0
votes
1answer
3k views

Why is “being ” used in this sentence “it being a rainy day” as a present participle?

The following sentence is somewhat confusing. It being a rainy day, we had to abandon (or simply say cancel) the match. or Being a rainy day, we had to abandon the match. I think one of ...
-1
votes
2answers
836 views

What are these parts of the cheeks or face called?

Image source: http://neozeitgeist.tumblr.com/post/15761145451/hope-you-all-are-aware-that-for-my-life-being Do these parts of the cheeks/face have a name? If not, how would you describe a florid ...
-1
votes
1answer
426 views

What is the meaning of “rendition” here? [closed]

What does "rendition" mean in the following paragraph? References to the pea jacket appear in American newspapers at least as early as the 1720s, and modern renditions still maintain the original ...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

What is a prefix that means near?

For instance, if I were to describe someone as being *near-*carnivorous, I'm have the goal of depicting them as being a heavy meat eater that includes very few forms of non-meat based food in their ...
1
vote
1answer
242 views

Using “in” and “with”

Although I know the clear meaning of commonly used prepositions in English, sometimes, I'm a little confused with them and cannot understand the difference between them. A week or so ago, I asked a ...
5
votes
1answer
162 views

OED Appeals: Antedatings of “headhunter”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: headhunter noun earlier than 1960 The tribal practice of decapitating enemies and ...
0
votes
4answers
719 views

Converge and “Verb Confusion”

MS Word has been complaining of a grammatical Word Confusion error when I use converge. Here's my sentence: Managers had converged the thousands of ideas into a handful of big ideas. If I drop ...
13
votes
4answers
953 views

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't?

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't? As another example, wave speed is two words. But wavelength is only one word. What is the reason for this? In Swedish and other contructs, ...
2
votes
3answers
189 views

What to call the executor of an action?

I can't find the right word to describe the object that performs an activity/action. Doer Executor Performer Actor The term is to be used in an application where you may choose an "object" (from a ...
1
vote
3answers
138 views

Meaning of “true, with an asterisk”

How would one explain the following headline news in plain English? Romney's attack on clean energy: true, with an asterisk
0
votes
5answers
80 views

Is using “get on developing” correct in this phrase?

You could get on developing this project and help me to add more features to that.
0
votes
2answers
437 views

Word order with “just” and “only” meaning “merely”

Marking a German student's test I have encountered the following problem: The relationship between the two adolescents is one-sided. Just the boy really feels something, the girl hates him. Can ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What does the sentence “say hello to karma” mean?

It's a part of a Dilbert's strip you can find here: I understand every word. But not the joke as a whole. Can you explain the irony?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Substitute for “The thought came to my mind” [closed]

I want a substitute for the sentence "The thought came to my mind". It should be a slightly formal substitute as I am writing a formal letter. Can someone help me with that?
5
votes
5answers
810 views

What is going on in this sentence?

I was helping my brother study for the SAT, and we came across this sentence: While it was different from all the other classes he had taken, Eric was unhappy with his psychology class. The ...
0
votes
2answers
575 views

Romney, “regards to”, and disfluency

This is kind of a follow up to "in regard to" or "in regards to". I have always considered that regards to means sending well wishes, while regard to means "concerning". Hence with regards to or in ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

Megafauna is to animals as what is to insects?

I'm aware of several species of "giant" insects, such as the Meganeura (giant dragonfly) and the Arthropleura (giant centipede) — but I was wondering if anyone knew of a loose term similar to ...
0
votes
1answer
224 views

How to interpret a statement consisting of two ORs?

I found this statement on a newspaper that is the subject of a recent controversy: "no guarantee or loan shall be given or raised by the Government except under the authority of any resolution ...
0
votes
2answers
986 views

Adverb word order: “nicely shows” vs “shows nicely”

I have the following sentence in my dissertation: The even-tempered STO basis for Mg shows nicely why the virial theorem cannot be trusted as an error indicator. However, previously I had there: ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count?

Merriam-Webster says about another the following: being one more in addition to one or more of the same kind —http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/another However, I come across such ...
3
votes
2answers
727 views

Is “get one’s pants off” a popular idiom or an eyebrows-raising slang?

I came across the phrase “get one’s pants off” impossibly in association with Confucius analects in the following sentence which I found in a website, but forgot to jot down the source: What kind ...
8
votes
18answers
2k views

Word for small junk items in household

Every household has a drawer, box or case full of little assorted items — buttons, plastic bendy things, screws, small metal pipes, etc. — that are usually very inexpensive and generally considered to ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Why is “proceed” spelt “-ceed” and not “-cede” like “precede”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origins of the “‑cede/‑seed/‑ceed” suffix The pronunciation of proceed is exactly like that of precede with the only difference being the o instead of the e. What rules ...
1
vote
2answers
198 views

“Sorting on” vs. “Sorting by”

Recently asked a question of a colleague: Are you sorting this list by acronym? He responded: Yes, I’m sorting on acronym (ascending). Emphasis mine in each case. Is one correct and not ...
1
vote
0answers
480 views

“To mistake X as Y” vs. “to mistake X for Y” [closed]

I'm not sure what the correct preposition choice would be in this instance. Don’t mistake a moment in the journey as your final destination. Don’t mistake a moment in the journey for your final ...
3
votes
4answers
866 views

What word can be used to describe someone you're following? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What’s a good word for a person that’s being followed? For example, a Twitter user can have many followers. Twitter refers to the users that another user is following as ...
3
votes
1answer
335 views

Comma — a punctuation error?

Consider: This book provides a solid psychological understanding of these experiments, and adds a few expansions and conclusions of its own. It also provides … My question regards the comma. I ...
9
votes
3answers
133k views

Is it acceptable to use “Much Appreciated” as the closing for a letter or email?

When I send an email requesting assistance from someone, I am tempted to close the email with the phrase “Much Appreciated”. Is it acceptable to use that phrase outside of a sentence?
11
votes
4answers
358 views

Hire an employee (a consultant)?

I am trying to fill in this sentence: “My company is looking to ___ a consultant”. Is the correct term “hire” or is there a different word that is more fitting when talking about a consultant?
3
votes
4answers
889 views

Is “reach out and touch” an idiom?

Is “reach out and touch” an idiomatic expression? The manual for the console versions describe him as “half unfeeling machine, half raging horned devil. This walking nightmare has a rocket ...
4
votes
5answers
716 views

A word that refers to spilling or splashing of ink?

Is there any word which refers to the spilling, splattering, sprinkling or splashing of ink? (Or something less “violent”, like the pouring or dripping of ink?)
1
vote
2answers
294 views

Should I use an article with the word “part”?

I’ve noticed that some people use an article with the word “part” and the bulk of them does not (at least at some web pages I skimmed through). Which is the correct variant? I think that parts of ...
13
votes
4answers
2k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
2
votes
2answers
283 views

Solution of/to/for equation

A recent question to when to use of and when for/to for solution suggested that of appears only in context of chemistry, and the word means something very different then. But I recalled almost ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Access to…” or “access of…”?

Translating a title of a paper from another language, I’m debating between Remote Access to a Computer System Remote Access of a Computer System This is a title, so it should stand on its own, ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“I won't” vs. “I'll not”

I won’t and I’ll not are both short forms of I will not. Both are used in English. Are there any situations where one is preferred over other?
-1
votes
3answers
638 views

Semantic difference between “if I did not want” and “if I wanted”

I was reading My Antonia and came across this line: [She] asked me if I did not want to go to the garden with her (12) And was wondering why Cather chose if I did not want over if I wanted. Are ...
4
votes
3answers
527 views

S-V agreement: It is not clear what is/are meant by A and B

In the following sentence, the verb “are” strikes me as odd. In paragraph 6, it is not clear what are meant by “the front unit” and “the central element”. It seems that “. . . it is not clear ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “to be done” [closed]

The following is a transcript of the well-known recorded lecture by Prof. Michael Sandel of Harvard University (the cited portion starts at 43:36): The only argument this painter makes is that the ...
1
vote
1answer
337 views

Proper use of pronouns and conjunctions

Could someone please verify the grammar in this sentence? Particularly the use of 'her' (should it be she?) and the implied 'her' after the and. Should there be a second 'her'? "They sought treatment ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

What's the word for taking an article from somewhere and published on my own site? [closed]

Sometimes when I see a good article on the internet, I want to keep a copy of it on my own blog. I need one word to tell visitors that this article was taken/copied from somewhere else. It is usually ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“I was wondering what time it is” or “I was wondering what the time has been”

Can you tell me which option is more natural in this English sentence? I'm sorry to trouble you but I was wondering what (A) time it is (B) the time has been The whole story is that ...
6
votes
1answer
161 views

What do references like “Docc Rom.” and similar mean? [closed]

In the book Giordano Bruno: His Life and Thought, by Dorothea Waley Singer, references often have a form of 18 Doc. Ven. XV. or 49 Docc. Rom. XX, XXI. How to decipher them?
15
votes
3answers
690 views

Can I use “US-American” to disambiguate “American”? If not, what can I use?

Based on this question, I wonder: as an alternative to USAian (which is very nonstandard) is it OK to use US-American to more clearly indicate "inhabitant of the USA"? According to Google Ngram, this ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

Skill-set is not common in or on

I've written the following sentence but after reading it, it sounds to me like it's wrong. The skill-set for iOS and Android development is not common in the current team. Is it correct to say ...
2
votes
6answers
822 views

“Suffer from a headache” vs. “suffer from the headache” [closed]

I am not sure which article to use in the following context: She has been suffering from a headache. She has been suffering from the headache. Please clear up my doubt.
1
vote
2answers
316 views

Does one top up or top off rechargeable batteries?

While writing a forum post on proper lithium-ion battery care, I started wondering whether the proper term for recharging them while still fairly full is called topping up or topping off. Perhaps both ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
1
vote
1answer
549 views

“Opposite the mall” vs. “opposite to the mall” [closed]

The new showroom that he has put up is opposite the central mall. I have doubts about the grammaticality of this sentence. According to my understanding, it should be: The new showroom that ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

“The more…, the less..” type of sentence corrections

The more you think about it, the less likely you will take action. I feel that sentence sounds a bit awkward, especially the less part. I am not so sure if the sentence is correct, grammatically. ...

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