-1
votes
2answers
28 views

Which is easily understandable?

[missing words here]would be utilized in the best possible way to achieve the goals of your organization, while at the same time continuing to develop and gain experience. [missing words here]would ...
0
votes
3answers
110 views

Difference between 'I would like to be' & 'I want to be'

I would like to be and I want to be What is the difference between them? I think 'want to be' sounds stronger than 'like to be,' but I'm not sure if this is true.
2
votes
7answers
119 views

How to write a pair of pairs without sounding awkward

I am attempting to write a list of pairs of people, like so: "The pairings are Bob and Jane, Joe and Mary, and Fred and Ashley." This works fine in that the comma lets you know where each pairing is ...
0
votes
3answers
90 views

Do you always have to put a comma before someone's name? [duplicate]

Example: (1) Hello John. (2) Hello, John? (3) How are you today John? (4) How are you today, John? (5) I wish I could John. (6) I wish I could, John. Must there always be a comma before ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Difference word descriptions [on hold]

Why do we say >we are going to sea< when we board a ship that will travel across an ocean?
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Do “in a black study” and “in a brown study” mean the same?

I encountered relatively often the expression "to be in a brown study" but I can find nothing about the "black" version of the same expression. I found it in William Hope Hodgson's The Island of the ...
-2
votes
0answers
32 views

Is the sentence “How is <name>” localised to game-specific forums? [migrated]

I keep seeing people say "How is X", where X is the name of a game or a band. I think the implied question is about the entertainment quality of the thing in question, e.g. "Do you find this game ...
22
votes
14answers
2k views

Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning? [on hold]

A friend posed the following word puzzle to me: Can you think of a sentence that keeps the same meaning whether you use "it's" or "its"? He asserted that this puzzle does in fact have a ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Stative verbs in the continuous form?

As a nonnative speaker of English I was always taught in school that there are verbs that cannot be used in the continuous form, i.e. the stative verbs. However, I've seen some stative verbs used in ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

A simple question about syntax [on hold]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

What's the meaning of “stand” in this context? [on hold]

The following is a verse from the song Billy Jean by Micheal Jackson (this is the full version of the lyrics of the song): For forty days and forty nights Law was on her side But who can stand ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “utter” in the sense of enphasis if there is any whatsoever?

English is not my first language. I don’t know the difference between sheer and utter used for emphasis. For example, instead “That’s utter nonsense” can I say “That’s sheer nonsense” instead?
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Can an -ing or -ed clause be seen as a relative clause?

I'm confused with reducing clauses. I need help to understand reducing clauses in English. For example: The amount of goods transported by train totaled about 70 tonnes. I think the full ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Verb form of suds - is “sudses” permissible? [on hold]

If I want to say, for example, that a cleanser produces suds, could I say "This shampoo sudses"? I think the answer to this question depends on whether the verb is considered to be "sud" or "suds." ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

A record of recorded, tabulated, numerical records of observed phenomena

I am looking for a good word to use to describe a record of recorded, tabulated, numerical records of observed phenomena. I am studying an video game using a system which generates a large amount of ...
-1
votes
2answers
55 views

Is 'Loneliness is profound on weekends' correct? [on hold]

Profound being an adjective, is its usage in the sentence below correct? Loneliness is profound on weekends.
1
vote
3answers
82 views

'Which were a size too small.' or 'which size were too small.' Which one is correct?

The whole sentence is Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! I'm so confused about which were a size too ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

Explanation of these proverbs used in 'Wedlocks of the gods' by 'Zulu Sofola [on hold]

not all cutlasses that went to the farm are used. one does not have to see a skunk to smell him. no one knows why the snail sighs. it is a slave who sees the truth and ties his tongue with silence. ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

What does “shrinking beneath someone's feet” mean?

I just watched Batman Rises on HBO, and I didn't get it when Bruce Wayne spoke about the Cat Woman. He said, "But the ground's shrinking beneath her feet". It seems like it may mean "no one can ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Difference between “queue” and “enqueue” [on hold]

What is the difference between queue and enqueue given that both are verbs?
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Camera calibrated to/into/? optimal settings

I am trying to figure out what the correct preposition would be (and why): Camera calibrated to/into/? optimal settings Thanks
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Which should I use? That or which? [duplicate]

I am confused on the usage of "that" and "which". Would using "that" on both clauses of the following sentence be correct? Which ones should I use instead if it's not? "Why did you eat the pie that ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

The meaning of “Naturally Enough”

I have been reading a book about programming and since I am not very good with the phrases, I got confused. Please notice the following text : Modules You may think of modules as extensions ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Pres. perfect + going to + past infinitive

I have seen the following sentence: For four months now John has been going to have finished his novel by today. I hope I understand it (I assume it says that he has been trying to finish his ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Can an abandoned software project “gather dust”?

I was reading a blog of someone who is trying to emulate Nintendo Gameboy hard- and software as a hobby project. In the oldest post, in the following sentence: I eventually [...] bought myself a ...
-2
votes
1answer
51 views

Whereupon or thereupon?

Marion arrives at the Bates Motel, whereupon Norman comes out to greet Marion. Marion arrives at the Bates Motel, thereupon Norman comes out to greet Marion. Are both words interchangeable in this ...
4
votes
3answers
92 views

Is addressing a guy as “guy” rude?

Non-native here, is addressing a guy as just "guy" considered rude? Like, while addressing a pet-store clerk: "Hey, guy, how many mice will $13 buy?" Also, how long has it been in use?
1
vote
1answer
25 views

“False reasoning” psychiatric term

I am looking for a one word English equivalent for "false reasoning" of schizophrenia patients. There are two type of this - one is non pathological when low-educated people explain some phenomenon on ...
2
votes
4answers
299 views

A word for killing a cousin

Almost every type of killing can be described in a single word such as suicide, parricide, genocide, etc. Is there such a term for killing a cousin specifically?
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Is this sentence structure correct? I catch myself using this structure a lot [on hold]

This is a line from a story I'm writing: "The blanket had been peeled back, revealing imprints of recent slumber." Is this correct or should I make another sentence for the second clause?
1
vote
3answers
43 views

Can “backup” be used as a verb in the context of data management? [duplicate]

I have heard backup being used as a verb in the sense of I have to backup my hard disk by non-native English speakers (the English noun backup is also used in other languages, for example in ...
5
votes
6answers
49 views

Term between 'mentoring' & 'rubber ducking'

This may be a Programmers Stack Exchange question, but I don't think so, because I don't believe there is an accepted term for this in the industry, so I turn to all of you for suggestions. Say I'm ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

“described by either … or …” or described either by… or by…"? [duplicate]

I write a sentence like follows: This could not simply be described by either A or B. I was wondering may be the following is correct: This could not simply be described either by A or by B. ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Capitalizing First Letter of Word in Continuing Dialogue

I have a rather tricky question - I'm a writer, about to send my manuscript off to agents and publishers, and have noticed I have a rather strange writing style, particularly when it comes to ...
3
votes
1answer
131 views

From a non-native's standpoint: Which dictionary should I pay attention to when I find semantically contradictory definitions of a word?

[The following is one of dozens of cases I come across on a daily basis] By accident, I have recently noticed that the phrasal verb go through (as in experience) -- which I've been using so far in my ...
6
votes
3answers
736 views

Better term for “intellectual jokes”

What can you call a joke, pun, or anything funny that likely needs intelligence to get? All I can come up with is intellectual jokes; is there another word for this? A one-word answer would be great. ...
-2
votes
0answers
21 views

Need suggestions [on hold]

I was working on my resume. I need a more assertive and strong sentence in place of the following: Interacted with xyz team for deciding work flow and schedules. I would like to replace "Interacted ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Is it “shouldn't we?” “No, we should not” or “Yes, we should not”. And why? [duplicate]

As the title says: Someone wants something done: "Shouldn't we go to the park?" Someone else answers, saying that we should not go to the park. Would the answering person say Yes, we should not! ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?

Please help me to understand the meaning of this expression: Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once. (The Cherry Orchard). What does "even this once" mean in this phrase?
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

What's this word? [on hold]

I'm watching a video on youtube and just heard a new word/expression that I can't seem to spell "right enough" to have google correct me and bring me to its definition. I've included the context and ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Irony - Alanis Morisette Song [duplicate]

This is old news ...but I am having trouble understanding why some of Alanis Morisette's examples from her song 'Ironic' are not ironic. For example: "An old man turned ninety-eight. He won the ...
-2
votes
1answer
50 views

How to express “Help someone secretly”

One of my friend always helps me but does not want me to know that he helps me. Is there a word or phrase to describe this secret helping? Also, if someone wanted to thank the secret helper, is there ...
-1
votes
2answers
44 views

Do these sentences make sense? [on hold]

Notwithstanding the argument, I would still consider you as a friend. I was exhausted, notwithstanding I stayed up for another two hours. Maybe too formal to use in everyday writing as a word for ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Is there a word to describe the positioning of words directly below other words, as in translations

I was hoping to use a word to say that in a song lyric, the translation of the original language appears directly below the original language throughout the song, without having to say all that. I ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
-1
votes
1answer
84 views

Obsolete language. [on hold]

Is it appropriate to use obsolete words in a modern-day essay? For example, using "unto' instead of "until"? Or will the teacher who is marking your essay just think that you're a pretentious student ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them? [duplicate]

We would never say "I builded my own house", and we would never say "I ment my fences" - as far as I can tell, words either went the d-to-t route, or they went the add-ed route. Gild, for some reason, ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

What is the correct expression: “the estimate number” or “the estimated number?”

I have been looking for a place that tells me which expression is correct, but I didn't get any satisfactory answer. Google returns 2,060,000 results for "the estimate number of *", and 73,200,000 ...
7
votes
1answer
149 views

Describing a group of people who lie down in a public place to send a political message

I was walking through the square, and I came upon a group of people all lying on the ground. Each had a print out on their chest with a political message, and nobody was moving. What word or phrase ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Is there any difference at all between these three sentences? [on hold]

I figured you wouldn't come if I had told you. I figured you wouldn't have come if I told you. I figured you wouldn't have come if I had told you.

15 30 50 per page