1
vote
1answer
7 views

Do I use a comma between whimsical and clay in the sentence below?

Billy did a wonderful job creating his whimsical, clay fish dish.
1
vote
1answer
13 views

Is there a better word than “moot” for “not worth talking about”?

Of course a lot of people misunderstand the primary meaning of the adjective "moot" -- "open to question" or "argued about but not possible to prove" -- using the word only in the expression "moot ...
1
vote
1answer
11 views

Shall I use in or of?

I would like to write about the Municipal Services Sector in my country, which is the Kingdom of Bahrain. So, what is the right phrase to use: The Municipal Services Sector of the Kingdom of Bahrain. ...
2
votes
2answers
14 views

The word for understanding that everything is one?

Is there an actual a word for the understanding that everything and everyone is one?
1
vote
1answer
6 views

Any difference in meaning: “They differ in language” and “They differ in languages”

(I am not a native english speaker but a translator asking help for better translation) I saw the expression, "All these differ from each other in language" and thought it is a typo of 'languages'. ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Preposition for “Alternative”

I've found out that there are several prepositions for the word alternative that all seem to be correct, however, I think there should be a best choice. Do these prepositions affect the meaning in ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Can “obviously” be used in a sentence which is related to past event?

Let's say there would be a sentence like this: I obviously still don't speak Danish and therefore I am having a hard time living here. Is it correct if you consider that, in the past, I had a ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

The Hollies ´ song [on hold]

What´s the meaning of "the early bird´s been up all morning" second verse of I am down by The Hollies. Thank you
0
votes
1answer
30 views

word “recourse” usage

I have a sentence where someone uses the phrase, "she is also a great recourse". Could that be correct? Or are they confusing the word for "resource"? A person can have recourse to another ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Is the use of a colon in this question grammatically correct?

Which colors do you prefer: blue or green?
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Using “a” with a superlative adjective

The Wikipedia article for Drum Machine contains the phrase an earliest fully transistorized rhythm machine Is this grammatically correct? Is it any different from the phrase an early, fully ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

I am about to go now vs I have to go now - Which is more polite?

Is "I am about to go now" grammatically correct? If so, is it more polite than "I have to go now"?
0
votes
1answer
30 views

A Sentence in Lost Series

I was watching Lost (again) yesterday and someone said: " - Well, then. I guess I won't have to convince you after all." " - I'm not going to kill -spoiler-, Ben. You are." My question is: I was ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

(go) off the boil

"(go)off the boil" seems to mean "past the crisis" in British English. What is the origin/etymology of this expression? Is it used nowadays?
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Another way to say “when we send you there”

I’m looking for another way to say .. When we send you there It’s referencing an introduction in a website context; When you click the link we will let the destination know that you’re with us. ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Ways to use 'both' in a specific sentence

Which of these sentences are grammatically correct? Are there even more ways to write the correct ones? Although I'd really like an analysis of why each sentence is correct or wrong, I would be ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Transcribing English words into IPA showing syllables [on hold]

We are studying the first 1600 words children are presented for reading, and want to translate them into IPA using syllables and tracking the variable pronunciations of the phonemes. We have the 1600 ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Difference between near & close [on hold]

I say that CLOSE is nearest to being right, but NEAR is closest to being correct. I hope that yelps —I mean helps.
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Order of adverbs

Is there any specific rationale behind ordering similar adverbs? Clearly, I point out time adverbs, never and ever. I've found examples in which these two used in different orders. My mom will ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

should there be a comma after thank you?

Should there be a comma after: Thank you, for notifying me of Connor's behavior/attitude in class.
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Subjunctive that has no subject?

Like it or not, . . . (Whether you like it or not) I've come across this kind of phrase many times, but this is the only one--among no-subject subjunctives--that I can be sure it's common and right ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Has “Extraordinary” Ever Been Spelled with an A-O Ligature?

For example, instead of spelling it as extraordinary, you would write it as extrꜵrdinary. This also applies to its derivations, such as instead of extraordinaire, you would write extrꜵrdinaire. I'm ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

The verb as a noun

I have a question regarding the use of verbs. As a simple example, let's say I want to be nice to someone who is dancing and I want to praise the way that person dances. Instead of saying: I ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

“you” in spoken, quoted dialogue

My partner and I have been having a debate about the proper way of relating dialogue in spoken English. Our problem is as follows: It often happens in conversation that one wishes to relate a ...
4
votes
2answers
59 views

What the heck is “not”, anyway?

Consider the following sentences: Enough are present to form a quorum. Not enough are present to form a quorum. M-W and Wiktionary both label enough as a pronoun in this usage, but they also ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

'weighed in' vs 'wade in'

When someone to gives their opinion on a complex topic, is the phrase used "weighed in" or "wade in"? I thought it was the former, but I've been seeing the latter crop up more and more often. ...
2
votes
2answers
31 views

Word for a description of the physical characteristics/range/habits of an animal or plant species?

i.e. is there a word for something like an entry in a natural history dictionary? I poked around trying unsuccessfully to find one, and I'll probably just use "description", but I still have a nagging ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

what is the meaning of 'there are worse ways doing this than that'

what is the meaning of There are worse ways doing this than that. For example: There are worse ways spending this evening than coming to the meeting. Does this mean coming to the ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Difference between “will now be” and “is going to be”

What is the difference between "will now be" and "is going to be"? Just to provide you some contest: The memory will now be deallocated. vs. The memory is going to be deallocated.
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there another word that means 'togglable'?

Using Merriam-Webster as a baseline, the word 'togglable' doesn't exist yet. It has made it into Wiktionary. It also makes enough intuitive sense that I don't have a problem using it. But, I'm ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Relative stress principle

the degree of stress of a syllable is determined in relation to the stress of the syllables adjacent to it. i.e. according to the theory of relative stress, differences in stress do not just ...
3
votes
3answers
40 views

Contrary vs Converse when used as a noun

Q: Which is the better word to be used in the following sentence? My history seems to indicate the contrary in that my hypertension was the cause of my anger & stress. ...or... My ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

What doe Ev. followed by a number mean in a footnote?

I am reading a document with numerous footnotes providing references to the source of the information in the main text. However, some of the notes just give Ev. followed by a single digit number. All ...
6
votes
8answers
1k views

Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the world?

In a sci-fi movie from 1957, an astronaut says he's "going to palaver" with the cave-dwelling natives. I'd never heard the word before, but my husband—a history buff—knew it by its ...
9
votes
8answers
1k views

A word that means a bad copy of lots of other things

Used in this context... I don't like The Cleveland show because it is **** It's a term we use in animation to say that we don't like this programme or idea because it is too similar to other ones ...
0
votes
2answers
108 views

Why “a” bow and arrow?

Anyone who's watched CW's Arrow would recognize this line immediately: They've got guns. You've got a bow and arrow. They never say a bow and arrows. They never say a bow and an arrow. They say ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

…is/was in debt

I'm really sorry to put the same question through. Let's say I'm narrating a past incident in which one of the sentence is -- "There was a rumor that Citibank is in debt." I'm aware that here 'is' ...
2
votes
3answers
58 views

What does “face as sharp as a pen” mean?

I am reading a text and there is a phrase which I don't know the meaning of: His face was as sharp as a pen. What does it mean?
-2
votes
0answers
20 views

correct my text [on hold]

I have to write a short and easy story for my English class. would you correct it for me ? let me know if it has any solecism. The legend of fugitive. He was banished to their Apple orchard many ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

“single in a run off”

Kang Jung-jo of the Pittsburgh Pirates singles in a run off Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Urena during the first inning of their game Tuesday in Pittsburgh. Kang, who started at third base and hit ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Correct usage of *'ve contractions

Coincidentally over the last few days, I have twice seen what I view as an 'incorrect' use of I've, viz. How could I've done this better? On attempting to explain why this sounds wrong to a ...
1
vote
2answers
27 views

Can “how has ” be abbreviated?

For example, if I say "How is your day going" I can abbreviate that to "How's" (How is). But if I said "How has your day been" can I abbreviate that to "How's" (How has)?
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is “It's not a second, seven seconds away” a kind of idiom in English? [on hold]

Is "it's not a second, seven seconds away" a kind of idiom in English? What is its meaning? I am trying to make sense of the chorus in "7 seconds" by Youssou N'Dour and Neneh Cherry and I just can't ...
0
votes
3answers
58 views

The most appropriate term for a noisy machine

I've written the following sentence: He had wanted to write a letter to Jimmy, an old comrade of his, but when the boisterous clipper started, he decided to have a second breakfast instead whilst ...
2
votes
9answers
1k views

What is a person who participates in computer network chatting, called?

I just wrote the word “chatter”, but then, googling it, I found no definition in the direction of “one who participates in a computer based chat”. Can the role of such a person ...
2
votes
2answers
71 views

How would you invent the word for 'fear of standing next to beds'?

It is known that there is a proper word for almost any phobia you can think of. What is the etymology of such? And how would one construct the word for the phobia of standing next to beds; because of ...
-1
votes
2answers
89 views

Is 'theris' a 3rd person plural possessive pronoun?

I saw a grammar chart earlier today stating 'theris' is a third person plural possessive pronoun. I've never seen this word used.
0
votes
1answer
23 views

When to use addicting vs. addictive?

We're having a debate in the kitchen about this. When would I use addicting vs addictive?
1
vote
1answer
31 views

It was comprised of five ingredients. It comprises five ingredients

I have always used the term the first way, as in "comprised of five ingredients," but someone I work with regularly uses it as in "comprises five ingredients." Are both usages correct? If no, which ...

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