0
votes
0answers
15 views

The use of “Earnestly ask” [on hold]

I wonder if "earnestly ask" is proper to say when requesting someone to make comments for my proposal. The whole sentence goes, I do earnestly ask for your comments. Thanks!
0
votes
0answers
24 views

The United States. Possesive is its or their?

The United States made no secret of its/their hope to absorb the provinces... http://grammarist.com/usage/united-states/ "Although United States is usually treated as a singular noun, it’s treated ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

How do I speak about a relationship between two things to a third one? [on hold]

I'm confused which prepositions I should use to connect three different elements. Which question form would be more appropriate? What is the relationship between age and gender to / with ...
12
votes
19answers
3k views

Chasing something that doesn't exist

I'm trying to find a word or short phrase that would describe chasing something that doesn't exist. My restriction is that it can't be referencing something that would only make sense in our world ...
4
votes
1answer
103 views

What is this US accent found so often in instructional videos?

What is this accent or register? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0E4PX3e3RE It seems to me to include extensive creaky voice a broad range of pitch rising question intonation This question is ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

What do we call a person who studied humanities, e.g. at university or college?

What do we call a person who has a background in the humanities as a field of study, e.g. linguistics, comparative literature, but isn't necessarily a humanities academic? Is that correct to say a ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What phrases, words and verbs are acceptable to end a person's quote? [on hold]

I am a translator and I need ideas on phrases and verbs to end a quote. For example, "The whole world is concerned with generating alternative energy," the President stated. Words like the one in ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

She or her in a relative clause where she is both subject and possessor

If I have a relative clause where 'she' is the subject of the relative clause, but a possessor in the main clause, should I use 'of she' or 'of her'? Let me give an example, would I have: The ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Can -phobia words be plural?

Can you use a word ending in -phobia as a plural, in the following context: Their anachrophobias led them to running away from the fake spider.
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Usage of 'that of' [on hold]

Vishal invested 2/11 th part of his monthly income in stocks share and that of 4/11th part in mutual fund This is a mathematical question (source). I am confused about the usage of 'that of' ...
15
votes
16answers
5k views

What is the word for a joke which is told as real thing?

Is there any single word for a joke which is initially told by somebody as a real thing, then when person is fooled, the person disclosing the information that it's just a joke? Like April Fools' ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Are these two prepositional phrases disjuncts or something else?

Are these two prepositional phrases disjuncts or something else? I’ve looked through Biber and Huddleston, and the two examples don’t seem to fit into any of their categories of disjuncts. Thanks in ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Which phrase is grammatically correct? [on hold]

(About being a Victim or Victor) "Don't claim them both" or "Don't claim both of them"
0
votes
2answers
40 views

What do you call the following phrases?

In the following examples: A boy with blue eyes and black tshirt stood in the corner. An old man who knew how to live a life the right way looked through the window. What would you call ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive

Is there a word that means "Mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive" (as an adjective) or "to be mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive" (as a verb), or is there a noun that describes ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

When is the period that coined the most English words?

It seems that there are numerous words being made every day. This got me wondering, when was the historic period when most words were formed?
-2
votes
0answers
12 views

punctuation needed or not [on hold]

Does this sentence need any punctuation before the word(studying JIM IS IN THE DINNING ROOM STUDYING. 0 9 0 0
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Where should I put the apostrophe for the word positions? [migrated]

I feel that my skill set and personality fit the positions responsibilities and requirements perfectly. is it: position's positions or positions' ?? My best guess is position's because of ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Pairing consonants together in memorable ways [on hold]

I want to create a list of 10 pairs of consonants based on linguistics, logic, and/or intuition, regarding the sound of the letters, the shape, or other criteria. The logic need not apply to all ...
-2
votes
0answers
18 views

Don't or didn't [on hold]

My friend to me, I have a shop in this place. I replied to him " I thought you don't have one in this place". Were I right? Or should I use didn't instead of don't?
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What is the correct word for a group of categories, tags, and roles?

I want to create a database table that will hold all categories, tags, and user roles. I see WordPress uses "taxonomy" and "term" for this concept. Are there any other words to name it? If not, then ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Improper use of words with Subjective Pronouns

I read a quote as below: "You is kind. You is smart. You is important." (Kathryn Stockett) Clearly using "is" is not grammatically correct for "You" I have heard another sentence in which it seems ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

A word for a person who always needs there to be a problem?

I spoke to a woman who had several issues dealing with a common process we go through at work. I gave her several solutions to her issues and even explained that one of her main issues was not really ...
1
vote
4answers
91 views

What is the word for this container?

It's glazed ceramic, tan and brown. There's no handle. It's about 21" tall and about 10" diameter. It's quite heavy. The sides are straight up and down. Thank you.
-1
votes
0answers
18 views

Best way to express “Fredrik wins”

I'm making an iOS game. After the match I want to write something like: "Fredrik won" "Fredrik wins" "Victory by Fredrik" etc What's the best short phrase to express that someone has won a match? ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Three year free insurance or three years free insurance [on hold]

Should we use plural or singular for 'year'?
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Use of only with a plural object and a plural noun

Is the sentence "The only things that irritate me are preconceived notions and illogicalities." grammatically correct? Here "preconceived notions & illogicalities" belong to the same set of ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Helping doing or helping in doing?

Are these sentences equivalent and/or correct ? Thank you for helping us building a wall. Thank you for helping us to build a wall. Thank you for helping us in building a wall. I'd go ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Well-to-be, and Well-be-done meaning in Jason Mraz song 'No Stopping Us'

Nowadays I have been getting like to listen to Jason Mraz again. In the song 'No Stopping Us', some strange words were found, speciffically in these lyrics: Should I address all my letters to the ...
2
votes
2answers
23 views

Use of the word competent

Can you use competent in the context of an inanimate object such as an instruction manual, or a voltmeter? e.g. "In my opinion Standard 12345 is considered a competent document." or "The potentials ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Difference between elegancy and elegance

I recently saw someone use the word "elegancy" for the first time in forever, and it set me wondering about (and wandering about) why the synonym "elegance" appears to be the preferred noun. I ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Question regarding using the term “weekend / weekends”

Usually people say "How was your weekend?" But weekends are two days right? Then why don't we say "How were your weekends?" (If we are asking how his/her weekend was then which one of the two are we ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

manufacturing process vs process for manufacturing

Question: Is it idiomatic to say "a manufacturing process of/for a high-precision lens" in place of "a process for manufacturing a high-precision lens"? In connection with this question, I've ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

“The one what is blue” - WHAT versus THAT

I have a student who consistently uses "what" for "that" as in "The one what is blue." I need to come up with a rule(s) that would work for a 3rd grader, and am having difficulty finding anything. ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Send and receive stuff? What to use in receiving in-from or in-to

hope you can help me. I am not sure what should I use (or what is actually correct to use). I want to say that "I am sending stuff from one place to another" and at the same time "I am receiving ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

“giant stone blocks that [weigh/weighs] several thousand kilograms each”

The Egyptians built the pyramids out of giant stone blocks that weigh several thousand kilograms each. Weigh or weighs, which one is correct? Some teacher give the following answer The ...
1
vote
4answers
113 views

Can you use “get” in a past tense sentence

I had a voice over where I was asked to record the following line in a script: "Our small initiative turned into a sizeable movement with the support of influencers, who helped spread the word and ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Words for people who are neither ancient nor contemporary [on hold]

The phrase "People in old times" sounds clunky and "ancient people" sounds remote and ambiguous. I'm looking for two terms, one for people about the age of our grandfathers or great grandfathers ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Can the word “line” be used as a substitute for for “sentence” when referencing text?

Does "line" always mean row, or can it be used as a substitute for "sentence" when referencing text? Dictionary definitions seem to define "line" as one row of text. This seems a bit restrictive to ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

What does “corrupt” etymologically mean?

I see that interrupt morphologically and semantically means 'to break something intermittently'. I see that corrupt is formed from prefix 'co-' (which I know means "(put) together") and 'rupt' which ...
-1
votes
5answers
43 views

Could someone please give me a helping hand to explain or paraphrase the expression in bold? The expression in bold below is incomprehensible to me

CAESAR. Vengeance! Vengeance!! Oh, if I could stoop to vengeance, what would I not exact from you as the price of this murdered man's blood? (Source: G.B. Shaw, "Caesar and Cleopatra". Hello! I am ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

How did 'attitude' come to mean 'orientation' in travel?

I read the question WHY (actually) did Rosetta have to go into hibernation for 2.5 years? that uses the term attitude to refer to the orientation of the Rosetta probe: It spun itself up to ...
1
vote
5answers
47 views

All-Round, Versatile, Everyday - For Food

I need to come up with a creative, catchy way to describe a food item (2-3 words), and I have been given the following words as a starting point versatile everyday all-round Any ideas on what I ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

What was the purpose of the ethical dative?

I can find examples of its use, but not a rationale. Presumably there was one at some point. What was it for?
0
votes
2answers
24 views

The word “perplexed” in academic writing

Can I use the word "perplexed" in academic writing? If not, would you please suggest another word? Example sentence: When numerical examples provide different results, audience will be left perplexed ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Use of tense in “By this time”

By this time tomorrow he will have reached London (correct says my book) But i want to say my brother is coming home tomorrow at the same time today is.... By this time tomorrow he will have come ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

What does “liabilities” mean in this context?

From CNBC's article "Will AI spark a wave of job losses in banking? This what the experts think". (Emphasis mine) "There's a lot of liabilities," said panelist Matthew Blume, director for client ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Which sentence is more appropriate grammatically?

I was typing an e-mail. The confusion is between preposition "enroll in" and "enroll at". In which sentence has this preposition "enroll" been used correctly? I have enrolled in a university. I ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

The use of “proceed” on the web

Recently I have been puzzled why the word proceed is found on most websites when the user is going to checkout, cart or shopping cart. Is there a reason for this in the english language that warrants ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

Why exactly is this sentence the way it is?

I couldn't explain it in the title, my apologies. Now the sentence, in indirect-speech: Anne asked me who my favourite actor was I know this sentence is correct, but WHY isn't it the following? ...

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