2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference in meaning between 'nonchalant' and 'insouciant'?

OED defines them as: nonchalant adjective (of a person or manner) feeling or appearing casually calm and relaxed; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm insouciant adjective showing ...
1
vote
0answers
260 views

Why doesn't the singular verb “pass” take an “-es” suffix in this sentence? [duplicate]

As I was studying Peterson’s Master TOEFL Writing Skill, I saw the sentence: Teamwork requires that a player pass the ball whoever is in the best position to make the goal. I wonder why pass ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Word to describe a sensation of death coming over your entire body?

This is the context where I want to use the word: He closed his eyes. The living did not come to mind, neither friend, nor family—only the dance of death, plain to see. The dancing figures of ...
0
votes
2answers
453 views

Words or expressions to describe having a difficult time in your dreams or nightmares

What is the best word to use in the following sentence? Any other words or expressions that can be used? That day as well he had barely woken up after a night spent tossing and turning in a ...
1
vote
1answer
768 views

Is “in about” grammatical in “I'll reach there in about 5 minutes”?

Is it correct to say "I'll reach there in about 5 minutes?" Is "in about" correct in this sentence?
1
vote
1answer
342 views

Using Past Perfect after an event

While reading a book, I came across some sentences that used past-perfect "after" an event had taken place. Actually, I've seen many books do this, so this must be the grammatically correct way, but ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

What word would you use to describe the most interesting man in the world from the dos equis commercials?

I'm trying to think of a word that describes a person who's skillful, intelligent, capable, interesting, etc. Think of the character in the most interesting man in the world commercials. What's one ...
2
votes
2answers
447 views

Which word should I use to describe the noise made by an electronic device?

The noises made by electronic devices (lamps, electronic chargers, etc.) sound to me like a high-pitched,barely audible "zzzzzz". In my mind is the word "buzz". Beyond that I don't really know. ...
-2
votes
4answers
580 views

“There is” vs. “there are” when contracted [duplicate]

Unless I am mistaken, when referring to a single thing or entity, one can say there is or there's (the contraction of the same). When referring to more than one of something, the correct wording is ...
0
votes
1answer
239 views

How to parse a sentence with verb 'bring'

“He brought the umbrella swishing down through the air to point at Dudley.” (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) I guess the sentence could be parsed as below: [He] [brought] [A: the ...
2
votes
4answers
617 views

Is the expression, “Who do you trust (speak / teach / give / vote / fire …)?” predominantly used today?

The popular TV game show, “Who Do You Trust?”, aired from 1957 to 1963. I learnt this from the New York Times’ (March 29) article written by Dick Cavett under the title “Tonight, Tonight, Its World Is ...
1
vote
1answer
181 views

Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around? [closed]

Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around as in the example here? 'her fingers creased in gold [and] her body ringed in folds' In this ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Difference between 'Redundant' and 'Superfluous'

(I made a search for this question on this forum but surprisingly did not find related questions. Which is odd because surely this question is asked often.) First, the sentence I'm trying to use ...
2
votes
0answers
243 views

Does issue as “Offspring, progeny; a child or children” have modern usage? [closed]

When looking at the word "issue" in the thesaurus I noticed that children was given as one of the definitions. Having not seen issue used in this context before, I decided to do some investigation. ...
-5
votes
1answer
1k views

How do we correct the sentence, “The party was held on the hotel’s roof.” [closed]

INCORRECT : The party was held on the hotel’s roof. CORRECT : The party was held in the roof of the hotel.
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it “falsy” or “falsey”?

I have seen both versions of the word, falsy and falsey. It can mean "something that is equivalent to false" in computer science, such as "The only two falsy values in the Ruby Language are false and ...
1
vote
2answers
113 views

Word implying this object is required by another

I'm looking for a word that has the opposite implication to "depends on" or "has this prerequisite". Something which describes the relationship of B to A if A is a prerequisite of B. Something that ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

“courgettes” vs. “zucchini” under a historical perspective

In this TimLymington's answer it is said: Interestingly, there is another vegetable with the same identity problem; what the British call courgettes and the Americans zucchini. What is the ...
-2
votes
2answers
174 views

Is there a word for the desire to care for an injured or vulnerable person or animal? [closed]

Specifically, I'm looking for a word or phrase that captures the feeling of wanting someone to need you to care for them, and feeling guilty that the desire implies that you want the other person to ...
1
vote
1answer
519 views

Use of “would” in the specific situation

A man asked a question to his friend, “Why was it the best time for Bilal to be in his home?” His friend replied, “It would be the best time for Bilal to be in his home because his uncle ...
0
votes
4answers
213 views

What does “data-lite” mean as an advantage of an application?

What does "data-lite" mean in the following context? This application is: ... data-lite and saves you money ... I couldn't find it online or in the dictionary (OAAD). For ...
3
votes
4answers
338 views

What is the history of the word “lobby”?

I would like to know if the word "lobby" would have been used in 1890s Georgia (United States) and to what exactly this word would have referred in that time.
3
votes
4answers
917 views

“Hot cakes” or “flapjacks” in 1890s American South?

Which term is more likely to have been used by my main character, a young man from a wealthy Macon, Georgia family, in 1893?
1
vote
1answer
214 views

Is this transitive or intransitive?

Let's consider this situation. A mother asks her child, "Who ate this apple?" Then her son replies, "I didn't eat." In this situation, is "eat" an intransitive verb when "the apple" is omitted? I ...
2
votes
8answers
28k views

Word for someone who pays attention to details

I know I've seen a word that describes a person who has a high perception of details (for example, seeing specific information in a log file), but I can't recall it now. Insights?
0
votes
3answers
749 views

Do you put an 's' at the end of acronym? [duplicate]

For example, is it FAQs or just FAQ? I guess it's either: Frequently Asked Questions or "Frequently Asked Question"s
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Is it “backward/forward” or “backwards/forwards”? [duplicate]

Can backward and forward be used interchangeably with backwards and forwards, or is there some particular situation in which one pair is consistently used over the other?
0
votes
1answer
711 views

Meaning of “I command you for that” [closed]

I noticed this somewhere and I have no clue what it means, as I'm not a native speaker. Google hasn't helped out. Does anyone know what this means? (If you need additional context, let me know). I ...
1
vote
3answers
214 views

How to phrase “two companies being the most successful one in their respective countries” as a noun-phrase?

How to express this in one sentence: there are two companies, one is the most successful in America, and the other the most successful in Canada. Can we say it like this? they are the most ...
1
vote
1answer
129 views

Isn't this against tense agreement?

When I got home yesterday, John called and said he will arrive next week. (Wikipedia) Wikipedia says the sentence above is possible. Does it not break the tense agreement when there’s no ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Why are dictionary definitions for verbs prefixed with a 'To'?

I look up a dictionary for allow and I get To permit To assign To grant or give, esp periodically To concede or acknowledge Similarly for flow, I see to run to move or change form like a fluid ...
-1
votes
1answer
95 views

“The European raw materials” or “European raw materials”?

I am confused about the usage of "the" before European, British. I am able to find situations where "the" before European, to denote the people of Europe, and the European army to denote the army of ...
2
votes
2answers
405 views

What image do you recall when hearing 'Fluffy'? [closed]

In Harry Potter’s story, Fluffy is a monstrous looking dog with three heads. But if I look up dictionaries the word might have the meaning of ‘very cute fluffy dog’, I thought. So I like to call him ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

Which preposition should be used when referring to an exact date?

I read this in a text book: My test is on 22th of June. I saw this in a YouTube tutorial: My test is at 22th of June. Which sentence uses the right preposition?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

site with word used in sentences and expressions [duplicate]

I am looking for a site or tool which would show a word used in actual sentences and expressions, in everyday life, business, scientific books, spiritual books and any other contexts. Looking a word ...
2
votes
3answers
218 views

What word describes the shape of a whirlwind when seen from above?

What word describes the shape of a whirlwind when seen from above? Swirl Whorl Radial The shape they make when seen from above resembles a radial pattern or even a whorl.
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Applying the concept of 'trolling' to tall poppy syndrome

In Australia we have a concept of 'tall poppy syndrome' — which comes from a cultural assumption of egalitarianism. If someone puts on airs, or considers themselves more important than others, then it ...
0
votes
1answer
588 views

What is the difference between “on” and “ upon” in these sentences?

There are clauses like: This is an equipment that stiffens on the collisions. and This is an equipment that stiffens upon the collisions. What is the difference between on and upon ...
0
votes
2answers
978 views

“Download from” vs. “download off”

I usually download music off the web. I usually download music from the web. What is the difference in between off and from in these sentences? Which one is more suitable in this ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

When to use whence instead of hence

I've come across instances where I felt using both was just fine. The dictionary definition doesn't provide much clarity either. Could someone please clarify the differences between the two?
2
votes
4answers
203 views

Is there a word for when a problem's understood complexity grows exponentially as you work on it?

Example: Hey Joe, can you fix simple problem A? Sure, Sally, no problem! After all it's simple, right? But A is then found to have dependent sub-problems B and C; B to have dependent ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Does “approbate one's flaws” make sense?

I'm going for a little stronger word than accept and I like the word approbate. To approbate my flaws. Does it work?
0
votes
1answer
180 views

What is wrong with this sentence?

I do not even get the chance of show my skills in an interview. Someone told me that this sentence is wrong and instead should be: I do not get the chance of show my skills in an interview. ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Can one use “hopefully” in an absolute sense?

Bill Bryson, author of the recent best-seller "A Short History of Nearly Everything", in one of his books says: We must never use hopefully in an absolute sense, such as "Hopefully it will not ...
2
votes
1answer
226 views

What is funny in Inflammable

In one episode of Simpsons there is joke when fire catches because a foreign citizen read "inflammable" on a gas bottle, and said it is all right.
8
votes
5answers
990 views

Is there a word/expression that would correspond to something like “self-distance”?

In Swedish there is a term called självdistans, which would be directly translated to "self-distance", which means possessing a certain objectivity towards yourself, to be ego-less or not taking ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

Is “develop” transitive in “technology developed by X”?

In the following phrase, is developed a transitive verb? Technology developed by the XXX company.
-1
votes
3answers
611 views

Passive form of “John is painting his room”

When we want to change a statement from active to passive, in the present continuous, we have to change the verb that is continuous from the active verb to the continuous for of be and the past ...
7
votes
3answers
364 views

Whoever had the lice, they're dead now

This sentence is from South Park. There was a lice problem in the school and the children demand that their teacher Mrs. Garrison tell them who exactly had the lice. She says that it's not important ...
5
votes
4answers
771 views

Is there an English equivalent for the Swedish expression “the droplet that caused the beaker to overflow”?

In Swedish, the expression "det var droppen som fick bägaren att rinna över", directly translated to "the droplet that caused the beaker to overflow", is used to express that enough is enough. Is ...

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