0
votes
2answers
15 views

“feel the urge” vs “have the urge”

Which of the following options is correct/would you chose? "I have the urge to say something" or"I feel the urge to say something"?
-4
votes
5answers
81 views

Is there a short, preferably monosyllabic, intransitive verb that means “to be absent”?

My internal thesaurus seems to have a weak point and I don't know what search terms to enter in an on-line thesaurus for this one: Is there a short, preferably monosyllabic, verb that means "to be ...
12
votes
3answers
220 views

Is there a word for “a person from another race”?

I am searching for a word that means ‘of another race’ to be used in context of a sentence such as "She was deeply protective to her [of other race], foster children." "They shunned the ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Functionality is working “fine” or “as expected”

Here the functionality is related with web Site responses. Now I'm looking for a sentence which would be preferable when, ABC functionality was not working before, (Explanation of some work ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

What do you call a person from New Zealand?

This Question made me think of what you would call people from New Zealand. With Australian people it's quite clear, you can say One Australian, two Australians But with people from New Zealand? ...
2
votes
6answers
1k views

What is a verb meaning “bringing out emotion within someone?”

For example: when you are listening to a song and a piece of it moves you emotionally. What verb could be used to describe the "vivification" of that emotion?
4
votes
3answers
345 views

Does “Hang a Shingle” refer only to lawyers starting their own business?

I guess I've only heard it used to refer to lawyers. Is the term exclusive to lawyers?
0
votes
1answer
67 views

“am/remain/stay” as linking verbs or not

(1) I am here. [linking verb or not?] (2) I remain here. [linking verb or not?] (3) I stay here. [linking verb or not?] (1') I am angry. [linking verb] (2') I remain angry. ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Under what kind of conditions is a past time adjunct allowed for in experiential perfects?

In CGEL p.144 the author says about experiential perfects This use of the present perfect allows for the inclusion, under restrictive conditions, of a past time adjunct: iia) We've already ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

I'll come sometime end of March

Is this sentence correct: I'll come sometime end of March. The expected meaning should be, I'll come end of march but exact date is not known yet.
18
votes
6answers
2k views

Is there any all-purpose opposite for “in person”?

I'm looking for a term or single word that can be used as the opposite of "in person" in situations we might be involved in a given activity without our direct (physical) presence, like: Taking ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

When to use 'is' and 'has'?

I have a question ,where to use is and has. Examples: 1. Tea boy is come or tea has come 2. Lunch is ready or has ready 3. He is come back or he has come back. 4. She is assigned for work or she has ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Until i met you or meet you

I'm in a process of an arranged marriage. I met her very recently and I really love her. I told her once that I'm unlucky because I was interested in love marriage and I didn't get it. So I want to ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Restrictive vs Non-restrictive Relative Clause

Can you tell me the difference in the meaning of the two sentences below? As a defining relative clause. The location which was called Central Park was a park in New York. As a non-defining ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

did not think he would steal some

a. I did not think he would steal some of my ideas. b. I did not think he would steal certain of my ideas. Could these sentences have two meanings: I did not think he would steal any of my ideas. ...
-1
votes
1answer
15 views

Which of the two is grammatically correct?

'Remind me to tell you about my favorite movies' 'Remind me to tell you my favorite movies' Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct? and why?
3
votes
4answers
116 views

What is implied by the bold sentences?

Malfoy : “But this is servant stuff, it’s not for students to do. I thought we’d be copying lines or something, if my father knew I was doing this, he’d —” Hagrid : “— tell yer that’s how ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

So, in connected speech, we can only connect A with B if A is “a strong or weak word” & B is “a weak word”, right?

I discovered this rule in connected speech. I asked this question many times but seem no one has a proper answer. See this saying at 11:45 in this video "My room is on the fifth floor. I had to walk ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Suspension or suspensions

What is the difference between suspension and suspensions? I know suspensions is the plural form for dispersion but in what circumstances the word "suspensions" can be used in a sentence. ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Single word for “personal vocabulary”

I find that I have a sort of "personal dictionary" of words that I like to use. I use "salient" a lot. I use "hence", "perhaps", "incapable", "fortuitous" frequently. I store a sort of "cache" of ...
9
votes
6answers
4k views

Is there such thing as an online preposition dictionary?

Is there such a thing as an online preposition dictionary? For example, I want to use the word "interpretation" but I am not sure of its preposition. I don't know if the correct preposition should ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Meaning of “False Positive”

My question title itself is self explanatory. Can any explain what "false positive" means? I got this word usage from one of my clients in bug report. Can anyone explain with usage in layman's ...
0
votes
4answers
171 views

Can the word petrify be used correctly in the sentences below?

Can the word petrify be used correctly in the sentences below? He was petrified with exhaustion! He was so petrified he slept without moving a muscle.
0
votes
2answers
19 views

The person whom to be accompanied? Or the person to accompany to?

Accompanying guests must enter the name and ID number of the person whom to be accompanied. Accompanying guests must enter the name and ID number of the person to accompany to. The name and ...
0
votes
2answers
117 views

Phrases using the Arabic particle “al” as a separate word apart from “Al Qaeda” and “Al Jazeera”

Many words incorporated into English a long time ago have the Arabic particle "al" incorporated into them. For example, "algebra" and "alcohol". But does English have commonly used phrases with the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “I Hope All goes well” Appropriate here?

Is the response for this dialog appropriate or even correct with "I hope all goes well with your project"? (the conversation happened through text message, so I believe it wasn't very formal) ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

meaning of “un-work”

Does "un-work" imply "to be null and without action" in the following contexts? So art’s function within the context of urbanity is to facilitate, as Kwon puts it, a ‘critical unsiting’. In ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

On words related to commone root: awe

My question is: How come the three words "awesome," "awe," and "awe-inspiring" denote positivism with the root awe, they are virtuous too,but the 4th word "awful" denotes negativity. Even the spelling ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Word for knowing what one wants to do, but not knowing how to do it

I often imagine my dream softwares, but I do not know how to program them into reality. What words, that are more fitting than impotent and ignorant, are there for a practical, non-verbal "tip of the ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Can anyone correct my grammar mistakes and sentences? [on hold]

My weekend was not good because I had to make my resume till Monday so I was busy with my work, otherwise I had planned to go for a movie with my brother in law but because of my work I cancelled the ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

Common Noun vs Proper Noun

I'm proofing language for a proposed statute change and am confused about whether or not the word Program needs to be capitalized throughout the document. Lots of questions... A Health Professionals ...
5
votes
3answers
140 views

What does “a bit of a tartar” mean?

Recently, a woman I know who lives in England (OK, she's my fiancee, if you want to know), wrote to me and described someone she knows as "a bit of a tartar". Now in context it seemed like a friendly ...
1
vote
4answers
56 views

What is the difference between “perpetrator” and “transgressor”? [on hold]

I don't quite understand when one might be applied, but not the other. Also, is anyone who committed a transgression a transgressor, or might they also be perpetrators? Does it make a difference? ...
5
votes
4answers
308 views

Do you capitalize “My Queen” in dialogue?

I've seen some questions discussing the capitalization of "queen" in general, but I'm wondering if you would ever capitalize the "my" in "my queen," particularly in a line of dialogue such as "Very ...
5
votes
0answers
177 views

“Alcoholic” doesn't rhyme with “melancholic.” Why?

According to Merriam-Webster, the pronunciation of alcoholic is "ˌal-kə-ˈhȯ-lik, -ˈhä-" while the pronunciation of melancholic is "ˌme-lən-ˈkä-lik." OK, the title is an exaggeration: they can rhyme ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

for + period of time + present continuous/past perfect tense

What is the difference between (1) I've taken antibiotics for 10 weeks. (2) I've been taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (3) I'm taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (4) I take antibiotics for 10 weeks. ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

“engineer of” or “Engineer in”

What is the correct expression when we want to say :The Grade of someone is: Engineer of Applied Sciences & Information Technology. or Engineer in Applied Sciences & Information ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

What is “school annex”? [on hold]

Could you please explain what does the following expression mean: school annex I saw a building with this title on the front. However, I cannot figure out what it is exactly, and how does it ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Whether one could use the verb drink with ice-cold tea?

I have a feeling that we need to say "I took my tea [or coffee]", instead of saying "I drank my tea" since tea is consumed hot, you take it and not drink it. If the above impression that I carry is ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Whether words like thou, thee, etc. from old English can be used by a poet or a fiction writer? [on hold]

Whether words like thou, thee, etc. from old English can be used by a poet or a fiction writer to add a suitable color to the spiritual or romantic conversation. I write poetry in English. Although ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

quote within a quote and apostrophe

say I have a quote within a quote, and inside of the inner quote there is a sentence with a plural possessive, so that there is an apostrophe after the "s." how do I distinguish between the apostrophe ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Language school & language institute

I'm a non-native English speaker in Iran. Here we have schools to which students go to learn about different subjects such as math, history and English. We have institutes (or at least we call them ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Does “The UK” mean the state or its citizens?

When I have expressed criticism towards the UK government saying The EU policy is crystal clear ... The UK as usual in their bizarre anti freedom ways and I got an (obviously) UK citizen pissed ...
4
votes
2answers
61 views

Is there a kind of “official” dictionary for the English language?

Context On languages having an Academy (I know it's not the English case thanks to this SE site) it's usual that those academies edit and maintain a kind of official dictionary for that language. ...
-1
votes
0answers
22 views

Countable singular nouns not preceded by any articles in some circumstances, What could be the reasons?

Occasionally, It can be noticed that even countable singular nouns are not preceded by any articles, especially for book or article titles or song names, What could be the reason for writers to ignore ...
3
votes
5answers
10k views

Usage of 'at' and 'in' for cities

As per my understanding, 'at' can be used for streets and specific address etc. and 'in' has to be used for cities. For eg. at Suite 101, Johnshon Avenue in London. But I see in a prominent ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

English equivalent for “matrimonial bed”

I just heard that some romance languages (e.g., Spanish and Italian) use a word that translates directly as "matrimonial bed" and basically means a queen- or king- sized, as far as I can tell. Does ...
2
votes
6answers
466 views

Is there a term for when just by saying that something is broken and showing it to someone fixes the issue?

This seems to be a common enough occurrence that it would merit its own phrase. I imagine it might be some sort of subset of Murphy's Law. But it's specific enough that Murphy's Law doesn't quite ...
6
votes
2answers
83 views

Etymology: predicament

Can anyone explain how predicament from the Latin word family dicere ‘to say’ and praedicare, can develop the meaning precarious situation? Etymonline can't. early 15c., "category, class; one of ...
2
votes
1answer
302 views

Interview, taking, giving, being interviewed

So what is correct to use in the context of the interview? (If one is an interviewee) I am taking an interview. I am giving an interview. I am being interviewed. (If one is an interviewer) I am ...

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