1
vote
2answers
193 views

“On the lake” vs. “in the lake” [closed]

Which of the following sentences makes sense? We took the new kayak out on the lake as it was a nice day. We took the new kayak out in the lake as it was a nice day.
6
votes
3answers
446 views

In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?

For half, I could use semi, demi, or hemi. While semi does mean "half", it sometimes has a connotation of "some". Demi is often found with French roots. According to this link, hemi is the least ...
1
vote
1answer
336 views

dependent vs dependant

I find so many different "rules" on the internet that it is really hard to understand when to use these words: dependent and dependant. In the below examples, what would you pick and why: a) "Your ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the correct usage of this sentence?

Had you been there, you would have understood. or If you had been there, you would have understood. Which of the above sentences is a grammatically correct sentence or usually preferred ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning

As onomatopoeia means words that sound like what they mean, is there a word which means words that sound contrary to what they mean? Pulchritude is an example of such a word.
2
votes
4answers
742 views

How to describe the various ways in which one can experience something?

I'm looking for a word that means "The various manners in which one is able to enjoy, gain fulfillment from, and/or experience a given activity." For example, you could say "The <filler noun> ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

Is “catch up” used in formal language as in “We will catch up sometime”?

I wrote "we will catch up sometime" to one of my new friends. When I searched the Internet I found that people used it in informal situations. Is it okay to use this in formal writing as I did since ...
0
votes
3answers
531 views

What's a more sophisticated word for “gadget”? [closed]

I'm looking for a word that isn't tacky like gadget, but that describes interesting and novel technological items.
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “have been being investigated” in the following sentence grammatically correct?

I need to know whether the following sentence is grammatically correct or not. Specifically, I am unsure about have been being investigated part. Do the times that I am using match each other? ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

When it come to bicycle tyres, what does “cheerful”, “sprightlier” mean?

The usage of those words can be found in this review of a certain make of bicycle tyres. Unable to understand what the author is trying to say using those adjectives, since they are usually used to ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Subscribed/unsubscribed

I am using a notification system where I have trouble naming a category of user. A user can subscribe to the newsletter of the week. If the user set his settings, and decides to receive the ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Contact us “on” or “at” [duplicate]

I would like to know what is the correct form and the use for inviting peoples to calling you by phone, specially in the context of written materials). Contact us on +123 123 123 Contact us ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“Not so much” at the end of a sentence

I've occasionally seen "not so much" used at the end of a sentence. For example, Jeff Atwood saying Some community feedback is useful. Others, not so much. Doing a symbolhound search for "not so ...
3
votes
3answers
298 views

Phrase for someone taking over business when you skip for humanity

Is there a witty or general saying of indicating the act of taking over a business when a person, business or country skips an opportunity for general benevolence? Examples: If I don't sell weapons ...
1
vote
2answers
508 views

single word for 'Hospital' and 'Clinic'

I am developing a software that requires users to enter hospital or clinic name. The software treats clinics and hospitals the same way. I wanted to know a single word that can be used for any medical ...
-2
votes
1answer
193 views

What are the most well-understood vocal animal languages? [closed]

Just as the Bee dance, for a "language", I mean that there are vocal pattens. In the nature, there are many intelligent animals like human beings. Bird songs, whale songs, dogs? In fact, bird ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

“Suspect” versus “Suspicious” as Adjectives

A recent question on this site ("to suspect" vs "to be suspicious of") asks about the difference between "to suspect" and "to be suspicious of." An even more complicated situation ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

“Taller than me” or “taller than I”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct here and why? He is taller than me. He is taller than I.
0
votes
1answer
329 views

Can I use a plural last name as my company name? [closed]

So let’s assume my last name is Norton and I’m starting a publishing company. I want it to be “Nortons, Limited”. It is quite common to use plurals in company names — for example, Waterstones, ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Can “the least I could do” be negative? [closed]

A common answer to being thanked for doing something is "It's the least I could do," which by my understanding is basically synonymous with "It was nothing". Recently I received a gift as thanks for ...
2
votes
6answers
912 views

Is there a better way to refer to “Real Life” when chatting online?

When having a conversation through an online service, you may encounter a scenario like this: (Messenger chat) Me: Hello Stranger! Stranger: Hello! Me: What do you think of Barack Obama? Stranger: ...
3
votes
3answers
17k views

“on par with” vs “on a par with”

Which of "on par with" and "on a par with" is the more correct way of saying that two things are of equal value, and why? Examples from a couple of google searches: "His verbal intelligence was not ...
2
votes
3answers
681 views

Are there other verbs that work like “dare” and “need”? [duplicate]

The verbs dare and need do not require auxiliaries when used in the interrogative; for example, “need I?” is as acceptable as “do I need?” Excluding the auxiliaries themselves (like be, do, have), ...
8
votes
1answer
54k views

Difference between “zeros” and “zeroes” [duplicate]

Are there any differences between “zeros” and “zeroes”? Is any of them more correct, more often used, more modern? Are there differences e.g. between British English and American English in the usage ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“to suspect” vs “to be suspicious of”

What's the difference between "to suspect someone" vs "to be suspicious of someone"? For example, what's the difference between these two sentences: I'm sorry for suspecting you. I'm sorry for ...
3
votes
2answers
496 views

What do R-rated and X-rated mean here?

From a course website for Brownian Motion and Stochastic Calculus Recommended Reading: R-Rated Stochastic Differential Equations: An Introduction with Applications (6th edition) by B. ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“I care for you” versus “I care about you”

I would like to know if there is a semantic difference between I care for you and I care about you.
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Is the word 'request' by itself as polite form of asking for something?

Is there a difference in the degree of politeness between saying 'I request that you...' and 'Could you, please, ...'? I realize that I could say 'I kindly request...' or 'I would like to kindly ...
0
votes
2answers
379 views

Multiple objects + relative clause [duplicate]

Which would be best / acceptable? "He saw people, animals and buildings THAT / WHICH had suffered greatly." As I see it, there are 3 subjects; people, animals and buildings. The grammar rules I know ...
46
votes
5answers
5k views

Is “Just a friendly advice” grammatical?

I know that "advice" is uncountable and thus is incompatible with the article "a". However, the phrase "Just a friendly advice" seems to be rather widespread. Is it idiomatic, or incorrect? What is ...
1
vote
4answers
445 views

Difference between “delight” and “delightful” [closed]

I am wondering if there is really a difference between delight and delightful. I would like to make a title for a French cooking app and was thinking of this: MyApp - Homemade delightful French ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

'Keeping up-to-date on' or 'Keeping up-to-date with'?

I recently replied to someone who was informing me about my application for something. I replied "Thank you for keeping me up-to-date on my application". Afterwards I wondered if I should have written ...
-2
votes
2answers
336 views

Has “Kinki” become less common than “Kansai” because of the word “kinky”? [closed]

According to Google NGram, "Kinki" and "Kansai" (which are pretty synonymous) used to be roughly equally common, but Kansai is now more common. Is this difference statistically different? And if so, ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Too many “and”s? Is it grammatically correct?

A friend of mine (a non-native speaker of English) has asked me to check her CV and I'm afraid / ashamed to say, I'm having trouble. Are there too many "and"s in the given sentence? It seems OK to ...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

Grammatically incorrect sentence?

I just appeared for GATE 2013. In its aptitude section, I was totally confused. The question was to identify the grammatically incorrect sentence. The sentences were: 1. He is of Asian origin. 2. ...
2
votes
2answers
451 views

Plural noun with singular modifiers [duplicate]

I am writing up a document for an art exhibit and have found myself a bit confused. The piece in question is a lidded jar with a stand and handle. The sentence in question is as follows: Worthy ...
3
votes
5answers
418 views

Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of) [duplicate]

Question: Is the first one redundant and proper, or is it redundant and not necessarily correct? (1) He is a friend of Doug's. (2) He is a friend of Doug.
0
votes
1answer
675 views

How to quote a list from a paper? [closed]

I'm writing a paper and I need to quote the following list: Step1: Compute the center of each triangle and the correspondences between the center and three vertexes of the triangle; Step2: Set up ...
1
vote
5answers
369 views

Proper adjective for an addictive TV series

Can I use Crazy addictive for a TV series which I'm being hooked up? Like: This TV show is not as crazy addictive as that TV show.
6
votes
3answers
387 views

Advocate versus Partisan

Advocate and Partisan are two of the most ambiguous words I have ever come across. I have been researching these two words for almost three hours trying to figure out if they're the same or different. ...
1
vote
5answers
6k views

What does “sweet spot” mean? [closed]

Not the sport definition, but this one: In our survey, the sweet spot for Windows are organizations with 300 to 1000 employees.
1
vote
1answer
212 views

What does the phrase “trying to snow” mean? [closed]

What does the phrase trying to snow mean? E.g., Trying to snow the audience ... I think it is more of a slang usage. I am looking for a meaning other than weather related.
1
vote
2answers
528 views

Is this the right meaning of this sentence? [closed]

I am trying to find an original way to say "Conquer the Justice". Looking on the dictionary, I found that "storm" not only means something like a tempest but also to "conquer with weapons". Supposing ...
0
votes
2answers
281 views

Which is better, “customer number” or “customer count”?

I want to express the number of customers my company has. Is it better to use customer number or customer count?
2
votes
2answers
267 views

Can “with” be replaced by “to” after verbs? [closed]

Does this replacement change the meaning to something wrong? Examples: I came with her or I came to her I talk with you or I talk to you
6
votes
4answers
6k views

Install on, install in, install to

When I say "programs to install on a new PC" it sounds alright to me, but I'm not sure if it's the correct usage. Which one of the following should I use? Programs to install on a new PC Programs to ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

usage of “yet to be”

Can I say He is yet to be a murderer. to mean the he is not a murderer, but very soon he will be one?
3
votes
5answers
6k views

When is “to” a preposition and when the infinitive marker?

I want to see you. I look forward to seeing you. How can one say "to" in the first sentence is an infinitive marker and in the second sentence a preposition when we are given just the ...
3
votes
1answer
420 views

Word for the superclass of buttons, zippers, and pegs?

I’m looking for a word which describes all of buttons, zippers, and pegs — or any objects used to secure clothing, such as on the face of a t-shirt or jacket. I’ve considered using seal and ...
1
vote
1answer
173 views

Differences in the Semantics of Three Tri-Part Phrasal Verbs

What are the subtle semantic differences in the following three tri-part phrasal verbs: (1) be up against (2) come up against (3) run up against

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