0
votes
0answers
5 views

Using the indefinite article

When I want to express that I have pain , should I use the indefinite article (a) e.g. I have a pain
0
votes
1answer
7 views

read the body please

Im looking for the PROPER TERM. So theres a female. Her name is kaylee. Knows this guy that is madly in love with her and would give anything to be with her well she is struggling and needs things for ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Is the sentence in the question correct?

I want to say that "x theory and y theory are much elder than z theory. However, z theory plays an important rule in germination of both x and y theories." How to write the two sentences above in ...
2
votes
2answers
11 views

More formal phrase for “throw someone off”

Is there a more formal phrase with the same meaning of "throw someone off"? I want to use the phrase exactly how I am sure everyone is used to it being used. I want to say that something unexpected ...
-2
votes
0answers
10 views

Choose the grammatically correct sentence

** 1. ** (a) She said that she was ill owing to cold weather (b) She said that she was ill due to cold weather 2 (a) He refused to dine with me (b) He denied to dine with me 3 a. It is much ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Terminology to describe the formal use of “I wish to”

I am aware that there is a similar post, however, is there a more specific term (other than simply formal) to describe the use of "I wish" in the following case: If your Ladyship doesn't wish to ...
0
votes
3answers
16 views

Usage of the word “largesse”

I am writing a sentence like: Show clients your largesse with a gift of equal proportion. Is it right in a formal sense or is it a little condescending? Is there another way to write it?
1
vote
0answers
10 views

“Ask” vs “ask for”

I've just been told that when you want information from a person, you should not use "ask for" just "ask". They're quoting from Longman's Dictionary of Contemporary English. This doesn't appear to be ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

“The woman's card” vs “the woman card”

In this recently uploaded video by CNN channel, it shows that it is not clear as to whether we should use the possessive apostrophe or not, though Sue Mendelsohn, Director of the Columbia Unv. Writing ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Is 'I don't know' an adjective?

Other than being an interjection, does 'I don't know' serve as an adjective?
0
votes
0answers
6 views

meaning of “a game of tease”

what does it mean when someone compares something or some act to "a game of tease"? I think it means like indulging in a game of seek and hide or something like that. Am I right? it is like a game ...
2
votes
3answers
18 views

If we say A is weaker than B by a factor of x, then should x be smaller or bigger than 1?

In math, we always need to derive different algorithms to get a tighter error bound. It may be correct almost surely that: the error bound of B is better than that of A by a factor x (x is bigger than ...
0
votes
1answer
9 views

These have been processed

I have been told I can't say the below in my email reply and am not too sure what is wrong with the sentence. Can someone enlighten me please? These have been processed.
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Meaning of this sentence “I am not great with blade.”

I wonder what is the real meaning of this sentence. A: I bet I would have made one hell of a capo at La Cosa Nostil. B: Nostra A: Ah, I don’t know. I mean, I have a wandering spirit. ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

which is grammatically correct

Which is the grammatically correct to write this sentence? Ask, we may just have what you are looking for. or Ask, we just may have what you are looking for.
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Is there an English idiom/metaphor for “mind boggling”, only more so?

In Hungarian, if you want to express that something is mind-blowing, you say megáll az ész "the mind stops". (For example, the National Geographic Channel's show Brain Games is titled Megáll az ész! ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Meaning of 'roll' in 'I have all my grass to roll'

‘Oh, I am so sorry,’ said Hans, ‘but I am really very busy to-day. I have got all my creepers to nail up, and all my flowers to water, and all my grass to roll.’ The above is a part of ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

“On holiday” vs “on the holiday”

Which of them should I use? I go to the club on holiday. I go to the club on the holiday.
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Question mark or period at the end of “What is your favorite song, and explain why”

Which would be correct? What is your favorite song, and explain why? (I'm thinking this is right.) What is your favorite song, and explain why. This could be written as, "What is your ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What is the female version of “forefather”?

I might say "My forefathers were Irish". Is there an equivalent for mothers? Could a woman say "My foremothers were German"?
0
votes
0answers
21 views

First Lover in the Nighttime? a little bit of bacon?

This is in the drama Psych. I am an English learner and I can't understand why the man suddenly says this. Juliet and Shawn are couple and they are a kind of policeman. I wonder the bold part. It ...
0
votes
5answers
40 views

What is a good word to use to describe someone who has that young, unknowing innocence about them?

I'm trying to think of a good word that expresses the meaning of someone who, like a child who doesn't know of the bad things going on in the world, that is innocent and unknowing in a certain ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Things with expiry date

I'm a software developer and currently I'm creating an inventory application. I need to name things with expiry dates, like medicines or food, in general. In Java (the programming language I'm using) ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

“Please orange juice” is natural? [migrated]

When a server at a restaurant asks me "Anything to drink", I say "orange juice please." In that situation, can I say "Please orange juice"?
1
vote
1answer
7 views

A term / title that describes “metadata” details for knowledge base article

I'm working on creating a knowledge base and want a section on each page to be essentially "metadata" for an article. Things like: Author name of article. Applicable product. Date the article was ...
2
votes
1answer
20 views

Why is it Autism Spectrum Disorder and not Autism Disorder Spectrum?

Certainly with Disorder trailing behind "Autism Spectrum" it indicates that the disorder is called Autism Spectrum when spectrum is merely being used to describe that the disorder has a spectrum. ...
2
votes
4answers
37 views

A term that describes the “shoulder angel/devil” but on a broader scale

I am attempting to find a phrase or word equivalent to "shoulder angel/devil", but on a broader scale, that does not only refer to the idea of "good" versus "bad". A shoulder angel/devil is a plot ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?

I have difficulty interpreting this line: they were taken for being taken in It is from Some by the late Daniel Berrigan. Exerpt: Some stood and stood and stood. They were taken for fools, ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

at / in / in the - daylight

While most of the nouns denoting parts of the day are used either with "at.." or "in the.." prepositions (in the morning / afternoon / evening / daytime; at nighttime / noon / night / midday / ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is there a name or term for these types of statements that avoid over-generalizations?

In the news, whenever a reporter or commentator talks about police violence, specifically towards minorities, and they imply racist motives behind police brutality, they also tend to add something ...
3
votes
3answers
42 views

Is “to silo off” a real phrase?

I often hear people (and myself) say that something is "siloed off from" something else, meaning that is is isolated (or, in software, sandboxed) and allowed to work without affecting something else. ...
0
votes
4answers
50 views

What did Samuel Johnson mean when he wrote this?

I do not in particular understand the use of the word "but" in the last sentence: Almost every man wastes part of his life in attempts to display qualities which he does not possess, and to gain ...
0
votes
2answers
21 views

Which of these is most correct, and why?

He called me over FaceTime He called me by Facetime. He called me through FaceTime. He called me via FaceTime. He called me with FaceTime. FaceTime = A calling service from Apple.
0
votes
3answers
41 views

Collective word for software and hardware

I'm looking for a term that collectively describes both software and hardware. Doesn't have to be a single word but it would be preferable.
1
vote
2answers
29 views

Can the word 'impossible' be used postpositively with other than 'mission' nouns?

For example, can I say The teacher gave us the task impossible?
1
vote
2answers
21 views

Guideline(s) vs rule(s)

Is "guideline" actually a synonym for "rule"? My understanding was that a guideline is a suggestion, but I could certainly be mistaken. Sources like: thesaurus.com suggest that it is, but some ...
0
votes
3answers
27 views

Is a comma between adjacent quoted phrases in the same sentence unnecessary?

This is a quote from Larry Wilmore's performance at the 2016 Correspondents' Dinner. One website wrote it as follows: "They just renamed ‘The Kelly File,’ ‘Becky with the good hair.’” I think the ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

What does the sentence, “You could do worse than review some of Lenny Bruce's material.” mean

I understand that it's an indirect form of compliment, also known as litotes. Here's a question already on that, "You could do worse than [x]" I couldn't get my head around, if it's a ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Does the word “brownie” have the same implication as the N-Word?

I was watching the latest episodes of The X-Files a couple of weeks ago and in one of the episode a middle aged white man driving down the road in Texas stares at a Mid Eastern/Asian guy at a traffic ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

when can we call a Prepostional Phrase adverbial?

In the car , she drank her coffee. is the prepostioal phrase here adverbial ?
1
vote
1answer
16 views

I want that my teammates run faster. Did I write the underlined part of sentence below right

I want that my teammates run faster. Did I write the underlined part of sentence below right? "I screamed for my teammates to they run quicker"
0
votes
2answers
26 views

I have good vision/sight/eyesight

In my language, Russian, there is only one variant to express the "abilty to see" in its common physiological sence. If I have a good ability (I am born with) I say: У меня хорошее зрение So ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Why a “bulb” is called “bulb”?

Why an incandescent lamp is called "bulb"? Does it have any relation to the "bulb" of a tulip?
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Is there a word for an road/path that splits specifically into three directions?

According to Wiktionary.org and Dictionary.com, one of the definitions of a fork is the something that divides into two or more branches. Wiktionary.org provides an alternative definition that is ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Present perfect simple or present perfect continuous with “often”

"Have you visited him often?" "For the last six months I've driven up to B. quite often." "For the last six months I've been driving up to B. quite often." The rule I have is that the ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Where does it come from vs What does it come from

Do both work? I could only assume that both are grammatically correct... As an example: Let's say that there is a word that derives from a name, such as "sandwich" which was coined from a name of ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Child Support Modified , Free Advocates [on hold]

I'm deep in dept with them for a period that prevented me literally from providing. ( prison) my license is affected and a warrant comes ever 6-7 months. Need help with this matter. I support my kids ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

before going to bed or before going to the bed [migrated]

My name is Sósimo Romero Domínguez. I want to know what is the correct way to write the following sentence. What is it correct? Greetings.
8
votes
1answer
519 views

What's the English for “allappare”?

This is essentially a translation question and as such off-topic, but please bear with me for a moment. Allappare is an Italian verb that is used to refer to the astringent effect that you may ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Using “Earth words” in a fictional, futuristic setting

As a writer of primarily science fiction, I've often struggled with finding a happy medium between making the prose/dialogue relatable for readers and avoiding using too many "Earth words" as I've ...

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