7
votes
7answers
998 views

Do synonyms exactly stand for the same

I have a question about synonyms: I'm wondering for quite a while if synonyms always stand exactly for the same thing. Is there sometimes a little difference in meaning? Let's use clumsy and clunky ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

“Fight Academy” or “Fighting Academy?”

What's more accurate, "Fight Academy" or "Fighting Academy" or is it equally correct to use either one. I have seen both being used and when I compare it to "Fight Club," it seems that "Fight ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Is it OK to use “after a moment,” “not long after,” and “before long” interchangeably?

I write stories, and I often find myself writing "after a moment," in too many parts. On their table was a smoked salmon, grilled meat, a plate of sushi, mussels, some salad, a basket with ...
2
votes
3answers
216 views

In Edsger Dijkstra's quote, meaning of 'the plague'

"The competent programmer is fully aware of the limited size of his own skull. He therefore approaches his task with full humility, and avoids clever tricks like the plague." I am trying to ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

“Not quite yet” vs “not yet”

Does the phrase 'not quite yet' mean that something will be done shortly? Does this imply less time than just 'not yet'?
27
votes
5answers
20k views

How correct is “quote, unquote” and where does its usage come from?

In the following quote, it seems (to me at least) quite difficult to figure out what exactly is being quote: “The best cure—quote, unquote—for aging is slowing disease,” Daniel Kraft, the chair of ...
2
votes
1answer
869 views

Use of preposition after 'Follow-up' [closed]

Could someone suggest what preposition to use after 'Follow-up'? Is it 'on' or 'of' or 'to'?
3
votes
2answers
539 views

Can “hidden in plain sight” be used in a sentence?

I learned from google that "Hidden in Plain Sight" is a movie title. Since I caught up the expression without context, I tried to use it. Now, I'm not sure whether it can be used without making ...
0
votes
3answers
154 views

Is the place for the king/queen's feet on a throne called the 'threshold' of the throne?

Is the place for the king/queen's feet on a throne called the 'threshold' of the throne? The place for the feet can be seen in this picture:
-1
votes
1answer
125 views

Can we say “in common sense way”?

"To understand this principle in common-sense way...." I heard a German teacher using "common-sense" this way, I think it is a little bit odd. Suppose I want to retain his idea, and modify the ...
4
votes
5answers
375 views

Single word for someone who is being impersonated (“impersonatee”?)

I'm writing about impersonators and people being impersonated in general terms and having 'the impersonator' and 'the person being impersonated' is cumbersome at best. 'Impersonatee' sort of works, ...
3
votes
1answer
274 views

What are the most common symbols or words used to refer a reader to a glossary?

What are the most common symbols or words used after difficult words in a text to refer a reader to a glossary for a definition?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“in the summer” or “in summer”

Both are correct forms when we talk about seasons of the year from what I learnt. But is there any difference between "in summer" and "in the summer"?
-1
votes
2answers
5k views

what does “Left off” mean?

Has anyone help me to understand meaning of "Left off" for example in below sentence: Where We Left Off and What’s Next
3
votes
5answers
5k views

“do the dishes” vs “wash the dishes”

Are there any difference in the meaning between do/wash the dishes? Are they used in different situations or are they synonyms? For example 'mountain hiking' would not say 'hiking mountain' ... ...
3
votes
1answer
161 views

Term for changing a word to fit another word inside it

Ska does this all the time. The Skatalites Eskanol (spanish ska) Skatastrophic I can't seem to think of a single other example, but I know I've seen it other places.
0
votes
1answer
429 views

What is the meaning of “some” in this sentence? [closed]

What does some mean in the following sentence? Does it has a meaning similar to hardly any? Some consensus has been reached regarding the theoretical basis for measuring the cost of travel time.
2
votes
3answers
63 views

“Simple marketing software” or “Simplified marketing software” - which is correct?

I have built http://www.inboundio.com/ which is a simplified marketing software. Now I am not sure in < title > tag of home page if I should use Simple inbound marketing software OR ...
2
votes
2answers
691 views

As Well As - Tense Change?

Consider a sentence such as the following: The new software was designed to increase programmer productivity as well as reducing the company's total invested cost. Note the two separate ...
1
vote
1answer
115 views

How to call these types of fragments? [closed]

I have three types of sentence fragments: Type A: "a sphere with a stem" Type B: "has a worm" Type C: "that is red" How can I call these fragment types to distinguish them? Context: I ...
2
votes
2answers
521 views

I will arrange for the manuscript to be sent on to you

Are all the following expressions correct? What are the differences? I will arrange for the manuscript to be sent on to you. I will arrange that the manuscript will be send to you in time. I will ...
2
votes
3answers
284 views

Can a man made object be named arbitrarily without reason

I had a debate with a friend on how things made artificially are named. My friend proposed that all man made things are named with a reason/proper meaning. I disagreed saying not all things made by ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is “hayway” an English word?

I thought I had heard and seen this word being used. For example, If you do this, things will go hayway. Meaning that things will go out of order in a mess/berserk, something like that. Now I ...
0
votes
1answer
255 views

I was able to re-introduce the process that had not been done anymore. Past perfect?

I am not sure whether or not there should be past simple or past perfect: I was able to re-introduce the procedure that had not been being followed anymore. I was able to re-introduce the ...
0
votes
4answers
335 views

“Whether or not” plus an instance of the verb “to be”

Consider the sentence, "Whether or not they will go back online is uncertain." If "whether or not" is removed from this sentence, leaving only "they will go back online is uncertain," is it still ...
7
votes
1answer
250 views

The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

Is there a term similar to girlfriendship / boyfriendship?

Sorry if this question is rather dumb. Is "girlfriendship" or "boyfriendship" actually a term, or is there a suitable replacement? I'm using "partnership" in the badly worded sentence right now: ...
1
vote
6answers
3k views

What is a synonym for bad writing?

I am looking for a word to reflect what a novice author would use to describe his own writing (somewhat derogatorily). My first thought was drivel.
3
votes
3answers
817 views

Perfect vs Perfect Continuous

I saw this sentence the other day and it struck me as awkward. I went online and saw many instances of the present perfect being used in such manner. She has worked here since 1995 Shouldn't ...
7
votes
1answer
756 views

How does one capitalize words like “un-American”?

Google's dictionary lists it as "un-American" or "unAmerican" (which looks clumsy to me). Since American is a "demonym," I would usually capitalize it, so I feel compelled to capitalize "un-American" ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“He told me that he [has/had] got temporary residence of England”

Telling a friend about another friend, Yesterday I met John. He told me that he has/had got temporary residence of England. Which one is fine here, has or had?
0
votes
1answer
149 views

Is it a misprint or a correct expression 'I could have also have called the method without brackets'? [closed]

I want to know the following sentence is correct or contains a misprint. I could have also have called the method without brackets, as these are optional in Ruby and can make the syntax much more ...
0
votes
2answers
209 views

what does the phrase “To bid on the drumsticks” mean?

I couldn't find the translation of this phrase so I'm looking for the meaning of it.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“What do children aged/ages 5 to 11 years old know about the sun?” — redundant?

I truly believe there is something a tad... non-normative about constructions like "children ages 5 to 11 years old" or "children aged 5 to 11 years old". Isn't that redundant? Shouldn't it read ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

Is “Tsuki hits” an example of alliteration?

I understand alliteration to be "repetition of a sound in successive stressed syllables". Assuming that's correct then "Tsuki hits" should be alliterate (since stress pattern is "TSU-ki HITS"). But ...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

Is “cast the balance to some/someone's side” a standard usage or a figure of speech?

...this biass, though, perhaps, it may not appear in a few throws, will certainly prevail in a great number, and will cast the balance entirely to that side. (David Hume, Of the Rise and Progress ...
5
votes
4answers
279 views

When should an adjective be followed by a comma?

This happened whenever she was left alone in someone else's home. She'd feel as if she had been put inside a huge, abandoned turtle shell. I don't know why, but I just put a comma in the ...
0
votes
1answer
399 views

What do you call these plastic that wraps around books/magazines?

They look like this: Do you usually just call them plastic wrappers or wrappings?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is a “cike” as in “taking the cike”?

In the novel Dracula I came upon the following sentence: "But the old Chapel, that took the cike that did. " Presumably that is an equivalent phrase to "took the biscuit". But a google search ...
5
votes
2answers
333 views

Use of possessive adjectives in English

When an Englishman wants to refer to parts of the body or to objects of personal use, he will use a possessive adjective. Examples: My head aches. I dropped my glasses. In the Romance ...
0
votes
4answers
241 views

Should I use “here” or “there” in the following sentence? [closed]

Sophia was awakened by the rattling sound of the alarm clock. Rubbing her eyes, she sat up, and after fumbling for a while, she finally managed to turn the alarm off. She lay on her back again, ...
4
votes
2answers
166 views

What does this old mark mean?

Now banish the pathetic。 from public discourses, and you reduce the speakers merely to modern eloquence; that is, to good sense, delivered in proper expression. Hume, On Eloquence There are ...
0
votes
4answers
191 views

Is 'handshaking' a legitimate word? [closed]

In microprocessors, handshake signals are issued by a microprocessor in acknowledgement of a request by another device. This process has been repeatedly referred to as 'handshaking' in my lectures. ...
5
votes
2answers
818 views

How do you describe this particular way of sitting?

In Japanese, there's this thing called 横座り (yokozuwari, lit. "side-sitting") that looks like this: Basically, you sit on your knees, but then partially swing your legs out to one side. Is there a ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

The difference between “delimit” and “limit”

In an article I came across the following sentence: "To delimit the responsibility of the police means to delimit human reason" I was just wondering why did the author use "delimit" instead of "limit" ...
5
votes
2answers
473 views

What does “Mercy within mercy within mercy" mean?

I saw a lot of articles in these couple of days about Pope Francis’ reflection of his style, influences and priorities as pope in the recent interview with La Civilta Cattolica, the Jesuit journal in ...
2
votes
2answers
703 views

Meaning of “to be sent clear”

I found this sentence: They were lucky the linesman raised his flag in the 27th minute against Javier Saviola after he was sent clear by Defour. Unfortunately, I don't know what sent clear ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Grammatical function of noun compounds

While reading the 'Guide to the use of the dictionary' of the Compact Oxford English Dictionary (yes, I read dictionary introductions, shame on me), I stumbled upon a section about hyphenation with ...
2
votes
2answers
169 views

What does “he’s sneaking in a cheeseburger” mean?

What does "he’s sneaking in a cheeseburger" mean? Context: Now I have a very unhappy stepdad, but at least he’s sneaking in a cheeseburger so that should keep him amused while I write you a letter.
4
votes
3answers
305 views

Can you explain the pun “erpigarms”

Here is an extract from a short story: When Pushkin broke his legs, he started to go about on wheels. His friends used to enjoy teasing Pushkin and grabbing him by his wheels. Pushkin took this ...

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