0
votes
1answer
185 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
0
votes
1answer
331 views

Are these consecutive prepositions?

If Gryffindor won, they would move (1) up into second place in the house championship. (Harry Potter book1) They follow him (2) out into the farmyard, and (3) on into the old flint barn. ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do American and British English use different quotation marks?

American English uses double-quotes, while British English uses single-quotes: "This is a quote." 'This is a quote.' Why do we use different quotation marks? When did this difference ...
-2
votes
1answer
81 views

The usage of relationship [closed]

I want to express that the sleeping time has no much relationship with the activity and ... But the following sentence looks very strange. Please help me paraphrase this one: No absolute ...
-2
votes
2answers
166 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
0
votes
3answers
427 views

Is “O.K.” less serious affirmation than “All right”? [closed]

I was interested in the usage of “O.K” and “All right” in the following conversation of a man ordering food delivery to a wrong number and a man who unfortunately received the wrong number call in the ...
1
vote
3answers
719 views

Difference between waste and squander

What is the difference between the verbs to squander and to waste? For example: to squander money to waste money
5
votes
2answers
3k views

What's the word for the “back arm” if there is one?

We have the word "forearm" — but what's the other half of the arm called by itself? Does it have a corresponding positional name?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Regional word for paperboard that school children use in projects?

I'm talking about large paperboard that school children create their projects on. They might draw or paste things on them, usually to present some sort of information. You may see them carrying them ...
3
votes
1answer
226 views

“Tabled”, US vs UK [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the meaning of the expression “We can table this”? Here's an example snippet for some context. Ann had an idea. We tabled her idea. In the UK this means ...
7
votes
1answer
834 views

Different types of whistling

Are there terms or succinct phrases that describe the different ways of whistling listed below? The standard put-your-lips-together-and-blow Tongue against bottom teeth Sticking two fingers (thumb ...
5
votes
3answers
939 views

Lexically recognized synonym for “humblebrag”?

As one might guess, a humblebrag is one who uses a pretense of humility as a vehicle for boasting. This word can be found at Urban Dictionary but, it appears, nowhere more authoritative. Yet, of ...
1
vote
1answer
263 views

Different meanings for phrase “off the regular price”

What is the correct way to say a product can be bought with a discount of 30%? Is it: “Buy this by 30% off the regular price.”? What I want to say is that a 30% discount is being given, so the ...
1
vote
3answers
800 views

“Encapsulated by” vs. “encapsulated in” vs. “encapsulated with”

I am writing some text wherein I have to mean "wrapped with double quotes". Would any of the following expressions be correct? encapsulated with double quotes encapsulated in double quotes ...
1
vote
1answer
245 views

“In a book store near my school” vs. “in the book store near my school” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any simple rules for article usage (“a” vs “the” vs none) Which article should I use in the following situations? There is only one book store near my ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Difference between “second cousin” and “first cousin once removed” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there an accepted rule for naming all of our various distant relatives (Kinship Terms)? What is the difference between second cousin and first cousin once removed? Is ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Resources describing Somerset English [closed]

Can anyone suggest any good resources describing the grammar of traditional Somerset English (not accented standard English)? The Wikipedia article for the West Country dialects provides a good ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

How to avoid past/future tense?

I'm writing a Software Design Document. It is being written in parallel to the development, so as some features are already finished they are written in past tense (the only way I know of articulating ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

“So much ahead of” vs. “so much forward of”

Let's say I'm a pitcher in a baseball game, standing on the pitcher's mound which is supposed to be 100m away from the batsman. Someone messes up the mound and moves it 50 m further, making it ...
-2
votes
4answers
259 views

Can using “drop” alone cause confusion?

Dictionary.com and Oxford Dictionaries Online define drop as: cause or allow to sink to a lower position let or make to fall vertically When I say “I dropped the baton” without further ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there any difference between “He won't do something” and “He wouldn't do something”? [closed]

I have read somewhere that He won't do something means He refused to do something and also He wouldn't do something has the same meaning. Now I'd like to know, what is the difference in usage of ...
-5
votes
2answers
876 views

“And so is everyone else.” What is this kind of sentence called in English? [closed]

"And so is everyone else." What is this kind of sentence called in English? For example: Man 1: “You are human.” Man 2: “and so is everyone else.” Is there any specific name for the kind of ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

When to use or omit periods in acronyms, abbreviations, and initials [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to drop the periods in abbreviations? I don't understand when or where to use or discard a period when writing short forms. For example, my college is the ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Should a company be referred to as “he/she” or as “it”?

When a customer represents a company, not a person, and a pronoun is needed to refer back to that customer, should one use he/she, or should one use it?
2
votes
2answers
321 views

Why is an apostrophe used in the genitive “-’s”?

The English possessive isn’t a contraction, but rather a relic of the grammatical case system, so why is an apostrophe used in (most) forms of the possessive?
0
votes
3answers
578 views

For people, can you say “a British” like you can say “an Australian”?

According to Wiktionary, you can't use "a British" to refer to individual British people, though you can use it to refer to a race of people as a whole, but you can use "an Australian", and this ...
4
votes
7answers
6k views

What adjective describes somebody who is quiet and obeys all the rules?

What adjective describes somebody who is quiet and obeys all the rules? For example, "Xiaoli is a very (adj.) student because she doesn't smoke or drink, gets good grades, and always does her ...
2
votes
1answer
288 views

Why do we need an indefinite article in the sentence “The price is **an incredible 50,000 dollars**”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: ‘A[n] * [number] [plural]’ Construction Why do we need an indefinite article in the sentence "The price is an incredible 50,000 dollars"? "An" is singular, "dollars" is ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Meaning of “pitches add up” [closed]

I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "pitch adds up" as it appears in this phrase from an article in Fast Company: None of [the applications] fit the bill, and the pitches add up ...
-2
votes
1answer
519 views

I need a word for the time just before some other moment. Like upon, only in reverse [closed]

I wrote a program that must add to some log entry (of some event) a note if event happened just before some other major event or along with it. And i cannot select a good word for this. This word ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Can any transitive verb be accompanied by a preposition?

Galileo was forced to recant his assertion that the earth orbited the sun (Oxford Dictionary) Can one recant on an absence of belief? (The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life) The first ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Meaning and sentence structure of “Why would we have thought otherwise?”

Here is a snippet from an article on CNN And of course the fiscal cliff turned out to be a dud. Why would we have thought otherwise? It somehow makes perfect sense that Washington created its own ...
3
votes
1answer
233 views

Is there a word to describe an offensive term reclaimed by the offended group [duplicate]

Is there a word to describe the process, or result of the process of, an offended group reclaiming a word for themselves. For example, it is common for gay people to call themselves queers, or ...
1
vote
2answers
655 views

What is the lexical equivalent of “syntax”?

I'm trying to find a word that means "lexical rules" (or perhaps not rules, but "tokens" I guess?); kind of like how syntax means "syntactic rules", but I'm unable to find one. In other words: ...
3
votes
2answers
346 views

One meaning of “of course”

Reading that classic of children's literature, Tiptoes the Mischievous Kitten (a Ladybird book from 1949), I started wondering about the phrase "of course." Here's an example of what I think of as ...
4
votes
2answers
940 views

Why does “right” have the same two meanings in both English and French? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: right (opposite of left) connected to right (legal term)? This is both an EL&U question and a FL&U question, so I've double-posted accordingly to maximize ...
8
votes
8answers
3k views

What's the word that describes this ability/quality?

What is the word that describes someone who displays the ability to think of alternative ways of dealing with a situation, especially a situation that calls for it and then acts upon it? In my native ...
-1
votes
1answer
126 views

What does “non-afirmated” artist mean? [closed]

I often hear this term "afirmated artists" or sometimes "non-afirmated artists", but I couldn't find meaning in the dictionary. What exactly could it be? See, for example, the International Festival ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

The sound of a moving tree trunk

When it's windy out as the wind is blown against a large standing tree, its trunk moves and makes a noise similar to that creaking noise that a door or a floorboard in a house makes. Do we use creak ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

What does the umlaut mean over the E in the name “Zoë”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Zoe” or “Zoë”: which is the correct spelling? The ë in the name Zoë suggests that the e should be pronounced as a long a. The name is from the Greek goddess of ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

Is capitalization of special words acceptable without another rule to justify it?

I've found that it's a rather contentious issue in the Pokémon fandom whether names like "Pikachu" should be capitalized when referring to the general species (and similarly for certain other words). ...
1
vote
6answers
308 views

What is the word for doing something absentmindedly?

Suppose a person throws his pen up and catches it by his one hand when he is deep in thought to solve a math problem. They don't know why they do it, but they just do and they do it unintentionally ...
2
votes
0answers
24 views

“I thought it was important that he say it in his own voice.” – That he say it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use the subjunctive mood? I have often come across constructions such as the one highlighted below and wondered how to explain the grouping of a third ...
4
votes
6answers
917 views

Proving that “at” is a preposition in “he laughed at me”

He arrived at 10 p.m. At in this sentence is clearly a preposition because it can be replaced with another preposition. He laughed at me. How can we prove that at in the above sentence is ...
-2
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “even when” a conjunction?

Does even when grammatically work the same as even though and even if work? Or is it more of a time expression? Following the rules is essential, even when it’s difficult. Following the rules is ...
0
votes
1answer
598 views

Can a subordinate clause split subject and verb in the main clause?

E.g. are these correct? Following the rules, even if it's difficult, is essential. Following the rules, although it's difficult, is essential.
1
vote
1answer
990 views

Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Precise” vs. “exact” [closed]

Which of the sentences below looks more natural? Question answering systems that appear with the aim of providing precise textual answers. Question answering systems that appear with the aim ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

Comma in “Before I go I will return the book” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use the comma? Before I go I will return the book. Do we have to use a comma in the above sentence?
0
votes
2answers
475 views

“Many books” vs. “many of books”

Is it correct to say "Many of books are in English" or should we say "Many books are in English"?

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