0
votes
0answers
3 views

use of Phrasal Verb (risen into/to)

Which one to select? It has risen (into the fifties, to about fifties, into the fifty's, to the fifties)
0
votes
0answers
6 views

Which one to select (often, more often, most often, oftener)?

Of all relatives, John comes early (often, more often, most often, oftener).
0
votes
0answers
18 views

I´m well hung from your cross - what does it mean?

Please, what does "I´m well hung from your cross" mean in the text "I´m on my knees, I beg your mercy, I´m well hung from your cross"?
0
votes
0answers
14 views

“In order to …, are many approaches available” or “In order to …, many approaches are available”?

Which one is correct? In order to network an Android device with the web server for data exchanging, many approaches are available." – or "In order to network an Android device with the web ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Express Emphasis without using Italics or Underline

Are there any methods to express emphasis without using italics or underline? I find that there are many cases where formatting does not allow italics, even if emphasis would add to the text greatly. ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

“Branching Factor” in military and industrial organizations?

In math, branching factor measures the (average) number of descendants in a tree; e.g., the branching factor of a binary tree is 2. How is the same number called when applied to the military (usually ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Coalescence of /t/ and /r/ in 'train', 'tram', 'traffic' etc

Could we say that when saying the 'tr' in words like 'train', 'tram' etc, that the /t/ and /r/ often coalesce to make a sound which is more similar to 'tchr'? I myself definitely do this, but I have ...
1
vote
7answers
208 views

How do you describe someone who isn't attending a certain event?

I'm working on a software project where we need to label people depending on their presence. Assume an event and people are attending it, we call them the attendees. I assumed I would call those who ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Difference between discourses and worldviews

I wondered if any one could help me to differentiate between worldviews (see the Cultural Theory of Risk for further information) and discourses (and their interrelation, if applicable). Thanks in ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

A Dish X Starring Y Ingredient (Is it possible to say?)

I want to say a dish X features the ingredient Y in order to emphasize 'the main and the most important ingredient in the dish is Y' in a pompous way. Or is it still possible to go with the verb "to ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Is there more than one way to write a lowercase cursive “f”?

I am aware that this is the canonical lowercase cursive "f": My question is whether the way I write a cursive "f" is also a common one or whether I just made this up without knowing it: Is my way ...
3
votes
5answers
186 views

Word that describes either a team or a single player

What is a good word for describing an entity (usually in a sports event) that can consist of one or more players? The idea is to give a name to a class (in code) for such a group (or player) within a ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Confused whether to use “in” or “of”

Which do I use in this phrase? ...and support the fact that the setting of the story is indeed in India. ...and support the fact that the setting in the story is indeed in India.
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Night do? What does it mean?

I'm watching a TV show about midwife, two ladies are taking: A: next year I'm gonna work Christmas because I'm getting married in the new year. B: are you? Is that when it is? Am I coming to the ...
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

Grammatical error in the following sentence [on hold]

"We are completed the work" or "we have completed the work", which one is wrong among these two sentences.
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Waving his flag around the globe?

I'm onto translating an article about a chef who has several restaurant around the globe and the original sentence (Turkish) included an idiom like following to indicate the chef's omnipresence and ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

What do you call two opinions that confict with each other but seem to be right at the same time?

When I ask a question about using hypophora in academic writing, Lauren Ipsum suggests me to organize things under headers while Kristina Adams advised me to avoid them. I have raised a question about ...
1
vote
1answer
189 views

What is the general term for “greater than or equal to” and “less than or equal to”?

We call this equation: A = B We call this inequality: A > B A < B What do we call this: A ≥ B A ≤ B ?
1
vote
1answer
18 views

What is the correct term in English prose for HTML page or html page?

I've seen prose referring to HTML pages and html pages. What is the correct English written description (assuming in modern English - in a written technical book) for an html page? Open the HTML ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Can't we say “all the day”?

I'm a studying English using a book titled "Grammar in use". I've learned that "all day" means "the complete day from beginning to end". The book says, "Note that we say "all day" (not "all the ...
0
votes
2answers
18 views

What does “wouldn't be exaggerating to say” mean?

Example: "It is very potent, which is surprising, actually," said Pandey. "I wouldn’t be exaggerating to say it's a little bit better than dandelion root extract." Why not just say "It is very ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

There's a pork chop in every beer, origin

I first heard this expression when, as a bartender, I asked a patron who'd ordered a pint if he wanted to see a menu. His response: "I'm all right, thanks. There's a pork chop in every beer." I've ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What does “Thanks for having me” mean?

It seems to be used like "Thanks for inviting me". But it sounds like "Thank me, cause I was there". Looking for a better explanation and situations it should be used in.
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Optionality of the preposition “at”

I see/hear many instances where the preposition "at" is omitted when a question starts with "What time ... ?" For example, I hear people say "What time are you guys meeting?" as opposed to "What time ...
-1
votes
2answers
35 views

How do I use commas in the following sentence

I am confused about proper usage of commas in the follow sentence. An engineer works for 13 hours a day, which is uncommon among factory workers, who work only for 10 hours a day. I believe the ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

How to pronounce miracle?

I ask this because I recently had a debate with my family about how to pronounce this word, miracle. They said it was pronounced with the "mir" in miracle the same way "mir" is in mirror. ...
-1
votes
2answers
39 views

Capitalization Police: Why all the capitals?

I'm writing an essay where I want to talk about introspection. I've written the following sentence and Microsoft Word is insisting on capitalizing every single 'w' even though this is essentially a ...
4
votes
1answer
401 views

What makes 'St-n-c-tt-r' a 'smirking pun'?

This passage comes from Walter Isaacson's “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life.”: Franklin wrote about a husband who caught his wife in bed with a man named Stonecutter, tried to cut off the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Which is it: “1½ years old” or “1½ year old”?

1½ is not yet 2 or more, so which do we properly say: "1½ years old" or "1½ year old"?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

A noun: the tool to fix neck in the neck sprain treatment

What is the tool to fix one's neck in a neck sprain treatment? It could be soft or hard, in plastic. I did a web search for neck fixture, but it turned out to be a component of a lamp.
1
vote
2answers
166 views

Meaning of “I'll hardly have time for a rubber”?

I encountered this expression in the book Sea Glass by Anita Shreve and can't figure out what it means. (Actually, I have a few ideas but want to know the correct meaning.) "I'll hardly have time ...
2
votes
3answers
37 views

Good synonym for “professional” that includes skilled amateurs

I sometimes want to stress a technique as something that would be described as professional. In my aviation scenario, I wanted to describe how keeping radio communication parsimonious and brief is ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

“être” and “avoir” verbs in English?

There are a few English phrases that appear to be conjugated with to be rather than to have. I think they all come from Early Modern English: He is risen (rather than “he has risen”) The Lord is ...
12
votes
5answers
193 views

Etymology of “cut someone some slack”

Teenagers. All the literature tells you one thing and one thing only – that whatever they are doing, give them a break, cut them some slack, it's normal. From the novel, Apple Tree Yard I'm ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

What does “treaty boom” mean in this sentence?

"Our products [fishing equipment] are treaty boom." (It's a slogan.)
-1
votes
3answers
34 views

Is there a word for a name that has multiple words that means more than the words imply?

This is a bit hard to explain, so let's try an example. There is something called "rock art", which means human-made markings placed on natural stone. Those two words when put together have a ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

Do some respected reference works contain real errors (as opposed to contrasting analyses)?

In a recent question (since deleted), CDO (Cambridge Dictionaries Online) is shown to give the following examples for (intercategorial polysemes of) since: since adverb B2 from a particular time in ...
-3
votes
2answers
55 views

Simile dilemma: Do leaves “fly like butterflies”?

Leaves from the ground fly like butterflies . What are the leaves being compared to? flies butterflies ground other leaves
-2
votes
1answer
40 views

“Two dead found dead”

Is it proper English to say 'Two dead found dead' like we read in the breaking news below?
4
votes
1answer
67 views

“Tommyknockers”: why the “tommy” prefix in AmE?

From The Tommyknockers by Stephen King: Late last night and the night before, Tommyknockers, Tommyknockers, knocking at the door. I want to run, don't know if I can, 'cause I'm so afraid of ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

Breathe vs. breath, why so much misuse?

I know the difference between the two. Breath is a noun and breathe is a verb. It was taught to me that way and I've never mixed them up in any way because their different pronunciation reflects ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

his very first novel vs his first novel

In a reading comprehension exercise for my students there is a sentence: "What was it like to become famous with your very first novel?" Does it mean that the author wrote more than two books? ... ...
0
votes
3answers
43 views

Grammar point around the word 'apropos'

I found a couple examples with that word: The song feels apropos to a midnight jaunt Clothes that are apropos to the occasion I'm interested in can we use that following the verb of action. ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Business Context [on hold]

I want to write a paragraph about a business problem in English. Please correct my English grammar and vocabulary mistakes. I work in a medical equipment company. The company has two products. One ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

What does “overheads” mean in the following context? [on hold]

Here is the context; The text deals with wind energy and wind plants: "Machine sizes are increasing, which means that fewer are needed for a given capacity, and so installed costs of wind farms are ...
-2
votes
0answers
24 views

What is the Superlative Degree [on hold]

She feel that her mother is better than all other mothers in the world.
0
votes
0answers
36 views

When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter S? [duplicate]

I know that in front of a vowel, but in front of the letter S I don´t remamber.
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Is is possible to use this construction?

Is it possible to say "He was being run after" instead of "He was being chased" the same way it is possible to say "He was being shot at" "He was being run down/over" etc. or is that not a valid ...
2
votes
3answers
64 views

A word for when a machine or process occasionally misses a step

I am looking for a verb that means that a process misses a step occasionally. This would be for a case where a machine or process sometimes, but not always, produces incorrect results. For ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

Is “to share” misused? [on hold]

Is it correct to use the verb "to share" in connection with expressing opinions or ideas or giving information?

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