3
votes
4answers
277 views

Idiom/word for someone who kowtows to his superiors and kicks his subordinates

Apparently, a "bicycle rider" is "a current German idiom for someone who kowtows to his superiors and kicks his subordinates". (Source: Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem.) Any similar expression ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Numbering series with “through” or “to”

I would like to know if a construction that I've read few times is indeed correct. When referring to a number of items, is it correct to say "The item numbers ranged from 4 through 7"? Is it better to ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
0
votes
4answers
67 views

One word for “change of requirements”? [on hold]

In software or in Any Industry the change of requirements is often seen. Is there a particular single word that can describe the "change of/in requirements". Apart form updation, editing, amendment ...
0
votes
3answers
55 views

What's it called when someone forms a general conclusion from something which is aberrant?

I'm trying to think of a phrase that describes someone who is in a certain situation and when an outcome out of the norm comes up then he takes the aberrant outcome and generalizes it, believing it to ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

“If you or somebody you know” vs “If somebody you know or you”

The following sentence makes sense: If you or somebody you know is an experienced such-and-such, please contact us. However, reversing the subjects (and choosing "are" based on the proximity rule) ...
3
votes
2answers
40 views

You're Coming On All-(blank), Coming Over All-(blank)

I'd like to know how widespread these statements are in the UK. In the movie 'In Bruges' Ralph Fiennes says to, a suddenly, soft-sounding Brendan Gleeson (employed as a hit-man by Fiennes): ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What is the difference between “above” and “over”? [duplicate]

We ordinarily apply above and over in place of each other. Is there an accurate difference between them? If so, what is it? When do we use above and when do we use over? what is the similarities ...
5
votes
3answers
302 views

Single word which means 'suffix' or 'prefix'

I would like to get a single word which means suffix or prefix. I am creating a database table, which has columns - 'suffix' and 'prefix.' I would like to name the table in such a way that on seeing ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

What does this line mean : “The man's high tone spread throughout the spacious bar”

I am reading this light novel called GGO and in it I came across these lines: "AGI (Agility) being all powerful is just an illusion." The man's high tones spread throughout the spacious ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Correct use of lie or lay in the following context

I based my final year project around web technologies where my strengths lie. OR I based my final year project around web technologies where my strengths lay.
0
votes
2answers
21 views

Usage of quotes in the letter writing

I have included this quote with single apostrophe within a sentence amidst letter writing. Is this allowed? Amidst his speech, I still remember his famous quote (saying): ‘Customer experience is ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Usage of apostrophe in this sentence

As per this statement, Does the usage of apostrophe looks correct? Thanks to "abc news" for this broadcast of memorable gathering of late CEO with his employees.
-1
votes
0answers
16 views

Usage of “is about” in a sentence [on hold]

Do you think this sentence formation could go better? Going ahead, I would suggest you to spend more time on applying the concepts that you are already aware of. This would be right approach when ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

What could be the better form of this sentence? [on hold]

Can this sentence formation be better? Mainly I was concerned about the usage of word Discipline One should not forget that, We had been through all core subjects of our Discipline in this semester. ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

Should I add “anyway” in the following sentence?

She looked at herself in the mirror and wondered if she should wear makeup. She decided not to. What was the point if she'd remove it in a couple of hours, (anyway)? I'm a little confused. It ...
3
votes
2answers
215 views

If you or somebody you know … are/is …? [duplicate]

What is the correct grammar for a sentence such as the following: "If you or somebody you know is an experienced such-and-such, please contact us." Vs.: "If you or somebody you know are an ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

abbreviation for “la maison” [on hold]

Do the french have an abbreviation for "la maison?" I'm wondering if there is commonly used contraction or abbreviation for the french "la maison" meaning "house"?
4
votes
1answer
55 views

Are both of these Raising’s?

[i] Equi Billᵢ wants [[(for) Billᵢ] to leave at noon] [Billᵢ wants [ __ ᵢ to leave at noon]] [ii] Raising [[(For) the casserole] to be done] seems The casserole seems [to be done] ...
4
votes
2answers
40 views

pronunciation : Vine vs Vineyard

Why vin in vine sounds similar to vice, but vin in vineyard is similar to that in the name Vincent? I would expect since both vine and vineyard are related to grape in some way, they probably should ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “Ur-moment” a normal English expression?

The New York Times article of this past July 29th titled, “The D.O. Is In Now: Osteopathic Schools Turn Out Nearly a Third of All Med School Grads,” features the growing popularity of the Touro ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Palatalization of “t” followed by “y”

I often hear "that you" pronounced (roughly) like "thatch you". I've taken on pronouncing it like that until my English teacher implored me not to do so. Is there a consensus on whether this is rude ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Quantitative to Qualitative Description Treatment

If this has already been addressed, I apologize, but, for the life of me, I can't figure out what this issue might be called. I have a sentence that switches from describing the subject in ...
1
vote
3answers
32 views

Can I mix singular and plural for a possessive?

I want to talk about a specific woman. She is the wife of one of my cousins. So I have several cousins, but not each of them has a wife, and those who have one obviously only have one. Can I say ...
4
votes
4answers
109 views

What is the word used to describe the fear of the unknown?

I believe it is a recurring theme in "Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" where the characters are scared of what they can't quite explain. Something like supernatural/transcendental. I can't ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Why do we say “in” a movie but “on” a TV show?

When referring to a television program, my experience tells me that it is proper to use “on” whether I’m referring to an actor on the show or events on the show or anything. Did you see Matt ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Difference between 'we both have' and 'we have both' [duplicate]

What would be the difference in meaning between the phrase "We have both noticed a change in your demeanor." and the phrase "We both have noticed a change in your demeanor."?
5
votes
4answers
328 views

How often is “more often than not”?

A person, supposedly a native speaker of English, assured me that I would say "often" means roughly 50-60% of the time, whereas "more often than not" means 75-95% of the time, and is closer in ...
3
votes
3answers
82 views

Meaning of “hinder parts” in the 17th century

While reading the works of William Laud in the edition by William Scott, I came across a description (No 2 on page 345) where it seems the Scots are upset about a ritual in which a priest turns his ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Geek vs Geek Out - beyond computers

I am struggling with new usages of the word "geek" or "geek out". In social media outlets, it's no longer confined to computers or technology, but can be related to other subjects including ...
2
votes
3answers
49 views

Which of “chafing at the bit” or “chomping at the bit” is more accepted/proper?

I've used "chafing at the bit" for quite some time, but have also heard "chomping at the bit" as a way to indicate impatience, etc. Which of these two is the more "proper" or accepted variant?
1
vote
3answers
60 views

Word or phrase for a story that takes place over several years

What word or phrase should be used to describe a story that takes place over a long period of time (e.g. a few years, a few decades, etc.)? For example, Gabriel García Márquez's famous novel One ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Definition by example

Consider the following two ways of defining a chicken egg: An oval-shaped white object with a hard shell and soft interior containing albumin. An object that a chicken lays. These are really two ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

Literally and figuratively [duplicate]

Can someone please explain the difference between literal and figurative to me, with a bunch of examples and whatnot? How "real" does something have to be to be literal? He literally ran the show ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

Can I use “will” as non-auxiliary verb?

I was in England and I heard that some people use word "will" as non auxiliary verb, in meaning "wish". Have I misheard? If it is true, in which cases can I use "will" as non auxiliary verb?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Right meaning of the phrase [duplicate]

[man] makes himself the instrument of somebody or something outside of himself; he need not solve the problem of living by productive activity. Bold part means “a man doesn't need to solve ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“I didn't know you golf” vs “I didn't know you golfed” [duplicate]

While reading a popular author I came across: "I left my clubs at home, so I can't play." "Oh? I didn't know (that) you golf." This sounds wrong, but presumably it was passed by at least ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Is this correct English [on hold]

Amazing to see a wild plant blooming so alluring where it’s not even wanted, all I saw beauty in their spunk!
6
votes
2answers
564 views

Last names that are English words with an extra 'e'

I noticed that there are a lot of last names that have an 'e' at the end. The pronunciation usually isn't changed from that of the base word. Poole Steele Browne Clarke Why do English words not ...
14
votes
11answers
2k views

Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?

To say "the noise outside shook her from her reverie" implies she was lost in pleasant daydreams. What if she was lost in worry or unpleasant thoughts? Is there an equivalent term (single word or ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

The relative pronoun “which” and the omission in this sentence

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Is “Sad sometimes what happens when kids stop being kids and grow up to become the kind of adults we simply detest” ambiguous?

In the Collins Dictionary entry for the verb detest, the following citation taken from a 2003 Ottawa Sun article is given to demonstrate that verb: Sad sometimes what happens when kids stop being ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
-1
votes
2answers
43 views

What are the differences between “from” and “of”?

Both of and from are possible, with different meanings, of course. ....a magnificent picture in a book, called True Stories of Nature, about the primeval forest. This means that the stories ...
11
votes
10answers
4k views

What is the opposite of an Epiphany?

I think of an Epiphany as a "Eureka Moment" as in a goldminer crying out, "Eureka!" upon discovering a vein of gold (I'm a native Californian (and former resident of Eureka), so that example comes ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

The usage of “with whom” [on hold]

I would like to write a sentence to thank a number of colleagues. I would like to express the idea that it was a pleasure to spend time with them. Which of the two sentences below is better? I ...
3
votes
6answers
123 views

Antonym of “apathy”

I'm looking for a word that describes a general feeling of concern for things. Preferably not with a negative connotation (ie. neurotic), but for use as a description of someone who expresses interest ...
4
votes
2answers
212 views

Business meeting jargon- a “walkthrough” of a document

I'm writing a document and I need to discuss sessions during which one party presents a document and walks the other party through the document, reading each sentence out loud, asking for any comments ...
-2
votes
0answers
35 views

Pronunciation of “relative” versus “relatives” [on hold]

What is the difference in pronouncing the word relative in the following situations: a relative clause I visited some relatives.

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