0
votes
0answers
5 views

Looking for an imperative word or expression

Hi guys im looking for a way to say "do something" in another way, one word or a slang will be great
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Is “A pair of two” redundant?

Question above. Can't seem to find an answer on the internet and would appreciate some advice.
2
votes
0answers
8 views

Where did the sports and game term “rubber” come from?

In sports, a rubber is a series that consists of an odd number of matches where a majority of wins takes the series. Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster both list the etymology of this definition as ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

That does “over time” mean?

I have problem understanding this: Over time, this is a fragile approach. What does "over time" mean here? Thanks!
4
votes
5answers
148 views

Should I say “She is in the park or She is at the park”?

I am really confused which one is correct. She is in/at the park, They are at/in the park, or I am in/at the park? I'm an Asian trying to learn English. I really need your help. Thanks in advance!
0
votes
1answer
18 views

“Pending approval” or “Approval pending”

I'm not a native english speaker so there are still some things that I don't fully understand. What is the best way to say, in a software, that an item is waiting for the approval of someone? ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How do I rephrase this?

As a result of seeing these sad situations, I have volunteered in clubs I want to say that due to the sad sightings that I've seen before, I am now volunteering in various clubs.
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Is “Click bait” an Internet buzzword? How can I rephrase it?

I found a video showing a fireman who rescued a suffocating kitten from a fire smoke and resuscitated her by oxygen inhalation introduced in the article titled “Why that video went viral” in New York ...
1
vote
2answers
25 views

How can we distinguish “uptalk” from a real question?

uptalk or high rising terminals is an intonation pattern where declarative statements occur with yes/no question intonation. "It is used when the speaker is establishing common ground with the ...
0
votes
3answers
33 views

English grammar [on hold]

Hey guys I am new to this and was referred to this holy grail of a website by my elder brother who recommended it to me as a life tool and I can see why now. Back to the topic. For some very long ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

looking forward to our tennis battle? can I say this way?

I am sending an email to a friend/mentor. We have the same interest in tennis and during our past conversation, we said we would like to play together one day. Is it ok to say "I am looking forward ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Meaning of “get it on”

What does phrase "get it on" mean in sentence "Am I wrong, cause I wanna get it on, till I die". I found a translation where "get it on" is translated as "to have sex" but i think it is not ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Can “tamper” be used transitively?

Consider the following two statements: The file has been tampered with. The file has been tampered. Does the second version make sense, or should it always be "tampered with"?
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Don't you do this vs Don't do this

Could anyone clarify, please, what the difference between these two sentences is? I heard an American woman say to her child: "Don't you do this!"
2
votes
2answers
58 views

“right of say” — legal term? poor translation?

I'm looking at a political document where Country A is saying Country B has no right of say over Area C. A cursory search did not turn up a legal term but I do not have an adequate legal dictionary ...
2
votes
3answers
65 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What's the English word for the Spanish “sobremesa”?

In Spanish, the situation where you keep talking after the meal has ended with the people you shared your lunch or dinner is called "sobremesa" (literally over-table or after-table). Is there a word ...
-4
votes
2answers
57 views

Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”? [on hold]

I'm writing a letter to my friends and I want to make some parts of it sound more impressive and say in one part of the letter "thousands of <something>" Can I say so if is actually in order ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Can “definitely” be used as a conjunction? [on hold]

Under any circumstances, is it possible for the adverb "definitively" to be used as a conjunction?
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What's the difference in meaning between “grandiose” and “elaborate”?

What's the difference in meaning between adjectives: "grandiose" and "elaborate" ? Thanks in advance.
0
votes
0answers
29 views

A non-defining relative clause sentence

My question is something to do with non-defining relative clauses.. One online friend of Breck's claimed the teenager had been groomed by Daynes, who he described as a 'control freak' So is ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“Prefer” usage - If the emphasis is on the habit --ing form or to-infinitive? [duplicate]

-ing form : Most people prefer watching a film at the cinema rather than on TV. -to-infinitive form: We prefer to drive during the day whenever we can. Which of the above two sentences ...
7
votes
6answers
426 views

sound played when a key character appears

What is the name for the music or sound played when a key character appears in a play, movie or show; like in "Peter and the Wolf"?
2
votes
1answer
37 views

What do you call the process of reducing inflammation or the state that inflammation has been cured?

At First I was searching the antonyms for inflammation, concerning that one of the antonyms for the word "inflate" is "deflate" , but now I don't think this is the correct way,I am unable to find ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Singular or plural with attractiveness? [duplicate]

Q. Her eyes are (OR is) her only attractiveness.
9
votes
8answers
1k views

Equivalent of “Excuse me” for “you're not in my way”? Pedestrian bump avoidance

Is there a quick phrase, like "excuse me", that means "You're not in my way; please don't change this fact"? I mean in the context of e.g. passing someone who's on the grass between the sidewalk and ...
8
votes
11answers
1k views

What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?

Like when you want to say that you'll tell a short version of something which would alter the accuracy of the original version.
0
votes
0answers
13 views

overlapping two incidents in the future [on hold]

My English class has been scheduled on Friday December 5, and it will be overlapped with my vacation day. is it correct
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What is the negation of “last”? [duplicate]

If the opposite of "last" is "first", is there a word for the negation, i.e. non-last element in a list?
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Usage of to be + use to + verb (ing)

What's the meaning of "to be use to +verb +ing"? My doubt is if it can be used as the present of "used to" (habit or state in present), if it means to be able to stand an uncorfortable situation, or ...
-1
votes
0answers
7 views

Research about public space [on hold]

I'm going to research about the public space as a social space and public participation in the city of Palembang South Sumatera. could tell me what kind of theory could be use to explain this topic ? ...
-7
votes
2answers
57 views

Clean, concise, snappy synonym for “f—ing awesome” [on hold]

Our company mission is to make product X fucking awesome. Any clean, non-long-winded, emphatic, passionate synonym for 'fucking awesome' in this context?
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is it grammatically okay to say “ in a similar way as (subject + verb)”?

Is it grammatically okay to say " in a similar way as (subject + verb)"? For example, "A behaves in a similar way as B does". Or should I choose another expression for this meaning to be ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Etymology of 'scape goat' [on hold]

I am unable to find a clear historical link on the origin of scapegoat. Can someone tell me what are some of the believed origins of this word and which is the most widely accepted one?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

How do I use paired?

In the sentence "they've built roads, ports and stores in our city, but these facts are unpaired to the schooling steep growing levels." I'd like to know two things: Is the usage of "but these ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Difference between cause of and cause for [migrated]

Could someone please tell me whether to use of or for in the sentence given below:- Inactivity is the greatest cause of/for overweight. Please also explain the logic used to make the distinction.
-1
votes
0answers
9 views

Which article to use: 'a' or 'the? [migrated]

In the following sentence, which article, a or the, is suitable before diameter, tensile strength, and modulus, respectively? What is the reason for that? For example, multi-walled nanotubes with ...
3
votes
3answers
94 views

What do you call someone who has passed deadline?

What do you call someone who has passed deadline or someone who should return book to the library, but has passed due date?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Which is correct? Verb-ing

Look at the boy dancing. Look at the dancing boy. What is the difference between the two sentences? Are they both correct?
3
votes
2answers
171 views

Define “plate” from Sweeney Todd musical

The opening song of the Sweeney Todd musical contains the following passage about his wife: There was another man who saw that she was beautiful... A pious vulture of the law who, with a ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Mathematical Institute or Mathematics Institute: Which of these is correct and why?

Many titles of universities or research institutes have a variety of adjectives before the noun institute. Example: Oxford University and Chennai have a Mathematical Institute each. Then, there are ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Meaning of “I'm surprised you ever do that.”

While reading some quotes from a book, I came across a quote consisting of the phrase whose structure I found hard to figure out. "You're so slow. I'm surprised you ever get anywhere." (From Aesop's ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Can I say “I'm glad I was of any help”?

I received an e-mail from a person thanking me for my help when I had traveled to Germany. I would like to start my answer with the following phrase. Is it correct? I'm glad I was of any help! I ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Any specific word for refferring and fetching back old data

I am looking for a specific word for referring and fetching some data from old document. e.g "I pull out some points from my documents from last project." I am trying to write something like ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Is there a word or concise phrase for “alternative name for something”? (but not pseudonym or alias)

Question Is there a word or concise phrase for "alternative name for something" which doesn't have the associated negative connotation that pseudonym and alias have? It has to be short so as to fit ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Use of commas around 'though'

With regard to the use of commas around 'though', which of the following is correct or deemed more appropriate? 'It is interesting, though, as I've done a lot of work in...' 'It is interesting though, ...
13
votes
4answers
2k views

The word for a man who hunts a dangerous mountain cat without prophylactic? [on hold]

Hello once again special team stack exchange and a usage. I search many hours dictionary for a man goes into woods for hunt dangerous mountain cat or similar enemy despite no protection or ...
1
vote
3answers
36 views

Is there a term in English (or any other language) to refer to the movement of a large, rapidly spreading fire?

I like very specific words and this would help me with a poem I'm writing. Also, if you have any references for very specific words/know any yourself (English or otherwise), they would be appreciated. ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Word for “take with permission but no intention of returning”

In such cases, "borrow" doesn't fit, as it implies intent to return, nor does "steal", which indicates lack of permission. "take" seems too general. As a concrete example: "Hey, can I [verb] some ...

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