-1
votes
2answers
209 views

“The title of Bachelor of Engineering” vs “the title Bachelor of Engineering”

... obtained the diploma and the title of Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.). ... obtained the diploma and the title Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Which sentence is correct? Which is ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

“misunderstand” vs “misunderstood”

If speaking or writing to someone and it becomes apparent they did not interpret something correctly, is it correct to inform them "you misunderstood" or "you misunderstand"? I'm not sure because the ...
4
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “with respect to” wrong?

My English professor suggested yesterday that the expression "with respect to", despite being frequently used is simply wrong. He said that one should rather use "in respect of", which in turn is not ...
1
vote
1answer
376 views

Past vs. perfect in present-tense narrative

When telling a story using the present tense, should events at a specific time in the past be recounted in the past perfect or in the past tense? For example: I know to writeJack entered the room and ...
-1
votes
1answer
200 views

Using a pronoun and a proper noun with a descriptor

With the sentence: "If he was Little Freddie, the apple of Vinnie's eye, would have told him." Does it mean if he was Little Freddie, or was he referring to Little Freddie? I think the meaning is for ...
2
votes
3answers
289 views

One word that can be used to represent student and professional

I am having two options for users to select from, either they are a Student or they are a Professional. What one word can be used to represent both the names collectively? I tried a lot but couldn't ...
0
votes
5answers
850 views

A better verb for “cement” in “cement one's interest”

Is there a better word for cemented in the following sentence? All the experiences I went through have cemented my interest in this field. I was told "cemented" doesn't quite fit in and I was ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

A word for “nobody depends on me”

If I do not depend on anybody, I can say: I am independent And if nobody depends on me. Is there a monoword to describe that?
2
votes
2answers
245 views

A term for someone who demotivates

What do we call a person who constantly demotivates others? For context: someone who thinks he is so brilliant in English, keeps discouraging me about the questions/answers I post.
1
vote
1answer
348 views

“Typed,” vs “typed in”

For example: I opened Google. Then, after giving it some thought, I typed (in): lolcats. Should I include the in in cases like this. Why?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Should I modify a gerund using an adjective or an adverb? [closed]

I know that a gerund is a noun, so it should be modified by an adjective. However, it is also a verb form. Can I modify it by using an adverb?
1
vote
1answer
69 views

How should I search information on the origin of a country on Google? [closed]

I'm trying to find some information on how the very first country came into being. I'm not sure what keywords I should start with. I've tried synonyms like state and nation as well, but none of them ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Forming the possessive of a username that is a contraction

Suppose there was a user of one of these sites whose handle was Won't. How would one form the possessive of this username to refer to that user's post?* Won't's answer Given that the 's ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Between friend and acquaintance? [closed]

What do I call people in between friends and acquaintance? I want to refer to my classmates who I know somewhat well and are friendly with, but not friends.
0
votes
4answers
345 views

at which point I can shift from past perfect back to simple past?

Imagine I'm writing a story in past tense. Here come some questions: SENTENCE 1: "Tom simply couldn't imagine how different the world had been when his father was at Tom's age: there hadn't been ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

When writing out a phone conversation can you use multiple capitals in a row? [closed]

When writing out a phone conversation for the purpose of transcription or translation, is it correct to write: 1) Hey, Hi, Well... OR 2) Hey, hi, well... I personally think 2, but others ...
1
vote
1answer
921 views

Is “Everyone is welcome along.” a valid sentence?

Is "Everyone is welcome along." a valid English sentence? My English grammaticality is basic at best and I'm not sure how to even research this...
17
votes
5answers
6k views

A word for blowing air into baby's tummy to make him(her) laugh

How do you call the action when you press your mouth against baby's tummy and blow the air to make the baby laugh?
1
vote
2answers
114 views

Is there any phrase for journalists lies? [closed]

I need a word or a phrase or expression for journalists lies.. There must be something...
3
votes
2answers
189 views

A word for someone who comes from one city but supports a team from a different city?

Is there a word that describes someone who, for example, supports Manchester United but was neither born nor brought up in Manchester but comes from another city in the UK? I'm not looking for a rude ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

what do you call the feeling of pain addict have before using drug? [closed]

when addicts don't use drug for a rather long time, they feel kind of angry and are in a bad mood. they also feel pain over their body I think(esp opium users.) what is that feeling or mood called?
5
votes
4answers
492 views

Why do some people prefix people's names with “the”?

Lately I've been seeing a trend that I find disturbing for some reason, mostly in Indian publications but also in some American ones - prefixing people's names with "the". For example: The Mr. Gandhi ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Are any classes taught on…” or “Is any class taught on…”

Should I say: "Are any classes taught on Wednesdays?" Or should I instead say "Is any class taught on Wednesdays?" Which one is correct/more appropriate?
0
votes
4answers
319 views

Usage of 'AD' era designation

Considering the sentence: AD 1453, the city of Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman empire. Is this a complete sentence? From what I understand of the situation: The era designator ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

Is it common to use MRT to refer to subways all around the world?

According to The Free Dictionary: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mass+rapid+transit Noun 1. mass rapid transit - an urban public transit system using underground or elevated trains rapid ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Someone just told me that my business website structure should be “well-siloed”… what does that mean. [closed]

I know they're referencing a silo but i'm not understanding how it correlates/translates to business structure and presentation. are they talking about the function of the silo?
2
votes
2answers
318 views

To use vs Make use of. when to use what

I often hear 'to make use of something'. Is there any difference from just 'to use something'?
10
votes
7answers
1k views

Word or phrase for “seeing meaning where none exists”

Is there a word or a phrase to describe an instance where meaning is ascribed to something where there is no such meaning or where the interpretation is particularly fanciful? For example, when ...
0
votes
4answers
103 views

Is it still an indirect object if you're taking something away?

So Jim is the indirect object in the sentence "Sally gave Jim a sandwich." But is Jim still the indirect object if the sentence is "Sally took the sandwich from Jim"? And if the sentence were to ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

'Spree' as a figure of speech

I came across the following sentence in a book by the English nature writer Robert Macfarlane; Sunlight fell in bright sprees on the floor (of the wood). What part of speech is 'spree' in this ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“As [adjective] as a [noun]” vs “as [adjective] a [noun] as there”

How does the meaning differ for the following two sentences? Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating a problem as there could be. Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating as a ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Ending summation with “and” right before another “and”?

Let's say I have this sentence: This process uses [summation] and produces z. Should it be written like this: This process uses w, x and y and produces z. Or like this? This process ...
2
votes
2answers
225 views

What does this text from The Haunted House by Charles Dickens mean?

"Who is--or who was--the hooded woman with the owl? Do you know?" "Well!" said Ikey, holding up his cap with one hand while he scratched his head with the other, "they say, in general, that ...
0
votes
3answers
107 views

What does 'had been took with fits and held down in 'em' mean?

The following appears in The Haunted House by Charles Dickens. What is the meaning of the bolded phrase? This very concise summary of the facts was all I could learn, except that a young man, as ...
0
votes
2answers
137 views

“a truce to sport..” from a poem by Paul Laurence Dunbar

From "A Lazy Day" by Paul Laurence Dunbar: No ripple stirs the placid pool, When my adventurous line is cast, A truce to sport, while clear and cool, The mirrored clouds slide ...
1
vote
2answers
139 views

Finding the correct interpretation of “Every X [units of time], at maximum/minimum.”

I've recently been involved in a discussion over different interpretations of the following sentence (paraphrased): Users may update their information every two weeks, at maximum. The intended ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“Ski in / Ski out” – Which action is which?

Hotels on ski fields directly connected to the lift system are often referred to as "ski in / ski out" hotels. In this context, does "ski out" refer to the action of skiing out to the mountain, or ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

“Do this” or “Will this” in questions

I have a question sentence: "Will this set of vectors form an orthogonal basis for the system?". Is it ok to start with "Will this" or "Do this" is more appropriate?
6
votes
6answers
14k views

Where and when did “Bucket List” come to mean what it does today?

I'm not sure I had even heard the term "bucket list" until the movie came out. I get the feeling though that the term long predates the movie. Can anyone identify how "bucket list" came to mean what ...
16
votes
10answers
3k views

Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?

That's a line from a Twilight book. It's a grammar mistake pointed out by this website. She sighed, and began whispering again. I don't see anything wrong with it. Is the comma the mistake?
1
vote
1answer
653 views

grammar - how to use “ birth ” and born? [closed]

How to explain the following My mother gave birth to me. So I was born. what is the usage of this " birth "
0
votes
3answers
152 views

How to specify one had the topmost GPA during his education?

I am writing a CV and I want to specify that I had the best GPA among all of the students. What is the best way to write such a thing in north america? Does 'Bachelor with first class honor' work? How ...
0
votes
1answer
340 views

“A challenge to X” vs. “a challenge for X”

Nile countries are facing tremendous challenges for food security,... Should I use "a challenge for" or "a challenge to" in the above sentence?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What is another way of saying “and more”? [closed]

What is another of way saying "and more" in this sentence? Throughout my life, I have discovered the love for science, mathematics, and literature, all the way to visual arts, badminton, and more.
2
votes
2answers
162 views

How did 'arching' come into use as a verb meaning 'to thwart'?

I have seen the word 'arch' used as a verb in the context of a villain causing trouble for a hero, or a hero thwarting a villain. It is also used when a villain is actively trying to become a hero's ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

Term for a polygamist's wife

Is there a term for a wife of a polygamist if she has only one spouse?
0
votes
2answers
185 views

“The first step in making” vs. “the first step on making” vs. “the first step at making”

I have this sentence: I strongly believe that the first step in making the most efficient solution for any problem is analyzing it well. Would it be better to use either of the following? ...
1
vote
1answer
519 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
0
votes
1answer
336 views

with/without “-ed” for the compound adjectives formed by “adj.+noun”? [duplicate]

Among tons of "adj.+noun" compound adjectives, some of them end with "-ed", e.g. open-minded, double-sided, big-headed, some without, e.g. present-day, rear-view, deep-sea. I've also seen the usage of ...
0
votes
1answer
209 views

Expect a dog: figurative meaning [closed]

What does this mean? I stumbled across it here: "If the design requires a million trips to the server, expect a dog." (The last sentence in the paragraph titled Efficiency.)

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