that the frequency of the word "sustainable" has undergone significant growth. According to explain XKCD, it has gone from 0.000005% in 1960 to ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. I arrived home. Arrive is intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object but 'home' is adverb of place and I think we can't use any preposition before it as we were ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Should one enclose variable names in commata?

In scientific writing, when should one enclose variable names in commas? Take the following example sentences: 1a) "For a set of pixels S, two pixels p and q from S are said to be connected if ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Singular or plural form of “a door” when a doorway has two or more doors

Usually, a doorway consists of a door frame and a door that swings on hinges. I would like to know which is more common, the singular or plural, when the doorway consists of a left hand and right hand ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

“Abstract nonsense” — does it have negative meaning?

Is the collocation "abstract nonsense" coloured somehow in negative way? I mean mostly the second word -- can it mean "something too strange to be good" or something like this, and in what context?
1
vote
0answers
33 views

What's a word for “apprehensively hoping”?

I'm talking about that feeling of hoping that something will happen, despite that thing possibly causing a negative effect—in spite of that negative effect, even. Context: I'm a software developer. ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Should questions phrased as declarations end with a question mark?

Should a question masquerading as a declaration—like, "I wonder if you have any suggestions?"—end with a question mark or a period?
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Shortening of the phrase “Six weeks”?

In many North American high schools and colleges, the year is split into two sections, called "semesters". If the year is broken into three sections, they're referred to as "trimesters" (notice the ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Which terms work best for a translated interface?

This question relates to the best use of English terms for optimal translation to other languages. It may not fit well here, but I couldn't locate a more relevant StackExchange site. I've tried ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Is it Possible to Learn Indo-Proto-European?

Is there a reputable and/or notable dictionary that lists all the words in Proto-Indo-European that can be translated to their literal equivalent in Modern English?
1
vote
0answers
64 views

I wished somebody told me

I got to the bank this morning to open an account, but I could not because I did not have one of the documents required. The day before, when I booked the appointment with the advisor, they told me to ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Is 'Oxford Comma' Capitalised?

I was taught in primary school that a common noun refers to a thing, idea, person, etc. whereas a proper noun refers to a specific thing, idea, person, etc. and that when referring to specifics and ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Can we say "Electronic dictionaries are useful IN looking up words?

One of the teachers at my school asked me this question. I believe the answer is NO. We can use FOR or WHEN but I don't believe IN is workable. Am I right and why?
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Is “more-point function” correct? (mathematics)

How do I describe in English (i.e. without mathematical symbols) the following mathematical object, if I want to stress comparison with the two-point function? The n-point Green's function for ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

When writing in cursive, what is the proper way to write an acronym?

Would I just write the letters in cursive or switch to block text?
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Adverbs for non-gradable and base adjectives

I'd like to ask which adverbs should we use for non-gradable and base adjectives. For example : environmental When I read my book, it says : Non-gradable adjectives are not used with adverbs ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

I'm trying to describe a sound i.e. a popping sound which is metallic. How do I phrase such a sound?

The best I could come up with is Metallic Pop which doesn't suit the rest of the writing style at all, which has a bit more imaginative use of adjectives. What other phrase could I use to describe ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Usage of “of” prepositions sequence

Today, I have encountered the following sentence in a documentation: Department of development and support of information systems of ABC JSC I have argued about the correctness of using this ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

Looking for a special synonym for “sharing”

For sake of naming convention, I need a noun synonym to share that start with "ea" or "e". Is there any word that meets this constrain?
1
vote
0answers
57 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Comparison between to have the good luck “of getting” and “to get” (a thing)?

I am not a native speaker of English and it's a little confusing for me to differentiate between phrases of the type: I had the good fortune / hap of getting ... versus I had the good ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Name for Literary Device

Are the word groups below all fall in the same group, and if so, is there a name for this device? Examples: - Jibber jabber - Flip flam - Hodge podge - Trials & tribulations I thought of ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Relative clauses

I have these two sentences: "All of them knew the criminals by sight. The local police arrested them." If you were asked to join them using a relative clause, how would you do it? all of them is the ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Joining a semicolon-delimited complex list to a multiple-clause sentence

Although I am in general aware of the conventions for using a semicolon as a "super-comma" to join complex list items which themselves contain commas, I have not been able to find guidelines for one ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Something/Someone is (not) there

My (Italian) students tend to produce sentences like: When I arrived, there weren't my parents (as opposed to 'my parents were not there') I cannot think of a grammar rule to provide an explanation. ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Looking for a nice and unique word that resemble the general usability of a device

I am looking for a nice and unique word that resemble the general usability of a device. Let's assume we have a smoke detector that is installable on any heater, so what should I call it? e.g. ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What would be the first use of the noun 'longboarding' for skateboarding, surfing or skiing?

The skateboard longboard goes back to Hawaii in the 50s, surfing back much earlier, and skiing back into the nineteenth century yet I can't find incidences in print earlier than the 70s. Many ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Is 'seeing' after 'open to' a correct sentence?

In a book that I'm reading, there is a sentence: We seem to be quite open to seeing others as people rather than coworkers or competitors. I just wonder I should be see not seeing in the above ...

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