1
vote
3answers
120 views

“if” used to introduce facts

I have learned that "if" is used for more or less likely possibilities while "when" is used for things which are considered facts. Now I read a bit similar to the following in a book. My sister ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

What is the subject in this sentence?

I would like to know whether to use the singular or plural verb in the following sentence: In cases where there is/are headroom, .... It seems to me that the subject ought to be "In cases ...
0
votes
2answers
242 views

Is this sentence proper grammar? [closed]

Is this sentence using proper grammar? - "The money was and is not a loan."
-1
votes
1answer
177 views

What does 'Lets himself be swept along like a log of wood by a current.' mean?

I read the following quote by Gandhi when he was describing the actions of a moral man: Source How can a man understand morality who does not use his own intelligence and power of thought, but ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Latch onto [something/someone]” for “obtain, get (hold of) [something/someone]” in AE

I just rediscovered the colloquial expression "latch on to [something]" online and would like to know the story to its meaning of "obtain, get", which is presented by CD as AE and CE. ...
5
votes
2answers
287 views

Usage, prevalence of “rooster sauce” and “cock sauce”

Sriracha sauce is a kind of chili sauce named for Si Racha, Thailand, but in the United States many people call it “rooster sauce” or “cock sauce” after the prominent rooster logo on a popular brand ...
0
votes
3answers
639 views

“Massager” vs “masseuse”

A friend of mine recently used the word masseuse to describe a person that gives massages. I have never heard of this terminology before so I'm wondering what the difference is between massager and ...
0
votes
4answers
385 views

How would you say someone was “disrespecting you” correctly? [closed]

Is there a grammatically correct synonym for the word "disrespect" in the form of a verb? As in: "Please stop disrespecting me, Bill."
0
votes
1answer
139 views

About catch the bus, train etc [duplicate]

I found the two meanings of the verb 'to catch the train, bus etc' in British English: 1) we are getting the stop/station, waiting and boarding 2) we are getting the stop/station, waiting and ...
0
votes
5answers
1k views

I want to know the difference between “you are false” and “you are wrong” [closed]

What is the difference between false and wrong? Is there any difference in meaning?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Term to describe quality of one's day

I'm working on a sort of diary app with which users will rate different aspects of their day. One of the metrics being measured is the overall quality of the user's day. Currently I'm just calling ...
13
votes
9answers
12k views

What is a word for somebody who lies to themselves

I feel like the fact that people lie to themselves about things can tell you a lot about that person but I just can't put my finger on a single word that I'd use to describe them. In fact, not just ...
2
votes
3answers
922 views

Take the car (underground) and get the car (underground)

I know than we can say let's go by car OR let's take the car (because it is too far to walk - and I already have the car nearby.) But, can we say: Let's get the car And the same ...
1
vote
3answers
190 views

Correct usage of “The” within this sentence

A client has requested that I put a notice in the form of ALL THE PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY on a web page. However, the word "THE" in the sentence appears unnecessary in my opinion. Is ...
4
votes
18answers
2k views

What is the word meaning “going on and on for miles and miles”?

Edit: I was walking down an intolerably long sidewalk one day, and every time a mounted another hill, I saw more of it seeming to stretch out before me. It got me to thinking: is there a word for ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

'How dared you?' versus 'How dare you?'

A book I'm reading has this sentence in it: "How dared you go and see her without me?" Is the usage of the past tense 'dared' here grammatically wrong or just odd given the established phrase "How ...
1
vote
2answers
981 views

origin of the expression “one eye on the past, one eye on the future”

I would like to know what is the origin of the expression "one eye on the past, one eye on the future". After googling for it, all I get is references to songs.
0
votes
4answers
113 views

Single word for both inbox and archive

I'm looking for a word that suggests both a place where new things can arrive and where you can safely store things, but where you wouldn't want to keep things that you are actively working on. In ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

Processor vs Processer

Is there any difference between "processor" and "processer"? Some spelling dictionaries only have the -or form, and some have both. Is it a US vs UK English thing? Or something else? More ...
0
votes
2answers
210 views

Looking for a word meaning “where or who it came from”

I'm trying to describe feedback from a software system. I believe if the application's emails seems like they are from a person rather than an automated message it will get a better response from the ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

To be versus have in their passive forms?

'He'd only had it told to him by the townspeople'. What is the difference between this passive construction and if it had said, 'He was only told...'?
-5
votes
6answers
506 views

he pregnate my daughter and he pregnated my daughter [closed]

i have being trying endlessly to think up something positive about this expression which of these is correct? He pregnate my daughter He pregnated my daughter
0
votes
3answers
164 views

The target is narrow/ limited / tight?

If I would like to describe a target of a very small group of people, like age 14 to 16 , girls, should I say the target is narrow / limited / tight or any other adjectives? Which one sounds better? ...
1
vote
4answers
655 views

What does 'with all that' mean in this sentence?

The sentence goes as: Surely, through most of the history of history writing, the dominant mode of recalling that past has been narrative, with all that this implies about literary crafting and ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the word “queer” an accepted and polite word for lesbian?

I was reading an article on the promulgation of the dental dam as a means of preventing sexually transmitted disease. Article here. The author of the article Arielle Duhaime-Ross consistently refers ...
2
votes
1answer
347 views

To buttonhole someone

Can you help me find a synonym to this expression meaning to approach someone as if by grasping the person's garment to have his attention. Could it be used informally to describe boys' attitude to ...
0
votes
1answer
217 views

'to be predicated' can be followed by which prepositions?

I'm interested in "predicated of", but which the ODO below doesn't explicitly define: predicate = [with object] 1. {Grammar & Logic} state, affirm, or assert (something) about the subject of ...
2
votes
1answer
775 views

Is the word “annotation” suitable to describe “underline, highlight, strikethrough” made by reader/user? (labels in computer application)

I am not a native speaker so I would like to know what terms are suitable to describe notes highlight underline strike-through to the user, in computer applications where user can annotate text ...
0
votes
3answers
97 views

Can accomplished be used synonymously with executed or carried out?

I've stumbled upon this sentence and to me it just sounds a bit off: The selection of shops is accomplished by our company. I've never seen accomplished used in that context and I was just ...
2
votes
2answers
140 views

A line in Reflections on the Revolution in France

In Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France he says: "I flatter myself that I love a manly, moral, regulated liberty as well as any gentleman of that society, be he who he will ; and ...
2
votes
4answers
199 views

“What I feel [is] more important” - should I include “is”?

"What I feel more important is for you to go home right now." "What I feel is more important is for you to go home right now." Which sentence is correct? Also, is there a rule that is being followed ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What's the meaning of “over two-years' time”

For example, if someone says: Looking at the next three years, I think stock prices will drop, then does the phrase "two-years' time" mean at the end of the next three years, in the next three ...
0
votes
2answers
325 views

Can Someone Tell me if This Sentence is a Pun?

My friend and I are walking along a nude beach. There is an exposed man directly in front of us. My friend asks me what time it is. My response is "It's 12 o'cock." Pun or bad joke?
4
votes
5answers
583 views

What's the right punctuation for the following list?

Many cases of animal suicide were discused. A duck drowned itself after the death of its companion. A school of dolphins stranded on a beach with no reason whatsoever. A deer threw itself from ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

“ It was a pleasure knowing”, “It was a pleasure to have known”, or “It was a pleasure to know”?

I am in the process of ordering a headstone for my dad and I wish to have the words It was a pleasure to have known (as opposed to the more traditional "in loving remembrance", "in memory of", ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Is it “described in” or “described on”?

This one is probably fairly obvious for native speakers, but I'm always confused. I am writing an article and I want to say that such and such methodology is described in/on a table, a figure or a ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a way to express “knowing just enough to be dangerous” succintly?

Every sector has them: the employee who has had very little formal training about a certain program, device or concept, but has done research into it himself and figured out just enough to have a ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Callback”, “call-back”, or “call back” [closed]

This was briefly touched on here: "What/When is the best time to call back?" but only in comments for an answer rather than the question itself. Should I use callback, call-back, or call ...
1
vote
3answers
107 views

Any reason why the collocation “the wound healed” is more common than “the injury healed”?

"The wound healed" gets 890,000 hits when googled, whereas "the injury healed" only gets 525,000. Is there any reason for the difference? Whether the damage to someone's body is deliberate – wound – ...
0
votes
3answers
360 views

How similar or different are “recant”, “repudiate”, “renounce” [closed]

Recant, repudiate, renounce are synonyms of abjure. I'm unclear as to how these terms may be utilized in different sentences. I will be delighted to see them all in one sentence. I seek efficient ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between “admit” and “accept”

Which of the options sounds correct? She has been accepted/admitted at York University.
0
votes
2answers
104 views

“How many rooms left to clean?”

I want to express how many rooms have yet to be cleaned before the work is finished. Is this correct: How many rooms left to clean?
0
votes
1answer
107 views

“Course in/on/of/for nursing specialty”

Which preposition would be the correct one? the course in/on/of/for nursing speciality
-1
votes
3answers
100 views

Does the “defense sickle” exist in english football/soccer language?

In German football vocabulary, there exists a so called Abwehrsichel during defensive play. The meaning can best be seen at this youtube video at the 09 second mark: ...
0
votes
2answers
734 views

“He denied having killed him” vs “He denied he had killed him”

I'm trying to understand the perfect aspect of the verbs and I am not sure whether both are correct: He denied having killed him He denied he had killed him. If not, what is the problem? ...
0
votes
2answers
163 views

Any opened supermarket near?

I want to know if this sentence is correct: Are there any opened supermarket near? If I want to place "Do you know" before the question, which is preferred? Do you know if are there any ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

singular event with singular verb [duplicate]

Is the use of the contracted negative form of Do, the DON'T, in reference to a singular event or action acceptable in formal writings as is in song lyrics composition?
1
vote
1answer
505 views

What is the (explicit) meaning of “Till daddy takes the t-bird away”

I first heard this in an audio-book. I do understand the implicit meaning but I always wondered what this really means and the background of this phrase. I have tried searching the Internet but all I ...
21
votes
2answers
785 views

“Fire” a weapon before firearms existed?

Did the verb “fire a weapon” exist before the actual introduction of firearms on battlefields? More specifically, does it make sense for a creative work to have archers (or whatever ranged weaponry) ...
0
votes
2answers
193 views

When should “literally” be used?

We all know that literally is being overused currently. I want to know if literally should only be used in contrast to situations which are normally figurative in common usage. For example: It ...

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