0
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0answers
2 views

Origin of phrase “passing the trash”

In broadest terms, the phrase Passing the Trash describes dealing with corrupt individuals by giving them transfers, new job titles or even promotions. However, a quick search with Google suggests ...
0
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0answers
7 views

What is the correct usage I have (I've) or I multiple times in one sentance?

This probably won't change your life, however I'd love to know which is correct and why? "I compiled a list of tests I performed" OR "I've compiled a list of tests I performed" OR "I compiled a list ...
2
votes
0answers
11 views

“Have a shower” vs “Take a shower”

According to take-a-shower-bath-or-have-a-shower-bath, there are many answers there. but it still not clear for me. I still wonder that Have a shower and Take a shower, they are the same or not? ...
1
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0answers
8 views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Has Usage defeated Grammar, so that “none” is now plural and “data” is singular?

Other Q & A have dealt with parts of the evolution of these two words, but shifts in meaning move quickly. I thought an update would be interesting
3
votes
3answers
51 views

“They are Australian” vs “They are Australians”

On the very first page of "Essential Grammar in Use" book of R.Murphy. He wrote Those people aren't English. They're Australian. My question are Is this sentence grammatically correct? What is ...
1
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2answers
21 views

What does “Take a collective look” mean?

Surely the fortieth anniversary is a good time to take a collective look at this problem. What does Take a collective look mean?
2
votes
2answers
34 views

Idiom whose etymology involves misunderstanding the original meaning

I found this question on a rather fascinating (if unapologetically prescriptivist) website: Is there any idiom -- not a single word, but a full phrase -- whose meaning has changed over the years, ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Can I say “had better do this THAN do sth else”?

I d like to form this sentence but I am not fully sure if I can use "than" for "had better" phrases to express that this advice is better than doing another action just as we can use for preferences ...
0
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1answer
23 views

where does the phrase “all of a 2 'n 8” originate from?

where does the phrase "all of a 2 'n 8" originate from? It means - not knowing what to do - confused - unsettled
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Is “yet” and “ever” interchangeable in “the most pivotal contest yet / ever”

Today’s (February 7) Time magazine carries an article titled, ”Republicans ready for eighth debate,” which starts with the paragraph, “Republican presidential candidates will face off in New Hampshire ...
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

Countable singular nouns not preceded by any articles in some circumstances, What could be the reasons?

Occasionally, It can be noticed that even countable singular nouns are not preceded by any articles, especially for book or article titles or song names, What could be the reason for writers to ignore ...
0
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1answer
25 views

“I decided just to go away”, “I decided to just go away”, “I just decided to go away”?

What I mean is: I decide this: just going away. Does any of the sentences below convey that sense in a gramatically correct way? I decided just to go away. I decided to just go away. I just ...
4
votes
1answer
31 views

The “wrought /wreaked havoc” misunderstanding

According to the American Heritage Dictionary:. the past tense and past participle of the verb to wreak is wreaked, not wrought, which is an alternative past tense and past participle of work. ...
1
vote
2answers
129 views

What is the word for the face of a mountain or a huge rock that rhymes with edifice?

I think it kind of rhymes with 'edifice' or *'Irifice' or something. Can someone give me a word for the face of a mountainous brown rock?
1
vote
2answers
26 views

English (UK) - does “an enraged expression” make sense?

I am writing a book and one of my characters is angry but I feel like angry doesn't fit in and that enraged makes more sense and also makes the language of the book better but I'm not sure if it makes ...
-1
votes
0answers
13 views

Can “The reasons could be many.” be a sentence on its own?

Or should I rather say, "There could be many reasons."?
1
vote
1answer
17 views

which construction is it?

This sentence is from George Eliot: Blessed is the man, who having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact. I would like to know why did he use Having instead of Has? is it ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Should I use in 'has' or 'have' in sentence

If I have a sentence that reads: ''Consequently, industrial use and academic research have employed the product on this basis.'' Should I be using ''research has employed'' or ''research have ...
3
votes
2answers
39 views

Word for confusing two objects & their respective uses

I want to think there is a word for when one accidentally uses one tool in the place of another and vice versa, such as with someone using their straw to eat cereal and their spoon in the milk, or ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Stone bridge vs. Stony bridge

It might sound weird but one of my students asked me if there is a difference between 'a stone bridge' and 'a stony bridge'! Well off the top of my head I said it's the matter of collocation: we ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Tip of my Tongue: some word that means fear out of respect

So I'm looking for some word that means to fear someone out of respect. I feel like the mafia comes to mind? Or something of the kind. For example, someone excelling in an area, and demanding(?) ...
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Is a second 'is' in a compound sentence redundant?

Is it correct is say: This file is part of X and is distributed... or this: This file is part of X and distributed... What's the rule here?
1
vote
1answer
37 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Using 'or' twice in a sentence

Can I use 'or' twice in this sentence? I don’t know whether it was a last-minute programme or they didn’t get information about the programme or the school did not get to inform the parents on ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use ...
4
votes
5answers
248 views

What does the author actually means when he says “ underestimate the value of gold.”

Excerpt from Honor Among Thieves: "The reason for numbers being limited on this occasion will become all too obvious to you. The issue we are about to discuss is so sensitive that the fewer ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

What is a 7-2 ruling in legal context?

"Although his court challenge (Eldred vs. Attorney General John Ashcroft) was turned down by a United States circuit court, many believed that the lower court's decision had a very good chance of ...
-2
votes
3answers
43 views
1
vote
6answers
236 views

What is a word for over-celebrating?

I am looking for a word similar to pompous or haughty. I thought of it for a while, and could not find a word that fit that description. It's also similar to tooting your own horn too much.
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votes
3answers
43 views

Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

How to use the word “proposition”?

Does it make sense to write "Therefore, the proposition statement of this essay is flawed"
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Reflexive pronoun of someone [on hold]

It is really hard to someone who has not any respect to it's own values to be respected by others. What is the reflexive pronoun of someone?
-2
votes
3answers
41 views

Dynamic Society

Is there a single word that describes Dynamic Society? Something like 'Dynasociety'? That's a self created word, but I was thinking, if the word itself does not exist, are there any rules in creating ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

The word quite “ very and not very”

I have a question. The word quite has two meanings, very and not very. How can I distinguish between them?
1
vote
2answers
73 views

A powerful idiom for “low exposure”

Imagine someone creates a piece of art, but nobody notices it. Like a great book, which nobody reads because nobody knows that it exists. What are some powerful words or metaphors for this condition? ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

The usage of 'would'

Could anybody explain to me the usage of 'would' in the following sentenses: I asked to borrow the car but my father wouldn`t let me. The landlady wouldn`t allow me to have guests. Thank you.
1
vote
1answer
30 views

forever unfinished

Does "forever unfinished" mean "continuing forever"? and does it refer to "translocation"? Context: This has witnessed an increased translocation of the ‘place of art’ to the contextual ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

“Singular” vs “Uncountable” nouns

Today, searching for the term "cloak", I came across these definitions From Longman DOCE 5th Ed. cloak noun [singular] an organization, activity, or way of behaving that deliberately protects ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

“Clutching” vs. “Flinging”: Which one is correct here? [on hold]

I think option C is correct. Option A and B are clearly ruled out. I don't understand what is the difference between option C and D. From Cambridge Dictionary Clutch : to take or ​try to ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

'Wasn't dressed' vs 'Didn't dress'

I was wondering what is the difference between : She didn't dress properly to the live performance. and She wasn't dressed properly to the live performance. If it's completely identical ...
2
votes
2answers
36 views

I have bought a car this year too

I have bought a car this year, too. What does this sentence mean? "Me, too," or "I have done something else and have bought too," or "I have something else and a car too," or "this year too." ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

“The price of an apple is greater than an onion”– Why is this incorrect?

I think C is correct option. D option is clearly wrong since more and costlier can't come together. I don't understand why other options are wrong? Please suggest.
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Use of “well” in “Britain’s Labour Party is in thrall to a man well to the left of Mr Sanders”

I have a question about a sentence from an article of The Economist Magazine: Britain’s Labour Party is in thrall to a man well to the left of Mr Sanders. Does the word "well" in this sentence ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

crack of the door [duplicate]

Through the the open window and the crack of the door, the wind came in, and rustled the book pages. the preposition is "of" as opposed to "around". What does "crack of the door" refer to? 1) the ...
-3
votes
1answer
45 views

What is Actual Difference on Began and Begun [on hold]

When searched for this I found a site is referring this "began is the past ‘simple’verb of begin and begun is only used for past ‘participles.’", Cant get what they are trying to mention on this
0
votes
1answer
30 views

First or second syllable accent for “tarot”

Is it acceptable to pronounce "tarot" with the accent on the second syllable? So, phonetically it would be pronounced "Ta-ROW"
-2
votes
1answer
38 views

“what did you just say?” or “what did you just said?”

when there is 'did' the verb has to remain in its natural form but,when there is 'just' which refers to an immediate past,the verb has to be added 'ed' at the end. But what if there is 'did' and ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What's the difference between “Thanks anyway” and “Thanks though”?

To me, they seem to have almost identicial meaning, but I believe there's a difference in usage. Could you please decribe the difference with specific examples?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Correct way to use capitalization for undergraduate degree

In writing about a persons college degree achievements I'm confused over capitalization. Any thoughts or inputs would be greatly appreciated. Here goes, should I write... He/She earned a Bachelor of ...

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