5
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0answers
67 views

What is the equivalent in English of the French sentence part “complément de phrase”?

In French, a sentence has two essential syntactic parts (the subject and the predicate) and may have one or more "complément de phrase", which are optional parts. "complément de phrase" = "sentence ...
3
votes
0answers
56 views

Can penult stress for “stigmata” and similar words be explained or justified by any principle?

I enjoy studying the pronunciation of Greek-derived words in English, and I've found an odd anomaly. There appear to be two possible pronunciation patterns for words ending in the plural suffix -ata ...
3
votes
0answers
62 views

Verbs like “go” and “come” which can be followed by another verb directly?

With most English verbs (apart from modals), if you want to put another verb after it, you have either put "to" in front of the verb or use the gerund (if such a construction is even acceptable). For ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

Envy vs jealousy - has the meaning changed?

When I was at school (in the 80's) I learnt that jealousy and envy meant different things: you are jealous if you think someone will take what you have, you are envious if you want what they have. In ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Does anyone happen to know more about the word “zoot” and this use of speech called “nonsense reduplication?”

I am curious about the word "zoot" in "zoot suit." I have not done extensive research on the word, but the cursory search I conducted yielded so little and was so duplicative that I didn't bother ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

Isn't the phrase “sleeveless vest” redundant?

I had always thought a vest implied a sleeveless garment of clothing, but I find several instances of the phrase "sleeveless vest." Isn't that redundant and is there any reputable, somewhat ...
2
votes
0answers
72 views

Why is this sentence infelicitous?

Consider the sentence: I saw her cry. Why is it, then, that we can't say: I saw her be crying. And instead say: I saw her crying. ? Why is the second sentence infelicitous?
2
votes
0answers
27 views

For 'also', how is ' the demonstrative sense of “similarly” weakened to “in addition to” '?

also (adv.) Old English eallswa "just as, even as, as if, so as, likewise," compound of all + so. The demonstrative sense of "similarly" weakened to "in addition to" in 12c., replacing eke. ...
2
votes
0answers
175 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with ‑st

In Early Modern English you normally would add ‑st or ‑est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Why was the word “alluring” much more used in the 1920 than in the 1870 or the 1980?

As per title. This is the Ngram Graph for the word alluring: For comparison, this is the same graph for the word remarkable:
1
vote
0answers
16 views

How to pronounce “besieged the” in “The army besieged the town for 30 days.”

How to pronounce "besieged the" in "The army besieged the town for 30 days." As I understand, the [d] sound in the end of besieged can be omitted. So it will be [bɪˈsiːdʒ ðə], which for me is very ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Some or more of something

I want to say "some 50 or more yards apart" (meaning at least 50 yards apart) but I'm not quite sure it's correct. I couldn't find the answer or an example of its use in google search. However, I ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Refined Definition of Missive

My grandmother 1883 - 1980 insisted that a "missive" was a HAND CARRIED message or letter. I don't find this distinction in modern thinking. Any ideas?
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Present Perfect Progressive in scientific writing?

Scientific writing is generally supposed to be written in present tense (focus on proof of the existence of the result, not how the author arrived at it). However, I have a case where this results in ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Can the stress pattern of “uroboros/ouroboros” be explained by any principle, or is it random?

The word "uroboros," coming ultimately from Greek, has a couple of spellings and also pronunciations (see How to do you pronounce Ouroboros?). As explained by Nohat in the linked page, the two ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) UK - Meaning

My question is simple (hope not too simple): Why this organization has chosen this name? - DISCLOSURE AND BARRING SERVICE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disclosure_and_Barring_Service DBS enables ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Regional omission of “to be.”

I've noticed that people from the Washington, Oregon area tend to omit "to be" when describing something that needs to be completed. For example, just today one of my consulting engineers sent me an ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

to emanate from vs to stem from

Are the words to emanate from and to stem from synonym in the following sense? Do you think I can swap with each other without changing the meaning of the following sentences ? 1 (Of a feeling, ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Is there a formal spelling for the English letter names?

The English alphabet has a common pronunciation. For example, B is pronounced as "Bee", C as "See" and I as Aye. Is there a formal spelling for the letter names?
1
vote
0answers
62 views

What is “thars” in Dr. Seuss poetry “The Sneetches”?

The Sneetches, by Dr. Seuss: Now, the Star-Belly Sneetches had bellies with stars. The Plain-Belly Sneetches had none upon thars. Those stars weren’t so big. They were really so small. ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

“It's (high) time” vs. other uses of the past subjunctive

The most common usage of the past subjunctive is in counterfactual if statements: If I were you, I would eat more vegetables. Additionally, statements starting with "it's (high) time" are also ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Question or statement

Suppose there is very cold weather of zero temperature. Someone might say "How cold is that" (Usually with uptalk inflection. I think they mean "How cold that is" Really it sounds like a question, ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

What is the antonym to 'elevation'?

How do I say an opposite of "elevation of an object over the plane" which would mean "the level of the displacement of an object under the plane"? That is, I am looking for a word in "??? of an object ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Singular or plural for a compound subject with “and” but one part including the other?

This question is not a dublicate of "Singular or plural verb form where subject includes a 'parenthetical' element" since the latter discusses only compound subjects with "as well as". Is the ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Use of apostrophe or hyphen in money amounts

I'm trying to write a sentence along the lines of "we ordered 200 pounds' worth of stuff", but using the pound sign rather than the word. Possible options: "£200 worth" "£200's worth" "£200-worth" ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Parenthetical elements

Why is it acceptable sometimes for writers to enclose an independent clause--a clause which could stand by itself as its own sentence--in dashes and parentheses, yet this can't be done with commas? An ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

“Accessory” pronounced with a stress on the first syllable

I'm a first language English speaker, but grew up Bilingual in Spanish in a Spanish speaking country. Today I was speaking to another first language English speaker (Canadian) and used the word ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

What can I substitute for “A perfect example for this is”

I need a more sophisticated way of starting a sentence that uses soccer as a perfect example of an ancestral sport from china which evolved.
1
vote
0answers
46 views

How did 'so' mean 'so that'?

so, adv. and conj. = 24. so .. that [=] in such a way, to such an extent, that 25. a. With omission of that, = sense 24. 26. a. so (that) , in limiting sense: On condition that, provided that, ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

“an entertainment”

I'm reading Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death and I came across an interesting usage of the word entertainment. "The first is that on television, religion, like everything else, is ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Response Faster / respond faster?

I am looking for a new laptop, and as I scrolled down the page of this specific model, I encountered this: So, bottom line: shouldn’t it be Respond Faster? I am didn’t post a link because I’m not ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Answers for questions with “have to” and “have got to”?

Do we have to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. Have we got to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. I have to go home. a. Do you? b. Have you? ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

Dressing gown vs housecoat

As far as I can tell they refer to the same thing (bathrobe). I'd like to know the roots of both, and if possible the history of their evolution. Specifically if the usage is influenced by social ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
1
vote
0answers
44 views

How did 'to intimate' evolve to mean 'suggest indirectly'?

intimate (v.) [⟸] "suggest indirectly," 1530s, back-formation from intimation, or else from Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare. [...] intimate (adj.) [...] [⟸] ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Indirect question vs objective clause

Which is right: Do you think it's a good idea to visit in mid August? Or Do you think if it's a good idea to visit in mid August? On one hand, if viewed as indirect question, if should ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

How to tell the difference between predicate adjectives and action verbs

While analyzing essays, I often get confused between whether a word is a predicate adjective of an action verb. I found the definition of a predicate adjective to be "An adjective used in the ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

Which alternative is best English?

Are there any specific rules in English about how to refer to something that was introduced in the previous sentence? For example, compare these three sentences: Let X and Y be random variables ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Sequence of Verb Tense when it comes to if condition

Normally, a noun clause has the same tense as the main clause, right. So, I am wondering how about the case in IF condition sentence? If she were here, I would tell her that I liked/like her. ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Are copulars considered linking, helping, or auxiliaries?

I'm having a hard time understanding why most people consider the infinitive to be and all of its verb base forms helping verbs. I've consulted multiple English grammar sites and forums, and most of ...
1
vote
0answers
106 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Describing the difference between at and to?

How do you describe the differences between speaking to and speaking at person? When a person is giving a speech and yelling it rather than speaking in normal tone.
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Usage of loss or losses (for undesirable heat produced)

I am working in the field of electrical engineering where losses may appear due to for example and in short, pulsating magnetic fields in magnetic materials (Core losses) or electric current (Copper ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

What does “the networked listened” mean in regard to NBCUniversal’s decision to break off relations with Donald Trump?

There was the following passage in the Vanity Fair (June 30) article reporting that NBCUniversal announced that they would put an end to their relationship with a new Presidential candidate, Donald ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Origin of “sitting there like Lord Fermoy”

What is the origin of sitting there like Lord Fermoy? This had been a stock phrase in our family.
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Did 'inter-' evolve to mean 'together'?

entertain (v.) (<--) late 15c., "to keep up, maintain, to keep (someone) in a certain frame of mind," from Middle French entretenir, from Old French entretenir "hold together, stick ...
1
vote
0answers
112 views

Meaning of the term “empty use” in the context of modal verbs

I'm reading a book titled Comprehensive High School English Grammar & Composition. The author, who is Indian, says this on the use of the modal verbs can and could: Can is used to express ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

past progressive with always

Hi^^ I'm a student learning English. I learned in a class that either present or past progressive can be used to express a negative reaction to a situation. The explanations on the lecture note ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

How common is the 'object-subject-verb' construction?

E.g. from Wiki: I hate oranges, but apples I'll eat! or He's not very interesting, but her I would like to know! I understand it is a form only used for emphasis, but how common is it? Is it ...

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