-2
votes
0answers
26 views

Meaning of each with a single eye in the middle of his forehead [on hold]

How does it look like each whit a single eye in the middle of his forehead,Cyclops?
0
votes
2answers
70 views

What do you call an “atheist” who might believe in an afterlife?

Is there a term for someone who proclaims they don't believe in an afterlife but they are not sure whether the supernatural exists? I don't mean agnostic. Atheists don't believe in a deity, but an ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

Meaning of goat-footed nature gods play in the fields and woods

There,shepherds play their pipes and sigh with longing for flirtatious nymphs and goat-footed nature gods play in the fields and woods. How can I understand this sentence? And does "play pipes" mean ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

How to use “near” and “nearby”? [on hold]

Can you guys show me when I should use "near" or "nearby"? I absolutely get confused to use those... :<
0
votes
4answers
44 views

Is there a word for “back and forth”?

I'm struggling with how clumsy the term "back and forth" sounds, is there a word that essentially means a repetitive back and forth motion? IE: The machine ____. (moves back and forth) or operates ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Starting a sentence with “And so” in a mathematical proof

Inspired by this question, I thought of something more. As Tim says, and I ageree, one more often sees repeated use of "Hence", "Therefore" etc. in a mathematical proof, and not very often do people ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Is “completabilty” an actual word, and if not, what's a valid replacement?

I'm looking for a word for the ability of something to be completed, or fulfilled. My situation is specifically about sales orders. I found completability, and wiktionary.com says it's a word, but ...
18
votes
8answers
850 views

Is “The MSO/MSE Split is soon underway” grammatically correct?

We're in the middle of a historical time. Two creatures will be separated from each other. Waffles will be torn in two. Meta Stack Overflow will be split. This banner is currently being shown on Meta ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

A derogatory definition for a politician

I am looking for a definition, a negative one, to describe a politician who is not doing politics in the public interest.
0
votes
1answer
30 views

According to protesters - correct; according to THE protesters - possible?

Source: http://rt.com/news/mariupol-base-shooting-ukraine-008/ They called on the troops to abandon the base, but the soldiers didn't listen, the demonstrators said. Instead, the troops opened ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Greetings after initial email

In a formal / professional email (i.e. emails directed at potential employers, co-workers and administrators), is it okay to exclude the greeting after the first email? For example, I will send an ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Common ground between Deck and Graveyard in trading card games

I am developing a Trading Card Game and I am in need to extract functionality from two of my classes as they are both doing almost the same. it is about the Deck and Graveyard constructs which are ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

'uplink' or 'interfaces'

I wonder, which sentence fragment is better? ... effectiveness of the interface failure detection ... effectiveness of the uplink failure detection
0
votes
1answer
36 views

what does the logical fallacy “shifting issues” mean?

what is the meaning of the logical fallacy "shifting issues"? I have tried a web search on many different forms of the question "what is the definition of the logical fallacy shifting issues. I have ...
9
votes
10answers
780 views

Something of value that is worthless in the current context?

Is there a word/metaphor/idiom for something that has value, but is worthless (or even harmful) in the current situation? To use a couple of monetary examples: A check for $1,000,000 has potential ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

What are the characteristics of slang, dialect and colloquial speech? [on hold]

**What are the different aspects of slang, dialect and colloquial speech?
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Do these phrases have any sense? [on hold]

To besmirch the honor of mr. Johnson. When we compare mr. Johnson with mr. Jackson, we disrespect the latter one (is it understandable that 'the latter one' refers to mr. Jackson?).
2
votes
4answers
98 views

Less-technical synonym for “timestamp”

I've already looked at Is there a word for "a point in time"?, but there doesn't seem to be any answers other than "timestamp". While I agree that it is the most technically accurate ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Is “on-parade” an actual term?

A google search came up with almost nothing. Am I just imaging things? I could have sworn one could use the term "on-parade" to mean a succession of something. For example: Life is an on-parade of ...
5
votes
5answers
705 views

Antonym(s) for “antipode” / “antipodes” / “antipodean”?

Wiktionary says these terms refer to "the opposite" side, etc and offers no antonyms. But in practice, in the field of north vs south hemispheres, they are only ever used in my experience to refer to ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “robot”, “machine”, and “automaton”

What is the difference in meaning between a robot, a machine, and an automaton? I was inspired to ask this because I really can’t understand the subtle (or not so subtle) difference in meaning here. ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Could you lend me any/a little/../money?

I would like to know how to say that correctly and whether some/any could stand as a subject in the sentence: Could you lend me ... money? Sure, If I find some/any.
14
votes
3answers
80k views

Co-Founder, Co-founder, or cofounder?

I've seen all three used and there doesn't seem to be a definitive one that I can find. I'm hedging towards Co-Founder as it's a title, but any clarity would be appreciated. Edit If it makes it any ...
7
votes
2answers
37k views

How do you spell “Aye Yai Yai”

The phrase that's spoken when someone is hand-wringing about a thorny problem. Speaker One: Uh-oh -- we have to reformat ALL THE DOCUMENTS! Speaker Two: Aye Yai Yai, that's a lot of work! "Aye ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

How should I understand “short of ” in this sentence?

I learned the following sentence from The Economist (December 3rd-9th 2011). ... The implications seemed nothing short of revolutionary. I've looked it up at this online dictionary. It is said that ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

The expression “Pitch a loaf”

I would like to know where the expression "pitch a loaf" came from, what its origin is, and if people really use it nowadays. I heard it in a movie, and I believe it means to go to the bathroom, by ...
6
votes
1answer
27k views

“Without further adieu” vs “Without further ado”

I have just seen an email containing the phrase "Without further adieu"; I always thought it was "Without further ado." Which is it?
17
votes
5answers
37k views

“Clean as a whistle” — why is a whistle considered appropriate for describing cleanliness?

Every time I hear this idiom, I cogitate to no avail as to its sense. Why is it a whistle, and not a lantern, or an axe?
18
votes
5answers
12k views

When I say “comment out”, does it mean to uncomment something or comment it?

When I say "comment out", does it mean to uncomment something or comment it? What is more better, or correctly, used? PS: I'm talking about source code.
13
votes
7answers
4k views

How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?

Merriam-Webster Dictionary online shows “Top 10 Favorite British Words”. I’m interested in knowing how many of the listed words are understood or accepted by Americans as English, whichever British ...
3
votes
2answers
394 views

Irregular plurals. Leathermans or Leathermen?

Which plural do you use for a word that should have a regular plural but ends with a word that has its own irregular one? The example that made me ask was "leatherman" (the multitool) but there are ...
6
votes
3answers
6k views

Phrasal Verbs. Rules and Tricks

Are there any rules or tricks that might explain how phrasal verbs are formed to understand their meanings?
10
votes
4answers
19k views

AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm

I used to think PM/AM was correct, but at some point, I switched to using p.m./a.m. for reasons I can't recall. I know that in practical, casual writing, people tend to use whatever form is most ...
6
votes
8answers
1k views

Is there a single word that means “under the table”?

Is there a single word that means "under the table"? I am looking for a single word that conveys a knowing, sly, violation of law or ethics — like an under-the-table or off-the-books payment.
8
votes
4answers
53k views

When should you use “despite” over “inspite”, and vice versa?

Most dictionaries suggest that inspite and despite are synonymous, but are there any specific instances when their usage is not interchangeable?
5
votes
2answers
10k views

What is the meaning of “you bet!”?

I often hear the term "you bet!". What does it mean?
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the “really” in “I don't really know” necessary?

I know that one can have a greater or lesser amount of surety (i.e. "I'm not really sure"), but don't you either know or not know something? Are there degrees of knowledge? I hear this phrase often ...
5
votes
3answers
12k views

Usage of 'much more'

Is saying much more grammatically correct? For instance, some purists argue that this is wrong: I'm much more comfortable with A than B and that it should be: I'm more comfortable with A ...
6
votes
3answers
819 views

If ______ gets outlawed, only outlaws will ______

What is the common origin of these and similar phrases, and how are they used? I've seen them in both silly and serious contexts. If guns get outlawed, only outlaws will have guns. If ...
3
votes
2answers
884 views

Why are many TV personalities beginning to pronounce “daughter” as “dotter”?

I have noticed the changing of proununciations of words with -au and -aw by TV presenters which is spilling over into everyday speech. For example “dotter” for daughter, “otto” for auto, “jah” for ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

“If it was” or “if it were”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? Should I say "If I were [something]" or "If I was [something]?" This came ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Not only… but also

Consider the following: Not only you should be able to speak but also able to write. You should be able to not only speak but also write. You should not only be able to speak but also be ...
26
votes
3answers
20k views

Is it “despite” or “despite of”?

Should I always use 'despite' instead of 'despite of'?
43
votes
12answers
2k views

Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs ...
12
votes
5answers
12k views

Difference between “should” and “ought to”

What is the difference between You should go and You ought to go? I rarely use the latter.
20
votes
3answers
36k views

Which is correct: coming down the “pike” or “pipe”?

Is the expression "coming down the pike" or "coming down the pipe"? I've always used pike, but I've heard a few people use pipe recently. I can see how both could make sense, but which is correct?
14
votes
8answers
18k views

Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?

I think friend of mine can be translated to my friend. In that case, doesn't friend of me make more sense? If we translate friend of mine to one of my friends then I guess friend of mine makes sense ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Origin of “idiocracy”

Did the word "idiocracy" exist prior to the release of the movie of the same title, or is it a neologism coined by its screenwriters?
52
votes
6answers
59k views

“Login” or “log in”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “log in to” or “log into” or “login to” Is there accepted terminology for the process of logging in? As a verb, would you say "Go to ...

15 30 50 per page