1
vote
3answers
508 views

What is “If you're tired” called in this sentence?

"If you're tired, you should sleep." What is the name for the phrase "If you're tired" in this sentence? Obviously "you should sleep" could stand alone as a sentence.
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Preposition: “[In] Which city are you located [in]?”

In which city are you located? Which city are you located in? Which city are you located? I know the first is grammatically correct, and the second used frequently in conversation, but ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Does “living in squalor” necessarily imply poverty?

Some definitions of squalor and its adjectival form squalid: Merriam-Webster squalor: the quality or state of being squalid squalid: marked by filthiness and degradation from neglect or poverty ...
4
votes
1answer
95 views

Where does “acutilobate” originate from?

I see the claim that acutilobate is a “dictionary-only” word, for example seen in the 1913 Webster’s dictionary. How would a word get into a dictionary that only appears in dictionaries and is not ...
7
votes
2answers
241 views

How to say “bolillero”?

In lottery games or bingo games, sometimes an object like this is used: What is the name of this? In Spanish we call it bolillero but I didn’t find the definition in Enlgish.
0
votes
3answers
494 views

Five percent VS The five percent [closed]

Five percent VS The five percent. Which one is correct and why? Because i.e. this page exists http://www.thetwopercent.com/ or the famous slogan ;) "we are the 99%.". However, on the official apple ...
16
votes
7answers
2k views

Phenomenon of overused and popular words [closed]

Certain words or phrases become really popular. These words are picked up by many people, are overused, and sometimes misused to such an extent that the whole meaning of the word changes, or is even ...
0
votes
1answer
347 views

Where versus were [closed]

New York Times editorial today says: The Bronx district attorney should be applauded for refusing to prosecute bad arrests that officers were unable to prove were warranted. Should it be: ...
1
vote
2answers
311 views

What is more commonly used in US? “Cum Laude” or “With Honors”?

I understand that the terms Cum Laude and With Honors are interchangeable, but which one is better understood in US and more commonly used?
4
votes
6answers
334 views

Veracity in terms of accuracy

I want one word which indicates "Something with great veracity". Here, the emphasis of veracity is more towards "accuracy" than "truth". It's a thing, an instrument that has good veracity. I want ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the difference between “lonely” and “lonesome”

Both words seem to be used interchangeably. E.g., I'm feeling lonely tonight. I'm feeling lonesome tonight. I guess I always felt "lonesome" was somehow more severe and heart-wrenching, ...
0
votes
2answers
165 views

What is the opposite of “in-image ads”? [closed]

The term in-image ads describes ads that are inside of images. What would be the term that describes ads that are outside of images? Could it be out-image ads?
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“Self-assured” vs. “self-confident”

Are there any differences between the words self-assured and self-confident?
2
votes
2answers
109 views

On the structure of “search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out”

I came across the following expression: The primary task of many American troops in Baghdad has been to search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out. This is from a ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Since more than six months

As per English grammar, 'Since' is used to show the time period in the past from which the event is happening. So, is the sentence given below correct? "Since more than six months, I have been ...
1
vote
2answers
217 views

“Irreparable damage” vs. “irrecoverable damage” [closed]

Which word is a better fit in the following sentence? Some of the environmental changes may produce irreparable/irrecoverable damage to the earth's capacity to sustain life.
5
votes
3answers
621 views

When can “very” modify a prepositional phrase?

In Hamlet, when Hammy Jr. asks Polonius whether a cloud looks like a whale, Polly replies, Very like a whale. In contemporary English, however, "very like ..." feels ungrammatical. You instead ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Is the second “are” required in “Here are the ideas I thought are worth spreading”?

Here are the ideas I thought are worth spreading. Here are the ideas I thought worth spreading. Which one is correct?
9
votes
4answers
1k views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Can I “re-enable” something?

I have disabled something and want to enable it again. Can I say that I "re-enable it" or do I simply "enable" it?
4
votes
2answers
940 views

Terminology for pairs of words with the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but different spelling

Is there a term describe word pairs like colour/color that have the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but a different spelling? The most common examples I can think of are English/American ...
4
votes
4answers
183 views

What is a non-religious word for an apocalyptic event?

I am looking for a noun which describes some sort of apocalyptic or world-ending event, but does not have the religious baggage of words like apocalypse.
3
votes
1answer
16k views

“Go by foot” vs. “go on foot” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “London By Foot” vs. “London On Foot” This is a very simple question, yet I did not find anybody that could give me a satisfactory answer. I ...
6
votes
4answers
815 views

What is the opposite of “alexithymia”?

Alexithymia refers to a state wherein a person cannot understand or describe his or her feelings, and means literally "without words for emotions". Is there a term (psychological, medical, or ...
2
votes
0answers
493 views

What preposition goes after “directed”? [closed]

Is there a comprehensive explanation of which prepositions I should use with directed, and why? directed at directed to directed on directed onto directed in directed into directed toward directed ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Meaning of “Conceptual point of view”

Now and then, I listen the below quoted expression: From the conceptual point of view ... However I still can't get its meaning, I think it is somehow related to the way to think about a ...
4
votes
1answer
351 views

Can “this time around” and “all the time” be compatible?

I was a bit puzzled to read the following sentence in the article titled “Obama showering Ohio with attention and money” in September 26 Washington Post: “It goes without saying that, every four ...
3
votes
4answers
71k views

What does 'abstract ideas' mean? [closed]

In the sentence for example: This book would also interest intelligent students with a taste for abstract ideas and theoretical arguments. What does the phrase "abstract ideas" mean? I looked up ...
0
votes
2answers
406 views

“Lives” vs. “life” in “the life of those living on the farm”

James is giving a tour of his farm to some of his friends. Which sentence is correct: James introduces some of the animals on the farm: "This is Elmer, the pig... That's Mini, the mouse, and that ...
1
vote
2answers
494 views

Is “He picked up a quarrel” correct?

Is this sentence grammatically correct? He picked up a quarrel.
-1
votes
1answer
528 views

Can we really “get in” or “get on” a thing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origin/reason for the expression “on the bus” instead of “in the bus” Can we really "get in a bus" or "get on a bus" in Standard English usage?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

till vs. until in “from Apr. 21st till/until Apr. 28th” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between “till” and “until”? Please kindly advise me on the correct usage of till/until when talking about period of time. ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Is it OK to italicise only part of a word?

As an example: inhomogeneous. 
7
votes
4answers
630 views

Why “me” instead of “my” in pirate speech?

I don’t understand the usage in constructions like “Spare meself, me ship, me crew” in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. Is it a dialect or “bloody pirate’s speech” or what?
1
vote
1answer
76 views

concept/name extraction [closed]

I need your help to set all rules for extracting names/concepts from a phrase. for example, in the phrase "in toshka, it's always sunny" the name/concept here is toshka, which is a place in Egypt. i ...
-2
votes
5answers
4k views

“Travel” vs. “travels” [closed]

My question is about formation of plural form of the noun travel. I have a folder on my PC that contains a photos from my different travels (France, Germany etc.), I want to create a folder structure: ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

What does “emphasizer vs. adjunct” mean? [closed]

"I do not really get to do much topical material." A scholarly paper gives that sentence, and it then comments: "Really" performs the function of emphasizer vs. adjunct. What does it mean by ...
3
votes
5answers
128 views

Concise word for “common default but with individual appearance”

Imagine an editor with multi-language support. You’re able to open multiple documents at once, and the language of each document can of course be different to the languages of other documents. First ...
1
vote
1answer
165 views

Usage of “eggheads and fatheads” in a sentence

Recently I came across this expression "eggheads and fatheads". I know the individual meanings of both the words. In which context should I use these two words together?
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

significance of “The” before country name [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the definite article before a country/state name I am from India, and I do not say that I am from “the India”. But someone from USA would say “I am from the ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

Can you say “hyperbolizing”?

When you are expressing something in an exaggerated and ironic way, often to prove a point, can you say that you are hyperbolizing? Could it be used in a way where you could end the statement with it? ...
5
votes
4answers
995 views

Using “basically” in an interview

Can I use word basically in an interview? For example I basically belong to X but I am working at Y from last 10 years. Or can I use I belong to X and I am working at Y from last 10 years. ...
7
votes
5answers
754 views

What are specific cartoon-type interjections like “cough” and “sigh” called in English?

In comics, for example those by Walt Disney, interjections that describe or emphasize in words what the characters in the image are doing are quite commonly used (cough, sigh, tweet). According to ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What tense is “You were unable to do it.”?

"You were unable to do it." Can you describe the tense of this sentence? Is it Past Progressive?
7
votes
7answers
20k views

Name for the relationship of wife’s sister’s husband

Is there a name for the relationship of my wife’s sister’s husband in English? Or in case of a lady, what is the relationship of her husband’s brother’s wife called? There are words for these ...
7
votes
0answers
22k views

List of expertise levels from beginner to expert [closed]

I am looking for a list from beginner to expert in as much as possible steps. I have constructed by myself: Newbie Novice Rookie Beginner Talented Skilled Intermediate Skillful Seasoned Proficient ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

What are the synonyms for 'face-to-face'?

I found in dictionary - opposite, but that is not the synonym that I am looking for. I am interested for something like 'local'. For example, "We work with customers face-to-face as well as ...
9
votes
2answers
383 views

How was “ben't” used, and when did it cease to be used?

In Jane Austen's The Watsons, the maid of the titular family utters the following sentence: "Please, ma'am, master wants to know why he ben't to have his dinner?" I have never encountered ben't ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

Apples are “in the tree” or “on the tree”?

Apples are "in the tree" or "on the tree"?
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Waiteen for waiting

While it's reasonably common for people to drop the g in words such as waiting, hating, and dating, I seem to be stumbling upon a number of Americans additionally drawing out the final syllable of ...

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