4
votes
3answers
7k views

How to describe a person who loves everything about nature and the outdoors

I'm looking for a good adjective to describe a person who loves experiencing nature, as in a person who has been in the Boy Scouts for most of his life, loves fishing, hiking, mountain climbing, ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

What does “ingenuous” mean?

As well as the standard oratorio repertory, she sang solo recitals, her dazzling smile and enchantingly ingenuous personality creating an instant bond with audiences. TELEGRAPH I am a little bit ...
3
votes
4answers
133 views

Is “steepness” a proper word? [closed]

I am a marketing writer and am working on a product description, which would be as follows: We track cool metrics like location, duration, speed and steepness. Is that use of the word correct? ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How do you rephrase a quality about yourself as a skill, specifically, being detail oriented?

I am filling out questions for a job application on-line. I am to list the top skills I used in my last position. The job I had was somewhat like editing, but for item records on a library circulation ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Distinctive features of English diphthongs

I am looking for a table of distinctive features for English dipthongs along the lines of that available for other vowels here. I don't trust my purely book learned linguistic skills to produce an ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

“feed aggregator” instead of “feeds aggregator” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? I find it odd that the common expression (see Wikipedia for example) is "feed aggregator" ...
2
votes
4answers
152 views

Word for “how it fits”

What are some synonyms for relationship which encompass how something fits - like how a couch fits in a room, or how a building fits on a block, or how a neighborhood fits in a city. Its ...
4
votes
3answers
491 views

What is the origin of the expression “to prick one's ears up”?

What is the origin of the expression "to prick one's ears up"? Does this come from an actual physical action seen in animals or from some literature reference?
1
vote
2answers
496 views

Why do we use “to” after “how”? [closed]

For example: How to makes this? Why do I use the to after how?
3
votes
6answers
2k views

What's that word? Does it mean “circular reasoning”?

This is really a two part question. How do you find a word that you forget, but you remember its definition? I have this problem routinely. I usually try googling "word that means ...
1
vote
1answer
287 views

“Zoom out the map”? “Zoom the map out”?

On a website, I show a Google Map with markers. I have some text that says If you can't see them all, zoom the map out to reveal the rest. This sounds kind of lame, I also considered: If you ...
3
votes
2answers
361 views

Use of “groin” as a verb [closed]

I came across this line when reading Owen's Strange Meeting: It seemed that out of the battle I escaped Down some profound dull tunnel, long since scooped Through granites which Titanic ...
1
vote
1answer
259 views

Is this sentence of “mixed construction”?

In English class, we've discussed the following sentence and considered if it is of mixed construction: The increase in the number of times his name appeared on such lists after the poem was ...
4
votes
2answers
196 views

How should I correctly repeat possessives?

planning of mine, the student and the company planning of mine, the student's, and the company's Which is correct/better, and why? I would assume 2 is correct, but is 1 incorrect?
6
votes
4answers
355 views

Analogue of “most recent” for events in the future

In the context of a listing of events that are time-based, it is common to use "Most Recent" to describe a listing of events ordered by date, in descending order, with the upper limit being today's ...
3
votes
3answers
156 views

“At least make this” vs “make this at least” - which is grammatical?

Which one of the following sentence is grammatically correct? Can we at least make this predictable? Can we make this at least predictable? What is the grammar rule?
4
votes
5answers
259 views

How can I say “You should save your work 'at short regular interval'?”

I want to say that "You should save your file frequently at regular interval" because this area has electricity problem. I want frequently at regular interval in a word.
12
votes
4answers
574 views

Was “terror” ever a positive thing?

A friend has just told me that "terror" used to be a good thing, as opposed to the negative thing it is today: ter·ror (trr) n. Intense, overpowering fear. See Synonyms at fear. One ...
6
votes
1answer
517 views

Word order for “What is… that … called?”

I am having difficulty with finding the natural word order in the following passive construction: What are people called who do a lot of unnecessary work? What are called people who do a lot ...
2
votes
2answers
269 views

checking parts of speech pattern of this sentence

I wonder if the following sentence is grammatically correct. Foobar is a novel, set in a scenic landscape of farmland and ancient woodland on the banks of the River Foo. I suppose the word "set" ...
1
vote
3answers
696 views

Technical term for `avoiding responsibility` with decision-makers?

Suppose a parliament that tries to "outsource" their responsibility in various ways (they take the gains but not wanting to take the risks). Of course, the situation cannot last: risks and gains ...
3
votes
3answers
494 views

Name of a sequence of moves in martial arts?

What is the name of a fixed sequence of moves used in training of martial arts? Precisely, used in training, not in actual combat, as both parties know exactly what is to come and follow a fixed ...
4
votes
2answers
445 views

Meaning of “we're not out to get anybody” [closed]

What is the meaning of We're not out to get anybody? This is a message from a teacher to the student.
3
votes
2answers
157 views

The thing proper

I found myself writing this: .. and this is before we consider mathematics proper. It seemed like a natural kind of thing to write, but I couldn't find an example of it. I get the impression ...
3
votes
3answers
507 views

Is “flatter than a mashed cat” a common phrase?

I became interested in the expression but can’t find out whether it has original or common forms. Why is it a cat? From the very first note she was horribly, hopelessly, irretrievably off key, and ...
1
vote
6answers
104 views

Have definition; searching for matching word [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Other expressions for “to be the devil's advocate”? Given the definition: "the adoption of an ostensibly defensible position, less because one actually ...
2
votes
2answers
743 views

Is the phrase “out of the box” an adjective or an adverb or an idiom?

Could someone explain the meaning of the phrase "out of the box"? Is it an adjective or an adverb or an idiom? Please point out its function in below sentences. For Python fans of Google’s Cloud ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Incorporating indirect third person pronouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? I am sure this has been asked before, I ...
9
votes
7answers
507 views

Is there a name for an answer to a question that does nothing but rephrase the question in an answer form?

(if you can think of a better title please change it, I know it's bad) Is there a name for an answer to a question that does nothing but rephrase the question in an answer form? For example, if you ...
2
votes
3answers
593 views

Does this sound vulgar or have sexual connotations? [closed]

I'd like to ask you to help me clarifying if a brand name sounds sexual/vulgar/queer for native English speakers. It is "I Job You" which is a social job recommendation site. However, we had some ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between “vanish” and “disappear”

What is the difference between these words, exactly? Both mean to stop existing or to become invisible. vanish He turned around and vanished into the house. My glasses seem to have vanished. ...
3
votes
4answers
701 views

Is there a prefix for “infinite”?

I was looking for a prefix I could prepend to a word to mean an infinite amount of the thing the word describes. I eventually found someone with the same question, and since there were no answers, I ...
1
vote
6answers
475 views

A phrase for ignoring the disparity at a low level, while seeking commonality at a high level

I'm having a hard time describing the phrase I'm looking for, so I think the best way to ask the question is to simply present the problem. At work I've been tasked with merging the guidelines (the ...
7
votes
2answers
274 views

How should I pronounce 't' followed by 'the'?

This combination is really hard to me. This is an example: Knowing what to check is just the start to process. Can anyone help?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What word means “the ability to read more than one form of writing”?

If a person can speak and understand two languages, he is bilingual. How would you describe a person who can read and write in two languages with very different forms of writing, such as Chinese and ...
4
votes
1answer
786 views

Rules for forming demonyms

Are there specific rules / conventions at play when creating demonyms? Or are they merely formed organically over time - the most popular winning out? There are many suffixes to choose from, but I ...
2
votes
1answer
246 views

Word for parents of your child's partner

There are words for relationships obtained by marriage or partnership of family members: xxx-in-law. But, surprisingly, there is no word (that I know of) for the parents of your child's partner. Or is ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

Use of “which” in a sample phrase [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Other ways of saying whichs Is the following grammatically correct? Sampling was mainly random, with the exception of some services which indexes, calculated with ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Punctuation within a question [closed]

How do you punctuate "Are you Mr. Jones?" Is that correct or should it be "Are you, Mr. Jones?"
1
vote
1answer
331 views

Meter in Tennyson's *Maud*

How should Tennyson's Maud be read? I.e. what is its meter? Here are the first four lines: I HATE the dreadful hollow behind the little wood, Its lips in the field above are dabbled with ...
0
votes
2answers
197 views

Is an all or nothing affair [closed]

I've been reading an article and the author uses such a phrase : If our model binder deserialized JSON into a ComicBook it would not be able to make that determination because serialization is ...
2
votes
2answers
396 views

'All that' vs 'all what' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “all that” vs. “all what” How can I be sure when to use 'all that' or 'all what' in making sentences. Is there any differences in their meaning. ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “Please to” proper English?

I have been around on Twitter for awhile and I regularly find people using "Please to retweet this" or "Please to help me", etc. Is this proper English? I do not think prefixing the infinitive form ...
30
votes
5answers
3k views

Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?

wintry: characteristic of winter, esp. in feeling or looking very cold and bleak: "a wintry landscape". summery: belonging to or characteristic of or occurring in summer; "summery weather"; ...
3
votes
3answers
198 views

“Which” or “where”?

A question of mine on another SE site was corrected from: I am trying to determine where on Earth has the lowest gravity. To: I am trying to determine which on Earth's surface has the lowest ...
12
votes
6answers
3k views

Why do we put the verb to be at the end of these questions? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions Look at the following questions - can anyone give a simple grammatical explanation as to why we put the ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do you say “to place a call”?

I know to make a call and this makes sense to me. But recently I read in an article: [...] if you are actually placing calls. I wonder about the verb to place. NGram Viewer shows that this ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the exact usage of “that of”

I think in the following sentence: Adam's answer was similar to that of clergy. "That of clergy" can be replaced by "clergy's" or "clergy's answer": Adam's answer was similar to clergy's. ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

What is a “belligerent demands” of something? [closed]

The following is an excerpt from an article in the New York Times, which is the same one in a previous question: No poet of our day has such a well-earned reputation for difficulty as the ...
4
votes
2answers
672 views

What does “moral vision is so imperiously unsparing” mean?

The following is an excerpt from an article in the New York Times: No poet of our day has such a well-earned reputation for difficulty as the Englishman Geoffrey Hill, and there are few whose ...

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