1
vote
5answers
266 views

“Government by [two/three/many persons]” is to “[diarchy/triarchy/polyarchy]” as “government by simple majority” is to what?

The government by ... ... two persons is called "diarchy," ... three persons is called "triarchy," ... many persons is called "polyarchy." So, my question is, is there a word to define the ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Using an adjective to describe something that is already intended

Is there a word that describes the case of using an adjective to describe a noun that already suggests as much? Examples the pretty model won all of the awards the smart genius answered ...
2
votes
3answers
676 views

Alternative expression for saying “piece of someone's mind”

Sentence example: I am really upset and frustrated with one of my friends. So when I meet him next time around I will definitely not hold myself back and give him a piece of my mind. What ...
6
votes
2answers
478 views

What does “pay you out” mean?

I came across the following passage of text in one of the original Thomas the Tank Engine stories, and realised there was a phrase in there that I didn't understand. "Be careful with the coaches, ...
3
votes
5answers
836 views

Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis

I have trouble understanding headlines because they abuse ellipsis. Two examples: "Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan To Awkwardly Hug, High Five For Next Three Months" "Scores Dead as Fire Sweeps Through ...
52
votes
11answers
3k views

Phrase for overusing just-learned skills?

Is there a saying or word for indicating the overuse of something you just newly learned? Say you were happy with a hammer and a nail and then somebody taught you the virtues of a screw and ...
2
votes
2answers
334 views

Is there a special word for amounts between 11 and 20?

Translation is often tricky. I'm stuck with the Polish word kilkanaście, which literally means few-teen. It is used to describe an amount more than ten, but less than 20 (or including 20, it's hard to ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

Single word for denoting “various divisions of the day” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the category name to describe “day”, “night”, or “dusk”? What would be the hypernym for the various divisions of the day such as morning, noon, evening or night? ...
2
votes
2answers
186 views

Commision on stock market

Is it correct to use word commision as a synonym to order on stock market? In meaning: an instruction from customers to brokers to buy or sell on the exchange. I know that commision is a fee or ...
2
votes
2answers
609 views

What's the difference between “sea port” and “maritime port”?

Road transport is not the only sector concerned. LNG is also used in maritime and inland waterway transport. The Commission therefore proposes the installation of fuel stations in leading ...
11
votes
5answers
37k views

What's the difference between “on the contrary” and “in contrast”

Is there any difference between these two phrases? Is there any context in which we only can use one rather than the other?
1
vote
3answers
4k views

Is there a rule for “wouldn't” used to mean “didn't want”?

I have seen the sentences in books where wouldn't seems to have been used in the meaning of didn't want, and I wonder if such a rule exists. For instance, I wanted to participate, but he wouldn't ...
2
votes
3answers
712 views

Can a “because clause” be a subject clause? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Sentence Construction: “Just Because … Does Not Mean” Consider the following sentence: Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean that they're not after you. The ...
0
votes
2answers
105 views

“Did China Birth the Next Steve Jobs?”

As the title of a Forbes article, it has been drawn to my attention because of the use of birth as a verb. I think it should be give birth to or bear.
2
votes
2answers
210 views

The word 'opprobrium'

Free Dictionary states that one of the definitions for 'opprobrium' is Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy. Dictionary.com states it means the disgrace or the ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

The difference between using a comma or a full stop

What's the difference between "I see, I see" and "I see. I see"? Can one use a comma in between? The first sentence could be used in formal writing, right? What about this one: "My house, my rules" ...
2
votes
1answer
525 views

To “lay lodged” — what does it mean?

I've googled and looked it up in every dictionary I know, and I can find "lay" and I can find "lodge", but I can't seem to work out the meaning of the two words together. The context is this poem by ...
1
vote
3answers
232 views

The phrase 'give you me'

There was another sentence that I wasn't sure about: "Rather, O blessed one, give you me boldness to abide within the harmless laws of peace, avoiding strife and hatred and the violent fiends of ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

Can 'it' be used plurally?

Can 'it' as a pronoun refer to many different imperative verbs? For instance, in the sentence: Abide by thy customs, thou excellent one: grind thy corn, drink thy water, praise thy cooking,-- if ...
3
votes
2answers
144 views

Listing of items in order of their effectiveness

In a research paper, how do I list things in order of their effectiveness? For example, The order of antagonistic effect of acetic acid against E. coli O157:H7 was salt > glycine > glucose > ...
1
vote
5answers
578 views

What is the logic of having ‘not’ in the usage, “be not above doing something”?

I came across the idiomatic usage, ‘not above doing’ in the following sentence of Jeffery Archer’s fiction, “Kane & Abel.” Allan Lloyd, a banker and Chairman of William Kane’s trust tells ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for a male that prefers female companions (no slang such as “pimp”)

I am looking for a word describing a man who has a lot of female friends, and who prefers female friends. I was "Wikipedia surfing" (going through Wikipedia pages and clicking on links found within ...
1
vote
0answers
169 views

What does 'ironic' really mean? [closed]

I've heard different meanings and uses of ironic everywhere. But I still can't wrap my head around what exactly is ironic. Can someone explain or provide an example?
-1
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the clause “chances are” grammatically correct?

You've most certainly heard this: Chances are, he overslept this morning. I realize the comma is a splice, but it's there only to emphasize the pause that usually accompanies it. When written ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

In the order of (what most people have recommended) [closed]

I asked three people to list the items that they think are most important for something. PERSON A PERSON B PERSON C Item "aaa111" Item "bbb222" Item "bbb222" ...
5
votes
2answers
326 views

Is it a standard usage of ‘blue’ to be used as a verb to mean ‘being deflated / become pessimistic’?

I was interested in the usage of ‘blue’ as a verb in the headline of New Yorker’s article, “Bibi Netanyahu’s election blues,” followed by the following lead copy: “The center-left, which had ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Does “or” mean both conditions?

We are ordinary Russian folks playing an English board game and came across this sentence: You may splay your green or blue cards left. We expected that it meant you must choose only one card ...
6
votes
2answers
430 views

How to properly say that a given day/date does not exist?

I wanted to use this, but I don't know if it's actually valid in English: The specified date is invalid.It points to a non-existing day. I'm not a native speaker, and I just want to say that the ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is this a positive or negative sentence?

I heard a sentence like this: How will Bill ever know that? Can someone tell me if this is a positive or negative sentence and what are the guidelines to decide which it is?
11
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a word for numbers between 10 and 99?

I'd like to find such a word instead of saying "greater than 10 but less than 100".
1
vote
8answers
6k views

What do you call people who are constantly moving [i.e., “in motion”]?

Moving here does not mean moving to a new city or something like that. I am talking about the people that just can't stay at one place. It is impossible for them to sit put at one place and relax.
5
votes
7answers
3k views

Em dash vs semicolon: which is more appropriate in the following examples?

I am very confused by these, and even when I understand other people's usage of them I find it difficult to know when to employ them myself. For this reason, I am trying to make my own examples and ...
3
votes
2answers
96 views

“length in bytes” vs “length by the byte” and “paid in hours” vs “paid by the hour”

"The variable len indicates the buffer length in bytes." "The variable len indicates the buffer length by the byte." I'm a computer programmer, so I know 1 is far more common than 2. ...
4
votes
4answers
7k views

Difference between get “off of” and “off”

What is the difference when you say "get off of something" and "get off something"?
4
votes
1answer
227 views

Please help explain this long sentence

It bore an engraved escutcheon, a herald's wording of which may serve for a motto and brief description of our now concluded legend; so sombre is it, and relieved only by one ever-glowing point ...
1
vote
2answers
224 views

Does anybody use the elative degree in modern speech? [closed]

I read that English has the following degree of comparison: positive, comparative, superlative (with definite article) and elative (with indefinite article). I'm wondering, whether sentences like "it ...
3
votes
1answer
200 views

Does this stylistic guideline have a name?

The principle would be something like: Avoid a long modifying clause that creates distance between your subject and verb For example, according to this guideline, the sentence One of his uncles ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Formally saying that you are laughing without euphemisms or colloquialism without referring to yourself

I want to know how one can manage to assert that they are laughing without using euphemisms or colloquialism in first person, for example in a letter, without referring to yourself, that is saying ...
12
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “drownded” a word?

Is there such a word as "drownded"? I would say "drowned" but I am hearing "drownded" so often I am beginning to wonder. For example: He went into the deepest waters and drownded.
3
votes
4answers
533 views

How closely synonymous are “forward” and “straightforward”?

Part 1: Introduction In the U.S., we have a game show called Jeopardy!, where contestants answer trivia questions in certain categories. This television program, which has aired for a few decades ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

“It is” + present simple

If it is build here, it will be next to a large housing estate. Can anyone tell me if "it is build" in the above sentence is correct? And if so, why isn't it in the form "it is" + past ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

“Scheduled to” vs. “scheduled for”

If there is this: source He is scheduled to a confirmation hearing on January 24, 2013 before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the same panel where he first testified in 1971, and of ...
0
votes
3answers
258 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
1
vote
2answers
239 views

“Kamarka part” etymology? [closed]

I know of some people in south Arkansas and north Louisiana that use this phrase. An example of its use would be when you have almost used up something, you have reached the "kamarka part." I hear it ...
1
vote
2answers
493 views

Idioms meaning to do something at great cost

What I'm looking for isn't quite the same as a Pyrrhic victory, as the action isn't necessarily done to obtain victory. Rather, it is any action that will ultimately result in the person taking said ...
6
votes
2answers
532 views

A word for a person who is made a villain by their circumstances, not necessarily by their actions

I was watching the movie Leon: The Professional. The protagonist, Leon, is a hitman — not somebody we traditionally sympathize with. The antagonist is a crooked DEA agent, pretty despicable ...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

What do the question marks in this quote mean (or are they typos)?

I read the following in an article entitled "Duke resets after the 'annihilation'" By Laura Keeley of the Raleigh News and Observer, dated Friday, January 25, 2013. I've not seen question marks used ...
1
vote
0answers
194 views

What does it mean that I made a doctor? [closed]

I want to know exact meaning that I made a doctor. Does it mean that I strived to be a doctor and I finally became a doctor? I want to know the exact meaning of it?
1
vote
4answers
184 views

“Removals Service” or “Removal Service”?

Take for example the tag line: "reliable removals service". Is this correct grammar/usage? Or should it be just "removal", singular? To me, "removals" seems more correct because it is describing ...

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