0
votes
1answer
17 views

Placing proper preposition [on hold]

Suppose I am seeing a picture and telling someone at/on the left side you and at/on the right side me
0
votes
1answer
94 views

“Don't you…” question

I'm studying English for 10 months. I suppose myself to know it quite well now. But I'm confused about one thing. I noticed that some of my English speaking friends sometimes ask "Don't you ...
0
votes
3answers
87 views

Richard Feynman is certainly not mischievous!

In the introduction of Richard Feynmans book Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!, a colleague describes Feynman's character. The description makes sense to me - except for one word. The word ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“Replace the position of the object” vs. “replace the object”

How should I write «replace the position of the object» or «replace the object» will be enough and the first variant is verbose? Thanks.
2
votes
3answers
212 views

What is the correct plural form of “offspring”?

What is the correct plural form of the word "offspring"? From the dictionaries I have looked at, I am guessing it is just "offspring", but Dictionary.com says "offsprings" is also acceptable. ...
19
votes
5answers
3k views

Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”

Is there a hypernym for animal noises like "bark", "meow", "roar", et cetera?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
4
votes
0answers
78 views

What does 'lazy' mean in the sentence 'They bought the mansion for a lazy $10 million.'?

It seems to me that 'lazy' in this context suggests a humorous, off-hand attitude to a sum most would consider serious money. Is it a jocular minimisation of the amount, almost the opposite of the ...
17
votes
8answers
2k views

A correct word for 'learnful'

I’m looking for a word that would fit in the sentence it was a very learnful experience: i.e., I learned a lot during that experience. Learnful feels correct to me, but the dictionary disagrees. It’s ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

What does the extra “e” mean in some names?

Many times, I saw an "e" on some names. For example: blackthorne Is this only for decoration, or is the extra "e" from old english? Or maybe spelling for certain cultures?
0
votes
3answers
43 views

“Didn't” or “Wouldn't”?

When I was in high school, a mosquito bite used to be itchy for many weeks. It didn't subside for a month or more. Is the word didn't proper here or should I use wouldn't? Wouldn't sounds ...
1
vote
4answers
264 views

How to frame a sentence which means that someone has passed the day idly lying back on the couch? [on hold]

I want to frame a sentence in English which means that someone has passed the whole day lying back simply on the couch idly and doing nothing. But I cant frame that in an appropriate manner.
-2
votes
2answers
35 views

The difference between quarter and district [on hold]

What is the difference between district and quarter ? e.g. dwarven district and foreign quarter
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Question form of a sentence [on hold]

What will be the question form of the following sentence? "They're scared of spider."
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How to write something like nobody would have been better to achieve this [on hold]

I am wondering if this is correct : Finally someone from Cuba featured here and who could have been better suited to achieve this feat than you
1
vote
4answers
96 views

Single word to define a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement

I am looking for a word that defines a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement. Just like the term "perfectionist" that defines a person who always looks for perfection. Is ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

What does “looked every day of it” mean?

She was in her late fifties and looked every day of it. In this instance, what does looked every day of it mean?
0
votes
3answers
145 views

Usage of 'we' by companies

Often companies refer to themselves as 'we', e.g. We offer the following services Even though a company is singular, is this correct usage of 'we'? If not, what should be the correct usage?
-1
votes
0answers
16 views

Quoting Quotes with First Person [on hold]

In a given text, there is a piece of dialogue where a character speaks in first person. I am using this portion of the text as my quote and I am unsure whether or not to change the dialogue so that ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

I'm looking for a word that defines a situation commonly used in TV/film writing

Is there a definition, or a set of categories that describe situations in tv shows, movies, etc. Example, When the protagonist is a social underdog and his love interest is that of the ...
0
votes
7answers
121 views

Term for a person trying to create unnecessary controversy

What is the term for someone who is trying to create controversy out of nothing? For example, a politician attempting to cause outrage over a very minor thing done by a member of an opposing party.
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the word used to describe the redundancy of using two synonyms to define one thing?

Incorrect: a baby lamb Correct?: 'a baby sheep', or just 'a lamb' Is there even one word used to describe this duplication? Or would you just identify the mistake as "a redundant word"?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

How to use which?

Is it grammatically correct to say: A(x) and B(X) are the velocity and the temperature of the solution which we need to find them. Many thanks
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Word for someone who “backseat-games”, but in real life [duplicate]

I'm looking for a term that describes a person commenting everything you do in a manner that puts (or tries to put) this person in a position superior to you, often mocking whatever you do and telling ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Which sentence is correct? [migrated]

I didn't go to party. I didn't went to party.
1
vote
2answers
16 views

Motive, Motivative, or Motivating?

What is the most fitting adjective to describe '(something) that motivates' among motive, motivative, and motivating? EDIT: Reading from the answers that 'motive' is not an adjective, actually I put ...
2
votes
2answers
30 views

“X as well as Y” ; will this be followed by singular verb or plural verb?

"X as well as Y" singular or plural When two nouns are connected using "as well as", does that become singular or plural? For eg. Sam as well as his brother Dean has / have to come. Which one is ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Let Alone ≈ Much Less ≈ Still Less : How do the 2 words in each combine to mean 'not to mention'?

For brevity, I symbolise (imperfect) synonymity with ≈ :  X ≈ Y  means  X and Y are synonyms. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/let+alone: let alone ≈ not to mention From Merriam Webster: let ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Past vs. present tense in relative clauses in the past

Which sentence is grammatically correct, and why? He wrote a didactic novel that set out to expose social injustice. He wrote a didactic novel that sets out to expose social injustice.
1
vote
2answers
38 views

“My class ended earlier than expected” vs. “my class ended quicker than expected”

I'm studying English at the moment and I don't know which one of these is correct: My class ended earlier than expected. My class ended quicker than expected. Could I also say my class ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Should I capitalize the word “on” in this title? [duplicate]

Should it be "Alive on Arrival" or "Alive On Arrival"?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

How can a verb like “jag” symbolise sudden movement or unevenness?

[ODO:] jag Origin [=] Late Middle English (in the sense 'stab, pierce'): perhaps symbolic of sudden movement or unevenness (compare with jam1 and rag1). How can any verb, let alone jag, ...
-1
votes
2answers
59 views

Indian English: Is this a correct sentence? [on hold]

Is this a correct sentence in Indian English? It is not very long when my sister will finish their graduation.
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Sentence type, clause identification

I've been told that this is an example of a complex sentence: But then he took a great leap, trying to pull a high kick out of the sky. I see that the "but then" serves as a cohesive conjunction ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“He cooked me a soup with a lot of hot oil”

I'm looking for an English equivalent to a Persian expression which means this person got me in a lot of trouble. Literally translated, the expression is this person cooked a soup for me that had too ...
4
votes
4answers
93 views

Is there English counterpart to Japanese proverb, 一期一会 , meaning “Cherish once -in -a-lifetime encounter”?

I met a married couple of elderly American tourists to Japan who are both attorney at law in Connecticut a few days ago, and happened to have to introduce a Japanese proverb, “一期一会 - Ichigo ichie” in ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Which one is grammatically correct: “wood door” or “wooden door”

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
5
votes
0answers
69 views

Why do we say “archenemy” differently from “archangel” and “architecture”?

Like other words that start with "arch-", archenemy is partly derived from arkhi or arkhos from the Greek (Wikipedia), meaning chief. But why is it said differently, using a "ch" sound, from ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
13
votes
10answers
3k views

What word means “explicitly forbidden by the most fundamental laws”?

I am working with engineering equations in a vacuum system and want to emphasize that a certain set of parameters will not work. Usually, this is due to real world effects (friction, pump efficiency ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Is there a word for wanting bad things to happen to others?

The German word schadenfreude is often used in English to express the pleasure derived from seeing misery in others. From dictionary.reference.com schadenfreude noun. satisfaction or pleasure ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?

In The Syntactic Phenomena of English, McCawley considers the phrase "a dark blue necktie", and concludes that "blue" in that phrase is simultaneously a noun and an adjective. It modifies the noun ...
4
votes
2answers
52 views

Is `bonny' neutral register?

Dictionary definitions of `bonny' admit to chiefly British (or even Scots), but give no further hint of the possible tinges of this word. Bonny (adj.) means attractive, fair; fine, excellent [M-W]. ...
-2
votes
0answers
59 views

what does 'swing your other leg over' mean? [on hold]

I cannot find the phrase in any dictionary. What does swing your other leg over mean? EDIT: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio/playtime/playtime_20150519-1500a.mp3 Audio programme, ...
4
votes
3answers
247 views

Annual school events

How would you call these kind of events organized by schools at the end of the year generally in June where children (6 to 12 years old) sing, dance or act? In French we say : "Fête annuelle de ...
2
votes
2answers
38 views

“Bucket and chuck it” origin

Used in this sentence (by a friend): Well, if it doesn't work, just bucket and chuck it.
0
votes
4answers
82 views

Word that means “Sneak and Steal”?

I'm looking for a word that combines "Sneak" with "Steal", like: To sneak and steal It would be best if it were archaic, but I'd love to hear all possibilities of course. Thank you! EDIT: Thanks ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Asking for more time in AmE [on hold]

I've been speaking english for like 2-3 years.. And I want to know what is the polite way to ask a potential client to give me 2-3 minutes to provide information about a new offer (on the phone) I've ...
0
votes
3answers
68 views

How should I interpret “Be different like that”?

Be different like that! What does it mean? Is it grammatically correct? I don't think it has any problems, but I am not sure.
1
vote
3answers
59 views

What does “drive a spike” mean? [on hold]

what does drive a spike mean in this sentence : It's like driving a spike through my heart

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