0
votes
1answer
112 views

“Hurried times” grammar/usage

While I know that most songs don't necessarily follow proper grammar or usage, or even need to make any sense I couldn't help but be troubled by a line in a song I heard. "These are hurried times" ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

How to call the two points at each end of a path?

By "path" I mean a route that has been walked by. The best I could come out with is starting point and ending point. Is there a shorter way to refer to them? (Maybe end points?)
0
votes
3answers
82 views

Does the term “page responsible” make any sense in English?

Each page on my organizations web site is assigned a person that takes responsibility for the content of that page. E.g. in the page footer Page Responsible: John Doe The current term used to ...
2
votes
3answers
454 views

Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?

When my 6-year old daughter spells words phonetically, she regularly drops final 'n' at ends of syllables, after vowels, like "rabo" for "rainbow", "lach" for "lunch". This made me wonder, are we ...
2
votes
3answers
261 views

To be able to toggle something [closed]

So I'm programming something, and it has the property to be toggled. Now I want to enable or disable this property. In other words, I want to toggle the toggle property. This property, whether or not ...
1
vote
3answers
10k views

we have had or we had

I would swear that we have had this conversation already. I have two questions regarding the sentence above: Can it be put just "I swear" instead of "I would swear". What is the difference? ...
1
vote
2answers
398 views

Converting a sentence to passive with “would”

I know how passive voice is created in general: He is rich => He is said to be rich. People say that he's not able to win => He's said not to be able to win. There is a sentence: He ...
0
votes
2answers
923 views

“in front of” or “opposite”

Imagine my house is on the left side of the road, and if there is a bus halt on the left side of the road and a vegetable stall on the right side of the road, when I talk about the bus halt, should I ...
2
votes
1answer
347 views

What would be the one word substitution of the phrase “one who receives a donation”? [closed]

I have searched a lot and could not come to a conclusion about what should be the exact word :) My guess is that the closest possible word for this should be "beneficiary", but there are other words ...
2
votes
1answer
309 views

“at the time” and “at that time” usage and differences

Are the expressions "at the time" and "at that time" interchangeable? What are the differences between the two? How do use them?
2
votes
3answers
69 views

Point “made by” intersections?

There are lines and when they intersect, there is a point. I am not sure if "make" is the correct here: With 4 points made by interesections of both vertical and horizontal lines.
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Using “despaired” as a replacement for “said” or “asked”

May I say: "Why does this happen?" despaired Ralph. Or if not, do you have any suggestions as to a suitable replacement for the placid "asked". What I'm looking for is a mixture of despaired and ...
-5
votes
3answers
729 views

Is “Milk and honey” a way to describe curvy women?

In Czech there is a term used for curvy women: krev a mlíko "Krev a mlíko" means "blood and milk". In this term, "blood" is a reference to red cheeks on a girl (which was considered a sign of ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

how many types we can use the word dog [closed]

There are various set expressions, idioms or merely collocations, which include the lexeme 'dog' – such as 'a dog's life' and 'every dog has its day'. What other expressions including this lexeme are ...
-1
votes
1answer
77 views

“I don't” or “don't I” in questions [closed]

Please tell me about the difference between these two questions: Why don't I see it? Why I don't see it? Is the second question grammatically correct?
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Usage of 'Should'

What kind of sentence is it: It is a pity that he should fail the examination. Kindly explain to me in what situation do we use such a structure?
4
votes
4answers
550 views

Common term for 'row' and 'column'

Is there a single term that can be used to describe both a 'row' and a 'column', such as in a spreadsheet? EDIT: I like Kris's comment-answer of "linear array", because it doesn't have so much of a ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

observe someone … to have been…,

My question is in following sentence What happens, says Hume, is that we observe individuals of one species to have been constantly attended by individuals of another. Why use to have been ...
1
vote
1answer
207 views

Colon designated list of colon itemized sentences

I'm just seeing dots, working with colons. Is it correct to use a colon to introduce a list of items which begin with colons? Or is it quite superfluous? Typically, I seem to employ this for lists ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Is there a name for this reading habit? [closed]

Someone was asking for advice about reading only half of the letters in a word. Is there a name for it? Example would be...instead of reading "I won't go there with her" you read "I won go here wit ...
0
votes
2answers
105 views

“Which stage is most desirable?” or “Which stage is the most desirable?”

Which sentence is correct? Should I put "the" before "most"?
3
votes
1answer
376 views

Is *-scule* in *minuscule* a suffix?

Is -scule in minuscule a suffix? What does it mean? scale? (I have looked it up in etymonline and didn't find the answer)
0
votes
1answer
482 views

“Haven't known” and “haven't knew”

Google search gives about 19,500,000 results for "haven't known" and about 12,500,000 results for "haven't knew". So I am a bit confused about this. Could anyone please explain how should I say and ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

Is there a suffix in “masquerade”?

Is there a suffix in masquerade? in masquerade, masque means mask, so is -rade or -ade its suffix? -ade is a suffix in lemonade and blockade, meaning "product". Note: I have searched it in ...
0
votes
4answers
5k views

How does the phrase “Is something the matter?” make sense?

Is something the matter? I've read or heard this usage of matter many times. For instance, in The pleasure of finding things out, R.P. Feynman writes: I could tell that something was the ...
0
votes
4answers
150 views

What's the best way to write nested “and” clauses?

Say I have the following sentence: I went to the store to buy eggs, regular, chocolate and soy milk, apples, and bread. There are two and clauses here, one that describes the kinds of milk I was ...
-1
votes
1answer
120 views

expression meaning - brash talk does not always mean a pink slip [closed]

What does this expression mean? brash talk does not always mean a pink slip
2
votes
1answer
199 views

Is it important to use the word "I' in this sentences [duplicate]

I've read how the use of the word I isn't always necessary when writing a resume as the employer already knows that the resume belongs to the job applicant. However some of these sentences sound ...
12
votes
7answers
1k views

Other ways to say “I have a bad hunch”

I'm looking for ways to say "I'm having a bad hunch", or more like a bad feeling about something upcoming. The gut-wrenching feeling that something bad will happen.
5
votes
3answers
340 views

The word or term for inserting the wrong word into conversation

What is the term for incorrectly injecting the wrong word into conversation because of a mental flaw that pulls a word that is alliterative or related? An example that got me searching for the term: ...
2
votes
1answer
598 views

Can I use a colon twice in one sentence?

Can I use a colon twice in a sentence. For example, 'These are hugely important factors for S. Oliver Canada as we’re dealing with a brand: 1) that is unknown in our market and: 2) that is known for ...
2
votes
1answer
531 views

Capitalising when starting sentence with digits

This might be more a typography related question than actual language question, but I didn’t know where else to turn. First of, I am perfectly aware that it’s generally considered bad form—regardless ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

Toll Booths 1,2 and 5

Suppose I have a collection of numbered items, say toll booths that are numbered from 1 to 10. Consider three sentences: Toll booth 4 is closed today. Toll booth 1, toll booth 2, and toll ...
4
votes
1answer
340 views

Saxon genitive and “et al.”

I am writing a scientific paper. In this context, it is usual to cite other works with the last name of the first author followed by "et al." when there are many. If I want to use a possessive form, ...
3
votes
1answer
771 views

Why is the “a” in “have” a short a sound?

As far as I'm aware, every word of the form consonant-a-v-e has a long a sound - cave, Dave, fave, gave, lave, nave, pave, rave, save and wave - every word except have. What is the story behind this ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Word or Phrase for the beginning or end of an event or period of time?

I'm looking for a single word to indicate a point in time which is either the beginning or end of an event. Edit, for a better example: A bell rings at the start a round of boxing. A bell rings at ...
5
votes
3answers
274 views

A word that means “at an unusual time or season”

I'm looking for a word that refers to a fact that something happened at an unusual time or during an unusual season. Somthing that could be applied to things like: Pancakes for dinner Easter ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

There are two phases in sequence - correct?

I know that "in sequence" means "one by one" or "one after another". I want to express that there are two phases (A and B) and that they are exactly in this order and do not overlap. Would this be ...
2
votes
4answers
387 views

What does 'dispensation' mean in this particular context?

I was reading this article and stumbled upon this line First, presidential dispensation is useful, but it's not remotely permanent. White House occupants change. A more authoritarian chief ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Utopia or utopia [closed]

Does one write Utopia (with capital) or utopia (without capital)? Or does it not matter which one is chosen? I do not know whether it matters, but I want to use it as follows: Using a (certain) ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Ambiguity about passive in my textbook

In my textbook, it said "In an active sentence we need to include the agent as subject; using a passive allows us to omit the agent by leaving out the prepositional phrase with by" Ex: ...
1
vote
2answers
545 views

sensible, sensitive, and sentient

Despite the apparently same meanings of the three words (which I looked up in Wiktionary), I would like to know if my interpretation is correct regarding their differences. "sensible" is used to ...
2
votes
3answers
102 views

A better word for “synchronised”

I'm struggling to find a better and less "harsh" word for synchronised. I'm trying to convey a message of simplicity for our product which synchronizes viewing of documents on multiple iPads. (The ...
1
vote
2answers
159 views

Is there a name for the verb “to have”?

If "to be" is the copula, is there any special name for "to have"?
0
votes
1answer
143 views

Can the phrase “extended all the way up” be used to describe very tall objects?

According to my search, I think the phrase "extended all the way up" is usually to refer to things that are spread until a certain location. Can this phrase be used to refer to a very tall object? ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

using only in plural

This is the question: A: Does she have many books? B: ................. She only has two books. a. Yes, she does. b. No, she does not. My answer is B, am I wrong? My friend absolutely ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

Who is Mrs Trimmer in Charles Dickens' novel “The Haunted House”?

Who was Mrs Trimmer in the following excerpt? And Prince Arthur, nephew of King John of England, had described himself as tolerably comfortable in the seventh circle, where he was learning to ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

What does he mean by iron country?

From The Haunted House of Dickens. He is travelling by train from north towards London when he says this: It was a cold, dead morning (the sun not being up yet), and when I had outwatched the ...
1
vote
1answer
761 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “common humanity”?

What is common humanity as Dickens uses it? “You will excuse me,” said the gentleman contemptuously, “if I am too much in advance of common humanity to trouble myself at all about it. I have ...
1
vote
2answers
317 views

“I came to do” vs. “I did”

What do we exactly mean when we say that we came to do something? Consider these two sentences: I authored a book on peace. I came to author a book on peace. Does the second sentence ...

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