4
votes
2answers
4k views

Modal vs Non-Modal vs Auxiliary modal vs Conjugated Verb

Please help me. I am very confused. How are these kinds of verb related to each other? Specially Non-Modals and Conjugated Verb. Is the "Auxiliary modal" just another name for "Auxiliary verb"?
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Categorization of figures of speech

Is there a clear categorization of tropes? Some talk of the four master tropes (Metaphor, Synecdoche, Metonymy, Irony), Whereas some give An extended, unsorted list of tropes Some talk about the ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Should I capitalize the phrase that has its abbreviation following?

I am doing a technical and scientific writing. I have been confused by this for a long time. Basically, there are two case. A well-known phrase with its abbreviation. e.g. Global Positioning System ...
3
votes
2answers
208 views

Number of syllables in “liar”, “prior”

It seems that there are two syllables in "liar" (li·ar) because it is made up of a stem "lie" plus the suffix "ar". But what about "prior" (pri·or)? Does it have something to do with the ...
2
votes
1answer
174 views

What does “personally identifiable” mean

I was reading a booklet when I came across the phrase "personally identifiable". What does it mean in the following context (emphasis mine): As the common household and business router will often ...
1
vote
2answers
297 views

Article - “a” or “the” or plural for countable nouns?

I think a countable noun are usually of the following 3 forms: the + countable noun (single form) a + countable noun (single form) countable noun (plural form) I am confused about which to pick ...
0
votes
2answers
111 views

“Should character education be part of the curriculum that perspective teachers are exposed to in their credentialing program?” — is this too wordy? [closed]

Should character education be part of the curriculum that perspective teachers are exposed to in their credentialing program?
0
votes
1answer
162 views

what does a three-up mean in below contents?

Print proofing with a three-up: The two sides show the lightest and darkest prints that are within tolerance. The one in the middle is juust right. I can guess what it means by reading the whole ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

Prepositions after objects [duplicate]

I live in the house next to/close to the cinema. I live in the house that is next to/close to the cinema. I go to the school in front of/behind my house. I go to the school that ...
3
votes
2answers
771 views

Why does the verb 'have' require 'do' or 'got' and cannot be used alone?

When I began to study English, about 50 years ago, I was taught to ask, for instance, 'Have you a car?' and, if the answer was negative, to answer 'I have not a car.' However, when I came back to ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Best internet sites for British English learners? [closed]

What are some great resources for advanced British English learners?
0
votes
2answers
75 views

“String of numbers” vs. “field of numbers” [closed]

I'm trying to choose a name for a variable in my program that includes some number tandem. What is the difference between string and field in this case? For example, which one is better: "field of ...
0
votes
1answer
146 views

'yet to collect' is this correct or not?

I have to specify not yet collected whether I can specify 'yet to collect' or 'yet to be collected' which one I can use?
1
vote
2answers
55 views

“Class X” OR “X Class”

A. I will sit in class X. B. I will sit in X class. Question: Any specific reason for using "B" format?
6
votes
2answers
613 views

Is there a special word for purposely misspelling a word?

I was thinking the other day about Kleenex, which is purposely misspelled from clean-ex, if that makes sense, and I was wondering if there was a word for purposely misspelling a word, or name.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Three formal ways to express “we got very good comments”

A question from a non-native speaker: For some reason I have to find at least three different formal ways to express "we got very good comments". The context is like "our paper got published and the ...
2
votes
1answer
125 views

Is there a generally accepted group of grammatical terms for English?

I've never studied English grammar, although I have studied a little German and Latin. If you asked me to differentiate the past perfect from the pluperfect, I wouldn't know where to begin. I read ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

“Choose a username that is …and must contain”: phrased incorrectly or just awkwardly?

The following parameters are given regarding creating acceptable usernames for a particular website: The username is case sensitive. Choose a username that is 6-74 characters long and must contain ...
0
votes
3answers
137 views

Does “use X, Y, or Z” mean use *one of* or *all of* the options?

This is the text supposedly providing the parameters for creating acceptable usernames for a particular website: The username is case sensitive. Choose a username that is 6-74 characters long and ...
7
votes
5answers
36k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between “University of Bla” and “Bla University”?

In some scientific papers, we see that some professors write "University of Bla" on their papers, while others write "Bla University". What is the difference between "University of Bla" and "Bla ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

What is the name of this elevated street crossing thing (In Britain?)

What is the name of this elevated street crossing thing (In Britain?)
1
vote
1answer
523 views

What kind of phrase? …while walking down the stairs

Is walking a gerund in this sentence? I think while is acting as a conjunction. . . Gloria tripped and fell while walking down the street.
4
votes
1answer
496 views

What's the grammatical structure for “there is nothing a guy can do that even comes close”?

I got a sentence when watching a dialogue: There is nothing a guy can do that even comes close. In my opinion, "nothing" has an attributive clause: "a guy can do"; and in this atributive clause, ...
0
votes
2answers
70k views

Is it “Play it by ear” or “play it by year”? [closed]

I've come across a few cases where I needed to write this phrase and I cannot determine which is correct. Do we "play it by ear" or "play it by year"? I'm using this with the intended meaning of ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views

What are the capitalization / italicization rules for Betta fish?

I recently edited this question on Pets.SE regarding fish compatability. The original author used mixed capitalization of "Betta" fish, but did not capitalize "neon tetra". The Wikipedia entry on ...
3
votes
1answer
346 views

Sentence fragments as modifiers: “self-sacrifice incarnate, the 10th Doctor wavered…”?

I was recently asked to choose which of following two excerpts sounded better: Emotionally vulnerable and incarnate of self-sacrifice, the Tenth Doctor wavered between romantic and intensely ...
11
votes
2answers
296 views

Is there a word for the practice of fobbing off additional unwanted software on the downloaders of your free product?

Free software providers, including such giants as Adobe or Dell, will often try to make the downloaders download more than they are trying to download. Is there a name for this practice?
2
votes
2answers
155 views

Idiom for or more colorful phrasing of “without having their lack of trivia exposed”

I am writing a children's book (8–12) and am looking for an idiom or more colorful language to be used in place of the highlighted section. Now that she’d stumped me, Ms. Sanders, my favorite of ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

English language proper sentence [duplicate]

Which is correct of the following two sentences, one of which contains 'I', the other 'me'. That is the point of the question. In all other respects the sentences are the same. Someone bigger than ...
2
votes
2answers
234 views

Can you use “Goldilocks” as an adjective?

Space professionals have popularized the terms Goldilocks planet & Goldilocks zone to describe planets and regions of space around a star that, like earth, are "just right" to conceivably harbor ...
4
votes
4answers
569 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
0
votes
2answers
171 views

What does “desperate sign” mean here?

The one political outlook to which it(general will) remain fundamentally inimical, not surprisingly, was that of royal absolutism-which is not to say that there were no attempts to confiscate ...
2
votes
2answers
248 views

Are you exercising tonight or Do you have an exercise?

I have a US Army friend and he had a military exercise a few months ago. I texted him Are you exercising tonight? during exercise period. I learnt that present continuous can be used for ...
1
vote
2answers
143 views

Using plural for two individual objects of the same kind

Assume Einstein conjectured something (in Mathematics) and Zweistein conjectured something slightly stronger (implies Einstein's conjecture). Which one of the following is correct?: (a) Every X ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Compare 2 factors among others

I am trying to polish the following sentences: The analysis time of an image depends on many factors. The size of an image is not as primary as its nature, because... The context is: There are ...
2
votes
2answers
162 views

Using “in” in Present Perfect Tense

I remember my grammar teacher saying that: If we want to tell the length of time a person has not done something, then we can use either for or in. As in: I haven't written a single line of ...
1
vote
1answer
390 views

Questions beginning with “How to”

(particularly related to question/answer sites such as this) Quite often people want to ask "How do I/you... ?" Maybe to be less personal or to have a generic title, "How to... ?" is chosen instead. ...
1
vote
3answers
92 views

source for “buff”?

what's the derivation of the term buff for a physically well built, attractive male? Is it simply it simply shorthand, since buff means polished and therefore a man's torso that resembles a marble ...
2
votes
1answer
207 views

What is the meaning of “the green and blue of the crops”?

I'm reading the My mother never worked essay by Bonnie Smith-Yackel. In the other fields, when the oats and flax began to head out, the green and blue of the crops were hidden by the bright yellow ...
0
votes
3answers
561 views

might find or might have found

Under which grammatical rule does this fall? Which is grammatically correct: (1) A teacher might find it difficult to explain a lecture in the past. OR (2) A teacher might have found it difficult ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

where to put the comma between two distinct quote? [duplicate]

Where should I put the comma and the quotes in such a sentence? The comments were significantly focused on my being “engaging, patient and extremely helpful,” “very coherent and ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

Why “Daddy” in this sentence was written with a capital D?

Why is Daddy in this sentence written with a capital D? Her love letters to and from Daddy were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs. This sentence is from ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Using “might as well have been” in analogies

I've seen this phrase in many literary works. Does it have the same purpose as like, as if, and as though (in the context of similes/metaphors)? For example: She might as well have been a skinny ...
2
votes
4answers
149 views

What is the opposite of pollutant, in the sense of “victim” or “casualty”

I am busy writing a report where I need a word which would mean "the recipient of pollution". Specifically I want to mention domestic sewerage which has been polluted by industrial sewerage. The ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“Development of technology” vs. “technology development”

I was wondering which form is the correct one, "technology development" or "the development of technology". For example: The pace of technology development affected me in several ways. The ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Archaic conjugation of common verbs?

I'm looking for an online resource to list conjugation of some of most common English verbs (to be, to get, to do, to have etc.) in their archaic (Early Modern) forms. In particular, I'd be interested ...
2
votes
3answers
148 views

Does ‘the mighty’ take a verb in plural form as in “the mighty are rendered helpless”?

There was the following sentence in the article of Time magazine’s November 25 issue under the title, “John F. Kennedy's Assassination and the Conspiracy Industry.” “This whiplash convergence of ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

Looking for synonym 'look into heart' or 'reexamine thoughts'

I am looking for synonyms for 'reexamine thoughts'. I want to use the synonym in a context where I want to say 'think about myself or karmas before going to bed'.
1
vote
1answer
59 views

What is the meaning of “home question”?

I have learned what "home truth" and "home thrust" means. But what is the meaning of "home question"?

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