0
votes
2answers
1k views

Which is bigger, “a lot” or “a ton”?

Maybe there’s no really well-defined answer, but I’m wondering which phrase is the more significant (meaning bigger) between these two: We’ve been doing a lot of work. We’ve been doing a ton of ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

Wondering if there is a word for “Incompletely defined”? [closed]

No big deal if there does not exist such a word, but I was wondering.
4
votes
1answer
154 views

What does “count off” mean as a noun?

I looked up Webster, Oxford and some other sources and fund nothing for the meaning of "count off" in the followig sentence. Each track on the CDs that accompanies the book is presented with an ...
1
vote
1answer
360 views

A single word for “blind” and “slow on the uptake” [closed]

We have a word tiomny in Russian which has the meanings blind, dim, and dumb. Is there a word (possibly slang) in American English which is as close in meaning to both blind and slow on the uptake?
0
votes
3answers
801 views

What is the origin for meaning of “Wild-card”?

Please go through the below excerpt from "The tales of Kasi" by "Madhira Subbanna Deekshitulu" 'Kasyam maranam mukti', goes the sanskrit saying, which means dying in Kasi leads to liberation. ...
2
votes
1answer
471 views

Where do I use (and not use) “that?” (not a vs. “this” question)

Given this sentence, the that feels unnecessary: If I believed that I were in a position to do so, I would. I find these seemingly spurious instances of that working their way into my prose all ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “at least” a parenthetical expression requiring commas?

Is this sentence punctuated correctly with no commas surrounding "at least," or does it need them? Why or why not? Adverbial phrase? Essential or nonessential? I have been looking at it too long and ...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

In “an idea of Hölderlin’s”, is “of” a partitive or a genitive?

We often use these constructions. A friend of mine is probably the most common. I have often wondered, being an English teacher, whether the function of the preposition of in such contexts is that of ...
4
votes
2answers
111 views

Meaning of “stands there” in “[The word] stands there, easily repeated back”

I do not understand the "stands there" part related to the word: It is much harder to deny having said an angry word. It stands there, easily repeated back, hard to disavow totally. What ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Belong to x one of

Is it possible to use he belongs to the greatest players to mean he is one of the greatest players? While I know that in other languages (including my own), these two are interchangeable, I feel that ...
2
votes
0answers
331 views

How is “World English” difficult for native speakers of English? [closed]

There is a newly used term, World English (WE). It is nobody's mother tongue. It is spoken across the world, for example, at check-in desks, airports, international trade fairs, world cup football ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

“a” vs. “an” when the following word is in a bracket [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A/An” preceding a parenthetical statement Let's say I send a text to someone saying: Can you get me a coffee? Over here, I use a as the following word doesn't ...
-1
votes
1answer
8k views

The meaning of “What's she gonna look like with a chimney on her” [closed]

Title - Feel It Artist - The Tamperer ft. Maya You got it on the side A little one night thing I thought it over and this time I will forgive you Well I'm not letting go But don't forget ...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

Name for title used before a name for phonetic or rhythmic reasons

Often, when people are announced or mentioned in the news, their name is prefixed by a title that gives rhythm and balance to the sound of their name. For example, we sometimes hear "Libyan strongman ...
3
votes
5answers
3k views

Word for people easily influenced by propaganda

What is the word that describes people who are easily influenced by propaganda or always do what all other people are seen to be doing without much thinking?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the courteous alternative of “Do you understand what I say?”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Does it make sense?” or “Do you understand me?”? "Do you get me?", "Do you get my point?", etc? What is the courteous alternative of "Do you understand what I say?"?
4
votes
2answers
879 views

“I have been keeping ignoring you.”

Does this make any sense? I have been keeping ignoring you. Besides that it sounds awkward, my Chinese buddy who knows more grammar rules than I care to list said that the phrase is ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
0
votes
2answers
456 views

How did “to lie” (i.e lie about something) and “to lie” (i.e. lie down) end up being spelled the same way?

I'm hoping to find out the history of how "to lie" as in say something dishonest and "to lie" as in rest horizontally end up being spelled the same way. To lie (lie, lied, lied): a false statement ...
0
votes
1answer
240 views

What do you think if you see an image with its description “last night at New York”?

I saw that a friend of mine who moved to New York City 3 months ago posted a picture on Facebook. She described it as "last night at New York." The first time I read it, I thought she meant that it ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Etymology and meaning of the word “snog”

Having looked to urban dictionary, witionary, online etymology, dictionary.com, Wikipedia and wordfreaks.tribe.net, I have found a wide variance in the etymology and definition of the word snog. I ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Do “figure out” and “realize” mean the same? [closed]

Talking about noticing something, do both mean the same? For example: I just figured out that the ball is blue. I just realized that the ball is blue.
1
vote
4answers
253 views

A prediction made in the past that affects something we will do in the future

Please ignore the factual accuracy of this sentence and focus on the tenses used. If the Mayans were wrong to end the calendar on Dec. 20, 2012, we'll use your donation to fund 2013 programming. ...
1
vote
2answers
443 views

''I don't know what" + direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions Why do we put the verb to be at the end of these questions? Is the expression I don't know what is ...
3
votes
2answers
805 views

Should “brother” be capitalized in a letter salutation?

John Smith, a member of my congregation, would be addressed as brother in face-to-face conversation. If I write a letter to him, should I capitalize this word? For example, as in: Dear Brother ...
-3
votes
1answer
76 views

Looking for a word that states an instance is immutable [closed]

If I have something that I don't want to change, is it proper to attach "candidate" to the end of it? So if someone applies for a job with an application, I would consider them to be a candidate, but ...
2
votes
2answers
438 views

What’s the plural of “Valentine’s”

If I want to form the plural of “Valentine’s” as a short form of “Saint Valentine’s Day” – where do I put the apostrophe(s)? Is it possible at all? I believe that Valentines’, although the normal ...
1
vote
3answers
974 views

Correct use of tense

Can you please confirm which of the following three is correct? I shared some ideas with Jon, which he agrees is a good solution for the problem we are facing. I shared some ideas with Jon, ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Can the word “personnel” ever be singular? [closed]

Can personnel be used in reference to a single person? See the example below: Testing must take place by a qualified personnel other than the requestor.
7
votes
5answers
451 views

Word for rhetorical style where different arguments get progressively weaker

I'm looking for a word to describe the rhetorical style where one uses different arguments that are not additional, but rather get weaker and weaker. I'm not explaining it very well, so let me give an ...
1
vote
2answers
858 views

Is there a difference between “brainstorming” and “mindstorming”? [closed]

Some people use brainstorming, others use mindstorming. I could not find the difference between the two words.
-3
votes
1answer
144 views

What is meaning of “Sulking though”? [closed]

The background story is as follows. Author flunked engineering entrance exam. He took tuitions by paying hefty fee from his father pockets in order to crack the exam. How ever he flunked again. After ...
4
votes
4answers
655 views

Why “the” in “Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog)”? [closed]

When reading the title of the book, we don't know what three men it is talking about so there is no/indefinite article (the same with "a boat"). But why is there "the Dog" instead of "a Dog"? We don't ...
4
votes
3answers
122 views

Correct words for transitional and non-transitional

I'm trying to explain two different ways of doing something and can't remember the correct words. I have a stock room full of items Way 1: Every week count how many of each item there are, ...
-1
votes
1answer
173 views

Exclamation mark at the end of a quote and end of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should end punctuation go inside quotes? Is the grammar at the end of the following sentence correct? If not, what should it be? I was told in no uncertain ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the connotations of the word “Greetings” when used as a greeting?

What are the connotations of the word "Greetings" when used as a greeting? I am British, and I have rarely heard "Greetings!" used as a greeting in the UK. I associate it in my mind with Commander ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

What is the definition of “hangry”?

Is hangry a real word? According to Collins Dictionary it means to be angry as a result of being hungry, but it seems far-fetched.
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Is the expression, “The Hillary Clinton Republican Primary” self-explanatory and clear-cut without reading the text?

December 6 Time magazine carries the following clip of Mark Halperin’s remark in MSNBC‘s “Morning Joe” under the Lede, “The Hillary Clinton Republican Primary.” “You talk to Republicans about ’16, ...
-1
votes
2answers
903 views

“Construct” vs. “build” [closed]

I am not sure whether we can use build and construct interchangeably in the following sentence: The report said that the loss of natural disasters has increased tremendously because we do not ...
-1
votes
2answers
279 views

What does “pre-delay” mean in this conversation?

This short piece of dialogue appears in the movie "Faces in the Crowd": Bryce: Shouldn't you be handing out gold stars instead of earning yellow ribbons on FarmVille? Anna: I was just ...
1
vote
6answers
642 views

What verb could I use to mean “make less anxious”?

What verb could I use to mean "carry out the appropriate actions to make them less anxious"? I thought of using to calm, but this doesn't explain what the current state of emotion (being anxious) is. ...
4
votes
3answers
234 views

If not directions, what are items in the set {northbound, eastbound, southbound, westbound}?

Is there a word that describes an item in the set {northbound, eastbound, southbound, westbound} as distinct from an item in the set {north, east, south, west}? Washington (place) → Washingtonian ...
20
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the “Ocean Sea”?

I've come across the term "Ocean Sea" and wonder what it means, especially compared to simpler terms like "ocean" or "sea"? Is this a recognized term in English, either current or historical?
5
votes
4answers
455 views

What’s the difference between “Take yes for an answer” and “Say yes for an answer”?

Today’s (December 7) Washington Post carries the following quote from the Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s remark on the back-and-forth debates of raising the debt ceiling in the congress as the ...
3
votes
2answers
259 views

Do you have mixed feelings “on” something or “about” something?

It seems to me that both the forms are used but I don't know if they have the same meaning or not.
5
votes
3answers
153 views

Usage of the word “genocide”

I am wondering whether the word genocide can also be used for the killing of a group of people based on their religion, for example: 'the Sikh genocide'. I have never seen it used that way, I have ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

How should I reply to “Dude, are you there?”

Let's say I am having a telephone conference with rest of the team, and somebody asks me "Dude, are you there?" How should I reply? Yes, dude, I am there. or Yes, I am here? It is ...
1
vote
2answers
256 views

What is “there” in expression “Are you out there?” [closed]

What does there signify in expressions like "Dude are you out there?" or "I am there for you"? It is not referring to any previously mentioned location, right?
3
votes
5answers
411 views

What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"

What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!" I'm looking for a single word which has the same effect but is less archaic. It is a very formal context I want to use it in that you may ...

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