1
vote
2answers
252 views

What's going on with *nuthin' doin'*?

The phrase nuthin' doin' in American slang means "There's nothing interesting or exciting going on". How does doin' come to mean "happening"?
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Computing: 32 bit or 32 bits? [duplicate]

This question comes from this other debate at SuperUser Forum. I have asked it here too because: It appears not to be only a technical question, but a language question too. Most of the answers in ...
2
votes
3answers
282 views

Is it permissible to omit “is” in the following case?

Denial. One of the strongest, most stubborn human feelings. It has nothing to do with logic; its function (is) to prevent us from completely falling apart, going insane. Can I omit is in the ...
6
votes
6answers
466 views

Releasatory? Releaseful?

What would be a good word to describe something (like sex) which gives a lot of release. The sense is "rewarding, emotionally fulfilling and physically ...releaseful?"
1
vote
2answers
182 views

Unusual adjective position and evolution of Present perfect

In English, an adjective is usually placed on the left side of the noun it describes. But there are some exceptional phrasings here and there. I had so great a time. The English present perfect ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a noun for the verb thrive/flourish/prosper/burgeon?

Consider the following sentence: "The government strongly profited from the company's ..." I could use the term "well-being" here, but it doesn't quite seem to capture the same meaning as a noun of ...
2
votes
2answers
943 views

Is there a grammatical term for 'extra information' in a sentence?

Sorry if this is a basic question, but is there a grammatical term for the 'extra information' in the sentences below? He was giving a presentation to the finance department She was having lunch at ...
4
votes
4answers
283 views

Word or phrase for a distraction that is no longer bothersome?

I'm looking for a word or short phrase that means something that is not distracting. More specifically, something previously distracting that has since faded into... well, I don't know into what. So ...
5
votes
2answers
961 views

Word for “opening and closing the mouth?”

Example: The stranded fish were flapping desperately on the sand, their mouths closing and opening, seeking for the water that wasn't there. Is there's a word that means opening and closing ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views
0
votes
2answers
56 views

pre-customer inquiry/ post-customer inquiry

I'm translating titles of paragraphs from Japanese to English. A pragmatic translation of the titles can be: "Before Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers" and "After Receiving Inquiries from ...
0
votes
2answers
281 views

One word for the thing that other things depend on? [duplicate]

If a have a sentence: "A depends on B", then I can describe A as a "dependent" (adj.). How can I describe B with one adjective?
0
votes
2answers
287 views

Usage of spending time

Which one is correct? a)Thank you for the time you spent on reading this letter. b)Thank you for taking the time on reading this letter.
0
votes
1answer
987 views

What is a courtesy message?

I have seen the term a few times in notification e-mails. Does it mean just a polite notification?
5
votes
2answers
760 views

Is it correct to use “or” in place of “and/or”?

Consider the following sentence: A project is a large and/or complex undertaking. To me, the expression “and/or” seems redundant since in formal logic “or” implies ...
12
votes
11answers
6k views

What do you call a woman who's feeling “emotional”?

It's that time of the month, your female partner has begun to fault pick you, for no explicable reason she becomes weepy, and anything you say or do will be criticized or misinterpreted. Is there a ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Brush up on as a Tri-Part

Is "brush up on" technically a tri-part phrasal verb?
1
vote
2answers
144 views

What we call the next consecutive question in series of problem

on stack overflow we can edit the questions and this problem is based on that. Scenario I was asking problem A and got the solution of A but face a new problem B. How do I mention (reference ...
3
votes
3answers
395 views

Can One Jump To Good Conclusions?

Jump To Conclusions is noted in the free dictionary's entry for jump a few different ways: To form an opinion or judgment hastily: jump to conclusions. to proceed abruptly, ...
1
vote
2answers
156 views

The right time to use semi-colon

Below is an example of how I normally use semi-colon in sentences and I truly do not know if it's correct. Open the gate; let the dogs out, then close the gate.
-1
votes
1answer
335 views

When should I use a comma before the word “who”? [duplicate]

Should I use a comma before the word who? This sentence is confusing me: I made this blog because I want to help all of the other people who have problems that are similar to mine. If I did ...
2
votes
1answer
172 views

When did “to forgive” lose its primary meaning for pardoning and become solely about an emotional response?

During a recent debate I was having with a peer, I was shocked to find out that the word "forgive" no longer carries a primary association with the act of pardoning another individual (i.e., ...
4
votes
5answers
103 views

An experience that induces self-doubt is a(n) ________experience?

If I were to challenge a great intellectual, who knows his area extremely well, on one of his points he has made; thinking about how I can repudiate his argument, how I will phrase my ...
2
votes
2answers
272 views

A word that describes the experience of pleasure at the sound of a word?

What word describes the experience of pleasure at the sound of a word? This refers to the enjoyment of words being pronounced, rather than to the euphony, or pleasing sound, of a word. I know that ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What does it mean to wax a cross?

On the TV show Archer, the saying "get some wax for your cross" is used. What does it mean? I'm guessing from context it means that you carry around a cross so often you need wax for it.
3
votes
2answers
15k views

Single word that means “to look down on others”?

What is a single word in English which means to look down on others (due to their younger age, lower socio-economic position, lesser experience, etc) Not look down upon everyone else in general, ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
17
votes
13answers
8k views

Is there a word or phrase for someone who strongly disapproves of smoking, drinking and gambling?

It would be used in a sentence like this: Let's not invite your Uncle Peter. He is (a) ......, you know, and he would feel very uncomfortable among our friends. I'm not looking for lists. I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

How do you form the plural of an elided/contracted noun?

The noun, without elision, is "beatings". Singular, elided, is "beatin'" (note the apostrophe). So what's the plural? I considered "beatins'" (note the apostrophe) and "beatin's" but neither of them ...
5
votes
3answers
481 views

English expression for facial hair (beard) of a woman

Is there a specific term for facial hair around the mouth (or a beard) if the person in question is female? I'm looking for a translation of the German "Damenbart". Some dictionaries provide ...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

Is there a “-nym” word for the members of a political party?

In an answer to a previous question, I referred to "tea-partiers" as the demonym for members of the Tea Party in US politics. But I know that's not right; demonym describes the name of the ...
2
votes
1answer
312 views

Is there an inverse of the word “consignment”?

Consignment is when you leave goods at a third party for them to sell as their own, and when it sells they pay you an agreed amount. In this case the third party is called a consignment store Is ...
2
votes
2answers
480 views

American words for gas stoves

Please take a look at the following two images: In India, it's customary to refer to the thing in the first image as a "gas stove" and the second as a"cooking range" or "hob." Is it the same in ...
0
votes
0answers
83 views

Capitalization after ellipsis

Although there does exist a related question on SE, it doesn't exactly address my issue. What that question asks if the first letter should be capitalized after an ellipsis. I have the same question ...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

Meaning of “tea party”

Of late I've noticed that this phrase seems to be tossed around all the time especially in the context of political discussions. What does it exactly mean? For example, take a look at the following ...
3
votes
2answers
151 views

Why did the word “alluring” peak in the 1920s?

As per title. This is the Ngram Graph for the word alluring: For comparison, this is the same graph for the word remarkable:
0
votes
0answers
1k views

“Provided to us” or “Provided us”?

Both the sentences/fragments below appear to be grammatical. Thanks for the help you have provided to us in the planning Thanks for the help you have provided us in the planning Is there ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

What are these vehicles called in the United States?

I understand the names for various types of cars in the US as well as elsewhere, such as hatchback, sedan, SUV, etc. However there are two classes of vehicles that don't seem to fall under any of ...
4
votes
2answers
689 views

“The more, the merrier!” — Is this a sentence? If not… what?

Is The more, the merrier! a sentence? It doesn't seem to have a main verb, so I'm inclined to say no, but it certainly functions as a sentence in everyday speech. I can think of three ways of ...
0
votes
4answers
387 views

What's a synonym for “ready to ship”

We have a service that essentially dropships products for merchants, but most of them don't know what that means. We've found better results with the phrase "ready-to-ship products", yet this too ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

'Birthdate vs birthday'- I know three other people who share my birthdate

We say birthday and not birthdate Generally, birthplace is used for place of birth but not birthdate for date of birth. What is the reason that birthday scores over birthdate when it comes to ...
0
votes
0answers
92 views

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket. I think that the above sentence is grammaticaly correct. Why is not possible to write: You drove faster than it was allowed, so you ...
0
votes
2answers
116 views

Is there any expresion in English that means “ in the right meaning ”

In Arabic we say ¨in the right meaning¨ when we want to add an expression better than the first one. E.g. ¨I am in best way today¨ or (in right meaning) ¨I am so happy¨.
0
votes
2answers
452 views

Less formal synonym for “Confirmed”, “Acknowledged”

I'm looking for a less formal synonym for "Confirmed" or "Ackowledged", that retains some brevity. As an example, say I've received an e-mail from my manager asking me to switch to a different task. ...
0
votes
1answer
297 views

“I am seeing” or “I am going to see”? [duplicate]

"I am seeing my friends from the club this Saturday at ten o' clock." or "I am going to see my friends from the club this Saturday at ten o' clock." Which phrase is more correct?
3
votes
5answers
215 views

Word for increasing complexity or image resolution?

Is there a word (verb) which means 'increasing the complexity of the structure' or 'increasing the image size/resolution?' I thought of tessellate but its meaning is not exactly what I need. Also, ...
1
vote
2answers
474 views

Usage of “I'm incredulous!” as an exclamation of shock or disbelief

Would the exclamation "I'm incredulous!" be an appropriate response to finding out some unexpected news, if the intention is to convey shock or disbelief?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

“If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be…” What does this mean?

I'm translating a book, which involves logic and quoted the sentence from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass: "If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ...
0
votes
2answers
128 views

Usage of the phrase “over his lifetime”

Is it appropriate to use the phrase "over his lifetime" for in introducing someone if the person is still alive, i.e. "...his dedication to music over his lifetime..."

15 30 50 per page