8
votes
7answers
8k views

Is “grammar nazi” politically correct?

I'm not a native English speaker and I'm puzzled where the use of grammar nazi would be appropriate. I have seen it numerous times around the SE network and was wondering when the use would be ...
0
votes
2answers
21 views

What is the word for to agree without questions?

I felt maybe there is an alternate and concise way of saying "She agreed to follow without asking questions ?" in one(or two) word(s) ?
38
votes
2answers
78k views

Which is correct: “rack my brain” or “wrack my brain”?

Which is the correct usage: "rack my brain" or "wrack my brain"? Google turned up pages with conflicting recommendations. One argument is that to "rack a brain" comes from the torture device known ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

One of many (singular or plural)?

What is correct way to structure following sentence? It will be fixed in one of future releases. It will be fixed in one of future release. In this scenario, there will be many releases ...
2
votes
6answers
23k views

“What needs to be done” vs “What is needed to be done”

When you are looking at a task remaining, it seems right to me to say, "what needs to be done" in the simple present tense. I have seen some people write "what is needed to be done." While I don't ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

What do you call someone that believes he is the only living being?

What do you call someone that believes he is actually the only living being and that everyone and everything that exist (besides him self) is a state of his own mind? I am not referring to a ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

“Much as” vs “Much like”

"Much as they had done with her..." "Much like they had done with her..." I was told that the use of "much like" in the second sentence is grammatically wrong. Any explanation is greatly ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

When do words like “Rewirable” keep the 'e' from “Rewire”?

I was spelling "rewirable" earlier and could've sworn it should be spelled 'rewireable' but google said otherwise. Whats the deal here? I never paid a lot of attention in my english classes ...
1
vote
4answers
54 views

Whats the word for an missed event?

I am looking for a fitting end to this sentence: With so many members around I refrained from speaking up and now my wish/plan to have a private conversation with the leader remains ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

where vs in which

I found these sentence in dictionary; A nursery is a place where children who are not old enough to go to school are looked after. I want to know if 'in which' can be used instead of 'where.'
0
votes
2answers
18 views

“(singular) OR (singular)” - plural or singular

Which is correct? "Is MS Office or OpenOffice installed on your computer?" Or "Are MS Office or OpenOffice installed on your computer?" Is this affected by the possibility that both may be ...
8
votes
4answers
26k views

Is 'useable' preferred in certain regions, or just an alternate spelling of 'usable'?

I rarely use spell checkers, but today when I did use one, it suggested changing the word 'useable' to 'usable' (i.e. to drop the first 'e'). This seemed immediately intuitive and I thought I'd just ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

“Being” fall into in this phrase?

...oops, never mind, because we actually just now passed the exact point of ever being able to undo the horrifying effects of climate change. -The Onion What category does the word 'being' fall ...
1
vote
2answers
104 views

Proud by thinking that one cannot be surprised by what others know

I would like one word for "proud by thinking that one cannot be surprised by what others know". Arrogant is explained as "having or revealing an exaggerated sense of one's own importance or ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Idiom or word for someone who opens their mouth and closes their ears in discussions?

Some individuals are not interested in listening to your opinion, and it seems like your idea either has no value to them, or they already know what you are about to say, and they talk over you or ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Number of verbs possible in a single sentence [on hold]

Richard Adams, a consultant for McDonald’s franchisees in San Diego, said Thompson’s departure was a bit of a surprise considering the numerous plans McDonald’s recently announced to turn around its ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

'watch her run' vs 'watch her running' [duplicate]

QUESTION 1 I'm trying to figure out the seemingly subtle difference(s) between a sentence modified by a bare infinitive and one modified by a participle phrase. What do you get out of these: I ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

When spelling, when to say 'double xx' and when 'x x'

This is something I have been wondering for a long time. When you spell (out loud) words that have some consonants doubled, you can say those as "double-X", or not (e.g. Allan: "Ay double-ell ay en" ...
0
votes
3answers
31 views

Two good things put together create a bad thing

I had this word as a vocabulary word in jr high I think. The definition is things that are good individually but bad when put together. I cannot think of the word! The example was ketchup and ice ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Which one is correct? (capitalization of the word president)

Between these two examples, which one would be correct? Specifically, the second line in each example. Would president be capitalized in that instance, or would it be considered a common noun? ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Phrase “In my spare time”

In an office environment answering a customer with the response "I will work on your project in my spare time". I feel there is a more professional way to answer. Suggestions?
1
vote
3answers
25 views

What is the word to describe explanatory person?

What is the word to describe explanatory person who like to explain everything even though they were asked an question which can be answered simply with YES or NO?
0
votes
2answers
23 views

What does fuzzy means in this context?

I am working a narrative which is told by a five year old girl, and somewhere she says "Momma will pluck me out of bed and feed me bacon. I want to ask out loud but my teeth are too fuzzy." I could ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Add “the” before “of” [migrated]

I am confused with the usage of "the" before an of". City of Pain A City of Sadness Why the first example does not add "a" or "the" before the word "city"? Actually, the first one is a ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

“Suffer from” use for non human contexts

Is it normal to use "suffer from" for subjects other than humans? For example is it acceptable to say: "this old building suffer from irregular electricity"
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Explain the quote?

[We command all] Ministers of the so called reformed religion, who do not choose to become converts and to embrace the catholic, apostolic, and roman religion, to leave our kingdom
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Can we use the preposition “for” with the verb “scoot”?

I checked the dictionary and found that I can use 'scoot' with 'off' or 'over' but can I use it with 'for'? Example: Kalya got out of bed and scooted for the toilet
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Is it correct to say someone is in a certain role?

For example, "Is Connie in the role of administrator?"
4
votes
10answers
863 views

Idiom for being stubborn about an opinion

Is there an idiom for the action when someone holds tightly onto his opinion? Like you keep to try convincing that person again and again but he keeps that opinion? I made some research but I ...
7
votes
11answers
2k views

Word that describes both skills and experience together

What is an English word that means together a combination of both experience and innate skills? I thought of the word talent but it conveys much more about skills than experience. I am looking for a ...
-1
votes
4answers
47 views

Long trip for small reward?

There's a German idiom (I think) for a long trip for a small reward. For example, driving from New York to Boston to buy a roast beef sandwich. Has a connotation of taking a trip for the trip's sake. ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

What is the tersest way for a speaker to request from the listener to refrain from making any inferences from a statement of fact?

What is the tersest way for a speaker to request from the listener to refrain from making any inferences from a statement of fact? Suppose as part of a narrative, I want to say something happened ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

is there a word for arguing no one?

I'm wondering if there is a word for when someone is making an argument but there is no one on the other side of the argument. it's like they've made a statement against an opinion, even though no one ...
3
votes
2answers
46 views

what's the difference between “important to” and “important for”?

When do we use important for and important to? What's the rule? For example: It's important to me. Or It's important for me. What's the difference between the two sentences?
0
votes
2answers
49 views

I speak common English. I want to know how to spell a sound I hear people make

When you stick your tongue outside of your mouth, and gently blow it makes a common sound to "say" whatever! or I don't like your answer/response or Yes, you are smarter than I am.
11
votes
7answers
1k views

Is “layman” an offensive term?

Is it offensive to use the term layman nowadays? Does it insinuate that the people to whom you are referring are uneducated? I am wanting to say This is just one of the ways that CERN's research ...
9
votes
12answers
7k views

Term for “Death by Lack of Water”

I don't know if the title is completely appropriate/applicable, but I guess it'll have to do until there's an edit. So a if one dies of starvation, one dies from "suffering or death caused by hunger ...
0
votes
5answers
40 views

What kind of character does a person who makes loud exclamations have?

Here, I am trying to find an adjective to describe a (relatively poor) person who is open but attracts a lot of attention (not attention-seeking though). As an example, I found this video: ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What's the difference between pigment, dye and colorant?

For example, is 'pigment' always solid, 'dye' always liquid, and 'colorant' a general name for the both?
6
votes
4answers
7k views

What is this idiom: “I'm going to start taking names and…”?

There is some idiom that starts out like, "I'm going to start taking names and..." I can't remember the rest of it. What is it and when is it used?
0
votes
2answers
47 views

What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?

Anonymous means someone who can't be identified by name. Pseudonymous means someone who uses false name. It seems to me that Pseudonymous is a subset of Anonymous. Is it right? If not, what's the ...
2
votes
3answers
181 views

Quiet vs Quietly

Is it correct to say “I will lie quiet beneath his touch”? Shouldn’t it be “I will lie quietly beneath his touch”?
3
votes
5answers
278 views

Why do we use back and forward instead of backward and forward?

In some English language user interfaces, both virtual and physical, the words back and forward are used instead of backward and forward. An easy example is the web browser, where the buttons to ...
4
votes
2answers
196 views

RP English pronunciation of 'the', 'this' and so on. Diphtong /əʊ/

I'm learning, that pronunciation of words like 'that', 'this', 'the' and so on is through /ð/ consonant. And I get it. But how native speakers say words like that in everyday speech? While listening ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Plural Noun--Its vs Their

I am trying to determine which sentence is correct. A) Storyboards got their name from the bulletin boards containing cartoon drawings. B) Storyboards got its name from bulletin boards containing ...
2
votes
2answers
115 views

Sorry I didn't turn up, I clean forgot. What's the sense of "clean' and its usage hygiene? [on hold]

Sorry I didn't turn up -I clean forgot. The explosion blew the cooker clean through the wall. What kind of usage is this- AmE or BrE ? The meaning of clean usually refers to removing ...
41
votes
9answers
15k views

Is it “alright” or “allright”?

In practice I find both spellings being used. From a logical point of view, "allright" (as in: "all's right — everything is fine") seems correct. However, I recall hearing that "alright" is the ...
50
votes
5answers
6k views

“Here's looking at you, kid” meaning?

I'm sure many will know Rick's famous line from the film Casablanca: Here's looking at you, kid. While I can guess at it, I was never fully confident about the meaning of this phrase. I am not ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Is the sentence given below an example of syntactic ambiguity?

The shelf can support a heavier load compared to the others. Would this sentence be considered ambiguous? To me, the pronoun others could refer to either other shelves or other loads, but I wanted to ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

“predicted at” vs “predicted for”

If you are trying to say that a bus will arrive some time in the future do you use "predicted at 2pm" or "predicted for 2pm"?

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