-2
votes
1answer
51 views

Is “People of Mars, why most of you are just losers?” grammatically correct? [on hold]

People of Mars, why most of you are just losers? Is this question grammatically correct?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

a possible meaning of “multiply” [on hold]

When one says "in our life we have to make the most of our life, go forth, and multiply", does he/she by "multiply" mean "to breed"?
0
votes
1answer
43 views

what adjective ending in -y best describes someone who thinks they're the centre of the universe?

I'm writing an article about the seven writing trolls. All of them end in -y, e.g. Cocky, but I"m struggling with one, ie the writer who is unwilling/unable to empathise with the reader and focuses ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Use of “age” as an uncountable & countable noun

Why is it that the "age" is used as an uncountable noun in some cases and as a countable noun in other circumstances? Examples: Now the market is not booming, and the employers are switching ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Is it “in the episode” or “on the episode”? [on hold]

Which one is correct "in the episode" or "on the episode"? If I talk about a specific episode do I have to use "on" like "on episode 40"? Is that correct?
-3
votes
1answer
33 views

What is your definiton of bright and sharp person? [on hold]

Like how would fully define a bright and sharp person?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

in images otherwise beautiful

I have two questions regarding the following paragraph from Art and Science by Sîan Ede (I.B. Tauris, 2012): Other artworks contain a sense of imperfection in images otherwise beautiful, a kind of ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

I can't understand what your point is or I can't understand what is your point?

What is it correct to say: I can't understand what your point is? or I can't understand what is your point?
1
vote
3answers
69 views

“Don't cut yourself on that edge”

What does the idiom don't cut yourself on that edge mean? I have seen it being used on multiple occasions, but could not find anything on the web that explains this idiom.
0
votes
1answer
57 views

The Expression “Drop it.” Stop talking about it

There are some phrasal verbs with drop, such as: Drop in Drop by Drop off Drop out etc... I saw the expression "Just drop it" used in a movie to express 'stop talking about it'. I'm just curious ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

is it correct to use 'often a times'?

Does the phrase "often a times" exist? If so, what is the correct way to use it? Would the following sentence be correct? I have seen him loafing about in the streets often a times.
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Use of 'such as themselves'?

Would it be correct to use the following sentence? The group make for a handsome lot. And that poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves. I have been ...
4
votes
6answers
114 views

What's a word for someone who does what they say? [duplicate]

I'm looking for a single word that means something like 'being a man/woman of your word', or 'follow through' as a noun. I tried using 'integrity' at first, but that has other implications, like ...
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Term for removing/replacing line-breaks

I'm looking for a good term for removing line-breaks from a piece of text and replacing them with a special line-break marker. (Like how, when quoting poetry, we use "/" to represent a break; though ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Nouns denoting a state and the point of its initiation

The word incarnation, according to Webster, has two meanings: 1) the act of incarnating 2) the state of being incarnate So, this word can denote a state, as well as the moment of initiation of that ...
2
votes
1answer
31 views

What is correct to say: “I don't like it when …” OR “I don't like when …”?

Very simple question. Which is correct to say: 1. I don't like it when ... - OR - 2. I don't like when ... Is there a difference? For example: 1. I don't like it when people can't understand ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What is the meaning of “read of”? [on hold]

I saw this phrase in a sentence. Here it is: He read of the room that was prepared at the palace at Rheims for the use of Queen. What does it mean?
1
vote
1answer
23 views

I was there by your side vs I was by your side there

She was by my side in the building. She was in the building by my side. The first sentence says that she was in the building, and she was staying beside me. The second sentence says ...
0
votes
2answers
26 views

Sentences with no object

I have known for years that sentences do not have to contain the objects. But there are some problems I am facing with great difficulty. For example, sentences below make perfect sense. I missed ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

What words are trending?

Google graphs word usage in print by year. It was interesting to see "cardinality" show a sharp upwards trend. What other words have become vastly more popular in recent years? Is there a resource to ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Singular they with ‘known as’

I want to use singular they with the phrase known as. I am not sure if the appellation following known as should be in the singular or plural. Which of the following is correct? After completing the ...
3
votes
2answers
41 views

Name for a person who is always trying to beat the system?

Someone I know is always finding a way to beat the system, for example: Getting fake records to get his children into college, contacting people in the system to find him a way to bypass waiting for ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

Word that describes this quality

When an entity (organization, person) does the best they can but are hindered due to outside influence or chance.
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Did you still want vs Do you still want

Is it grammatically correct to ask: "Did you still want to go to the park today?" Or should it be: "Do you still want to go to the park today?"
0
votes
1answer
28 views

“However” or “Though”?

Which would be correct in the following context? They had done this, though, while neglecting one of the most important aspects of our Father’s love, which is freedom. They had done this, ...
-1
votes
0answers
39 views

Is “He is being here” ever acceptable?

Is the sentence like He is being here acceptable in some context?
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

Adjective for something that allows you to be productive

I'm trying to describe a programming language. It's a language that's been designed by its creators to allow us, as the developers (users of the language) to be productive. I have a feeling the ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

What do you call the page you can bring to exams?

On an exam, you can often bring one A4 sized piece of paper that you can write anything on. What's that piece of paper called in this context?
0
votes
2answers
47 views

What tense do you use to refer to an adult's childhood as a child prodigy?

I'm currently writing a biography of a fictional character. Should I write "X is a child prodigy" or "X was a child prodigy" if X is currently an adult? My gut tells me to go with a past tense since X ...
4
votes
2answers
201 views

What does the word 'mandles' mean?

It was just mentioned in one of NPR word games as one of the choices that might be a word. The contestant, after some hesitation, picked this as one that is an actual meaning: Mandles is "candles for ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“Confirmation parents' meeting” or “confirmation parents meeting”?

If a meeting is for a group of parents run by a Church, for example, would it be "Confirmation parents' meeting" or "Confirmation parents meeting"?
2
votes
4answers
79 views

Are there any other words to describe “willing to do anything for love”?

I'm given a project to do some character analysis of Ward Beach, an American fossil hunter from a short story by Anthony Doerr called Mkondo, and I'm pretty much stuck. It was something like this : ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

“abundant” and “copious” are synonyms - undisputed?

Is it completely undisputed that abundant and copious are indeed synonyms? According to WordNet (an English database developed at Princeton university), abundant and copious are not synonyms.
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Clauses related by two uses of “the + adjective”

I frequently see and hear sentences constructed like this: The closer I am to you, the closer you are to me. or The longer we do this, the greater the risk. Can these be considered ...
6
votes
6answers
3k views

The meaning of 0% and 100% as opposed to other percentages?

Oftentimes, percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number. A $49.99 item may be marked 50% off, even if the price becomes $24.99 (it should be 50.03% off). However, I have come to notice that ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

question from sat

I'm so confused about this question. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow PUSH _______ to encourage diverse populations to become socially and politically active, was created in 1996 by the merging of 2 ...
-2
votes
0answers
33 views

Two flights delay? or two flight delays?

If I would like to say that one airline stated that there were two flights delay due to an engine failure, should it be “two flight delays”? or “two flights delay”?
0
votes
1answer
21 views

care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors

Which of the phrases best describes the general responsibility for people who are under-age? care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Which phrase is grammatically correct? [on hold]

Which phrase is grammatically correct: "working under a tight schedule" or "working with a tight schedule"?
0
votes
1answer
67 views
+50

Is this correct to say “a large group of crowd(s)”

Crowd means a large number of persons gathered together, however I've found some examples in which this expression is used "a large group of crowd". In the future, these flying drones may be seen ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

What does “nimble-witted” mean? [on hold]

I've just read a book and it said: Ron is a nimble-witted and silent guy.
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Countable nouns in the list of ingredients

I'm translating recipes into English and I need your help. I suppose that I can say 300 g tomatoes but what about small amounts used in the list of ingredients? 10 g tomatoes or 10 g tomato ? ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What is the difference between check-in and check in and checkin?

What is the difference between Check-in and Check in and Checkin? Kindly anyone can explain this three words. Thanks in advance.
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What's the difference between “roe” and “caviar”?

What's the difference between "roe" and "caviar". Wikipedia has two different articles, however, the difference is not explain in the either one.
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Placement of a sentence describing coming paragraphs

Let's suppose I've got the following sentence: Quantification provides the following advantages: independence of measurement, freedom from bias and increased accountability. Now suppose I write ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Some or more of something

I want to say "some 50 or more yards apart" (meaning at least 50 yards apart) but I'm not quite sure it's correct. I couldn't find the answer or an example of its use in google search. However, I ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

He will/would have won the match. Are both grammatically correct?

I came across a sentence while my father was reading. It was He will have won the match. but I think He would have won the match. Which is correct?
2
votes
1answer
50 views

“Classic symptoms” or “classical symptoms”?

According to Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, both 'classic' and 'classical' mean very typical in a sense. However, in Longman Dictionary of contemporary English and Oxford Collocations ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Possessive apostrophes

I have found the question Why doesn't “its” have an apostrophe?, and while it's close it doesn't quite answer my question. English isn't my first language, and I've noticed something that I'm doing ...

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