2
votes
1answer
37 views

Sweat the small stuff - motivational quote - what does it mean?

sweat the small stuff - quote by Robin Sharma.
0
votes
2answers
37 views

Usage of the word “one” in conjuction with name in genetive, like this example [on hold]

A friend of mine sent me this picture. I wanted to answer with "Should be the Alladin's one" or "Should be Alladin's" my question is are both correct and which one is more preferable?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Is there a correct abbreviation for “Interest” or “Interested”?

According to AllAcronyms.com, an acceptable abbreviation for "Interest" is "Int." Yet I am unsure that this is correct. What is the correct abbreviation for "Interested" and conversely "Not ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Which is correct, 'self-employed' or 'self employed'?

In the sentence Self-employed [or Self employed] farmer Belle Vue has lived in the state of Washington all her life. should there be a hyphen between Self and employed?
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to split two separate items as adj1, or adj2, noun? For example: adj1, or adj2, n = adj1 n and adj2 n

I'm writing some content and a coworker stated that the following was incorrect: You have the option to use the red, or green, ball. or should I be saying: You have the option to use the red ball ...
0
votes
3answers
50 views

Is it possible to do something both “cleverly” and “unknowingly” at same time?

I saw the sentence below in a New York Times article, and wonder -- is it possible? There is a possibility that dogs cleverly and unknowingly utilized a natural system meant for bonding a parent ...
1
vote
3answers
116 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
1
vote
2answers
33 views

Where had you been ready to go?

Does this sentence make sense in English? Where had you been ready to go? 2nd question: If that sentence doesn't make sense, what would the question of this sentence be using "ready"? -I was ready ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Is there a term for words that consist of the same syllable repeated? [migrated]

Words such as "mama", "papa", and "cancan" have only one unique syllable, and the whole word is just that syllable repeated once. Is there a name for such words? I am aware of reduplication, but I ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Lost In Punctuation

Usually, when a piece of text is translated from one language to some other language, and (due to slightly different idioms, phrases, words, etc.) the end meaning is changed, then it is attributed to ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

on a gravestone do quotations written in italics also require quotation marks

When using a renowned poet's quote on a gravestone does one write the quote in italics and also use quotation marks around the quote?
0
votes
2answers
57 views

Could 'heresy' be an accusation at those who follow the philosophy of Heraclitus? [on hold]

The wisdom of the world Tertullian (c160-240)pp-5&6 in Documents of the Christian Church 2nd edition by Henry Betterson:....any assertion about the God of fire,then Heraclitus comes in. Heretics ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Word for 'possessing large gravity well'?

Is there a word which means "possessing a large gravity well/exerting much gravity"? My friend suggested "gravacious" which, though not a word, sounds fitting. And in the non-existence of a such ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Should I say “rules of here” or “rules here”?

For example, should I ask "Do you know the rules of here?" or "... the rules here?" I believe the latter is correct but I did see some people use the former, got confused :-(
2
votes
1answer
32 views

How does one write a suffix on double words?

I was wondering how I should write words like "control structureless". Should you keep the space between the words, concatenate them or use a hyphen? In my native language, Dutch, we would write ...
-1
votes
2answers
35 views

Is “we” an imperative? [on hold]

Is the english use of "we" an example of an imperative in "We forced our backs...we cursed through sludge" ? I think it sort of is, I'm not so sure.
4
votes
4answers
311 views

Should I use “in any case” or “in either case” in this example?

My research wasn't immoral. The only difference was that they were doing it for the sake of the animals, and I was doing it for my own. In any/either case who is to say which reason was ...
2
votes
3answers
87 views

closing words for e-mail to person with incurable disease [on hold]

What kind of closing words as an alternative to We wish you full and quick recovery can be used in a formal letter when writing to a person with an incurable disease. I/We wish you all the ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Leading from behind [on hold]

I was trying to answer a question that someone asked about leading from behind and President Obama. However, I cannot do it because I need a "50 reputation" or something like that. Nevertheless, I'm ...
0
votes
4answers
118 views

What is wrong with this headline?

"Fascist X" said a lawyer and sent to jail for insulting him. There has been some discussion about this headline's structure. Since I intended to put the quoted speech in front of the sentence, I ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Stack Exchange profile: “This user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them” [duplicate]

When a user does not fill his "about me" section in his profile, the following sentence appears: Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them. To my knowledge (which are ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

I`m just curious about how to speak “anti-” is correct? [on hold]

I`m just curious about how to speak "anti-" is correct? it`s like ant/ai/ or ant/i/??
0
votes
0answers
4 views

What is the difference between these two statements? [migrated]

It rained at noon. It was raining at noon. I slept at 5 o'clock yesterday. I was sleeping at 5 yesterday. Actually, I seem to understand progressive quite well. But what is about the correct use ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

Word for mutually bemoaning a shared experience?

I thought commiserate was the word I was looking for, but found out that means sympathy for someone else's experience, rather than two or more people mutually feeling sorry for themselves.
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Must or have to?

Is it more usual to say " Must you wear a uniform ?" or " Do you have to wear a uniform?" I understand the ( slight) differences between must and have to in the affirmative form, but does this ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Singular or plural in a conditional statement [duplicate]

Which of these sentences is correct? If there is more than one book, I'll be happy. OR If there are more than one book, I'll be happy. The first one just sounds right to me, and that's the ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

It was suggested that measures be introduced that/which legalize alcohol [duplicate]

It was suggested that measures be introduced that legalize alcohol. It was suggested that measures be introduced which legalize alcohol. I'm still struggling with this. I think the second is right, ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?

Isabirra is a type of cheese. http://www.cheese.com/isabirra/ I couldn't find a source of its pronunciation. Can anybody help me with its pronunciation (in the most layman form). Thanks
0
votes
0answers
10 views

“…one of the [X]est [Y]s of the [first/second] half of the [Nth] century…”

e.g. "...one of the greatest figures of the second half of the 19th century..." Following this query, can anyone advise alternatives to the above that are more succinct, please..?
3
votes
1answer
50 views

Are numbers greater than one plural? [duplicate]

Two apples are plural. When I refer to a number of items only by their count, is the count singular? For example: "Two is enough." Is that correct?
0
votes
3answers
44 views

What is the difference between “poverty” and “poorness”?

What's the subtle difference? I'm not very good with grammar...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Longest lexicographic English word? [duplicate]

What is the longest lexicographic English word? In other words, what's the longest English word who's letters are in alphabetical order?
0
votes
1answer
22 views

“can agree” versus “agree”?

I want to know which one of the following sentences is better (maybe both sentences have flaws) : They can agree that we start the meeting first. or They agree that we start the meeting ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Derivatives of “ea” in the sense of “river”?

"Ea" is a largely archaic word still used in some dialects to mean a river or watercourse. The Online Etymology Dictionary mentions "ealand" as a term formerly used to mean a watery place or meadow ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Which one is correct: “You've got no life of/for” your own?

"Let's face facts here. You took care of your parents for so long, you've got no life of your own." "Let's face facts here. You took care of your parents for so long, you've got no life for your ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What does “blue's my colour” mean in this context?

Monica: How are you? Fake Monica: I'm not too bad. Fortunately, blue's my colour. How-how did you know I was here? Monica: Because... I'm Monica Geller. It was my credit card you were ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is “I Hope All goes well” Appropriate here?

Is the response for this dialog appropriate or even correct with "I hope all goes well with your project"? (the conversation happened through text message, so I believe it wasn't very formal) ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What does You play to pay mean? Thanks.

Actually it's from comedy, Weird loners. What does You play to pay mean? Thanks. Text from phone : Where's my money ? I know where you live. You play to pay ! 1K tomorrow. In case you can't ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Meaning of some unusual words [on hold]

Yesterday I came across three unusual words while surfing the net and I tried to look them up; however, Google was of little avail. Can anyone give me a clear definition? I would appreciate any help. ...
1
vote
3answers
112 views

What does you are getting reamed mean? [on hold]

Ms C is accusing Ms Z of eating the cheese that Ms C bought. Ms C and Ms Z are room mates. Ms C sees a therapist about it. Ms Z: I don't eat that kind of cheese. Ms C: You do eat that kind ...
1
vote
3answers
46 views

A word or succinct descriptor for someone no longer found physically attractive

I am looking for a word or succinct descriptor for a person whose appearance has changed such that they are no longer found to be physically attractive by the speaker/writer. The ideal answer should ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

apostrophe usage with subjects [on hold]

Could you help me please? I have am unsure which of the below sentences is correct: The languages course The languages' course I cannot remember the rule. Thank you.
0
votes
1answer
23 views

How can I diagram the direct object placement in “… the watch that my uncle had given me.”

Please consider: "... the watch that my uncle had given me." "my uncle" is the subject. "had given" is the main verb (past perfect). so... "me" is an indirect object? or should it really be "had ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Single countable word for trash/garbage

I am can't seem to think of a single word for trash or garbage in the singular form. I want to use in a sentence like so: I picked up two [trashes] yesterday. Obviously that is wrong because ...
-3
votes
1answer
42 views

Am I able to finish a sentence with 'for'? [on hold]

Am I able to finish a sentence with 'for'? eg. "...age that had long since disappeared but the return of which they desperately yearned for."
0
votes
2answers
60 views

What's the full form of DTO [on hold]

In my company, my colleagues always say 'DTO' when they take a leave. What is the full form of DTO?
2
votes
6answers
103 views

Word for “press softly”?

Example: I held the bee and [...] against my arm, to see whether it would sting me. I can't think of any word. And Thesaurus on has synonyms that mean pressing harder.
0
votes
2answers
40 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
-3
votes
1answer
39 views

“to become as an instructor” OR “to become an instructor”? [on hold]

When she was 14 years old, she even earned a black belt in karate. Also, she got a special training, exclusive for disabled people to become as an instructor." Should I rewrite the same sentence ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Idiom for dabbling in extremes

Is there a suitable idiomatic expression for a situation in which a person tends to dabble in extremes? For example, he might wake up at 4:00AM on some days and wake up at 11:00 AM on others and so ...

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