2
votes
3answers
43 views

What's a word for someone who just gets other people to deal with problems

What's a word for someone who, whenever there's a problem that needs to be solved, doesn't solve it and either pretends it isn't there, or gets someone else to deal with it?
3
votes
3answers
161 views

Antonym for Utilitarian

I was thinking about the phrase form over function today. A person who values function over form I would call utilitarian. What about the opposite, when someone values form over function? I could ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

WC Formal phrase for “trademark” (tendency)

The Russians influence the Ukraine in politics, culture, and with their trademark imperial greed. Russia is known in the Western world for being very greedy and power-hungry (no offense to Russians ...
1
vote
0answers
11 views

What other words can I use for unexpected? [on hold]

Like this sentence for example "Destiny is [x], you know it's going to happen to you but you don't know when or where it would."
5
votes
3answers
303 views

About the phrase “ pick someone brain”

Does the phrase " pick someone brain" have the meaning of "ask someone" and is it often used?
-2
votes
1answer
25 views

Are these 2 sentences same. minor different, moderately different substantially different or completely different

1 (.plant if Syria obtained a nuclear power reactor and needed fresh fuel...) or2.(plant if Syria obtained a nuclear capacity reactor and needed fresh fuel..).
1
vote
3answers
64 views

Is there any phrase or word to relate time, location and event? [on hold]

I'm working on a research paper, I need a word or phrase which is related to users' location, time and event. If there's isn't exact word or phrase then any best fit would also work out.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

The use of indefinite aricle with abstract nouns with adjectives [on hold]

What is the use of indefinite aricle with abstract nouns with adjectives unknown, peculiar, certain, better, brilliant, special, unusual, worse, warm, and great, small, little, late, complete, ...
-2
votes
1answer
28 views

Is this what these sentences mean?

"I don't like neither of you" -> In this sentence I think the meaning is that the person doesn't dislike any of the other people. "I haven't done it neither" -> This is just a confusing double ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Adverbial Placement [duplicate]

I'd like to seek your opinions about the following two questions. Does there exist any difference between (a) and (b)? If so, how would you spell it out? Which do you find grammatically acceptable? ...
3
votes
2answers
52 views

Which rule to follow for defining an intersection as an ordered pair of streets? [on hold]

Explanation Sometimes, for the sake of simplicity or speed, I need to list a location as a pair of intersecting streets. Let's use Luckie Street Grocery Store in Atlanta, Georgia as the example for ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

No one + plural verb

The sentence is: No one forget about the issue, please. From what I've read on the internet, 'no one' always takes a singular verb, but somehow 'no one forgets' doesn't sound right to me. But I ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“I don't want him knowing…” vs. “I don't want him to know… ” [duplicate]

There is some dialogue in a movie I saw: I don't want him knowing about this. I always thought it was I don't want him to know about this. I've been confused for days. What is the ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is there any differences between “I suggest doing” and “I suggest you do?” [duplicate]

I know that both "I suggest doing this" and "I suggest you do this" are grammatically correct. But I wonder if they have same meaning or there are subtle difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
37 views

How would I punctuate a run-on sentence like this?

How can I punctuate this sentence to establish clarity without having to sacrifice cohesiveness? In general, there are four distinct castes that one could be born into: Brahmans, the highest ...
0
votes
3answers
40 views

Mental lapse preferred to Synapse lapse? [on hold]

My friend used the term 'synapse lapse' the other day to describe what would be usually called a 'mental lapse'. Is this an acceptable term? I found no results in the Ngram viewer. It doesn't seem to ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Like (adjective) vs As (adverb) [duplicate]

May you please tell me which one is the correct usage: Run like the wind - common Run as the wind - grammatically correct?
6
votes
2answers
116 views

Apart from the intensity of the feeling, is there any other difference between “surprised” and “astonished”?

EDITED Surprise (verb) Cause (someone) to feel mild astonishment or shock. Capture, attack, or discover suddenly and unexpectedly. ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Name of formal form of address [duplicate]

In some languages, such as Italian, when addressing someone who is senior to you or at a higher level with respect to some social hierarchy, it is customary not to use the second-person singular ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is there a rule about placing semicolons versus periods? [duplicate]

Example: I ate a sandwich. It tasted bad! I ate a sandwich; it tasted bad! Wrong? Right either way?
5
votes
4answers
118 views

What is a word that means “the people in place when an organization ended”?

When an organization ceases operations, what is the word to describe the people in place at the time that it ended? "The ??? President" My first inclination is "final" -- "The Final President" ...
12
votes
5answers
963 views

1700s term for “a technology”

Today, I could use "a technology" to mean a mechanical or industrial development: The most important transportation technology during that era was the railroad. According to etymonline.com, ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Vocations and what people are famous for

The lead section on Wikipedia biographies tend to contain: Their birth name Their date of birth (in brackets) Their vocation(s), and/or the thing(s) they are famous for I'm aware this is called ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

If I hyphenate first-order conditions should I also hyphenate higher-order conditions?

It seems to me that the hyphens in "first-order conditions" and "second-order conditions" are correct, but I'm editing an article that also mentions "higher-order conditions" and "lower-order ...
5
votes
2answers
91 views

sound and noise from across a wall dividing two rooms [on hold]

What is the word used to describe the disturbing sound/noise hear across an adjacent wall where a couple are engaging in sexual intercourse?
0
votes
0answers
66 views

What is the exact difference between “irony” and “sarcasm”? [on hold]

What is the difference between irony and sarcasm?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Usage of the word “designates” as a noun [on hold]

my question was in regard to usage as "designates" as a noun or adjective following the word respective. I was thinking it should be designated or designator/ Thankyou.
2
votes
3answers
129 views

How to use “The first thing I did was”? [on hold]

I'm unable to figure out if the following sentence is correct: "After I watched the movie, the first thing I did was shutdown the laptop and go outside" Is this grammatically correct? Or should it ...
4
votes
3answers
245 views

Is there a word or phrase for someone whose ominous remarks come true?

Someone who makes such comments as: "Look at his car tyres! He is inviting an accident." (and he does suffer an accident minutes later.) "I never have shrimps with pepper. You're likely to ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

A thesaurus with prepositions [on hold]

What thesaurus contains extensive coverage of prepositions? For example, "street" may be used in the context of "in the streets" and "on the streets." So, what thesaurus explains commonly used ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Books on punctuation [on hold]

What are some good books on punctuation? Ideally, such a book should treat punctuation in both American English and British English. I have seen so many different rules in different books that I am ...
-1
votes
1answer
67 views

What is this symbol called [on hold]

This symbol shows up when I view a pdf copy of a word document € does anyone know what it is or why.
-2
votes
2answers
31 views

what is correct word substitution for following sentence? [on hold]

which one is correct? One should wear helmet ____ while riding a bike 1. all time 2. all the times 3. at all times
-3
votes
1answer
33 views

Which answer is correct for each question, and why? [on hold]

He told her (to, before, in, at) her face that she was a liar. I (caught, took, made, had) sight of the boat as I got to the top of the cliff. I know you hate your job but that's no reason to (take, ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Usage of “its” for unknown gender [duplicate]

In putting together a marketing document I have read Each investor in the fund may allocate its commitment to any one or a combination of the sectors offered. As can be noted from the bold, I do ...
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [on hold]

"with an ability to deliver clear and concise communication to our respective designates" It just doesn't read right to me.
3
votes
3answers
82 views

The day started off incredibly terribly?

Is it grammatically correct to say: The day started off incredibly terribly. My reasoning is that it is, since this is correct: The day started off terribly. The manner in which the day ...
-1
votes
2answers
31 views

“By spoken” Would this be correct? [on hold]

I have been studying English and seen "By which I mean." And there came my question. What I want to ask is whether following sentences are grammatically correct or not. I like dogs. By spoken I do ...
0
votes
4answers
48 views

Can “either” be used with “nor”? [duplicate]

Can I say, for example, "You aren't either pretty nor funny"? And if so, is it any different from saying "You aren't either pretty or funny"?
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Idioms usage by non-native speakers [on hold]

Is there an academic reference that may help foreign people in learning common American idioms to expand their vocabulary, and make their communication to sound more natural? Also if such reference(s) ...
21
votes
3answers
1k views

Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?

What is the origin of the pronunciation of words like Leicester, Gloucester, Worcestershire? Presumably, the pronunciation predates the spelling but what is the history here? What language do the ...
3
votes
2answers
35 views

Using 'better' as an adverb before a gerund

I recently used the following headline in a document: Better Managing Your Health Means Better Managing Your Life My boss wrote back that "better managing" is not grammatically correct. She's wrong, ...
-1
votes
0answers
16 views

How to correctly adress interest in a job with pointing to my interests and skills? [on hold]

I am currently working on my cover letter for a job application. There I have this sentence in the first paragraph (not the opening sentence): Since the job description calling for a xx ideally ...
-4
votes
1answer
37 views

What does “Thanks! Sounds like XYZ forgetting that he’s changed teams to me” mean? [on hold]

XYZ has been transfered to other team.After seeing his behaviour(I gave him hints), my boss sent me. "Thanks! Sounds like XYZ forgetting that he’s changed teams to me". What does it mean?
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

three sentences in one sentence [on hold]

can you tell me my mistakes in this sentence? "trays represented in green have 100mm width and for 250VAC." -we have a project drawing and there are green paths for trays -these trays have 100mm ...
28
votes
5answers
2k views

Not “On the Rocks”

I walk into a bar and order a drink. The bartender may ask me:Do you want that on the rocks?I usually respond "Yes" or "No" Is there a colloquial expression for not on the rocks?
7
votes
2answers
602 views

Can you use “little” to modify an adjective?

For example, can you say, the toothpaste is little minty, or little fresh. Or for example, that man is little tall.
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

You Won or You've Won [on hold]

Is it possible to use YOU WON! in place of YOU'VE WON! in the context of a heading for a prize winning competition? Thank you
3
votes
3answers
71 views

Has there ever been a word for someone who has a thousand pounds?

If someone who has a million of a particular currency is called a millionaire, and someone with a billion is called a billionaire what do you call someone with a thousand? I realise that nowadays ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Can I use “How about..” in this way?

So, imagine that you wanted to suggest something to a friend of yours, like watching TV or go to the movies. You would say "How about watching TV?" or "What about going to the movies?" But what if you ...

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