0
votes
1answer
544 views

And so forth, and so on — comma to follow midsentence?

Comma after "and so forth"? He brought potato chips, pudding, and so forth, to the picnic. Comma after "etc."? He brought potato chips, pudding, etc., to the picnic. Thank you.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

difference between “get along” “get by” and “get on”

I cannot really understand the difference (if there's a difference) between : He gets along fine with it and He gets by fine with it And what about "get on" ?
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Elements

My mother, Theresa; my brother, Frank; and my sister, Danielle, are going to the meeting. (In this sentence I have one mother, one brother, and one sister.) The sentence is cluttered with punctuation, ...
-1
votes
5answers
489 views

How do you pronounce “grimace”? [closed]

How do you pronounce grimace? My parents taught me a long time ago to say "gri-MACE". Then the Burger King character Gri... came along.
0
votes
1answer
3k views

When is it appropriate to use the idiom “various and sundry”

To my ears the term "various and sundry" sounds redundant. What is the proper use of this idiom?
0
votes
1answer
7k views

Do we put a comma before “then” when it's the last word in a sentence?

Do we put a comma before "then" when it's the last word in a sentence? If she goes, I'm not going, then.
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
1
vote
1answer
11k views

Which is correct: “as good as possible” or “as best as possible”?

Which one is the correct expression: as good as possible as best as possible Both were suggested to be used in the following sentence: The activity has been performed as good/best as ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Academia — Correct Interpretation?

When someone says, "It's all academic" or "This one's academic", I believe that, certainly within the realm of sports context, the outcome of a game has finally been decided. The end result is a ...
1
vote
1answer
424 views

Why English does not have diacritics to distinguish between words with different meanings and pronunciations

It just occured to me that there are words in English that have two different meanings, two different pronunciations and are written exactly the same. For example "present" can be interpreted as the ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

“Better have it get fired at someone” - get fired?

I know "get" has so many meanings but I just do cannot figure out the right one here: If you establish a gun in Act 1, you better have it get fired at somebody by Act 3. Would it not work ...
0
votes
1answer
11k views

What is the difference between “have had” and “had”?

I have had letters delivered to me that had abuses. I had letters delivered to me that had abuses.
1
vote
2answers
143 views

outpointing (to point out an error or errors)

I'm hearing (and seeing in print) the word "outpointing" used a lot lately to mean "pointing out an error." Example: "Thanks for outpointing. The error has been corrected." I thought "outpointing" ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

What adjective describes that something is divided into sectors?

In particular I am looking for the correct terminology in air traffic management. Airspace is usually divided into sectors, i.e., smaller pieces of airspace. What is the corresponding adjective? Is ...
0
votes
1answer
13k views

“Sorry to have kept you waiting” vs. “sorry for having kept you waiting”

Can I transform "I am sorry to have kept you waiting so long" into "I am sorry for having kept you waiting so long"? Is there a difference between them? Additionally, is "I'm sorry having kept you ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

What does “burning the candle at both ends” mean? [closed]

I was reading some random book and came across this idiom. Can anybody explain the meaning?
1
vote
2answers
378 views

Why is the letter 'X' given importance in mathematics? [closed]

In mathematics the letter 'X' is always given importance over other letters. Why is it so?
0
votes
3answers
412 views

Why is endpoint a word while startpoint is not?

My text editor complains when I type 'startpoint' and does not complain when I type 'endpoint'. Why does this difference exist and what should I use for each?
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Reasons why is English the best language for scientific papers

Can you help me with some good arguments to prove that English is the best language for scientific writings? (some hard-core scientific articles would be nice). I'm from Slovakia. Few weeks ago I ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

“If the robot can learn from a human, it can/could keep track of humans.”

I have the following sentence and I don't know whether "can" or "could" would be a better choice. If the robot can learn from a human, it could keep track of humans. If the robot can learn ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

“what” as a determiner

I am composing a sentence describing results of an experiment: we find [results] beyond what can be expected from [theory] I am not sure this is a proper use of "what". Does my sentence needs ...
1
vote
2answers
265 views

Synonyms of quality in the technical context

I am writing a technical specification for a product portfolio containing a series of related products, differentiated by quality, well, sort of. I am looking for a synonym of the term quality which ...
0
votes
2answers
565 views

Bunch of girls/Buncha girls

as English isn't my first language, I don't really 'feel' whether bunch of girls/buncha girls is offensive, friendly, etc.? Could you tell me what's the proper meaning of the phrase? I hear it in ...
1
vote
5answers
859 views

Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
5
votes
6answers
11k views

If America has a woman President, will her husband be known as 'The First Gentleman'? [closed]

If, for example, Hilary Clinton becomes President, will Bill re-enter the White House as 'the First Gentleman of America'?
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Articles before word zero [duplicate]

"a zero magnetization" or "the zero magnetization" or "zero magnetization"? "a zero magnetic field" or "the zero magnetic field" or "zero magnetic field"? Are there any specific rules for articles ...
0
votes
2answers
345 views

Usage of two hads in a sentence, not continuously

Is the second sentence correct? Are we going ahead with this now? Earlier, you had told me that they had quoted a huge fee the last time we asked. Or should it rather just be "You told me that ...
2
votes
9answers
580 views

What term means or refers broadly to “the people of the parent's generation” or “the people of the grandparent's generation”?

Are there specific terms used to more broadly refer to the generation or which generation people are in? The first term would refer to the generation considering of mother, father, the mother or ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to cite a play with no line numbers? [closed]

First off, this may not be an appropriate question for this site. I'm not sure. But I'm kind of in a hole and I'd really appreciate some help with this. I need to integrate a quotation from A Raisin ...
0
votes
1answer
568 views

active or passive voice sentence?

Statement : Govt asked about safety of northeast community.
0
votes
2answers
278 views

'engaged in developing' or 'engaged in the development of'?

XXX is engaged in developing and commercializing therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's patients. or XXX is engaged in the development and commercialization of therapies for the ...
1
vote
2answers
199 views

What term refers to “one's personal definition of what is polite or rude”?

People tend to have their own feelings about what behavior or conversation subjects are polite or rude. Is there a specific term to refer to a person's personal definitions of this? The terms ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

all but.. none but.. usage

I'm a bit confused with the usage of all but and none but: "We are all but defenseless" – should mean we are definitely defenseless? "None but misfortunes follow" – only ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What (if any) is the proper hyphenation for the phrase “it's all too easy”? [duplicate]

Are any of the following correct? It's all too-easy It's all-too-easy It's all too easy Explanation/citations would be greatly appreciated
1
vote
2answers
205 views

Is “Implement Improvement” awkward English?

Do native English speakers use implement with improvement directly? I found that to implement means 'to carry out (something concrete).' Is implement improvement awkward English?
3
votes
2answers
657 views

what is the difference between employ and employment

I can not understand the difference when employ is a noun. So somebody help me to show the difference between employ and employment.
0
votes
2answers
258 views

Does “eschew” have negative connotations?

For example, in the sentence: He eschewed his father's profession. does this have the implication that he found it somewhat repugnant, or does it just mean he decided it wasn't for him?
0
votes
1answer
132 views

Can adverbs also modify/specify the speaker's state of mind, emotion, character, etc. in English?

I don't think there are such adverbs in English that officially indicate the speaker's emotional/mental state, personality, etc. "Could you please let me join your group?" doesn't convey the ...
-3
votes
1answer
151 views

What's the origin of the word “saccharine”? [closed]

What's the origin of the word "saccharine"? Has it transformed from a different word or is it taken from a different language? Have any words originated from this word?
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Difference between “in” and “to” in this context

My friend is taking an English conversation class. In it, she said I have been teaching math in high schools for more than 10 years. Before that I taught math in junior high schools. However, ...
1
vote
1answer
8k views

Is “mine's” a valid contraction?

Not mines, but mine's (mine is). As in, "You cooked a good turkey, but mine's better."
0
votes
1answer
527 views

Which verb is used for the word “activity” - “do” or “play”?

In an English test I had recently, there was this multiple choice question: There were lots of different activities for Jay to ... there. A - Make B - Do C - Play There was no extra ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
0
votes
1answer
203 views

“is” or “are” for x and y? [closed]

The boy and girl is going to the store. The boy and girl are going to the store. Which sentence is correct? I can't remember if 'x and y' is considered a singular or plural noun.
4
votes
4answers
263 views

Usage of the word “ascetic”

Is the sentence "You have to be ascetic about eating junk food" correct? Ascetic: Practicing severe self-denial
3
votes
2answers
295 views

Pronouncing th after r in Standard American English: /ɹð/

I natively speak Flemish (Dutch). We trill the R. I just had a 7-lesson course (over video chat with an American lady) to improve my accent towards Standard American English. According to the test I ...
-3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Anticipate” for “look forward to” [closed]

Can "anticipate" be safely used as a substitute for "look forward to" in informal prose like emails and general correspondence, but also in business writing? e.g. I'm anticipating to hear from you. ...
2
votes
9answers
562 views

Is there a casual way to say “this can wait” on a positive note

Is there a short and casual way (one or two words or the like) to express that whereas something is truly important, the exact timing of when it gets handled or completes does not greatly affect ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What do Americans call a 'double-barrelled surname'?

I refer to someone whose family name is, for example Fortescue-Smith; or Birchall Hughes. Sometimes they are hyphenated, sometimes not. But they are known in Britain as 'double-barrelled'. One senses ...
0
votes
1answer
186 views

Why do we no longer refer to Muslim and Hindu women as being 'in Purdah'?

The term purdah is used metaphorically in Britain for anyone who stays out of sight. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is said to go into purdah (away from the press)before he delivers his annual budget ...

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