All Questions

7
votes
3answers
170 views

The origins and usages of “waffle”

Scottish dogs used to waff American voters waffled in 2000 British politicians “waffle on” for hours And Swedish children eat them on March 25th Waffle nowadays has basically three meanings: ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Can “it” be used with plural subject?

Several years ago I heard of something called dummy subjects in high school. It was then stated that, for example, it is a dummy subject when it starts many instances of sentences, e.g. It is ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Sorry I'm late, the car wouldn't start this morning!

This sentence is used in Grammar book. I wonder why is they used "woundn't start" instead of "haven't started"? Thanks so much!
1
vote
4answers
41 views

Word for “having a lot of irregular bumps”?

I'm looking for a word to describe the bark of a tree or the inner walls of an intestine — specifically, their random and irregular patterns of bumps. Any suggestions?
14
votes
13answers
10k views

Why are movies so hard to understand (and what can you do about it)?

I have been learning English for many, many years now and think I have acquired quite some mastery. Yesterday I saw just another English (American) flick and thought it was a different language, but ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Are there many words that come with “a” as the prefix to mean “no, non” like “asymptomatic” and “apolitical”?

I didn’t know the word, “asymptomatic” to my shame, until I heard the following narration in AP Radio news aired on October 27 through AFN network: “Dr. Anthony Fauci with the NIH says CDC ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Collective term for HDDs and SSDs [on hold]

I need a collective term for hard disk drives and solid state drives for computers that do not also include other storage units like USB drives and DVDs. To be more precise, a word for the main ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Can plural subject precede a single complement? [closed]

I wonder if the the following sentence is correct grammatically, where a singular complement (if I am calling it the correct way) i.e. "a factor" is used with plural subject: these five roles ...
0
votes
1answer
8 views

conditional perfect continuous

If he had not supported me, I would not have been standing here in front of you like this. Is the above sentence gramittically correct or not. Regards, sri.
5
votes
5answers
11k views

Speaking with a forked tongue

What does it mean for someone to be "speaking with a forked tongue"? I've heard it used by my boss when referring to particular customers of ours.
0
votes
2answers
18 views

Verbally differentiating between “prince's” and “princess”

In Trondheim (Norway) we have a set of streets named after royal titles; Kongens Gate, Dronningens Gate, Prinsens Gate Directly translated, they mean "The King's Street", "The Queen's Street", "The ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Another way to say “Worked On”

Does anyone know a way to say "Worked on"? I'm wanting to say that I worked on a certain project on my resume but I have drawn a blank.
-1
votes
0answers
11 views

We are requested [on hold]

Apologies for the potentialy basic question, but is it correct to say "we are requested to provide x information". It sounds wrong to me and has been bugging me for a week or so... Many thanks Jo
1
vote
5answers
117 views

Noun instead of gerund 'expecting'

What noun can be used instead of the gerund expecting? Users below have suggested expectancy, but neither its definition nor expectation's, mentions pregnancy. I ask not about ...
6
votes
11answers
3k views

Gender-neutral alternative to “craftsmanship”?

It's straightforward to refer to a "craftsperson" instead of a "craftsman" if one doesn't want to imply a gender. But "craftspersonship", "sportspersonship", and the like seem pretty cumbersome. Is ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

How does 'be' + 'of' combine to mean 'possess; give rise to'?

I already understand and thus ask NOT about the definition, but instead want to dredge below it: to be of = Possess intrinsically; give rise to How does the juxtaposition of these two 'Top 1000 ...
3
votes
4answers
425 views

Pure verbal nouns/deverbal nouns vs. gerunds

This is a follow-up to a previous question which I am still trying to understand. I think I'm making progress in my understanding, but I would appreciate feedback to help me refine my thinking. Here ...
3
votes
3answers
21k views

“Subtotal” vs “total”

I've always thought of subtotal as a calculated value that is not the final amount on an invoice (for example, a sum of individual prices before discounts/taxes are applied, or the total for a ...
9
votes
3answers
10k views

What follows next in the sequence “unary, binary, ternary…”?

I looked on Oxford's online dictionary and was able to find the names identifying orders of a given degree: primary secondary tertiary quaternary quinary senary septenary octonary nonary denary -- ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

Should “listening” always be followed by the preposition “to”?

While we always add a preposition to with listen, as in listen to music, does that apply with listening as well? Is the following sentence correct? I am habitual of listening this from you ?
17
votes
6answers
1k views

“Childlessness is hereditary in our family” What do you call a statement containing a contradiction such as the example?

This kind of sentence is usually absurd and may or may not be recognized as such by the person who utters it. She will regret it till the day she dies, if she lives that long! "Aren't you going to ...
-1
votes
4answers
41 views

“If you get lonely, I hope you phone me” vs. “will phone me”

Which one is correct? If you get lonely, I hope you phone me any time. If you get lonely, I hope you will phone me any time. A detailed explanation would be fantastic.
0
votes
0answers
16 views

A one-off action or a series of actions in the past?

I have two sentences here whose meanings are confusing to me as they are interpreted by native speakers. 1) "When Jack did all the shopping, he went to the cafe." Means: On the days that Jack ...
6
votes
4answers
190 views

Present tense and conditional tense in a stated past tense

I have a question about using past and conditional tenses in a context that refers to something told in the past. I think I’ve seen both forms used in films/books, etc., but I'm not sure about it ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Sentence Structure practise material

I am not a native english speaker and I feel that's why my sentence structure is not proper. Can you please suggest me some worksheet, links, resources, books, advice etc.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

“Joe and Me” vs. “Joe and I” vs “I and Joe”

My Team lead sent me some appreciation and forgot one of my co-worker to include. So, Which one is correct : 1. Joe and Me worked together on this so, Kudos to Joe as well. 2. Joe and I worked ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

What is the difference between introspection and retrospection?

I want to know what is the exact difference between introspection and retrospection. I keep hearing words like self-introspection. What does that mean? Can someone clarify with examples?
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Has “as-is” plural form?

I wanted to shorten a sentence: "Let the procedures leave in their original state." I wrote "Let the procedures leave as-is." Is it correct or I had to use "Let the procedures leave as-are." Has the ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Is the use of “would” valid when describing a hypothetical, future situation?

I am uncertain about the use of "would" in a sentence describing a hypothetical, future situation. The sentence in question is: "If you feel that way, you'd say it." In my opinion, the use of ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

Check whether the following sentence is grammatically correct

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "I like fishing in a quiet, lazy, sunny afternoon by a lonely lake. I like to see the sunset in a wide horizon on a breezy dusk. I like to see the full moon in ...
3
votes
8answers
801 views
+150

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open” and “Can you try opening”?

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is the use of “feel” followed by “would” incorrect in this sentence?

I am talking about a feeling that could possibly arise in a hypothetical future situation, and if the feeling did arise, the person would express it. I phrased the sentence like this: "If you feel ...
0
votes
3answers
30 views

Using the word “Disposition” as a Verb

I know disposition means a persons inherent qualities of mind and character and it is a noun. i know you would say "he has a very quiet brooding disposition" but my roommate was cleaning the house and ...
3
votes
2answers
73 views
+150

Is the concept of “backshifted past tense” in reported speech applicable to other types of subordinate clauses?

BACKGROUND Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has this portion regarding backshift on page 154: Backsift not confined to indirect reported speech We introduced a concept of a ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

How do I hypenate a triple modifier?

How would I hypenate the phrase 'high poverty public school?' My first guess was 'high-poverty public school', but I'm not really sure.
1
vote
2answers
24 views

Stand-alone Use of 'There' in English

I was reading The Invisible Man by H.G.Wells. He uses There! without connection to other words (or maybe there is connection, but I don't see it). She glanced at his white-swathed head and blue ...
1
vote
3answers
37 views

What kind of punctuation would I use for this sentence?

The sentence: Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%; higher than Amumu's. I am not sure if I should put a semi colon, period, or comma in between "60%" and "higher."
1
vote
8answers
2k views

Is there a verb for 'to make heroic'? Something like 'heroicised'?

As per the title, is there a verb for 'to make heroic'? Something like 'heroicised'? EDIT: For example, talking about how an author elevated a character to heroic status.
11
votes
7answers
19k views

Origin of the expression “Dead to rights”?

I was watching a TV show and this term was used. I am familiar with the definition, but I was wondering the origin of the phrase. It does not make sense to me if taken literally. Reference
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Use of “off/off of” in speech

Why do Americans say off of when they tell someone to get off them?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Use Schedule and Timetable together

The context is a course scheduling and the process in creating one: course scheduling. I have looked up, that schedule is typically used American English and timetable is typically used in British ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Are “embarassing” and “bewildering” synonyms?

The dictionary that I'm using says those meanings are synonyms. Is there no difference between them? I'd also like to know if perplexing could a be synonym of embarassing and bewildering.
-1
votes
2answers
55 views

What do “To confide merrily” and “To take a skinny dip” mean? [on hold]

Please explain what do these phrases ("To confide merrily" and "To take a skinny dip") mean.
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Proud by thinking that one cannot be surprised by what others know

I would like one word for "proud by thinking that one cannot be surprised by what others know". Arrogant is explained as "having or revealing an exaggerated sense of one's own importance or ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

“With whom” vs. “with who” [duplicate]

It suddenly came to my mind that this is quite strange: Obama, with whom I was at school, has just come to live in our street. Who are you hanging out with? Obviously, both sentences are ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Literary term for referring to a future event in the story line

Is there a literary term for when an author refers to something that is going to happen later? I am referring to two usages of this technique. The first is when an author says "as will be explained ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

What does “throw a wrinkle” mean?

What does "throw a wrinkle" mean? Example: "I’ve got a conversation with Jacob later today that may throw a wrinkle in…"
0
votes
4answers
9k views

Better way of saying “this is because”

I am writing the following Previous work on Topic Detection and Tracking (TDT) has achieved great success on full length document, but the techniques has yet to be fully implemented on ...
6
votes
4answers
695 views

'Cultural amnesia' : what does it mean?

I came across this word while browsing and could not browse its definition. I understand amnesia, have heard of retrograde amnesia,but cultural amnesia appears jarring to my mind.
-1
votes
2answers
49 views

What is the meaning of “I could really use a break from this place”? [on hold]

I ask this because I am unable to understand the uses of could and can ?

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