2
votes
2answers
194 views

An adjective for gestalt

Is there an adjective to describe someone with the ability to quickly grasp/see the whole picture out of a few perceived details. This person is not detail-oriented and never fails to see the forest ...
0
votes
0answers
191 views

The meaning of “going over” something

I'm fond of old especially folk songs, but as a foreigner I often have troubles interpreting some phrases. Here is one from Wayfaring stranger: I'm going there to see my father I'm going there no ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

A new use for the word Alibi [closed]

At recent teleconference meetings, I've notice that the meeting leader will sometimes end the call with a phrase like, "So does anyone have any alibi's?" The context (and people's response) suggests ...
1
vote
1answer
140 views

Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

the Virginia public school district

Do I have to put "the" in front of "Virginia"? Thanks. Do disciplinary school removal rates differ between high and low poverty schools in Virginia public school district?
12
votes
5answers
2k views

One word for a man who feels vulnerable about his wife

What would we call a man who is always suspecting, distrustful and worried about his wife being wooed by other men? He considers his wife naive and the world (other men) as predators in waiting. It ...
3
votes
2answers
104 views

Would a specific type of animal be capitalized? [closed]

I did a project on owls. And I had to name 5 breeds, or species, of owls. But would they be capitalized or not? For example, spotted owls. Is it Spotted Owls or Spotted owls or spotted Owls or just ...
3
votes
0answers
2k views

Meaning of “Back on their heels” [closed]

In a townhall meeting, President Obama used the expression of "being back on heels": Now, it's no secret that unions have been back on their heels a little bit over the last several decades. ...
4
votes
1answer
10k views

“As for me” in the beginning of the sentence

Could I use "As for me" in the beginning of the sentence? For example, when somebody asks the whole group of people what was done, and one in that group answers what he did: "As for me, I did that ...
0
votes
3answers
145 views

Correct translation for the light switch for a website

I'm looking for the correct translation for a website (http://www.configurator.simonurmet.com/). I'd like to refer to the whole object, I don't need the name of each part for now. The "whole ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Can [sic] be used to show an omission or error in punctuation? [duplicate]

Can [sic] be used to show an omission or error in punctuation? Eg: Original: He was, happy to get a raise. Revised: He was [sic] happy to get a raise. There shouldn't be a comma after 'was'. ...
0
votes
1answer
215 views

Difference between sentences [closed]

What is the difference between: Did you remember to sign the letter? Do you remember signing the letter? and He didn't need to call the doctor. He needn't have called the doctor.
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Question regarding English in an old maths book

I'm currently working through an old British maths book, released around 1910, on the whole the language is quite manageable however I've reached a part of the text where there's talk of circles and ...
1
vote
2answers
143 views

Passive Voice vs Present Perfect Passive Voice

Neither Jeremy nor his friends have been informed about the accident by the traffic police. Why is the present perfect passive voice (have been informed) used in the sentence? Is it correct to use ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

What's the meaning of “figurative meaning”? [closed]

What does figurative meaning mean? What is the difference compared to literal meaning?
50
votes
5answers
4k views

Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?

There are drummers, buglers, fifers, whistlers, and fiddlers. Folks who play all the other instruments use the -ist suffix -- pianist, violinist, cellist, tympanist, guitarist, flautist, etc, etc, ad ...
5
votes
3answers
222 views

Antonym for 'bound' [closed]

What is the opposite of the term London-bound (meaning heading/travelling to London) - i.e. moving away from London?
0
votes
2answers
145 views

When have you officially 'started' something?

To say, I started playing Violin when I was 12 years years old: Does this imply that you have played Violin regularly since you were 12 years old? Can you 'have still started playing Violin when you ...
1
vote
2answers
113 views

“Degree of Proximity” or “Proximity of Blood” or “Relation Proximity”?

I'm translating a civil record to English, which has a table of information about a family registry. One of the titles is "Degree of Proximity", however I'm not sure which of the expressions suits the ...
0
votes
3answers
59 views

What does “intergeneric writing” mean?

What is intergeneric writing? I did a Google search to no avail. I am interested in learning about this genre, or something else that I could search for to draw more knowledge.
1
vote
2answers
359 views

A direct, ironic response to “How are you?” indicating that the person is in a bad mood [closed]

Imagine person A asks person B, how B is doing. B is doing bad and he or she is upset with the question (after all, nobody wants to admit that he or she is screwing his or her life up). What kind of ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

How to correctly abbreviate name [closed]

Please advice on how to correctly abbreviate name. Which are grammatically correct? (if there are more correct forms please kindly add them as well) NOTE, If there is no correct way, please point ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Shall. I use a preposition here? [closed]

which one is correct? We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and friends were invited. Or We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and ...
0
votes
1answer
644 views

What does ' My stomach turned to water mean '?

I found this phrase in To Kill a Mockingbird, but I am not sure what it means. I understand it is a metaphor. But what is the speaker trying to say here?
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Being watched but not seeing the observer

What is the word that describes the situation in which one is being watched, but cannot see the observer. As though the watcher resides in a tower, while the subject walks the streets.
1
vote
2answers
733 views

Word to describe quality being fit to each other

Is there any good noun to describe the quality being fit to each other? The picture as example, either of the two halves fits to the other. At this point, I want to make a sentence like this: Either ...
0
votes
3answers
199 views

Verbs or phrases to buy something which are specifically for sale later?

what is the verbs or phares stating that shop owners buy something which are specifically to be sold in future, chefs buy some ingredients which are specifically used to make foods to sell, or ...
0
votes
1answer
372 views

I regret that something didn't happen in the past

We can use should have + pp to express our regrets about things that didn't happen in the past. I should have talked to him about the car. (I regret, that I didn't talk to him) In the other ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

“Short for” vs. “Stands for”

US stands for "the United States". US is short for "the United States". What are the subtle differences between them?
-1
votes
3answers
1k views

Comma after 'is'? [duplicate]

Is it correct to place a comma after 'is'? Please, no recast. The question is, where do we get the money to pay for it?
1
vote
1answer
592 views

Word and etymology for “small of one's back”

I've encountered the phrase small of one's back often when I was reading the Divergent series, and recently encountered it again on a Wikipedia article. I've searched its meaning on the internet, but ...
1
vote
1answer
237 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

Why is the British tv show “the Undatables” not called “the Undatable” without 's'?

There is a tv series on Channel 4 called "The Undatables" which I have just started watching. The title keeps me wondering why it's not just called "the undatable" like the poor or the rich? Last ...
1
vote
4answers
923 views

A phrase for two characters that are unmistakably similar

I am looking for a phrase that compares two characters that share very similar attributes and characteristics. Prufrock and Hamlet truly are [ ... ] I don't want something like "very much ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

Which punctuation is correct?

Which of the following has the correct punctuation: Where this agreement usually ends, however, is on the question of, "does this Act go far enough?" Where this agreement usually ends, ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Meaning of 'subject to spells'?

The noise had ceased, and everything was quiet. Then she sat down on the side of her bed, and, feeling faint--she was subject to spells--("I told you that when I came, didn't I, Rosie?" "Yes'm, ...
1
vote
1answer
400 views

Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Does "Mary's Got Talent" mean "Mary Has Got Talent"? Is "has got" grammatically correct in this instance?
1
vote
1answer
122 views

How to rationalise the 'pro-' prefix in 'promiscuous' ? [closed]

I ask not about the definition itself, but about the impact or role of the prefix in English: promiscuous (adj.) c.1600, people or things, "mingled confusedly, grouped together without ...
0
votes
3answers
134 views

Phrase for “putting one's plans into action”

I am looking for a phrase, metaphor, or cliche to mean "putting one's plans into action". I am using it in the following sentence. As the events of the play proceed, however, Hamlet becomes ...
0
votes
1answer
188 views

What is the early modern equivalent of ' I think ' [closed]

Would the term 'I think' be used in this era? I'm looking at translation for a piece of art, I'm wanting to translate flippant/meaningless language from today (things people say drunk, tweets etc.) ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

In documentation simple prensent passive or simple future passive?

I saw in many documentations that the simple future passive is more used than the normal simple present passive. for example: These gained data will be sent to a server for filtering then saved in ...
0
votes
5answers
253 views

What kind of character does a person who makes loud exclamations have?

Here, I am trying to find an adjective to describe a (relatively poor) person who is open but attracts a lot of attention (not attention-seeking though). As an example, I found this video. I’ve ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

What's the meaning of “there is not a good reference for”?

This is the context : "For most projectors however, including SONY projectors that have been used for a few months, or more and the bulb has aged, there is not a good reference for use in calibrating ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

A Question on Shakespeare's use of conditionals [duplicate]

The following is a big question, but I am really confused by the use of conditional in this Shakespearean excerpt. From The Taming of the Shrew, Act I, Scene I: 142 I am agreed; and would I ...
0
votes
8answers
493 views

What's the general term for street/lane/alley/avenue etc?

Recently I was trying to explain the Dutch word gracht to a friend and I found myself needing a general word for a unit of architecture which joins two places together. I thought about "route", but ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Can “safer” be used as a noun?

The word "safer" can refer to several different meanings such as well-being, which would usually be placed as an adjective. It is similarly associated with being cautious, trustworthy, or reliable as ...
0
votes
2answers
781 views

it's vs their (country) [duplicate]

What is correct? Australia constantly improves its roads. Australia constantly improve their roads. Australia constantly improves their roads. Thank you!
1
vote
0answers
88 views

Does the tense in that clause need to agree with the main clause? [duplicate]

I don't know if the title of this question is accurate or not. My vacabulary of grammar is very limited. May you could understand me by the following example: She told me that the earth is ...
0
votes
1answer
641 views

“be better off” vs “would rather” [closed]

Be better off could be used to express that something is better than another. For instance, I would be better off driving insead instead of taking a bus. Can we say I would rather drive ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

What's a Word for “Very Sick”?

What is a word for having been very sick, as with the flu or pneumonia? For example, it should fit into the sentence A few days after the event, I became ___ and couldn't get out of bed for a few ...

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