5
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the term for a shortened word that is pronounced based on phantom letters?

I'm only posting out of curiosity. But recently I've begun to wonder what you would call a shortening of a word that only sounds correct when spoken, and the pronunciation cannot be inferred from its ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

Why do I never hear people say “I get to go now”?

This word got has been confusing me for a long time. Is it against the rules of English grammar, because got is the past tense of get? Why do I never hear people say it this way: I get to go now. ...
0
votes
1answer
569 views

Is the diaeresis legal in “naïve”? [duplicate]

I understand why naïve is spelled with two dots, and that those dots are called a diaeresis. What I do not understand is whether the use of a diaeresis is legal in English; is it? Other than ...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

When a sentence contains both “not” and “or”, which one has priority?

I am changing a piece of text which current reads: Payment not deducted to also include the situation where payments are withheld. The suggested revision of text given to me is Payment not ...
1
vote
1answer
461 views

What's the name of a large curly brace?

I'm looking for a particular element for a project and I'm not sure what to google. What's the name of that large brace that is used to group items together? A crude Paint rendition:
1
vote
1answer
131 views

“Subpage” vs “sub page” vs is it even a word?

I would go with subpage, but the corrector on stackexchange thinks it's a mistake and shows a red underline. You can try it yourself. Click on "Ask Question" link and type subpage in a sentence to the ...
1
vote
4answers
236 views

Term for means of communication

Considering such things as telephone calls {with/to/from} Raj text messages {with/to/from} Raj I want a term that includes calls, texts, emails etc. I can come up only with communications with ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Can you say “within 90 days after”?

I understand that you can say, "within 30 days of receiving your application", but I am seeing more and more "within 30 days after your application is received". Is the latter grammatical?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

How to avoid that “that that” that is so very awkward

In all seriousness, are there any common patterns or strategies people use to avoid having to write a sentence in which "that that" appears? For example: Evidential decision theory recommends ...
1
vote
2answers
179 views

Does 'tense' fit into Lexicology?

I am trying to assess errors regarding lexicology in an English-as-a-second-language-learner's spoken English. Does the use of tense fall into the 'Lexicology', Phonology, Syntax or Discourse? I need ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

When to use “programming's” vs. “programming is” [duplicate]

My sentence can be said as: Programming is fun. and it can also be said as: Programming's fun. Both seem to be correct. When should I use one instead of the other?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Term for one brother–sister pair marrying another?

While translating a book on the aboriginal people of northwest India, I came across a tradition of marriages, where one brother–sister pair were married to another brother–sister pair, as well as many ...
2
votes
1answer
247 views

pronunciation for consecutive /d/ and /ð/

Mr. Barnett has slammed the figure as outrageous. (Aussie ABC News) /d/ and /ð/ are made at different places, we don’t drop any one of them when pronouncing, like the news anchor, do we?
4
votes
1answer
198 views

Is there a verb that means “the act of replacing a word or phrase with an ellipsis”?

Is there a verb that means "the act of replacing a word or phrase with an ellipsis"? "Ellipsize" doesn't seem to be in the dictionaries. Is there a word for this?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Should I use a full stop at the end of text in a table?

The table has a mix of fragments and full sentences. I'm concerned that if I have full stops after the sentences and none after the fragments it will look inconsistent to the reader.
-1
votes
2answers
310 views

English teacher's question about subject of a sentence

My students and I have a disagreement about the subject of the following sentence: "Many animals were found on the farm." I say it's "Many"; they say it's "animals." Who's right?
-3
votes
2answers
707 views

no reservation or no reservations on invitation? [closed]

I am sending one invitation out for 3 events. The planners for two events would like for people to make a reservation for each of those events with their reply. So next to those events, there is ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Possessives of a title in italics

If one writes a word in italics, say the name of a movie, and wants to put apostrophe s at the end to form the possessive, is the apostrophe s italicised with the title? Chinatown's or Chinatown's?
0
votes
1answer
271 views

Tense agreement in reported speech

Jack didn't tell me that he __ my chocolate. eats ate had eaten has eaten I have a hard time figuring out which one to choose and why.
20
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “fundamental tenants” mean? (not occupant)

In the following sentence, I'm guessing "tenants" means "design goals" (based on the context): One of the fundamental tenants of Log4j 2 is to use immutable objects whenever possible and to lock ...
-1
votes
1answer
218 views

To devote vs. dedicate yourself: which works better for being studious?

In regards to studiousness, if I were to advise students to focus on their studies, should I say: Just dedicate yourself. or rather Just devote yourself. Am I right to feel that devote ...
7
votes
2answers
8k views

“via” vs. “through”

Could you please explain what the difference in usage is between through and via, which sounds like a Latinism? Are they completely interchangeable?
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What’s the word for somebody you know (sometimes well) but who isn’t your friend?

What is the English word for somebody who is not your friend, but you’ve know them even for years. For example, this might be a neighbor or somebody from school whom you see often enough but whom ...
3
votes
3answers
410 views

Why is this marked ungrammatical?

Why is the second sentence below marked as being ungrammatical? Ed wanted a new CD player. ✲ A new CD player was wanted by ED.                     —Bas Aarts, English Syntax and ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Split in half” vs. “split in two” — which one is correct?

Does the "in" imply multiplication, in which case split in half is correct, or is it division? It sounds like the latter to me, but I've heard it used both ways.
-1
votes
1answer
95 views

What will be appropriate in the following sentence?

What did the king do when he become/became angry? I am not a native speaker so am confused that since did is used in the begining, what will be correct, become or became? Also, what rule governs it? ...
-1
votes
1answer
151 views

Meaning of “through all right”

What does the phrase through all right mean? He'll see me through all right
14
votes
4answers
3k views

Racial connotations of the word “uppity”

I was told that the word uppity has some racial connotations originating from the times of segregation in the South. I never thought of it as such. I kind of like the sound of the word but was ...
4
votes
3answers
298 views

Is 'f-bomb' interchangeable with 'f-words'?

I found the word, “f-bomb” in the Time magazine’s (March 20) article titled with “Why insults exist–and Why one man wants to end them” introducing philosophy professor, William B. Irvine’s latest book ...
-2
votes
1answer
523 views

Euphemism for “a person one really detests / hates”?

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Is there a word to mean "a person one really detests / hates"? The word "bastard" may be a good fit, but I'm looking for something though forceful, is not vulgar.
-3
votes
2answers
623 views

Meaning of “it's not even close” in this context?

In some dialog, I often see something like this: Player A is voted as the toughest to play against and it's not even close. What does "it's not even close" mean in this context? Does that mean ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Adjective to describe a task that will take a long time because it's a lot of work and/or a lot of waiting

I want to describe a software task (unit of work) that could take a long time, either because it's a lot of operations (processing time) or because it has to do communication with the network and ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a word for numbers and letters, but not punctuation, etc?

Is there a word that would refer to a number or a letter, but not any other character (like a comma or an exclamation mark)?
2
votes
1answer
320 views

Relative pronoun verb agreement

In the sentence, “The dog gave me, who feeds him, a lick”, feeds does not agree with the person of the antecedent to who. I know that a verb used with a relative pronoun has the same number and ...
4
votes
2answers
358 views

'Arsonist' is to 'fire' as what is to 'water'?

According to Merriam-Webster, an arsonist is a person that engages in "the willful or malicious burning of property (as a building) especially with criminal or fraudulent intent". Flooding can also ...
-3
votes
1answer
194 views

Whats the meaning of “Outta” In a song of Metallica called “ain't my bit-ch” [closed]

((Dear Native English Speakers Please Help Me.)) Metallica is my favorite band and I love them but I have some serious problems in translating and understanding the meaning of the lyric entitled ...
0
votes
2answers
133k views

When do we use “had had” and “have had”? [duplicate]

I have seen several sentences in English where some writers have written had twice in a row. I am a bit confused about when the grammar calls for using had had. For example: I had had my car ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

“Bazaar” vs. “bazar”

Which of bazaar or bazar is better to use for the domain name of specialised marketplace? Both are available according to the dictionaries. Any advice which of these two is better to use in the URL? ...
-2
votes
1answer
211 views

"Science journal” vs. “science magazine”

What is the difference between the terms journal and magazine? Is it correct to call a magazine a journal? For example, I found the Journal of Radio Electronics and the Radio-Electronics Magazine, ...
1
vote
2answers
401 views

How to explain simple math with correct preposition embedded on explanation?

I have a construction to say a ratio. I think of or and would be the correct prepositions. So, If I give you my practice case The ratio of minimum rectangle’s floor area to enclosed circle ...
-3
votes
1answer
98 views

What is the convenient way to state the meaning that being bored in the past? [closed]

So, actually, I would like to form the sentence that includes "bored" in the past perfect continous. Is it right, if I say: "I had been being bored." ? Or what would be the right way to say that a ...
3
votes
3answers
267 views

What is the definition of a word? [closed]

I'm wondering what the minimal requirement for a word to be an actual word is. My opinion is that a word is a word if it can be understood and defined by everyone who hears it in conversation. For ...
-5
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the opposite of dramatic irony? [closed]

I know that dramatic irony is when the audience knows things the characters don't, but what do you call it when the characters in a story know information that the audience does not?
1
vote
3answers
366 views

Is “have not worked here for a long time” ambiguous?

I have not worked here for a long time/for many years. Is it ambiguous? Which of the two below is the correct meaning? I have been working here, but only for a short period of time. I once ...
-2
votes
2answers
128 views

Event: “archived” vs. “filed” vs. “shelved” [closed]

I'm coding a database that has an Events table with a status field. When an event's date has not yet passed, the status is Published. I would like to use a term to mean that the date of the event has ...
14
votes
1answer
633 views

Can the word Gentoo be used in a derogatory way?

I was reading a Wikipedia article on Gentoo Penguin and came across the following Paragraph. The application of Gentoo to the penguin is unclear. The Oxford English Dictionary notes that Gentoo ...
-1
votes
1answer
615 views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
-1
votes
1answer
211 views

Pluralizing a plural acronym [duplicate]

We use the acronym "CERT" to represent "Critical Error Reduction Techniques" quite frequently, but when we use CERT in a sentence should it be CERT or CERTs? For example, "Using CERT to Prevent ...
3
votes
2answers
368 views

Which are the word orders that can be found in English?

Besides SVO, which are the word orders that can be found in English? Are there any that are peculiar to dialects such as Singlish or Indian English? Please provide an example sentence for each order ...
-2
votes
2answers
52 views

Up to versus one's responsibility

Can "up to" be used to convey the idea of one's responsibility like in the quoted sentence below: It is up to the system to set all the needed variables. Is this usage natural or is there any ...

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