1
vote
1answer
7 views

“Obama is in town this weekend” or “Obama will be in town this weekend”

A friend of mine used the following phrase to tell me about Obama's visit to Malaysia this weekend (he told me this when it was not already the weekend): Obama is in town this weekend. This ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

Punctuation for comparison

How should this sentence be punctuated? The former are dogs, the latter: cats. Or is it: The former are dogs; the latter, cats. Or something else?
0
votes
1answer
13 views

What do we call a picture of a picture?

Is there a word for a picture of a picture? Had a search on onelook but couldn't find anything...
0
votes
2answers
11 views

what's the difference between “Indispensable Amino Acid” and “Essential Amino Acid”?

As I have seen several times of the using of those two words in even the same book. But I don't know what's the difference meaning between those two words.
0
votes
1answer
7 views

seniority or rank

friends! The following is a multiple choice question in a test paper: The chief of surgery became committee chairman by virtue of _. A. age B. service C. seniority D. rank I'm at a loss as to which ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

with all due consideration

i! The following is a multiple choice question in an English test paper: The employers prepared, with all due _, for a conference with the Trade Union. A. caution B. concern C. certainty D. ...
2
votes
3answers
25 views

Meaning of “it will do you in”?

What is the meaning of the expression "it will do you in"? I came across this sentence: if you are not careful, it will do you in.
0
votes
0answers
9 views

In a headline written with initial capitals, should “outside” be capitalized?

I'm writing a headline for an article ending with "outside the organization." According to our style book, we capitalize on headline. Should "outside" be capitalized in this context?
2
votes
2answers
13 views

We can see the shrine become big

I'm correcting some writing and the student wrote, We can see the shrine become big, little by little, from the ferry. As far as I'm concerned, it's grammatically okay, but I'm having trouble ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Base on home work

Which one is right I wanna used was or where it were a puppy or it was a puppy I think it were a puppy am I right I need some help am kinda baffle thank you
0
votes
0answers
36 views

How to use THAT and WHO

I have some doubts about the usages of That and Who. Sometimes I read sentences such as. "You are someone I love" "You are someone WHO I love" Or "People were asked to describe the qualities they ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

work 'at' the weekends or work 'during' the weekends?

I wrote "Many college students work at the weekends." My colleague changed 'at' to 'during' = Many college students work during the weekends. Do you feel there is a difference, however subtle?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

another greeting aside from “i hope you are well” in an email?

I'm stack with "i hope you are well" every time i compose an email. is there other greetings aside from "i hope you are well" in an email. During i composed an email, i keep on thinking what other ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“So though” vs “so even though”

Do they mean the same? Or they mean slightly different things? Example: They both had passion for music, so, (even) though their tastes differed, they never ran out of topic to talk about.
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Difference between “insensitive” and “not sensitive”

Is there any subtle difference implied when using "insensitive" as compared to "not sensitive"? I am writing: A is insensitive to changes in B. But someone suggested that it conveys a strong ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

Where did the phrase “Holy Toledo” come from?

I was reading online and noticed this phrase in the comments. What is the origin of this phrase?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“If there are 0 or 1 messages” or “If there is 0 or 1 message”?

I'm trying to say "Do something if there are 0 or 1 messages" but am not sure exactly how to phrase that. Do I use the singular, plural, or none of the above?
0
votes
1answer
20 views

How to use articles in parentheses?

Do I need to use an article for the option word in parentheses? If you want to create a new design of a handle (flag), the outer diameter of the casing can be changed in the place of possible ...
1
vote
4answers
59 views

Can you use obverse/reverse when referring to a sheet of paper?

Is it acceptable to use 'obverse and reverse' when referring to the sides of a loose-leaf sheet of paper? The wikipedia article on, "Obverse and Reverse" stated that: "Obverse and its opposite, ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Which of these two sentences is grammatically correct?

Which sentence is grammatically correct: In the fall Julie will attend graduate school in Italy. Or Julie will attend graduate school in Italy in the fall.
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Does this sentence sound good for a native-speaker? [on hold]

I've got a problem here. Hope you will help me. The question is how does the sentence below sound for a native speaker ear? Because i've got this strange feeling that it sounds awfull and I can't even ...
-2
votes
0answers
25 views

What is more appropriate “A UE” or “The UE”?

In the field of telecommunications, we often use the term "UE" which means User Equipment. I am writing a technical document. In the document, should I refer to UE as "A UE" or "The UE" or just "UE". ...
1
vote
2answers
27 views

Name of Shift-Key Concept

What is the name of the concept or type of key used in shifting characters on a mobile device? Many common virtual keyboards used in cellphones and advanced mobile devices use a certain paradigm for ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Origin of “minibeasts”?

What is the origin of the term minibeasts? Growing up in the UK I never heard the term, but recently I have heard it prolifically used in preschool education and children's television programmes.
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Is there a word to describe something that is bad/harmful, yet needed/imperative?

I am trying to describe the nature of pesticides. Although they are mostly harmful, we need them in order to produce the amount of food the world requires. Is there a word or phrase besides "necessary ...
5
votes
6answers
532 views

What's wrong with “stupider”?

On online boards I've seen some people claim that "stupider" is ungrammatical. I can't see any reason why it would be, and it seems like it's commonly used. Google Ngram Viewer And it's also in ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is the sentence “The table is included for completeness” correct?

I've used the sentence “The table is included for completeness” several times in university reports and have seen it in reports of other students as well. I am wondering if this sentence is correct ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Other academic field distinctions like math vs maths

Growing up in the US, I was taught to say "math" and the British "maths" sounded very awkward to me until I noticed mathematics had an 's' at the end, and it occurred to me that it could be considered ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Are the 'beautiful things' of life, the 'beautiful' of life?

The following question set me thinking: Can we use all "nouns" as adjective? What about the opposite? Can adjectives be used as nouns? What are the rules or the stylistic limits to their ...
4
votes
3answers
58 views

Is 'many' used in positive sentences or not?

It is uncanny how many books will insist that neither 'many' nor 'much' can be used in positive sentences. Have you got many pens? / Have you got much money? --> correct I haven't got many pens. / I ...
1
vote
3answers
67 views

“Is that more clear?”

RE: I said something confusing in an email. Then I restated it in a second email, and I followed this restatement by "Is that more clear?" It doesn't sound right. What would you say?
11
votes
6answers
859 views

Word for the emotion behind “D'oh!”

What is the name of the emotion that you feel when you accidentally make a mistake? Such as when you clumsily drop a bowl and it shatters? In the Simpsons, Homer says "D'oh!" when this sort of thing ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

“… is gift” vs. “… is a gift”

This is something that has always intrigued me. What part of speech is "gift" in Faith is gift. versus Faith is a gift. In the second case, "gift" is a noun, the subject complement of the copula ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Question about putting an adverb before a verb

I need to mention here that I red in an educational book that we normally or perhaps always put adjective before a noun. We do not say: A day beautiful, we say: a beautiful day. Wondeting if it is ...
0
votes
3answers
52 views

Word for problem listening/speaking and not reading/writing english

Suppose I have problems listening and understanding English esp. of non-Indian accent speaking English fluently How should I tell someone about it using very few words instead of typing a long ...
0
votes
0answers
3 views

“I'm done” or “I've done”, which is correct? [migrated]

I want to know if "I'm almost done" is correct, or whether it should be "I've almost done" as a present perfect tense. I often read this on Facebook news feed. Is it correct?
3
votes
3answers
87 views

Programming vs. Coding

As a programmer, I often hear "writing a program" and "writing code" used interchangeably. The way I understand it, a program is a file which contains code written to perform a task or a series of ...
0
votes
3answers
75 views

People who use “no” in every sentence [on hold]

I want to know whether using unnecessary "No"s and negations paints individuals with a negative/insulting attitude. Examples from my dear workplace. Example 1: 1: "Hey Eric, today is so warm." 2: ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

How to introduce two arguments

How to introduce two arguments in a scientific paper? I used: There are two arguments. On the one hand ARGUMENT1. On the other hand ARGUMENT2. Now I was told I should not use this construct unless ...
2
votes
3answers
32 views

To represent with a graph

I am preparing a number of charts to show demographic trends. Is there a word meaning to represent an event with a graph?
0
votes
2answers
30 views

What connotation does “unhealthy relationships” have?

What connotation does "unhealthy relationships" have? I'm told that it can't be used to mean strained or stormy relations with someone. Why?
5
votes
2answers
68 views

Grammatically, why does it seem that 'that' can't follow the verb expressing propositional attitude in this sentence?

Consider the sentence, Together with corroborant documentation, the petitioner must submit his own account of the events that he claims (that) justify the exemption. That can follow any verb ...
1
vote
4answers
56 views

Phrase to tell, that you have written a fast note

I am choosing a title for my essay, which is about a man, who wrote a fast idea on a napkin and lost in a pocket of his jacket. Then he dies in a car accident and ten years later his son finds an old ...
4
votes
2answers
43 views

Formal alternative for “dos and don'ts”

I want to write "dos and don'ts", or an equivalent expression, in a university essay. I am assuming that it is not very academic to write "dos and don'ts", so does anyone have a better way of putting ...
0
votes
3answers
31 views

Can I say it this way “ People are benefited by social networking ”

Is it correct to say People are benefited by Social Networking when what I really want to say is that People benefit from Social Networking
0
votes
4answers
36 views

General noun for lingual/verbal/written representation of data?

I'm a software developer and I try to take naming variables, functions, classes etc. rather seriously. I'm looking for a single-word noun that describes the verbal display or representation of data. ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

reduced relative clause

Could anyone please look at the following sentences and tell me if the reduced version is acceptable, and if any any difference exists between the full and reduced versions? Thank you a) ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

“Neither-nor” as an adjective?

I'm reading in a newspaper: "He is a neither-nor judge." Is the phrase correct?
2
votes
10answers
130 views

One word for someone who thinks they can do anything, and believes everything they do is right but others are wrong

If someone thinks they are always doing the right thing, and believes others are wrong, what would I call them? Say, for example, I did something that person considers wrong. But then on another ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

“IT specialist” vs. “computer scientist”

I talked to my English teacher about what to name a person who works with computers. For Germans: Informatiker. As far as I know, the job is called "computer scientist", that's what most translators ...

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