-1
votes
1answer
381 views

Usage of “method”

Which of these sentences is better? The method to measure the intelligence of a man is to... The method for estimating the intelligence of a man is to... Is it method to or method for? ...
2
votes
3answers
448 views

Which is right, “worst nightmare” or “best nightmare”?

When we refer to the most negative dream, we say it as worst nightmare. Since that nightmare is negative, does that mean that the meaning of the worst nightmare is the least negative of all ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What is a non-humorous 19th or 18th century alternative to the contemporary insult 'jerk'?

Most web sites and forum posts I've come across covering archaic insults are usually devoted to listing polysyllabic compound words of the Shakespearean variety, such as : you artless, swag-bellied, ...
1
vote
1answer
245 views

Words of Chinese origin in English? [closed]

When it comes to word-loaning, English sure stands out. Having come across many loan words from other languages, I started to wonder if China too blames us of contemporary word-theft. Well, apart from ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “in 6 months” mean?

I'm not sure about the usage of "in" and "after". For example, it's January now and I got rejected in a job application, some one tells me that I can re-apply in six month. Is this "in" the same as ...
2
votes
3answers
372 views

Informal Suffix Usage: -ity/ety

Sometimes in very informal or comic book language one will see phrases such as "bonkity bonk", "flippity-flop", and "knockity knock". Other examples include "crunchity", "swirlity", etc, etc. I have ...
0
votes
1answer
221 views

What type of phrase is 'not quite'?

I'd like to to know what type of phrase 'not quite' is. My English Language teacher says it is a mitigated adverbial phrase, but I have no idea. I'm pretty sure it is not mitigated, but partly ...
2
votes
1answer
198 views

When is “all y'allses” used?

I have a student from Virginia who says she has heard the use of all y'allses; does anyone know about this? Is it that the second person plural being used is all y'alls (with the -s at the end here ...
4
votes
2answers
204 views

Is 'major' in a musical context a noun or an adjective?

In the question What are the notes in the D major scale?, I'm trying to work out what type of word major is. A scale just means a sequence of notes with defined intervals between them, and these ...
-2
votes
3answers
136 views

Should I use “one” or “it”?

Which is correct: I think I need a better kind of gun. But where can I get it from? I can’t find it anywhere in this maze. I think I need a better kind of gun. But where can I get one from? I ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Where would the commas go in this sentence?

A man so powerful he could crush stones in his hands approached me. I'm not sure, but I'm guessing after "powerful" and maybe "hands"?
1
vote
1answer
319 views

Is it possible to say “ASAP” instead of “as soon as possible” when we speak? [closed]

Or is it just an abbreviation that should be written just on paper? I heard Al Pacino say "asap" on the phone when he was talking with his friend. What about pm? Could we say p m instead of prime ...
2
votes
3answers
181 views

Meaning of “jarring sales.” Is it negative?

The first harbingers of Christmas arrive in October when jarring sales and decorations follow fast on the heels of summer. Does the word jarring here mean annoying, or early/preliminary?
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Can this sentence be worded in this way?

Instead of saying: I was eating a steak, and John was eating the lunch he brought from home. Could I word it as such: I was eating a steak, and John the lunch he brought from home.
0
votes
1answer
768 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

What is the difference between the phrases below? [duplicate]

He dies. ( On the TV screen I saw. "Mandela dies at 94 " ) He died. ( On another canal simultaneously it was written " Mandela died at 94. ") She / he has died vs he died vs he dies When they ...
1
vote
2answers
259 views

Formal alternative to phrasal verb “turn down”

I wish to state on my curriculum vitae something along the following line: Scholarship turned down to pursue a career in industry. I find phrasal verbs (like turn down) rather informal. Is there a ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

A term needed for mixed pharmaceutical compounds

Anyone could help me to provide a term for compounds mixed by pharmacy then served as a medicine? Could I still just use materia medica nowadays? Thanks.
7
votes
4answers
40k views

Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc

I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est: hap.py → happier → (the) happiest ti.dy → tidier → ...
2
votes
1answer
832 views

When to, and when not to pluralise month?

Can someone please explain the correct way of pluralising month, for instance why do we sometimes use months or month, such as: "Victor is a 7 month old baby" and "Victor is 7 months old" What is ...
8
votes
1answer
683 views

Why do English men's names almost always stress the first syllable?

While looking at names of American Presidents I noticed that English men’s names almost always stress the first syllable. Barack Obama is unusual in that he’s only the second President (after ...
9
votes
10answers
3k views

Idiom for trying and failing, falling short and being disapproved

In one of my native tongues, there's an idiomatic expression, the semi-literal translation of which is "the 'being close' of yours won't shoot the hare". In another, there's something along the lines ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

Language Evolution: Use of 'It'

If, as it is written in Oxford Dictionaries, 'it' can be used to identify a person, 'it’s me', 'it’s a boy', why are 'she' and 'he' still used and, furthermore, why are people still discussing as to ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

Is “so” always accompanied by “that”?

In the following question, why can’t answer three be the right answer to fill in the blank? The correct answer is supposed to be choice one. The new skyscraper was ____________ the buildings ...
1
vote
2answers
118 views

What does “Logitem” mean on many freightliners?

What does Logitem mean that I see on the sides of many passing freightliners? I wonder wether it’s a kind of clipping combining logistic with item. I'm not a native speaker but I love English.
1
vote
1answer
208 views

“Account currency” translation [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker and I'd like to translate the following sentence: "Here you can see your Account Terms including the freight and payment terms, minimum order value, and account ...
3
votes
3answers
179 views

“covered by” vs. “covered with”

I found this sentence in some book: Imagine a young child who already knows that creatures that live in water are fish, they have gills, and their skin is covered by scales. Saying “their skin ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do we say and write “read” instead of “readed” for the past? [closed]

Why do we write read unchanged for present and past, while study changes; we have studied. The present form of read is read, pronounced as "reed". The past form of read is also read but it is ...
-3
votes
1answer
48 views

Are these two sentence make the speaker self-defeating? [closed]

As he sets out, China is on the brink of revolution. But I do not think so. (self-made) It seems to me to be wrong. Because the first sentence implies that the “I” have accepted “his” idea as true, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does the word dilemma have two pronunciations?

The word dilemma has caused a dilemma. According to Oxford Dictionary (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/dilemma) Pronunciation is : /dɪˈlɛmə, dʌɪ-/ Which is di-lema or dye-lema. ...
0
votes
3answers
903 views

How to describe the feeling you get when something exceedingly irritating, irritates you? [closed]

Got extremely annoyed today. But that's not the word I was looking for. I had to deliver a case of bottled water to some friends living in another dorm in our college. I have to tell you, the sound ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

what will be the alternate word for convey in the following sentence

I am writing my first official email in English which happens to be my second language. I am unsure about the correctness of the following sentence. Please help. The detected error is false positive, ...
1
vote
4answers
562 views

How do you describe the feeling you get when you've almost dropped something but caught it in time?

Question says it all. I've had suggestions of using "relieved" or "elated", but none of them really sound like what I'm thinking of. Think about it this way. The other day, I nearly dropped my ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Which voice is better here, passive or active? [closed]

Between If the moral principle of “love your neighbour” is adhered to, then the world will be free of war. and If we adhere to the moral principle of “love your neighbour”, then the ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Can “it” refer to or represent any element showing in the foregoing sentence?

In human soul sensory capacities are as fundamental as intellectual ones. It attain perfect goodness through many different powers including both intellectual ones and sensory ones. I use ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

Which one is better, a matter of urgency, or simply urgency?

It becomes a matter of urgency to establish the accountability of the public officials. It becomes an urgency to establish the accountability of the public officials. Which one is ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Is “morality in conduct of ..”" a natural expression?

Which one is better? There is a deep gap between morality in personal conduct of the officials and the public expectation for it. vs. There is a deep gap between the behavior of the ...
0
votes
2answers
135 views

Which question tag below is correct? Apparently the second is correct but I want to put emphasis on first part of the sentence “ I take it …”

"I take it that your question has to do with what my perception is of being a good teacher, isn't it?" "I take it that your question has to do with my perception is of being a good teacher, hasn't ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the exclamation “Why, I never!” a contraction of?

The exclamation "Why, I never!" is a well-worn exclamation (I think more common in Britain than in the US?), often used to express indignation upon having been accused of something. The structure of ...
7
votes
1answer
567 views

Are “adult” and “adulterate” cognates?

The word adult appear to have derived from the Latin term adultus, meaning grown up, mature, adult, ripe. Adulterate (and its cognate adultery) is reported to derive from the Latin adulterare - to ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

How do I ask permission to override a course? [closed]

I need override for a course I want to take next semester. Instructor has asked to email him asking permission. What should I write in the email? Respected sir/madam, I need prerequisite ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

What does “Blood money becomes bloodied money” mean?

There was the following sentence in New York Time’s (January 9) movie review of “Cold comes the night” that came under the title, “She’s hard as nails, he’s noir and nasty”: ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Definite article or not in “the low sampling frequency”

I do not mention what is the sampling frequency but I know that it is low. Should I use the article "the" or not in the following? 1 This can be highly error prone because of narrow bandlimited ...
1
vote
4answers
216 views

Can dogmas be false? Or is the very meaning absolute? [closed]

The word 'Dogma', does it mean: This is the truth or Something that is believed to be true I did search but I have hard time grasping what it really means. Edit: What I really want answered is: Can ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What's with the apostrophe in the standard spelling of the idiom “how's about”?

A recent question on EL&U asks Is it correct to use "how's" as short for "how does"? I have a series of tangentially related questions about a fairly common (in American ...
0
votes
4answers
424 views

“You” as an indefinite pronoun in a first-person statement

But like most young people of my generation, waking up 6 am in the morning to study things you do not understand, is not an idea that appeals to me Is my usage of 'you' in this context wrong? ...
0
votes
2answers
316 views

What is the proper word/phrase for SMS style language? [closed]

What is the proper word/phrase for SMS style language? Then one's which are commonly used while sending text messages, containing shortened words, phonetic spelling, multiple punctuations ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Are hyphens needed in a noun-phrase that precedes 'manner'? [duplicate]

I sometimes use "manner" to use noun-phrases as adverbs, like "in the manner of a vigilant watchdog". If I reverse the order, does the noun phrase then have to be hypenated? Like so: "in a ...
1
vote
1answer
368 views

In the early 1900s, would the name (Nettie/Nette) have been more likely to be spelled Nette or Nettie?

I am developing a family album. In doing so, I have seen the name (Nettie/Nette) spelled both as Nette and as Nettie. I have not been able to locate relevant birth records. Can someone tell me ...
-2
votes
1answer
230 views

Can anyone come up with two names whose pronunciations are respectively same as “who” and “how”? [closed]

I would like to find out occidental names whose pronunciation are close to my names in my native language. The first name and second name contain preferably only Latin alphabet. In order to state the ...

15 30 50 per page