1
vote
3answers
33k views

How to express “nice to hear from you” on telephone call in business situation?

I am expecting a call from a staff management company who will call me. I want to reply that I am happy that they call me. How do I say this in professional (british) english? Nice to hear from ...
1
vote
1answer
612 views

Usage of “even when”

In my understanding, a sentence of the following form A requires B, something that may be difficult even when C means that A is difficult since a necessary condition B is difficult. While B ...
11
votes
7answers
2k views

What are people who 'flee' called?

So as far as I understand 'to flee' is the verb, derivative noun from it is 'a flight' (as the process of running away), but what are the people who flee called? (And I don't mean cowards and other ...
4
votes
3answers
19k views

Does the etymology of the word “government” mean “to control the mind”?

I've heard some conspiracy theorists say that government, when broken down into its root Latin words, means "to control the mind". I'm wondering if this is really true or not. Is it? Edit: My own ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

The use of “'rat out on”

To leave or abandon. Can this expression be used to indicate an ordinary instance of leaving or abandoning like: I rat out on the party after midnight. I rat out on the city before noon. Or has ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Singular or plural in these sentences . . [duplicate]

I've often written sentences like these: The structure and linearity here is [are?]what is [are?] stifling creativity. Compare: The pencil and pen are in the room. [Where is seems wrong] The project ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

Word for a belief in extra-terrestrial rights

Looking for a word that means, "a belief in goodness and liberty toward sentient aliens." The use of "humanitarian" doesn't seem to fit due to the use of "human" in it, and I am not entirely ...
33
votes
19answers
6k views

What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?

When you eat something very hungrily, you can use the adverb "ravenously" to describe it. But when you drink something very fast in a similar way to quench your thirst, what adverb can you use to ...
4
votes
1answer
710 views

Let it be done - grammatical analysis

How should the phrase "Let it be done" be interpreted grammatically? What confounds me are the following assumptions, some or all of which may be wrong: "Let" implies imperative "it be done" ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

Can I use the word “persons”?

I hope this is the correct place for my question. I didn't post in English learner site because it seems a more specific question. As everyone knows the plural of person is people, but I saw in a menu ...
1
vote
3answers
301 views

Usage of 'and' between more than two items

Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought the case, and the European Union and Japan. vs Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

What's a synonym for the profile of a mountain?

I'm looking for a word to describe the the contour of a mountain. Something like profile, or cross-section. I've heard of stratigraphic column, but I think that requires showing the layers, like on ...
8
votes
2answers
541 views

Can the verb “tend” be followed by a bare infinitive (“tend be” v.s. “tend to be”)?

I thought tend (used to imply “regularly or frequently behaving in a particular way or having a certain characteristic – Oxford’s def; 1.1) always has to be used with the to-infinitive form of verbs. ...
0
votes
2answers
116 views

Is “will just need to [verb]” grammatical?

Consider this sentence on an official form: To change the arrangement, you will just need to fill up a new application form. For some reason, the phrase "you will just need to" sounds awkward. ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Thanking for scheduling meeting

I am going to send a email to a secretary of a CEO thanking her for scheduling a meeting. What would be a good phrase for the opening of email? Should I write: Thank you for scheduling the ...
-1
votes
2answers
381 views

active-passive voice related question [duplicate]

Please tell me the passive form (if there is) of the following sentence: Leave at once. ???
6
votes
6answers
3k views

What is an unambiguous single word for a five-pointed star without enclosure?

I am looking for a single word that describes this thing (1): but not this thing (2): The obvious choice here would be pentagram, but in colloquial use, that word unfortunately refers to both ...
0
votes
7answers
431 views

What's the similar word for Answer Sheet?

There is a quiz section on my blog, and a list of quiz result. I need a title for the list of quiz results. I prefer not to use "Replies" because I've already used it up in forum discussions. ...
2
votes
2answers
335 views

Can I say “Where can I find 'a' post office”?

It's a question in a grammar app. "Where can I find _ post office please?". I chose "a", but it says "the" is the correct answer. Same problem with this question: "Let's go to _ cinema tonight." I ...
1
vote
3answers
653 views

Is writing “My English is not the best around” wrong?

I was wondering if I can use "is not the best around" in conjunction with language skills, but some mild googling gave me no results for languages like German or French (in a context where I'd ...
1
vote
2answers
560 views

“No, I hadn't.” vs “No, I didn't.”

Which is correct option to the following & Why: Did you have lunch at home yesterday? (1) No, I haven't. (2) No, I hadn't. (3) No, I didn't. (4) No, I don't.
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

What does “could use a friend” mean?

I heard this word on some TV show and i have been trying to find its meaning(but they weren't of help much). Could someone please tell me ?
3
votes
1answer
5k views

What does 'both of you' mean?

How does one reflect the difference in meaning between 'I gave one to both of you' meaning you gave one to each of them, and 'I gave one to both of you' meaning you gave one item for the two to share? ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

confusion of dont vs doesnt [duplicate]

i have heard that it should does/does not for he/she/it and do/don't for i/you/we/they But I am confused when i always get to hear people talking do and don't for he/she Even in a lecture i listened ...
12
votes
7answers
18k views

If a person holds prejudice against people because of their nationality, would that be considered racist?

Would it be considered racist if a store owner believes all Canadians are thieves and does not let any Canadians into his store? Racism pertains to discriminating based on race, and (correct me if I'm ...
1
vote
3answers
18k views

“Both of you” vs. “the both of you”

When we refer to two people, which is right — "both of you" or "the both of you"? Are both the same or is there any difference between them?
1
vote
2answers
129 views

What is a misplaced modifier?

For example... The Animal Control representative described the lost puppy as a golden retriever wearing a silver collar weighing 150 pounds. In this case is "weighing" used correctly? My book says ...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

“Did you do it?” vs “Have you done it?”?

If someone did something that made me mad, which is correct to say: Did you do it? have you done it? If not, what is the proper situation for saying Did you do it?
4
votes
3answers
540 views

A verb for transforming something into currency

I need a verb that expresses the concept of transforming a raw material into currency, as in this sentence "The bitcoin manufacturing process currenciates digital information." New coinages are fine ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Is it possible to describe an event tensed ambiguously?

If an event will occur in the future I might say: There will be an event and it will have a number of features. If it occurs in the past I might say: There was an event and it had a number of ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

How to refer to a 'second' last name or family name?

I know in most english speaking countries, there's no such a thing like a "second" last name. But for example in spanish it's quite common (we are fond of long a complicated names lol), our full names ...
-1
votes
6answers
277 views

How to pronounce number, say 1024, in programming world? [closed]

This is a 1024-byte length string. How to pronounce the sentence above? This is a one-thousand-and-twenty-four byte length string. or This is a one-oh-two-four byte length string.
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Can “that” have a possessive form? [duplicate]

For example: It's a statue that's base is made of gold. The thing is, I'm pretty sure "that's" can only mean "that is" and I don't think I've ever seen "thats."
2
votes
1answer
4k views

“Open to opportunities” vs. “open for opportunities”

I want to know which sentence is correct and why: I'm open to new opportunities. I'm open for new opportunities.
0
votes
1answer
82 views

What does “another” mean in this sentence?

If someone says “Tom broke another lamp,” does it imply that Tom already broke a lamp or that another lamp was previously broken by someone?
1
vote
1answer
77 views

“To charge (that…)” for “to claim/to assert” in AmE

While browsing my bilingual dictionary, Ed. 1985, I stumbled upon the verb "to charge" in a meaning defined as an Americanism [3(b) U.S.: to charge that... alléguer que...(to assert that)] without any ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What does “I can get behind that :)” mean when you suggest someone to compromise on an alternative option?

"How about we compromise and ... ? ;)" Answer: "I can get behind that :)"
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Phrases about a journey in BrE and AmE [closed]

What is the common phrases in BrE and AmE to say someone when he/she is beginning a journey? I know that in BrE we can say (according to ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

English regulators? [duplicate]

Does anyone know if English has a regulator as Spanish does? We have "Real Academia Española" (Royal Spanish Academy) it seems English doesn't have one ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Is there a word for when caravan guards kill a merchant and take all his stuff to sell? Other than defalcator?

If it was on sea it would be mutineer. I swear there is a word for this.
4
votes
4answers
338 views

Why did the KJV use “thou” toward God?

The word "thou" (and similar variations of the Latin tu in other languages) was used between people for informal speech, and talking to people of lower standing. So why did people use it (most ...
2
votes
5answers
760 views

Everybody had a different opinion. Is there an idiom for this?

I'm searching for an idiom (in a negative sense) that means that a group of people have different opinions, so it's difficult for them to solve a problem, to decide on something or agree on something. ...
1
vote
6answers
174 views

How should I refer to people who have had something shared with them?

In the application I am developing, I'd like to refer to people who have had something shared with them (link, photo etc.) but I couldn't figure out what word or phrase to use.
0
votes
1answer
915 views

Synonyms for 'the use of'?

I need synonyms for the word 'the use of' in my sentence. Also, the use of commonly available solutions contributed to cost reduction. Thank you in advance for your help.
2
votes
4answers
7k views

What do people mean or think they mean by “not to scale?” [closed]

I have in front of me a map of an area in the Angeles National Forest that says at the bottom, "map not to scale." What, if anything, does "not to scale" properly mean on a map or diagram, and if ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between 'last' and 'least'? [closed]

What is the difference between 'last' and 'least'? Is least a superlative of last?
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Nonstandard English Syntax [duplicate]

What would be the best way to describe the non-standard syntax of "The spider he was confused."?
17
votes
11answers
6k views

Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE

Idiom: in my neck of the woods (AmE) The meaning of this expression is: in the region where I live. I once tried to find out how a word that referred to a part of the body could later develop into ...
1
vote
3answers
163 views

“To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE

The Harrap's New Shorter French and English dictionary Ed. 1985, defines both verbal and adjectival "tame" as Americanisms for respectively "to cultivate" and "cultivated", as of a plant or a land ...
0
votes
2answers
335 views

“Regret telling” vs. “regret having told”

Is there a difference between: She regrets telling him (that) she didn't like his mother. She regrets having told him (that) she didn't like his mother. To me, the first phrase sounds ...

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