2
votes
0answers
19 views

Spelling of one syllable changes pronunciation of another

I've been fascinated by word pronunciations where changing the spelling of one syllable doesn't change its pronunciation, but rather changes another syllable in the word. The only two examples I can ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Is the 'unmarked'/standard/basic form called the oblique/objective case?

[Source:] This happens because what linguists would call the “unmarked” or standard, basic form for pronouns turns out to be the objective form—me, him, her, them, and the like. This is the form ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“That” versus “which” [duplicate]

In the following sentence, are the words that and which interchangeable? In general, where to put that and where to put which? The sentence: At the end of this course, students will be able to ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

alternatives to “bucket list of kate”

I want to say: "kate's bucket list" but we need to have "kate" at the end of the sentence (that is the requirement). So I thought of "bucket list of kate" but it sounded a bit.... I don't know... bad ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

“She do not look like”

I have heard this phrase in "True Detective". What's the background? (It was used by police detective, 2nd episode, the dialog in a car.) update: Because of the discussion, I found that scene and ...
5
votes
2answers
97 views

“Here's looking at you, kid” meaning?

I'm sure many will know Rick's famous line from the film Casablanca: Here's looking at you, kid. While I can guess at it, I was never fully confident about the meaning of this phrase. I am not ...
0
votes
3answers
29 views

Let's you and I / me be fair with each other

"Let's you and I / me be fair with each other." "Let you and I / me indulge in a little bit of reverie." Is "I" or "me" correct in those sentences? And why?
5
votes
3answers
89 views

Etymology of “in the world” idiom?

I've searched the internet and found definitions, but I cannot figure out when this would have EVER meant anything. Any ideas? Specifically, the type of phrase I am referring to is "What in the world ...
-1
votes
1answer
93 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose”

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
0
votes
3answers
13 views

Need a synonym for “action” in a specific context

I need a synonym for the word "action". Here is the sentence where I need a synonym: When an event occurs, an action is taken. For example: When you read this question, you write a comment.
0
votes
0answers
12 views

What does “track each other” mean in the following context?

Here is the full paragraph : You might ask, if gain controls the proportion of color at all IRE levels, why do I need to make a whole series of measurements, wouldn't just one do? The answer is ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Is the use of the word “recognize” accurate in these sentences?

The following are some learning outcomes a freshman student should achieve. Is the use of the word recognize accurate in these sentences? Or, is there a better way to say this? Recognize the types ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Why are surnames often misspellings of English words?

Why do English surnames so often seem to be derived from slight misspellings of common English words? Weekes Thorne Browne Lilley Keene Paige Lowe Hooke Hawthorne Sargent Whyte Chappell Horne ad ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Haven't or hadn't

It's 1.Back to the old days when I haven't cut my bangs Or 2.Back to the old days when I hadn't cut my bangs
2
votes
0answers
30 views

What do you call one who has been challenged?

How should I refer to one who has been challenged? One who offers a challenge is a "challenger," but what would be the appropriate term for the person who receives the challenge?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Subject-Verb Agreement using have/has with multiple subjects

Could you please tell me if the verb "has" is correct, or should it be "have?" in the following sentence: The increasing use of electronic monitoring, such as CCTV cameras, 'phone tapping' and ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Using “it's” instead of “it is”

I like the way contractions operate and I know the difference between "it's" and "its" based on contraction and possession. That is, "it's = it is" and "its" is possessive. However, there are some ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

list of commas after not

I am confused by the meaning of the following sentence: This is only valid when the reservation status is not cancelled, departed, in-house. what's the scope of the not in this sentence? Just ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Parsing lyrics from “Blank Space”

I find myself getting mentally stuck on one particular line from Taylor Swift's "Blank Space": Don't say I didn't say I didn't warn ya Normally, I don't have a problem with song lyrics, even ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

“If you will eat so much, it's not surprising that you're fat.”

I came across this sentence and its explanation.Even though I know what "will" means and how to use it, the explanation made me confused a bit. Here is the explanation and the example sentence. ...
3
votes
2answers
28 views

Term for a person responsible for the next action

I am designing a system that tracks a complicated workflow. Each step of the workflow has a different person assigned to take an action. What is a succinct term I could use to describe the person who ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

It's my nerves vs. It's getting on my nerves

What is the difference between: It is my nerves and: It is getting on my nerves Are they alike? In what situation do we use the first one and second one? Can I use one instead of the ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Verb for giving others presents when you're happy

I am looking for a verb which is used in situations like these: I got good grades and then, for example, I give my friends a piece of chocolate for my achievement. When the owner of a restaurant is ...
1
vote
2answers
278 views

Semicolons — How many is too many?

In some legal documents, sentences can be the lengths of paragraphs due to semicolons. What are the grammatical rules for the use, or maximum number, of semicolons for non-legal writing? Here is a ...
7
votes
1answer
803 views

Is the word 'cocksure' considered informal, non-PC, or even vulgar?

None of the following resources seem to think so: Merriam-Webster, The Free Dictionary, Oxford Dictionaries, Collins. But Cambridge Dictionaries Online says it is informal. And it appears on Urban ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

“allow insertion” or “allow inserting” or “allow to insert”

I have some doubts about using ing-verb in the following case: Such data structures don't allow insretion/inserting/to insert any kind of objects. Is it considered grammatically correct to say ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

“Numeric” is to numbers as X is to dates. What is X?

"Numeric" is to numbers as X is to dates. What is X?
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Is “know it all” positive or negative [on hold]

If someone is described as a know it all, who has an opinion on everything, what type of person is this a description of?
2
votes
1answer
48 views

What's the meaning of “mean” in “in the mean time”?

As I understand it "in the mean time" means "in the time between now & a specific future occurrence." What's the meaning of "mean" here? I assume it has something to do with "average" but it's ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Can “anachronism” refer to things that have not been done in the proper order?

I've looked in a few online dictionaries, and I don't see any definitions of "anachronism" that seem to encompass this situation. However, I feel like, etymologically, this term could be used in the ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

Does the word zealous have an implicit religious connotation?

Earlier today I was describing someone to a friend. I said, "I never realized how zealous he was." I meant for the meaning of zealous here to be religiously zealous. Without an adverb, I would ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

An adjective for gestalt

Is there an adjective to describe someone with the ability to quickly grasp/see the whole picture out of a few perceived details. This person is not detail-oriented and never fails to see the forest ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

The meaning of “going over” something

I'm fond of old especially folk songs, but as a foreigner I often have troubles interpreting some phrases. Here is one from Wayfaring stranger: I'm going there to see my father I'm going there no ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

A new use for the word Alibi

At recent teleconference meetings, I've notice that the meeting leader will sometimes end the call with a phrase like, "So does anyone have any alibi's?" The context (and people's response) suggests ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Weird “genetive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

the Virginia public school district

Do I have to put "the" in front of "Virginia"? Thanks. Do disciplinary school removal rates differ between high and low poverty schools in Virginia public school district?
10
votes
5answers
699 views

One word for a man who feels vulnerable about his wife

What would we call a man who is always suspecting, distrustful and worried about his wife being wooed by other men? He considers his wife naive and the world (other men) as predators in waiting. It ...
-4
votes
1answer
61 views

Why is oral sex considered sex, given that no intercourse is involved? [on hold]

Why is oral sex considered sex given that no actual sexual intercourse is involved? Oral sex or oral intercourse is sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia of a person by ...
1
vote
2answers
26 views

Would a specific type of animal be capitalized?

I did a project on owls. And I had to name 5 breeds, or species, of owls. But would they be capitalized or not? For example, spotted owls. Is it Spotted Owls or Spotted owls or spotted Owls or just ...
4
votes
0answers
54 views

Meaning of “Back on their heels” [on hold]

In a townhall meeting, President Obama used the expression of "being back on heels": Now, it's no secret that unions have been back on their heels a little bit over the last several decades. ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

can someone tell me if i am right in identifying the odd word out from these group of words? [on hold]

a) taken WENT seen forgotten--- because the rest are verbs b) bright EARLY good some------because the rest are adjectives ??? c) NEVER but unless ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

“As for me” in the beginning of the sentence

Could I use "As for me" in the beginning of the sentence? For example, when somebody asks the whole group of people what was done, and one in that group answers what he did: "As for me, I did that ...
1
vote
3answers
40 views

Correct translation for the light switch for a website

I'm looking for the correct translation for a website (http://www.configurator.simonurmet.com/). I'd like to refer to the whole object, I don't need the name of each part for now. The "whole ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

how to greet teacher in email [on hold]

I am going to write an email to my college instructors, to congratulate their independence day; I don't know how to greet them and how to start. thanks
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Can [sic] be used to show an omission or error in punctuation? [duplicate]

Can [sic] be used to show an omission or error in punctuation? Eg: Original: He was, happy to get a raise. Revised: He was [sic] happy to get a raise. There shouldn't be a comma after 'was'. ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

Difference between sentences

What is the difference between: Did you remember to sign the letter? Do you remember signing the letter? and He didn't need to call the doctor. He needn't have called the doctor.
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Question regarding English in an old maths book

I'm currently working through an old British maths book, released around 1910, on the whole the language is quite manageable however I've reached a part of the text where there's talk of circles and ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Sentence Structure 'drag out of by' [on hold]

I'm interested to know if the following structure is correct: The family was extremely upset as every piece of information about the accident had to drag out of by the authorities. Is the ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Passive Voice vs Present Perfect Passive Voice

Neither Jeremy nor his friends have been informed about the accident by the traffic police. Why is the present perfect passive voice (have been informed) used in the sentence? Is it correct to use ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

What's the meaning of “figurative meaning”? [on hold]

What does figurative meaning mean? What is the difference compared to literal meaning?

15 30 50 per page