0
votes
0answers
3 views

What's the grammatically correct way to say the following sentence?

"I have studied a few psychology books which helps me understand the needs of each user". Should it be "which have helped me" or are both correct depending on the meaning ?
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Are “gadfly” and “gadabout” related?

A recent question prompted the answer of "gadabout" - which made me think of "gadfly". Are the two related? If so, which gave rise to the other; or, did they occur contemporaneously? What's a "gad"? ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Either/Or Usage

I want to know how I should use "Either/Or" when the clauses are of different grammatical forms. For example, in: The click is either followed by no further clicks for 30 seconds or the last click ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Is this line correct? [on hold]

Is it corrct if I use this line- "I have not that sort of brain." I have a little bit confusion about that.
1
vote
0answers
42 views

“If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?

I am reading The Code of Hammurabi translated by Robert Francis Harper. Many times there are sentences in the format "if one do this, some action shall be done". Here's an example: If a son strike ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Speaker in front of mic

A word for person who is very profound when speaking in front of mic ,or else a good speaker in front of mic.
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

Writing a letter for someone else, how to address it in the body of the letter

When writing a letter for someone else and stating it on the letter, do we continue the body of the letter as if the person I am writing it for is the one writing it?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

“See these guys [infinitive]” vs. “see these guys [present participle]”

Which is correct: I am excited to see these guys growing up. or I am excited to see these guys grow up. Having hard time figuring out how to use gerunds in a sentence.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Is there an unambiguous term for “singer or band”?

Say you want to ask someone what their favorite "music-creating entity was", but in more eloquent terms. iTunes just uses "artist", but out of context that term is very ambiguous. I don't really like ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

How is the word 'but' used in the famous quote 'What is life but a series of inspired follies?'

The full quote attributed to George Bernard Shaw: What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn't come every day. I ...
3
votes
5answers
42 views

Word for future collaboration that isn't guaranteed to happen

What word could I use to describe a future project or collaboration that isn't guaranteed to happen? I was emailing someone that I had talked with very briefly about collaborating on a project ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde

Kudde, Couth, is there an english farmers word that resembles Kudde. Kudde means herd, flock, fold, drove, livestock, and bevy. So I'm looking for a word that means something along the lines of ...
1
vote
2answers
21 views

a thousandS years tradition

A thousands year old tradition "a thousand year old" tradition, would mean only a 1000 years, but I'm not sure we could use the plural form in this expression. I'm looking for an adjective that ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is the sense of “news tip” in contact pages [on hold]

In which sense we can read "news tip" on contact pages like: http://reversemortgagedaily.com/contact/ https://upside.com/pages/contact.aspx which meaning can i pick from dictionary to understand ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

What does “the bully pulpit has splintered” mean?

The article of New York Times (April 29) written by a former White House speechwriter, David Litt under the headline,” What it’s like to write jokes for President Obama” wraps up with the following ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Combining forms of country names

For the names of various countries, we have combining forms, e.g.: England -> Anglo- France -> Franco- Russia -> Russo- China -> Sino- India -> Indo- These seem to be used in two major contexts: ...
-1
votes
2answers
20 views

Meaning of word with definite article the for a facebook page? [on hold]

Decorating cake is my hobby and am planning create a facebook page and a website to showcase this. Just listing out some names, can you please give me your feedback about these names? Cake Fairy Vs ...
0
votes
2answers
12 views

Would you ever use “closed-loop” as an adjective without a hyphen?

Is it correct to use "closed-loop" as an adjective without a hyphen? Example: Partners can serve as a recycling hub and sell the products in their stores, telling a closed-loop story. Our ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What's the Military Term for Standing for Extended Periods of Time?

Dad and I are having a conversation about this. Perhaps Inspection?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Where do the commas go? [on hold]

Here's a specific phrase I just wrote, but I'm not sure where the commas should go: " One thing we do need implemented into the login system that we need for datalayer stuff, is a way to pull out the ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Why do words like mean (in the context of '__ means ___') require an s?

I am trying to help a friend of mine from Thailand with his English, and before I correct his usage of 'mean' I'd like to be able to explain the why and wherefore of what I am telling him. He often ...
4
votes
1answer
28 views

What is the word for the gesture when someone takes three fingers and kisses it into the air?

You often see this with Italians, especially when complimenting some food they just ate, but it has evolved into a more universal gesture. Take the thumb, index, and middle finger, gather them ...
2
votes
2answers
49 views

If everyone in the world were a clone, would OPINIONS be considered OBJECTIVE?

Simplified Core Issue of Question: Do matters of opinion always fall under the umbrella of "subjective" by default? Original Question: If everyone in the world were an identical clone, then would ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Does “As much as possible” in a question needs an example?

Hello I am developing a questionnaire and I am using a sentence: "Do you plan to start to take the stairs as much as possible? (For example you would consider taking stairs instead of taking a lift ...
15
votes
3answers
648 views

What was “Herbal Tea” called before ‘tea’ was introduced in Europe?

I recently got in a discussion with a colleague, about herbal tea not being a correct term, as it contains no tea. Instead, one ought to use the term herbal infusions. Tea (dried leaves from the tea ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

“Are you a man or a mouse” phrase origin

Robert Burns associated the fates of mice and men in his poem "To a Mouse" (1785): The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, But this seems to suggest that mice and men have a ...
-1
votes
2answers
31 views

Laid vs. Lain in This Sentence

Which past participle would fit best in the following sentence? I've always struggled with this one. The idea that had presented itself during the meeting had plagued him all night, and he'd ____ ...
0
votes
2answers
17 views

Meaning of “go to!” as an (old) exclamation

I'm reading (well listening to an audio book really) Ivanhoe (19th century) and there are some old expressions and words that have rather fallen out of modern use. Most of them I can google, but the ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Punctuation for nested quotes at the end of a sentence

This is something I've gone back and forth on with a couple of writer friends and nobody is ever really sure what the correct punctuation format is, or whether there really is a format that's ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

certain (humorous) quote about revision of an organization’s bylaws

I’m looking for a certain (humorous) quote that goes something like: “The demise of an organization begins when it revises its bylaws.” After 15 minutes of googling for it, I have given up and am ...
1
vote
4answers
44 views

Synonyms for “walking on thin ice”

It's tough to find synonyms for whole phrases as opposed to single words. I'm trying to think of at least a couple for "walking on thin ice." So far the only one I've come up with is "playing a ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Suggest Indirect speech

Please tell me what will be the indirect speech of this sentence The boys shouted, "Don boscho school well played?"
4
votes
2answers
76 views

Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?

This is a follow-up to this question: Why is "violated" being used as future perfect with a person as the object? At that question, it was established that there is a jargon/slang usage of ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Use of pronouns her

Which is correct English? Jane's mother taught Jane to keep herself clean. Or Jane's mother taught her to keep herself clean.
3
votes
0answers
66 views

How should I use “so” and“ too” for implying “That's also true for me” in this example?

This is a conversation between two friends, one is 30 the other is 25. They are speaking about their school time: First conversation: A: Do you remember Mr. X? He was my English teacher. B: ...
9
votes
12answers
721 views

Word to describe someone who goes to all the events in town!

I'm looking for a short word that could describe people who are always going to every event in town. It doesn't need to be an existing word, feel free to create one of your own. It can also be made of ...
-3
votes
1answer
22 views

Do you use the word 'overwhelmingly' or 'extremely' often? [on hold]

Do you use the word 'overwhelmingly' or 'extremely' often? Overwhelmingly vs Extremely?
1
vote
3answers
41 views

What's the opposite of reckless? [on hold]

What is an adjective to describe someone who is the opposite of reckless other than 'cautious' or 'careful'?
4
votes
3answers
53 views

What is the opposite of indented (because “exdent[ed]” appears not to be a word)?

I've always used the word "exdented" when describing a paragraph of text (or, more usually, a section of computer code) where the first line is set further left than the remainder of the ...
-3
votes
0answers
18 views

every boy and every girl singular/plural verb [on hold]

a/''Every boy and every girl has to do this homework.' b/ Every boy and every girl have to do this homework.
2
votes
1answer
12 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Using “beau geste” as an opposite of sin

Beau geste defined here seems to be a noble act and from what I know to be the definition of sin, which has the word "immoral" in it, "beau geste" should be its antonym. Even if it isn't the perfect ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Why has “Caucasian” remained in use, while similar terms for other races have fallen out of use?

Why has the term "Caucasian" remained in use, while equivalent terms, such as those used for Asian people, African people, and Australian Aborigines have fallen out of use in polite society? I came ...
3
votes
2answers
84 views

“hugest” grammatically correct?

I saw an article on yahoo yesterday and thought I'd ask, is "hugest" a real word? I assume whoever wrote the article understands what they are trying to say, but it just seems wrong and foreign to my ...
-3
votes
2answers
29 views

can we use `localite` for business entity?

if any business was started in particular area, can we use "localite" for that business entity? For example: This business is localite to this area.
0
votes
0answers
49 views

“before I get it” or “before I got it”

I wrote the following sentence and my native proofreader corrected 'before I get it' to 'before I got it': I would like to know why this package was sent back to the sender at the transit center ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

plural or singular of verb following staff [duplicate]

Is it: A number of staff who was not able to attend. or: A number of staff who were not able to attend.
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Simultaneous usage past & present Part. in the same sentence

I have a doubt to be clarified. Kindly refer following sentences and suggest, which one correct and why? Is there any specific rule on that aspect? he who never failed, has never tried.< he ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is it insight in, or insight into?

Is the correct form - gaining insight in, or gaining insight into - or are both right? The context is: "Focus on your interactions to gain decisive insight in your emotional reactivity."
0
votes
2answers
32 views

“We're sorry for the delay in reply.” or “[…] delay in replying.”?

There's an office debate going on over this. We're all non-native english speakers so none of us can make a good case for either option. So, the debate goes on about whether the "delay in reply" ...

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