1
vote
1answer
100 views

Potential issues with passive voice usage [duplicate]

I checked the grammar of my research article using a leading software. This is my sentence: A total of 12.3 million sequences was used for the establishment of database. The error is: 'Potential ...
0
votes
2answers
542 views

Why is “from overseas” grammatical?

"Overseas", as far as I am concerned, is an adjective or an adverb. If "from overseas" is a correct phrase, why is it grammatical? "From" is a preposition, and it should be followed by a noun, not an ...
2
votes
1answer
375 views

Adjectives to describe a legal system that has a number of limitations

Im finding an adjective describing a judicial system that has many limitations like the system has lax regulations and sanctions are not harsh enough. Looking forward to your replies.
2
votes
1answer
446 views

Collective Term for Cardinal and Ordinal Directions

I'm writing a research proposal in which I frequently reference the cardinal and inter-cardinal (ordinal) directions together. Is there some term, no matter the obscurity, that refers to the eight of ...
7
votes
3answers
7k views

“shyer” or “shier”

My Longman dictionary states that the comparative of 'shy' is 'shyer'. However, at least two online dictionaries also give the form 'shier' as being acceptable: The Free Dictionary and ...
0
votes
1answer
927 views

meaning and use of “gotta” [closed]

I often heard people say the word "gotta". I have read in this web site that gotta is a contraction of "I have got to" and that that phrase means "must", is my understanding correct? Regarding the ...
2
votes
3answers
455 views

Is there a word for a pie chart that is in the shape of a rectangle?

Normally, pie charts are circular and each piece of data is shown as a slice of a whole. However, for some purposes, it makes more sense to display the same kind of data as a rectangle divided up ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

“Going to Maldives” or “going to the Maldives”?

The phrase "going to the Maldive Islands" is quite common and it fits the rules. However, when it comes to using just "Maldives", both "to the Maldives" and "to Maldives" are used. Which one is the ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Is “every… doesn't…” really the same thing as “not every…”?

I have noticed a to me confounding linguistic trend in the last few years of which I came across an example tonight: "Every receiver doesn’t become a star." (from here) This type of wording just ...
12
votes
8answers
3k views

Word for someone who has never experienced hardship

I am looking for a word that best describe a person who has never experienced any hardship or setback in life. In Chinese, such a person can be described as "温室里的小花" (literally meaning a flower in a ...
0
votes
1answer
308 views

How to use translator websites? [closed]

When I recently checked out the Google Translate website, where I translated some text from English into Tamil, I found that it translates individual words literally but does not translate sentences ...
0
votes
2answers
264 views

What is the best verb form to this question?

Write the best verb-form for the blank. A: Who have you worked with? B: I ________ with people from all over the world. The intended answer is 'have worked'. One of my students answered, 'have been ...
2
votes
3answers
137 views

etymology: to get rid of

To get rid of something according to OALD means to make oneself free of someone or something that is annoying. One can get rid of old useless things by throwing them away or of bad habits. There is ...
2
votes
2answers
364 views

Origin of “off the meter” idiomatic phrase

When and how did the phrase "off the meter" become established as an idiom? Urban Dictionary defines "off the meter" as the condition of being "very good, awesome, great". I have heard and said it ...
0
votes
2answers
167 views

Word or phrase that describes a group of acronymic initials that can be any order

Typical acronyms represent a phrase with a fixed word order. For example, NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) is not coherent when reordered to, say, ATNO (Atlantic Treaty North Organization). ...
2
votes
4answers
692 views

Alternative wording for “Falling into pitfalls”

Context: Are you fully knowledgeable of the subject, or are you falling into the common pitfalls? I don't like having falling and pitfall together. I also think "experiencing the common pitfalls" is ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Formal synonym for “badass” as a noun [duplicate]

This question discusses formal synonyms for "badass" as an adjective, but I am asking for a noun usable in a somewhat formal setting with the same connotation and meaning. A single word would be ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Does this have an indirect object?

I met a kind person As far as I know: subject = I; met = verb; But seems like "kind person" is a direct object. Is there no indirect object?
2
votes
1answer
189 views

What does a “talking-head-and-flapping-gums” sector of TV/Radio mean?

New York Times (May 6) reports that Mike Rogers (Mich.), the House Intelligence Committee Chairman decided to leave the House for a media gig as the radio host of Cumulus under the title, “Radio ...
2
votes
1answer
248 views

What does Twain mean by “tares” in the last sentence in a letter to Walt Whitman?

I know the dictionary answer is vetch, an alfalfa-like plant. Is he making a comparison between "wheat" and "tares?" I realize this sounds like a homework question, but I'm over 60, and maybe a ...
16
votes
6answers
3k views

What do you call those man-made “wooden paths” that are usually found in mountains?

This what I'm referring to: I guess the starting section can be called wooden steps, but as it goes further, it's no longer a step but a "path." What do you call the whole structure? (I'm looking ...
46
votes
2answers
2k views

What word denotes a belief that apparently inanimate objects actually express a malicious, autonomous will?

I came across this word a few years ago, but can't find it now. I do not mean deodand, animism, pathetic fallacy, scapegoating, anthropomorphism, or personification (Word for attaching blame to ...
0
votes
1answer
261 views

The couple holding hand with intertwine finger

The couple holding hand with intertwine finger. The couple intertwine their hand. Intertwine hand or finger. Which is correct?
30
votes
15answers
7k views

A word for a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that one cannot help but laugh

There is a word for this in Indonesian language: jayus. (Maybe, it is used in Filipino and Malaysian language also.) It is a joke that is so bad, it's funny. It is often mentioned as ...
13
votes
11answers
3k views

“School Students” — what, like there's any other kind of student?

I think this might be a Pennsylvania thing: every so often, you'll see a van or small bus labeled, not "School Bus" or anything sane normal like that, but "School Students". Whenever I see a van ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

List of names when there is ownership associated [duplicate]

Ok, so I am supposed to order business cards for people, then the company sends me the proof which I check over for correctness. When I do three on the people's names are right, one is wrong. So I ...
1
vote
3answers
245 views

Distinction between pre-hire onboarding and post-hire onboarding [closed]

Wikipedia talks of onboarding as "the mechanism through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective organizational members and insiders." And ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

When should we use the word 'status quo'? [closed]

I know 'status quo' means the existing state of affairs, especially regarding social or political issues. When should we use the word 'status quo'? (Here is a related ELU question.)
1
vote
4answers
178 views

What is the use/meaning of hedder as an alternate to header

I’ve been told that hedder is an acceptable way to refer to a header in journalism, but I can’t find any reference to it being a valid spelling or to whether it has the exact same meaning or might ...
-1
votes
1answer
284 views

Past tense vs past participle in passive forms [closed]

For example: The car is driven by my a friend of mine. vs The car is drove by a friend of mine. Which one is correct?
1
vote
1answer
686 views

Subject/verb agreement when a title ends in a plural

1) "The book 'The Three Musketeers' is a wonderful example of..." Here we have a proper noun, a title that happens to end in a plural, and I have no sense that the verb should be plural. ...
2
votes
0answers
205 views

Is language inherently circular? [closed]

I looked up "Hallelujah" in etymonline.com today, and the result, as often happens with etymological research, ended in following a rabbit warren of possibilities. Take the word "Hallelujah" for ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

What's another way of saying “I failed to mention” [closed]

I failed to mention I faced a similar situation with... I don't like the message I'm presenting
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is it correct to say “Me and my friend, we…”?

I know normally to use: "My friend and I went shopping." But what about when we make it into: "My friend and I, we went shopping." It seems to me that in this structure, we could or should ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

What does “candid” mean besides being honest?

According to various unnamed dictionaries, candid means "being honest, telling the truth". However, when I googled the word, a lot of pictures of women in bikinis popped up! Can someone tell me why ...
1
vote
2answers
156 views

Does “I am sorry” imply responsibility in this context?

I know sorry basically conveys two different meanings depending on including responsibility or not. "I'm sorry your grandpa was dead" usually conveys no responsibility, just sympathy. But "I'm sorry ...
-1
votes
1answer
256 views

Using the word “So” too much that it is annoying [closed]

So, ...........I'm tired of using the word "so" and I'm tired of hearing everyone using it also! What are alternatives and how long will it be before I can make myself stop using it?
0
votes
3answers
100 views

list characteristics in correct manner

What is the best method of listing specific characteristics when writing scientifically. My example: The study sites range in area from 1000 m² to 1200 m², cover depths of 0.08 to 5.7 m, range in ...
3
votes
1answer
212 views

Using quotation marks to describe technical terms

Consider: DNS has a similar feature, but instead of “Work,” “Home,” and “Fax,” it has special record types that indicate which IP address you want from the server. I'm British, but am ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
1
vote
7answers
351 views

Synonym for overdoing something/taking too wide an approach

I'm looking for an idiom or a synonym for a situation when someone has taken a heavy handed measure that achieves the desired effect, but also goes above this, affecting things that aren't a problem. ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

who/whom after I [duplicate]

What is the correct usage of who/whom after first person pronoun "I" I _ am most concerned, was not consulted. I think it should be who?
12
votes
2answers
762 views

Is there a word or concise phrase for this word play?

Take this for example: In this video, at 1:04 to 1:10, the person goes on rapping with a rhyming word at the end of each line, but he pauses before the end of the last word and, being humans, we ...
5
votes
4answers
190 views

Is there a word or concise phrase for this type of question?

Some questions appear clear, but are deceptively difficult to define, and their answer is very sensitive to the exact technical definition of the question, in such a way that it renders the original ...
2
votes
1answer
243 views

Does a phrase exist that one uses to another person who is about to sneeze?

"Bless you" or "God bless you" are commonly used after a sneeze but does one exist (or was one once commonly used but no longer) when a person is obviously about to sneeze?
-3
votes
1answer
7k views

“What did you eat?” vs “What have you ate?” [closed]

What did you eat? What have you ate? Are those the same? Can we use "What have you ate"?
0
votes
0answers
551 views

Singular vs Plural number 21, 101 & etc [duplicate]

When talking about number 21, 31, 101, 1231 & etc ( ends with "one" ), should we use singular or plural word for units. E.g. should I say "21 apple" or "21 apples"? Or, "101 apple" vs "101 ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Should I use the word “degree” or the symbol ° for expressing angles in a scientific text? [closed]

I hope this is the correct StackExchange to ask a question like this. For a scientific text (in computer science), which is the correct way of expressing angles (e.g. the yaw, pitch and roll angle of ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Term to identify siblings - one dutiful, one rebellious towards their parents

In a story, one person has two sons. One of them loves his parents and other hates his parents and beats them. In Hindi, the person who cares for his parents is called "Sapoot" and the person who ...
-2
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is “How are you” but not “How is You” correct? [closed]

My English is not very good. I just want to ask this simple question: "These are","this is", "those are", "that is" means "are" is used for plural, but when asking to someone how is he, why people ...

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