-1
votes
0answers
24 views

You Won or You've Won [on hold]

Is it possible to use YOU WON! in place of YOU'VE WON! in the context of a heading for a prize winning competition? Thank you
3
votes
3answers
71 views

Has there ever been a word for someone who has a thousand pounds?

If someone who has a million of a particular currency is called a millionaire, and someone with a billion is called a billionaire what do you call someone with a thousand? I realise that nowadays ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Can I use “How about..” in this way?

So, imagine that you wanted to suggest something to a friend of yours, like watching TV or go to the movies. You would say "How about watching TV?" or "What about going to the movies?" But what if you ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Is the sentence below correct [on hold]

With reference to the Company’s letter no. 01, we agree to the points mentioned therein.
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Boris Group or 'the' Boris Group? Is article omission an error?

From a native speaker standpoint, would it look OK if a company whose name follows the "X Group" pattern omits the use of the definite article when presenting itself on its website, like this (name ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Which sentence is most suitable in the context of history? [on hold]

The day of sorrow becomes the day of happiness. The day of sorrow changes into the day of happiness. The day of sorrow turns into the most peaceful day. Detail context: The day when one country ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Is there a rule how to punctuate adverbial modifiers of time in their front position?

I have a couple of sentences from a Macmillan coursebook by Malcolm Mann and Steve Taylore-Knowles 2007 going like this: Once a week, Helen watches a film at the cinema. In the evening, ...
2
votes
3answers
38 views

postmodifying phrase/under the leadership of [on hold]

Are these sentences correct: Such activities found favor with the social democrats under the leadership of Schmidt. Such activities found favor with the social democrats , under the leadership of ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

“Quyer” When and why did the spelling change so drastically?

The snippet above is taken from The Gentleman's Magazine (London, England), Volume 53, dated, 1783. It's only when you say Quyer out loud, do you realize what the word is. It is one of the ...
4
votes
4answers
271 views

Verb used with “threshold”

I am wondering what verb collocates with threshold. I can think of verbs such as surpass, cross, pass, but I am not sure if they are correct to use here. The threshold I am referring to is not a ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

I don't know Who there is with him or Who is with him

(a) Statement - There is a man with him. (b) Question - Who is there with him? (a man) (c) Noun clause -Who there is with him. (a)Statement -The man is with him. (b)question ...
-4
votes
1answer
69 views

How are new words created? Centuries ago there was no organization that created new words [on hold]

some of the words are so hard to pronounce for me like unequivocal,inadvertently,or entrepreneur, whoever created entrepreneur probably had been drunk with a vibrating tongue.Google is a new word ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

What phonetic phenomenon is with /mps/ of the word 'palimpsest'? [on hold]

What phonetic phenomenon is with the sequence of sound /mps/ for the word 'palimpsest'? What's the academic term of that?
1
vote
4answers
81 views

how to respond when boss says sorry to disturb you [on hold]

My boss intentionally takes so much time talking about nothing and then says sorry to disturb you in a very sarcastic way. How should I respond to him?
-2
votes
0answers
39 views

What's the most common name for “Vaccinium corymbosum”? [on hold]

What's the most common name for "Vaccinium corymbosum" in the US and th UK? "Northern highbush blueberry" seems to sound a bit long to use in everyday speech.
-2
votes
0answers
24 views

Is it right to say works such as i have lot of home works? [on hold]

We often come across some phrase such as,"I have lot of home works to do". Do you a word usage like that?
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Should “building blocks” be hyphenated? [duplicate]

Should "building blocks" be hyphenated? I am using the two words (or perhaps one word) as a noun. E.g., These axioms serve as the building-blocks of the English language. I understand that ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

Apostrophe in “At one's wits' end” [on hold]

Is the apostrophe after "wits" required in "At one's wits' end" ? Or is it optional?
-1
votes
2answers
45 views

Meaning of the sentance [on hold]

What does the following line convey " The old man was just as generous with his confidences as with his porridge and tobacco."
3
votes
2answers
86 views

What is the etymological justification for taking the grammatical term “pluperfect” and turning it into an adjective meaning 'more than perfect"? [duplicate]

I'm interested in the usage of the word pluperfect in the following passage from Thomas Harris’s crime thriller, The Silence of the Lambs. Jerry Burroughs of the National Crime Information Center ...
-2
votes
1answer
42 views

How does one properly pronounce 'enunciation'? [on hold]

Is enunciation ever pronounced with a 'y' sound at the beginning?
1
vote
0answers
41 views

What is the etymology of “floccinaucinihilipilification”? [on hold]

I recently encountered this word, "floccinaucinihilipilification" while watching Jason Bateman's directorial movie debut "Bad Words", in which he stars as a 40+ year old participant in a spelling bee ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Which is right: “3-peak” or “3-peaks”? [duplicate]

If I want to express something has 3 peaks, I should say "3-peak something" or "3-peaks something"?
1
vote
2answers
51 views

What's a formal/proper way of saying “the exact opposite”? [on hold]

I am writing a mock memo for a university assignment, addressed to a current professor. Thus, the general tone and genre of the letter is definitely formal. I am trying to say the following: (The ...
-1
votes
0answers
38 views

What's the English name for this function [on hold]

I have an app with a list function. It retrieves all the posts of my fan page. I think I can call it POSTS LIST, but I'm afraid that's not precise. I did a lot of research on the internet, but this ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a difference between the adjectives “express” and “expressed”? [on hold]

Here is an example. It is the expressed wish of the bride and groom that this be a non-alcoholic occasion. It is the express wish of the bride and groom that this be a non-alcoholic occasion. ...
9
votes
5answers
123 views

Does anyone know the word for a question asked with the intent to injure or insult?

Does anyone know the word for a question asked with the intent to injure or insult? I know there is term for it, but I can't find it anywhere. It's driving me crazy. Example: Are you blind, or ...
-1
votes
3answers
64 views

Does not divide the Sunday from the week [on hold]

Here's from Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 1 Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task Does not divide the Sunday from the week; It is easy to guess the meaning of: Does not divide the ...
2
votes
2answers
42 views

What is a medical term for the belief that you're healthy when you're not? [duplicate]

What is a medical term, as in a mental or eating disorder, that means "a compulsion with being healthy, while actually being unhealthy," stemming primarily from a poor understanding of science, ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

What's the meaning of “to him who”?

While I was searching on the net, I found this sentence: Memorandum to him who is concerned. I looked for a definition to to him who, but I found nothing. So what's the meaning of it? ِAre ...
3
votes
4answers
573 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences [duplicate]

I’m currently reading George Martin’s A Song Of Ice And Fire novels in English. As a non-native speaker (I’m German), I stumbled upon some grammatical constructs that I’ve never seen before, one of ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Is agreement required between subject and prepositional phrase? [duplicate]

Which is correct (and have you got a source)? "Animals store vitamin C in their liver." "Animals store vitamin C in their livers."
5
votes
1answer
80 views

Why is it spelled “curiosity” instead of “curiousity?”

I have been spelling the word "curiosity" with a u, "curiousity," my whole life, and only today was Chrome's spellcheck bold enough to highlight my lifelong error. I have two questions: The root ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

“Knowledgeable about” vs. “knowledgeable on” vs. “knowledgeable in”

When should I use each of the collocations "knowledgeable about", "knowledgeable on", and "knowledgeable in"?
14
votes
5answers
1k views

Stealing the topic from another person when he or she is going to tell you something

When someone is starting to tell you something from his or her life, some persons are immediately interrupting and starting to talk about the same topic, but from their own perspective instead. ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

What is a 'nearly quotation' called?

Last night in his eve of election speech to the Scottish electorate (a vintage performance according to the Guardian), the former UK Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, alluded to a famous line from Macbeth ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

How to say the plural of IP? [duplicate]

Can someone assist me with this doubt? In many sites I have seen it written as "IP's" and in other as "IPs". What is the correct form to refer for the plural of IP?
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Is it correct to say “an auspicious situation”?

Auspicious, as defined by Merriam-Webster means - showing or suggesting that future success is likely. I was learning about the correct usage of the word and found the following usages to be correct : ...
5
votes
1answer
142 views

Present continous and present simple

Why do we say, "Who is that man? What does he want", but, "Who is that man? Why is he looking at us". If the second is okay, which I am sure it is, why can't we say, "Who is that man? What is he ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Is there a noun form for “fine-grained”?

For example I want to say: ...the level of (fine-grained in noun) that is needed... I wonder if the word "grainery" will work.
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Negative form of “satisfy”, correct usage of “such”, difference between “quick” and “fast”

I just did an English test on the Internet because I have an entry exam tomorrow and I wanted to recap. I got 91% right, but I wanted to find out why I made these mistakes and what the correct way to ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Macbeth, Act I, scene 7, lines 41-43: what does “that which thou esteem'st the ornament of life” refer to? [on hold]

Lady Macbeth scorns her husband for his sudden lack of courage: "Wouldst thou have that / Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, / And live a coward in thine own esteem, […]" If "that which ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Is “I would understand everything you said if you said it in Portuguese” correct?

"I would understand everything you said if you said it in Portuguese." Is it any kind of conditional? And if it is, can you tell me which one? As I wrote this I had the feeling that it ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Indirect narration for following sentences [on hold]

q1) He said to me, "I don't have to do this for you." q2) He said to me, "I don't need to do this for you." q3) He said to me, "I have to do this for myself." I have certain doubts here: "to do" is ...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

Difference between promptness and promptitude

Seeing this EL&U question: 'saying thanks to someone answering your email ASAP who is important for you', the first word that came to my mind was promptitude which, as the definition states, can ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Should I use “have” or “has” after using an “and/or” in a sentence? [duplicate]

In the following two sentences, when "and" is used, then "have" would follow. When "or" is used, then "has" would follow. Example: "If the price and lead time have changed..." "If the price ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

parallelism: the farther/the more [duplicate]

I edited this phrase: the farther the negative from the lens, the more light needed to expose it properly and the longer the exposure to read: the farther the negative from the lens, the greater ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Problem with “at least you're not starving in Africa” saying [on hold]

Maybe you've heard this saying, maybe you haven't. However, this phrase I hear a lot and it bothers me. I see the logic as being flawed with good intentions. People usually use this when they are ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

What's the correct form of the negative subjunctive?

It is essential that [some parameter] be not reset during the day. (1) It is essential that [some parameter] not be reset during the day. (2) Which one is the correct form? I do know the ...

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