0
votes
1answer
13 views

Prediction / Foreshadow verb

What is a way to say "as you _____ mentioned" where _____ is meant to convey that the person correctly predicted / foreshadowed your response?
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Please identify the independent clause/s in this sentence

I am trying to understand where the independent clause/s are in the following sentence: However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else?

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
0
votes
1answer
6 views

I'm making sport live score application and I have a question

I'm making sport live score application and I have a question My application has many page for show live score and it has some page no any match playing. What sentences should i use ? No any match ...
4
votes
2answers
251 views

Does “avail” make sense here?

My colleagues in India frequently use "avail" to mean "use" or "take advantage of" as in the following example: Avail our special offer for this event. I have never seen "avail" used in the manner; ...
1
vote
2answers
13 views

What is an antonym for “prior” that is shorter than “subsequent?”

In a software application, two drop-down lists are presented. The first is labeled "relative period" and is populated with "Prior," "Current," and "Subsequent." The second list is labeled "interval" ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Non-finite Adjectival Clause or Adverbial Clause

I came across the following grammatical terms and example sentences on Wikipedia: As an adjectival phrase modifying a noun phrase that is the object of a verb, provided the verb admits this ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Learn faster English grammar [on hold]

For English is a second language in my country, but I'm really hard to write as official letter or email to someone or home as a higher level. That would be very nice if get the advise on how to ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Usage: “Having children by/from different fathers”?

In the phrase having children by/from different fathers, is by British usage, and from American usage? The collocation with by, I could find in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, but the ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Name of the quality of the bad sound that you have in Skype

When you talk through the internet by using some programs like Skype or Hangout, the quality of the sound may not be good. What is the name of that quality? There are some idea in my mind, but I don't ...
3
votes
3answers
292 views

When to say “a proof”, “the proof” and just “proof”?

My friend asked to check his work, and he had written: I think Asimov is proof that being prolific is at least as valuable as being talented. He writes simply is proof. Did he write correctly ...
0
votes
2answers
19 views

What is it called when you use something in a sentence that will be replaced? [duplicate]

For example say I have this sentence: The following sentence uses ________: You can find the program in [DOWNLOAD_DIRECTORY] where [DOWNLOAD_DIRECTORY] is your default download directory. ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Did I stress the words correctly in this sentence?

I have this sentence: "Keep your voice down!" I'm not sure how native speakers pronounce it, but I would put a bit of stress on "Keep" and more stress on "voice" "2Keep your 1voice down!". I don't ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What's the accent of this narration?

The person narrating in the attached MP3 link sounds like a good narrator, but I was wondering what his English accent is. It's difficult for me to say because I am not a native English speaker. Is ...
-1
votes
0answers
59 views

What do you call the phenomenon when a negative reflection is favored over a positive one?

Is there a word or expression which expresses the idea of a bias towards a negative reflection (e.g. negative judgement/criticism) rather than a positive one (e.g. appreciation/supporting comment)? As ...
3
votes
4answers
45 views

A fraction of something

Does "a fraction of something" always imply less than one unit? Or could it be 4/3 for example?
2
votes
4answers
7k views

What's the meaning for 'de' in “Tour de France”?

What's the exact meaning for 'de' in Tour de France? Can I describe an riding event like 'Tour de Hainan Island'? Assuming I riding around Hainan island by cycling.
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Question concerning the meaning of the word SHUTFACE

I have a question concerning the location of the vehicle safety certification label in a certain car. The corresponding user's manual says: "A vehicle safety certification label is attached to the ...
-1
votes
1answer
189 views

One of the 'Organisation' or 'Organisations'

I am writing an essay and stuck with the following sentence. One of the non-profit organisation that we worked with... Should organisation be plural or singular?
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What does “independent” bind to in this sentence?

Which of the following two sentences is correct? A is valid independent of B. A is valid independently of B. In other words, does independent bind to "are" or "valid"? I tend towards the first ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Period and Colon

Which of these is correct (The word manager is abbreviated to Mgr): Your Line Mgr: OR Your Line Mgr.:
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Shalln't vs. Shan't in British English

I am a British English speaker and often use "shall" and "shall not". When I contract "shall not", I pronounce it [ʃɑlnt] -- that is, the "l" sound remains. My question, therefore, is how do I spell ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

How much is the Indian english different from British English? [on hold]

Some people in India speak English but there's differences. But to what extent does it differ in grammar speech .. etc.? I choose to compare it with British English what do you think about this? in ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Name for the practice of composing sentences for ease and clarity of pronunciation?

Is there a name for the practice of composing sentences in such a way that they don't contain proximate consonants which cause difficulty when read aloud? For example: Under this criteria, "dogs and ...
0
votes
3answers
57 views

Linguistic term for all existing words

I really didn't know how to name this thread so I apologize about it. My question is: what is the linguistic term that refers globally to the words "vocabulary", "words", "phrases", "collocations", ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Is “If you be…” correct? [duplicate]

Are the "If you be my everything..." and "If I be wrong" structures correct? Thank you for the answers!
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Can verb 'grant' be used with preposition 'with?'

Could someone explain to me if the word 'grant' can be used with 'with' and what it means? (I checked with many dictionaries, but couldn't find an example used in that way.) example sentence in an ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Slang word or term for WWII food ration stamps?

Does anyone know of a slang word or term that was used for food ration stamps in WWII?
5
votes
4answers
732 views

How did the word “chunter” come about?

Did it arise from a mixture of chattering and murmuring?
-1
votes
2answers
103 views

“Apply” and the passive voice

I have a sentence like this. I applied this method to the problem. I want "the problem" to be the subject of the sentence. If "this method" were the subject, this might be very easy. This ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

DIfference between 'cause' and 'causation'? [on hold]

I think they mean the same, but still is there a difference between them?
3
votes
2answers
89 views

“Aged” vs. “Aging” to describe someone's age

I'm just wondering if we can also use the word aging when describing someone's age as in this example: The study included participants aging 20 to 50.
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Quoting title with a question and ellipsis

I need to quote a title which contains both an ellipsis and question mark. I am unsure how I should punctuate the sentence. Note that because of a particular style guide, I must also italicise the ...
1
vote
3answers
104 views

Difference between “Registration” and “Enrollment”

I'm developing a scholar system which I have to support english(and others) language. This system haves an "Enrollment" proccess. I've called it as "Enrollment" after some research because I could not ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

What is the meaning of the comma in this case? [duplicate]

He rides a bike reading the book. (with no comma between bike and reading) He rides a bike, reading the book. (with a comma between bike and reading) In the sentence above, What is the ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

The Usage of “ask”

Are the sentences below correct? I asked "Please send me some money." Can you use ask in direct discourse? John: What did you ask Tom? Megan: I asked "leave me alone." Can you omit the ...
4
votes
2answers
106 views

What Kind of Connotations are Associated with the word 'Bruv'?

I encountered the slang word 'bruv' for the first time not long ago while playing Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel. The word is used quite a lot by a genius scientist character named Gladstone Katoa, but ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

suburb to city?

The following sentence is taken from Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary: Today most commutes were not suburb to city but from one suburb to another. What interests me is the use of un-inflected ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

When do I use “hours” and “o'clock” in a programming document?

When do I have to use hours and o'clock in a programming document? For example, I have to show that the program runs at 23:45, should I use o'clock or hours? I used hours but my manager says that ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Imparted vs Imputed

so I am a bit confused by the meaning of the two words: imparted and imputed. I know impart means to give or to communicate something. Impute means to ascribe. However, I dont know how can i ...
0
votes
3answers
61 views

Rules for verb usage

I'm fairly new to the world of linguistics and this is my first post in this forum. I've been helping a friend to learn English and one of her questions has me stumped, even as a native speaker. She ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

Question about usage of the article “the” [duplicate]

Although I have learned English for over 20 years, using articles is still confusing for me. Sometimes I do'nt understand why the is used like in these cases: Shoot for the stars -> This is ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Do I use “has” or “have” when talking about a sports team? [duplicate]

For example, if I want to talk about a team's chances of winning a competition, which of these would be correct? What do I say? United have the best chance of winning. United has the best ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

What's the difference between “Speakers of English” and “English speakers”?

What's the difference between "Speakers of English" and "English speakers"?
4
votes
1answer
609 views

What does the prefix iso- mean in “isolate”?

My question is referring to the prefix iso- and its meaning in the word isolate. My question is, if the prefix means equal, how does that make sense in the word isolate?
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Could “Give in” mean “Hand over”?

Give in = hand in but does give in = hand over? and which of them are equal? and what's the differences?
2
votes
4answers
479 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
5
votes
2answers
127 views

What might this example teach us about singular “they”?

I just now encountered the following sentence in a student paper: Any new parents that have adopted a child of a different race generally embrace their biological parents[’] race. Having ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Interest ( someone ) in ( something )

This phrasal verb means to persuade someone when we try offering something. Examples : Can I interest you in coffee? Can I interest you in having a special relationship between us? Do native ...

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