0
votes
0answers
9 views

“All the more so” - correct use:

Is this sentence correct: "If this was true fifty years ago, it must be all the more so in modern times" Did I use the expression "all the more so" correctly in this sentence? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Is “will open 1st quarter 2015” grammatically correct?

A lot of signs in the Hong Kong MTR writes: xxx Station will open 1st quarter of 2015 Is this actually grammatically correct?
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Enhance Vocabulary

Hello Can anyone tell me the book/vedio links or texts to enhance my english vocabulary.I know english so do not require begineer lessons. I want to find sources where evry word is explained with ...
0
votes
1answer
6 views

What does 'at X's disposition' mean?

What is the meaning of "at their/his/her disposition"? For example: He left the apartment at the old's man disposition. Please explain with a few examples.
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Cloud nine Vs. Dante's Inferno!

I looked for the expression to be on cloud nine on Etymonline; it is stated 'of uncertain origin or significance'. ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

The correct terms for mobile phones

What is the correct term for stopping a conversation on a mobile. In the old days we used to "put the phone down". Do we now "put the mobile down" or do we "turn off" or switch off" even though the ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

When did corruption, bribery, easy money start to be associated with rot, decay -hence death in English?

E.g. the expressions the rotten boroughs or pocket boroughs used in 19th century Britain to refer to undemocratic practices in the electoral system back then. Also, I'm looking for similar ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

Please help me with my grammar and punctuations please

We are really excited for your visit here in the Philippines. We are all very grateful and blessed that you are here to comfort us, especially the victims of calamity in our region and for selecting ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

Where I should put a comma in this sentence?

where I should put a comma in this sentence? Thank you for inspiring us to be a better servant of God.
-1
votes
0answers
8 views

Can the comma be used after the word or?

Which of the following is correct? The glory is gone. Or, is it? The glory is gone; or is it?
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

Why does “raptor” not contain an apostrophe?

Why is the word raptor not written as 'raptor when used as the abbreviated name for velociraptor?
-2
votes
1answer
16 views

Statement grammar problem

" I found this when I sweep my room. " Any grammatical mistakes in this statement?
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Newton's first law, unless + past participle

I was reading Newton's first law: An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

year olds or year-olds

I am writing about some leadership stuff, and I am trying to say that I am leading the 14-15 year old boys. How do I correctly use year-olds as in I was the adviser to the 14-15 year-olds. Thanks in ...
-4
votes
1answer
19 views

can 'just do 8' instead of 'just do it' ? in daily usage, something like '4' instead of 'for'

In daily usage, if 'just do 8' can instead of 'just do it', I mean if other people read the it will feeling weird, the situation similar to '4' instead of 'for' But in my case, the 8 & it will be ...
-3
votes
1answer
32 views

What does the world Hella means? [on hold]

I have heard this word many times on movies but I could barely understand the meaning. does anyone here know the meaning? thanks!
2
votes
0answers
14 views

Allophones of /ə/

In (non-rhotic) British English there seem to be two major allophones of the phoneme /ə/. The first which can be heard in potato, career or the weak form of from as an [ə]. However, there's also a ...
1
vote
2answers
24 views

Word for “the little chores” in life

I'm looking for a noun which roughly means "the little chores" in life, something similar to mundane tasks (such as fetching groceries, doing the laundry, etc), but a bit more generic than "errand". ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Meaning of the phrase “you're a caution”

I have encountered the phrase "you're a caution" in a movie in a suggestive, possibly judgmental context. How is this to be understood and where does it come from?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

How do I best explain what it means to lose an hour or to gain an hour when traveling across time zones or entering DST?

When we travel east and cross a timezone boundary, we enter an area where the local time is 1 hr ahead. We say we've lost 1 hr. Conversely, when we travel west and cross a timezone boundary, we enter ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Phrasing improvement for cover letter [on hold]

"Extracurricular, as leader of my bachelor university's student consultancy and Head of Fundraising of the Finance Society I enjoyed taking leadership and responsibility for a team and accounted for ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

“Personal Letter”, is that “Personal letter from me” or “Personal letter to you”?

I have received a number of emails this christmas, all saying they're a "personal letter". They're all from past online accounts, like online learning services and similar. I started to ponder the ...
-2
votes
1answer
36 views

Inspiring Catch Phrase for Very Important Goal [on hold]

Leadership systems and self improvement software ask users to draft and achieve goals. But they can't just call them goals because these systems really want their users to think hard about what is ...
-2
votes
1answer
21 views

along with / together with / put together

The new Christmas card [along with / together with] the letter has to be sent out. When I was writing a short message to my little sister, MewMew. I came up with a few questions: 1. if I use "has", ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

Should I use a colon or not?

I am not certain whether I need to use an additional colon in the following sentence: As a result, you get a Managerial Framework: This document answers questions such as Who is in charge? Why ...
2
votes
1answer
116 views

Origin of “you have nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide”?

What is the origin of the phrase You have nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide. I see it occasionally bounced around, sometimes as an authoritarian slogan. Brief research indicates some ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Difference between “come up with” and “come across” a question

I was writing an email to the principal of my former school, and I [came up with / had come across] a question: "Shall I write "Merry Christmas" or "Happy New Year" at the end of the letter?" ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What tense should I use?

My native language isn't English. What tense should I use to describe some actions/activities: present simple or present continuous? I don't mean actions/activities that are happening right now. For ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

What is a better word for “treatment” in the given statement?

When I try to convert from English to Russian the following statement: If you are going to contact someone you should use either his or her exact name or the common form of treatment. then Bing ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

emerging vs new

I wonder if it is possible to place "emerging" and "new" on the relative timeline. Can we say that something "emerged" at first and the become "new" ? If not, is the contrary valid? For example, ...
3
votes
4answers
459 views

If it's incorrect to “learn” someone, then why is “learned man” correct?

I am well aware that "learn" is incorrect when used as "teach" (referenced in Is 'learn' the new 'teach'?). So why is "learned" common fare, since it is apparently just a participial ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Usage of the phrase 'what the point is to do'

I know that the following expression exists in English: There is no point in doing something. This means, it is pointless to do something because something is a waste of time or requires more ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Great Vowel Shift reversed. Is it appropriate? In what region this accent is typical?

I have been just pointed out that Google translator's GB English speaker pronounces vowels quite differently from the language standard. I made a comparison with Lingvo Online dictionary, which has ...
-4
votes
1answer
30 views

Which one should I use: in or at?

Which one do you think is correct? He was in charge of health informatics in an ophthalmology clinic. or He was in charge of health informatics at an ophthalmology clinic. I personally ...
4
votes
3answers
198 views

Is there a relationship between “boxing” (sport) and “box” (packaging)? [on hold]

How is boxing (the sport) related to box (packaging)? Is there a relationship between the words which I am not aware of?
1
vote
2answers
28 views

You do not need to take further action/s. Action or actions?

Okay, so this as been a great bother for me over the years. As a general rule of thumb, I usually follow this format: using "a" for singular and none for plural. Like so, You do not need to take ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Past Simple vs. Past Progressive

I've been noticing in conversations that people often use past or present or future progressive where I would normally use past, present or future simple. I know some rules about interrupted actions ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

What is the word for when people use associative words for technical terms?

Examples: the word "canned" is used for multiple items within a list "breadcrumbs" is used for specifying a part of a webpage used for navigation on the site "bootstrap" is used for start up (an ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

When to use named and called? [duplicate]

I am writing my Statement of Purpose. I am writing a sentence such as I moved to a small town called Falmouth where I .... Should I use named or called? I moved to a small town named ...
-2
votes
1answer
43 views

confused about using “as much” at the beginning of sentence

I want to know if this sentence is correct or not: As much interesting it was to do it, it was twice destructive to .... or should I write as much as interesting it was to ...., it was twice ...
-3
votes
1answer
45 views

Use of 'u' instead of 'you' - to what extent it is widespread now? [on hold]

I wonder what is the statistics on the usage of "u" instead of "you"?
3
votes
4answers
54 views

Possessives & Compound Construction

I came across the following sentence while reading "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. Is it correct Everybody in town’s father was playing, it seemed, except Atticus. Or it should be rephrased ...
2
votes
4answers
113 views

What do you call a person who doesn't believe in something but still saying things about it?

What do you call a person who doesn't believe in something but still saying things about it? For example let's say Mario doesn't believe in God (he is an atheist) and something bad happens to Mario ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Origin of Jessie

What's the origin of the name Jessie referring to an effeminate, weak, or cowardly boy or man. Since English is a gender neutral language, it strikes me as curious to see the female name Jessie ...
-4
votes
0answers
24 views

“PRO REACH” can we use this to indicate professional reaching out to somebody? [on hold]

"PRO REACH" can we use this to indicate professional reaching out to needy businessman .. O want to make it in one sentence .. PROfessional REACH out => PRO REACH .. is this make good English??
-3
votes
2answers
25 views

How do you write “outprioritize”?

I often hear "outprioritize" spoken, like: Request X outprioritizes request Y But it's not a word, so how should it be written? Out prioritize? Out-prioritize? Neither?
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense?

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
-2
votes
2answers
41 views

Not oxymoron or paradox [on hold]

What do you call one word that is contradictory? It is not an oxymoron or a paradox. I can never remember the term!
1
vote
2answers
35 views

Can the phrase “take it with a grain of salt” have four different ways to get to the same meaning?

Frequently in my workplace, when some bad news comes in, the advice take this with a grain of salt is used in such a context to mean choose for yourselves how to interpret this but don't consider it ...
1
vote
3answers
42 views

What does “freighted” mean in the context?

(Talking about paying more for expedited access in an airport and amusement park...) Expedited access to the Revenge of Mummy thrill ride may be spiritually morally less freighted than privileged ...

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