0
votes
2answers
478 views

Give some examples using “food, cuisine, dish, menu and ingredient” [closed]

I have troubles using some words about food and I cannot feel the subtle differences of their usage. I'd like to get some help with examples using these various words. Food Cuisine dishes menu meal ...
-1
votes
2answers
154 views

What term would best describe a need for friendship?

A friend of mine asked an interesting question today: If sexual frustration is need for sex and romantic frustration is need for romance, what is need for friendship? Note: To be clear, this is ...
2
votes
3answers
164 views

Dragons are “fantastic” creatures or “fantastical” creatures?

If I'm discussing fantasy as a genre, and I want to describe a noun as fitting that genre, should I call it fantastic or fantastical? It seems both words exist in (say) Merriam-Webster, but the -al ...
2
votes
5answers
153 views

Verb in active voice for “being penetrated”

The context is sexual and the example, straightforward: providing an alternative to "a man's penis penetrates a woman's vagina" where the female organ is the subject of the sentence, and using a verb ...
-1
votes
2answers
111 views

Antonym for “endorsement”?

What would be an antonym for endorsement? E.g. His poor performance and results served as an (anti-endorsement) of his technical method.
0
votes
1answer
142 views

Is there a word for 'subject' (of a sentence) that isn't 'term' or 'argument'?

I'm writing a philosophy essay that pertains to subjectivity (the condition of being a subject of experience). I use subject in sentences like x is a subject if, and only if, x satisfies criteria x, ...
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is statusing a word? [closed]

We use the word statusing at my work a lot and we are wondering if it's a real word because Microsoft Word doesn't recognize it.
0
votes
4answers
177 views

What is the equivalent of 'hungry' for breathing?

Hungry for eating. Thirsty for drinking. Tired for sleeping. What can we use for the need or desire to breathe? I can think of saying "hungry for air," "thirsty for a breath," "gasping for a breath....
2
votes
1answer
122 views

'Might' is the subjunctive inflection of 'may'; was there ever a subjunctive inflection of 'must'?

I acknowledge that there is no subjunctive mood in English. However, there are variants of some words that we might regard as subjunctive variants. For example, 'might' is the, if you will, ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

What is it called when the last word of a sentence is also used as the first word of the next sentence? [duplicate]

For example in the rhyme "Miss Susie" the end of each verse is linked to the next. Would these just be called puns? Or is there a more specific name when they are used in this way. Example: Miss ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Etymology of “high” and “low” notes

The words "high" and "low" generally refer to magnitude or vertical distance. How did these words come to be associated with pitch? We can draw comparison to high ("large") or low ("small") frequency,...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

The origin of “break of day”

I was quite surprised to know that "break of day" actually means "dawn", that is, the beginning of the day. But, the phrase "break of day" sounds much more like the end of the day, not the beginning ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

“data on my iPad” or “data in my iPad” [duplicate]

Which is correct and are there any differences in meaning or nuance? I have the data on my iPad I have the data in my iPad I searched data on my iPad and data in my iPad on google, and got many ...
0
votes
2answers
172 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance Why is it stated ...
0
votes
4answers
381 views

“do .. while doing” or “do while do” [closed]

Here is a quick question. In the following two sentences, which one is correct? XXX changes the syntax of software while keeping the semantic equivalence. XXX changes the syntax of software while ...
-2
votes
1answer
27 views

“Software diversification effect” or “software diversification effectiveness”? [closed]

here is my quick question, when I want to say "software diversity" (this is considered as a technical term), which one is the most suitable way? given the context below: XXXXX, with an amplified ...
2
votes
5answers
592 views

A word for “negligence of duty or responsibility”

I need to know a word which means: "negligence shown by a person in performing a duty, or a responsibility, or any given task." or, "A person who is negligent in performing their duties/...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

“Realizing that, despite…” vs “realizing despite…that.”

What's the correct form? Example: I smiled, realizing that, despite her craziness, I missed her. I smiled, realizing, despite her craziness, that I missed her. Is there any grammatical/...
-2
votes
2answers
80 views

Word for 'controlled by', with reference to an external controller [closed]

Is there a word for 'controlled by' applicable in " My body was controlled by the mind "
3
votes
2answers
752 views

Can I use 'better still' in negative sentences?

Can I use 'better still' in a negative sentence? I'm especially interested in American English usage. Does it sound natural to say: You may not have the access to a trusted counselling, or better ...
5
votes
3answers
402 views

What is the bestiary equivalent for plants

I am looking for the Bestiary equivalent for plants. But I don't want to use 'compendium' or 'herbal'. Is there such a word? If not would it be 'okay' to use 'Herbiary' or should I more go to the ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

“When did you go there?” vs “When you went there?” [closed]

Could someone help me to understand the difference between these two sentences. When did you go there? When you went there? What is the correct way of using these forms?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Ma'am: Is it as in “ham” solely for the Queen, whilst it remains spoken “ma”+“um” (less any glotal stop) for all others?

It's become conventional wisdom that, when addressing the Queen after introduction, one must be sure to address her as "ma'am" as if it were to rhyme with "ham". Only "ma'am" and "ham" don't rhyme. ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

What does “ leadups and outs” mean in following content?

What does "leadups and outs" mean in this quote? The best way to approach learning how to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" is to work on memorizing bits of it at a time. A lot of the piece is ...
0
votes
0answers
109 views

which tense to use in the following situation?

Can you tell me which tense you will use in the following sentence? Children who (to come) to the cinema tomorrow?
0
votes
2answers
177 views

Single word synonym for “Decays into”?

I'm a non-native speaker and was looking for a single word which has the same (or close to the same) meaning as 'decays into' – where something becomes less than it was by losing (little) parts of ...
-1
votes
1answer
123 views

Should I use “forget” or “forgot” in the following case?

Speaker A: Hearing your father's records makes you forget about death because it makes you feel as if he's still alive. As if death doesn't really exist--wait, that doesn't make sense. Thinking ...
1
vote
3answers
56 views

what he thinks is directly on his mouth

What is the term used for a person who says something without processing the suitability/appropriateness of that thing according to the situation.I mean what he thinks is directly on his mouth ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

Thought Leaders OF or Thought Leaders IN Physics? [closed]

Which of the two is correct or more natural?
6
votes
6answers
617 views

What is the term for material lost when a batch is transferred from one vessel to another?

When making brownies or a banana cake, for example, some batter is left in the mixing bowl. Or the spilled sand when filling sandbags. What is the term for that lost material? Or the phenomenon of ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

Is this construction of the sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

Today I see ways how several aspects of filmmaking industry can be improved so that myriads of struggling filmmakers won’t be left overboard and can find their niche in this very complex business.
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Word like “ancestors” or “ancestry line” which includes the initial subject?

I am trying to give a proper name to a function in a programme. What the function does is to return the node on which it is called, and also its ancestry line until the top node. The concept can be ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

Is “myriad” not prevalent in “day to day speech”? [duplicate]

I have noticed people using "myriad" when they mean "uncountable" or simply many. Is "Myriad" not prevalent in "day to day speech Can it be used for definite but large amount of anything.
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Correct Verb Tense

I am writing a software description in which I am explaining the actions the end user can take with regard to his/her assumed previous actions. Is it grammatically correct to use present perfect for ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

expression of the form “I wouldn't trust them with X”

The following expressions are idiomatic: 1) "I wouldn't touch Z with a 10-foot pole", meaning the speaker wouldn't want to be involved with Z in any way. 2) "S couldn't find his way out of a paper ...
-1
votes
2answers
538 views

The most common way to refer to non-immediate family?

Example: When my mother came back from the island, she came back as a newborn Christian. [...] was shocked, especially since none of them belonged to that religion. (In this case, they refer ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

“A History of Britain”: Why the indefinite article? [duplicate]

There is a movie called A History of Britain. Why is the indefinite article used? I have always thought in such cases the article must be definite because a country's history (or that of anything ...
1
vote
2answers
78 views

Possessive with multi-word subject [closed]

If my subject is "the side in question", is it OK to ask, "Do you have the side in question's cell phone number?" or "What are the side in question's intentions?" I hope someone can help clarify this ...
0
votes
2answers
227 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both? [duplicate]

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
-4
votes
2answers
81 views

Are the two statements equivalent?

"I will refuse nothing to a soul that makes a request of me in virtue of my passion. In this hour you can obtain everything for yourself and for others for asking" - statement (i) I tried to re-...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Origin of “Stick to your knitting”

I know that "Stick to your knitting" means to stick with what you're familiar with/good at rather than giving your opinion or trying your hand at something out of your area of expertise. But I can't ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

The companies money or the companies' money [closed]

Is there an apostrophe and where if you are writing about multiple companies such as in the example below? The companies money.
0
votes
2answers
581 views

Difference between “evaluate as” and “evaluate to”

Does the expression 1+1 evaluate as 2 or does it evaluate to 2? Is one (or both) of the above not proper English or misused in this context, or are they both okay?
2
votes
3answers
246 views

Alternative to “waiting period”

I cannot find an alternative to name this concept: In a negotiation process, after a proposal is presented, time is left for the parties to comment on or object to it. "Waiting period" alludes to the ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Do I still omit the closing quotation mark before a paragraph break in speech?

Traditionally, paragraphs in speech are rendered like this: The professor harumphed. "It's not as easy as that. "English grammar is surprisingly complicated. Why, only yesterday..." That is, only ...
1
vote
2answers
301 views

Correct arrangement of this sentence [closed]

I currently have this sentence: James Albert Bonsack took on the challenge and created a machine in 1880; despite losing his first prototype to a fire. But I am not sure about how it is best to ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

Contraction of “There are” to “There're” [duplicate]

I'm a soon published author going through my final edit of the book and I got stuck thinking about this one. I understand that when writing this you should type in "There are". When people are saying ...
3
votes
1answer
624 views

What does “ILL OR NAH” mean

A t-shirt was given to me as a present by a friend of mine. There is a cherokee chief head image and a text on it which is written "ILL OR NAH". I am hesitating about wearing it because i do not know ...
2
votes
3answers
107 views

Something that has dependencies is a

As is often the case, I got stuck while programming because I couldnt' find the right name for a variable. I want to write an interface for a class that has dependencies, but I'm unsure about how to ...
2
votes
3answers
544 views

Hyperbolic vs Hyperbolical

I just looked up the word "hyperbolic" in the 3rd edition of "The New Oxford American Dictionary", and the second definition says "(of language) exaggerated; hyperbolical." When I go to hyperbolical, ...

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