4
votes
4answers
759 views

Someone or something small yet capable of having big influence? [duplicate]

What is a word or phrase that means a person or thing which is quite small yet capable of having big influence and impact on society?
3
votes
4answers
168 views

Is the statement “to insert (one object) _over_ (another object)” acceptable usage?

The common definition for "insert" is: to put or place in, as in "to insert a key in a lock." Nonetheless, particularly in technical descriptions, you can find numerous examples where "insert" is ...
-2
votes
1answer
61 views

Article usage in “with + (a/an) + adjective + noun” [closed]

What is the best formulation, and eventually what are the differences, between: This task can be done without a human annotation. This task can be done without    human annotation.
3
votes
2answers
339 views

A phrase for a tip or trick passed down from one generation to the next

Many use the phrase life hack to describe a novel or clever solution to an everyday problem. Before this expression became popular I remember seeing another phrase in the English language to describe ...
-2
votes
1answer
52 views

Are the meaning of sentences change with the change of position of “as”? [closed]

What is the differences between 1 and 2? 1) As has been observed by many people, "as" is one of the trickier words in the English language. 2) As it has been observed by many people, "as" is one of ...
-2
votes
1answer
69 views

Missing word in VOA news:US Government Panel Says Consider Environment in Diet [closed]

I don't know whether it's suitable to ask this kind of question here. I just got some listening issues. I can't identify the word missing in the sentence No.1 in this metioned VOA and want to make ...
0
votes
0answers
68 views

In terms of putting

I heard someone says "In terms of putting this forward,". That was unfamiliar phrase with me, putting "In terms of something" and "Putting this forward" together. When I look in a dictionary (English-...
1
vote
4answers
289 views

What is the term for someone who doesn't want to know? [duplicate]

I am looking for a term for someone who is purposefully not learning information - usually bad information. Goes hand in hand with people who want to "hide their head in the sand" or have the "wool ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the etymology of “run like a dog”?

I've used the phrase "runs like a dog" to mean that my car is on its last legs and can't, sometimes, run anywhere near as fast as a dog can. Can anyone shed light on where this meaning of the phrase ...
-1
votes
1answer
153 views

What is the difference between 2nd and mixed conditional?

Could someone explain the difference in meaning between these two forms of conditional? 1.If I had time, I would be there. 2.I would have been there if I had time.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do we say “be to blame”, not “be to be blamed”?

I wonder why "be to blame" is used rather than "be to be blamed"? I've googled it, and what I found is that it is considered as an idiomatic expression.
1
vote
2answers
121 views

Is “are an” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

When I first learn about the present form of 'be', I was told that: Use 'are' with plural noun. And when I first studies articles, I was told that: Use 'a' / 'an' with single noun. So I ...
1
vote
1answer
208 views

“Product detail page” or “product details page”? [duplicate]

As a name for a (web) page that shows detailed information about a product, which of the following is better fitting/correct: product details page or product detail page Or is there an ...
0
votes
1answer
176 views

What does it mean by “Window of opportunity” [closed]

What is mean by "Window of opportunity"
0
votes
2answers
11k views

“Sounds like a plan (, Stan!)”

"Sounds like a plan (, Stan!)" (idiom, used to agree to a suggestion that you think is good: OxfordLearnersDictionariesOnline) It seems to be of relatively recent origin, if there's really a ...
0
votes
3answers
110 views

An alternative way to say “shifting perspectives”?

What would be a good alternative way to say "shifting perspectives", as in the meaning of looking at things in a new way?
4
votes
2answers
248 views

Word for the situation of being unable to pass opposing pedestrian, as you both start to step same direction

Is there a word or expression in English, which describes the situation, when you can't pass a stranger, who is walking towards you on the street, because you both start to step the same direction? ...
-1
votes
1answer
319 views

is it is correct to mention PhD in brackets or with upper line to express ongoing degree.(PhD) ̅ [closed]

is it is correct to write PhD as suffix in brackets or with upperline to express the degree is ongoing. is there any reference for this type of expressions
2
votes
3answers
174 views

Is it ok nowadays to say numbers instead of digits, while expressing a sum?

( example: 2345 - these four numbers make the sum..) or must I say digits?
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Origin of the saying 'all wet'

All wet is slang expression (mainly AmE) meaning: entirely mistaken. (TFD) All wet: The Phrase Finder, referring to OED, suggests that its first usage was: "c. all wet: mistaken, ...
1
vote
1answer
131 views

People who tell me vs. people telling me

I'm wondering if there's any difference, be it semantically, grammatically and so on, between phrases like: I hate people telling me what to do. / I hate people who tell me what to do. They'...
1
vote
4answers
141 views

A word for 'to empathize without identifying with'

I'm looking for a verb or noun that refers to our capacity to abstract someone else’s experience or experiences vicariously. Such a word would be good for describing what it takes to be able to ...
7
votes
13answers
1k views

Is there a common expression for “origin of everything”? What could it be?

In some languages there is a common pathetic hyperbole that goes like "the origin of origins" or "beginning of beginnings". Is there anything similar in English [or Latin]? Context: consider a ...
1
vote
2answers
207 views

Intransitive or transitive

As the common definition runs, an intransitive verb doesn't need an object as in "I run in the street." But my question is why some verbs are labeled intransitive, and at the same time,they take a ...
1
vote
4answers
275 views

Answer for “You know what?”

Could 'Yes' be the answer for 'You know what?' I mean: A: 'You know what?' B: 'Yes.' C: 'I won the first prize.' I'm not sure if I bother to write 'Yes' between A's words.
2
votes
1answer
125 views

“Find” as a transitive verb

I know that in this example I find it quite hard to do something the verb "to find" must be followed by the pronoun "it". But what if I say One thing I found "it" to get used to doing is… ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is “The State it was In when it was…” too wordy?

I saw this message: Reset all save data and return the game to the state it was in when it was newly purchased Is the the state it was in too wordy or redundant? Can it be just the state when it ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Possible ways to pronounce an IPv6 address

When reading out IPv4 addresses, people typically say something like, "ten dot one dot seven" etc. This is pretty easy since "dot" is one syllable. How can IPv6 addresses be pronounced? Saying "colon" ...
0
votes
2answers
481 views

A generic term for both books and movies?

I need to know this for an essay I'm doing. I thinks media might work but I'm not really sure. Do you have any suggestions?
1
vote
2answers
448 views

What does “What a make!” mean?

Stumbled across this on a photography forum. All the bells, dials and whistles on this one. I handled her once. Nice! But surprisingly heavy. The impression of weight (and a lasting impression ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

The order of “twice” and “the” [closed]

I have read this sentence. And I happen to wonder if the order of "twice the" is right or not. "It was a space in London, in Kensington and it went on sale for 400,000 pound, which is over twice the ...
1
vote
5answers
353 views

A word for one who goes against conventional wisdom because it makes sense to do so?

I'm looking for a word for someone who goes against conventional wisdom because they have sufficient evidence that it makes sense to do so. The only words I can think of, like contrarian, or hipster, ...
6
votes
2answers
697 views

How to describe heavy rain falling on a lake and making ephemeral “pockmarks”

I am looking for a word which describes the pockmarks that heavy rainfall makes when it is falling on a lake. Rain at Lake Constance by Rona-Keller / deviantart.com
1
vote
1answer
499 views

When to capitalize “certification titles”?

At my company you can take a course where you can receive training in being a "Super Helper." (Real program name anonymized to protect the innocent.) When, if ever, should we capitalize "Super ...
-1
votes
1answer
199 views

Is it Correct To Start A Sentence With a Coordinate Conjunction [duplicate]

This seems to be argued back and forth by my Writing and Reading teachers. Here is the problem. For example I write this sentence: And I went to bed to get some sleep. Just a simple sentence ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

Is there a word or phrase for walking into a room to get something but then forgetting what you went in there to get?

I'm fairly certain this has happened to all of us at some point: You go into a room to get something, but once you're there, you can't remember what you intended to get. It seems like a specific, ...
4
votes
2answers
636 views

Words For Frequencies Less Than An Hour

I'm writing a scheduling program and need to show frequency options ranging from once a minute to once a year. Anything over an hour is pretty simple, but I'm looking a formal term for frequencies ...
-3
votes
3answers
1k views

“It's a long time that” - correct or not?

I recently used the following phrasing in an fictional informal dialogue: It's a long time that I did this. Someone (a native speaker of English) corrected me and told me that I should use ...
0
votes
1answer
720 views

Complete the sentences with the correct form of the following words [closed]

I need to complete the two sentences with the correct form of the following words: offer, make. The sentences: Your exam grades _______ a big difference to your future career. The supermarket ...
1
vote
3answers
73 views

Technical writing: how to say more vs. less permission?

I'm writing a doc about user permission settings. I'm trying to say that if you select multiple settings for the same application, the highest permission will override the lesser permission. (In other ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Why don't we say: “The shop is opened”? [duplicate]

Why do we write "The shop is open" and not "The shop is opened"? The passive voice is formed this way: verb + ed. On the other hand, we write "The shop is closed".
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Is it just 2nd conditional?

"I would work on another script later this month, if I thought I could find the time." As far as I know, both parts of the 2nd conditional are supposed to express present situation. Is it present ...
0
votes
1answer
224 views

Receive a prize in/on/for a contest

What is the proper way to say that someone received a prize / achieved a certain rank as a result of his participation in a contest or competition? I would also like a brief explanation, if it's more ...
2
votes
7answers
730 views

Is there a single word that refers to a vagina secreting lubricant in response to sexual arousal?

I'm seeking a single word. An analogue is "salivate" which is what someone sometimes does when they experience hunger and refers to the mouth secreting liquid. "Elsa was hungry and began salivating" ...
3
votes
9answers
8k views

What to call Primary School + High School, but not College

I was creating a web form for a client who requested the highest-grade completed for primary and high school and then college. The original paper form had the following Circle highest grade ...
2
votes
3answers
250 views

Should I use Singular or Plural for “Donor(s) List”? [duplicate]

To be recognized in the Saddle River Donors List and help the Saddle River community, please include your tax free donation: Should it be Donors or Donor?
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Semi-colon, comma, or two separate sentences? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Thanks. I appreciate it. Thanks, I appreciate it. Thanks; I appreciate it.
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Should you pronounce the plural 's' after a word that ends with 's'? [duplicate]

I've always said, for example, "Achilles' shield" as "Achilles-es shield". However, I've noticed others don't pronounce the plural, simply just keep it as "Achilles". Should you pronounce the '-es', ...
3
votes
2answers
130 views

Why does 'continual' involve interruption, and 'continuous' none ?

Source: Continuous indicates duration without interruption. ... Continual indicates duration that continues over a long period of time, but with intervals of interruption. ... The ...
2
votes
1answer
163 views

'insidious' : How does 'sit in' mean 'gradual, subtle' ? [closed]

insidious {adjective} = Proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with very harmful effects: Etymonline: 1540s, from Middle French insidieux (15c.) or directly from Latin insidiosus "deceitful, ...

15 30 50 per page