0
votes
2answers
39 views

Is it proper to refer to a clothes dryer as a drying machine?

A clothes washing machine is commonly referred to as either a "washer" or a "washing machine" but I have only ever heard of a clothes dryer being referred to as a "dryer". Is it a regional thing? Is ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Regarding “iff” and its usage [on hold]

Did Betrand Russell say the term 'iff' is redundant? If so what was his reasoning for this?
0
votes
2answers
30 views

How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?

In a mall or somewhere with multiple basement levels, what is the proper way to designate each underground level? We have: first floor, second floor, etc. for above ground floors. Underground levels ...
-1
votes
1answer
24 views

Is “What do you expect from your partner” equivalent to “expected partner?”? [on hold]

I dont want to use long sentence like this "What do you expect from your partner?". Can i use "expected partner?" instead?
7
votes
9answers
792 views

Gaining a skill after some amount of time (while not actively practicing the skill)

This weekend I decided to master a song I recorded. The last time I spent time mastering a recording was well over a month ago. Before, I had no idea how to use an equalizer - I looked up a bunch of ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

entailed him / his being - use of pronoun vs possessive determiner [duplicate]

The position entailed him/his being in Chicago most of the time. The bonuses were based on him/his reaching the quota. It had nothing to do with him/his being privy to the information. His ...
-1
votes
2answers
44 views

When you come back / when do you come back / when are you coming back? [on hold]

I'm confused about the right way to ask this question: When you come back to London? When do you come back to London? When are you coming back to London? Which one should I use?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Part of speech in this Sentence [on hold]

In the sentence, "the baby squid should have swum to a rock" what part of speech is the word "have?" I know "should" is a modal and "swum" is the main verb, but I can't figure out what part of speech ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

What is the origin of the progressive [duplicate]

What is the origin of the progressive form of the english verbs
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Benefits or Benefit? [on hold]

The politicians will create programs that benefit the middle class The politicians will create programs that benefits the middle class Which one is correct? I've been writing freelance for years and ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Best English grammar book [duplicate]

First of all sorry for not asking a technical question. Actually I need to know the best English grammar book in terms of completeness and depth of every topic. Any help would be appreciated.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Guess the nationality of the writer [on hold]

When somebody writes a text in English he leaves clues of his mother tongue in the text. I'm interested in some methodology/training to write disguising my nationality as a native English speaker. ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Why does switch take a noun in the plural?

Why do we say "We switched locations." or "We switched phones." instead of "We switched location?" or "We switched phone?" Are there any other verbs that take the noun in the plural?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

So, why is “so” being used like this? [duplicate]

I first noticed it during an interview a journalist was doing with a presidential candidate. The journalist asked questions. Each time the candidate started his answer with the word "so". Now I am ...
3
votes
3answers
274 views

When if means iff and if, respectively? [duplicate]

It seems sometimes 'if' really means 'if and only if' (abbreviated as iff), and sometimes 'if but not necessarily only if'. Is there a better usage with 'if' than the regular/default way? Should I ...
1
vote
2answers
178 views

Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Apple's advertising slogan [duplicate]

Apple has an amazing marketing/advertisement team. Their ads and presentations are always amazing. In 1997, they had an iconic "Think Different" campaign for their new slogan. Within commercials they ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

What is the abbreviation for writing “verse 1” and for writing “verses 1-5”?

What is the correct way to abbreviate verse 1? Also what is the correct way to abbreviate verses 1-9?
0
votes
2answers
23 views

present continues tense , present perfect tense ,and present perfect continues [on hold]

what is the difference between following three santances ? A.I am living here for 3 years. B.I have lived here for 3 years. C.I have been living here for 3 years.
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What is a Tent pole moment?

At a marketing meeting a speaker used the term tent pole moment. I have no idea what she meant. Is anyone familiar with the phrase?
0
votes
1answer
34 views

have been + V ing vs have been + V ed

I know that Present Perfect Progressive is have been + ing. I've been learning since 9 o'clock; But which tense is have been V + ed ?
-6
votes
0answers
49 views

Just tell me where i am wrong,please [on hold]

Which is in the correct sense?? This child, who was misdiagnosed, thrive by spirit. This child, who was misdiagnosed, thrives by spirit. This child, who was misdiagnosed, thrived by ...
2
votes
1answer
21 views

Describing the attribution of a machine's characteristics to humans

Is there a word, an opposite of anthropomorphism, that describes the attribution of a machine's characteristics to humans (e.g., speaking of humans as though they were computers)? Or, when we ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

what does “crack thumb” mean?

what does " crack thumb" and also " Balck fall" mean in this sentences from a Play: " that is the House of shaws! blood built it; blood stopped the building of it; blood shall bring it down. see ...
0
votes
3answers
32 views

What's a word for someone who just gets other people to deal with problems

What's a word for someone who, whenever there's a problem that needs to be solved, doesn't solve it and either pretends it isn't there, or gets someone else to deal with it?
3
votes
3answers
160 views

Antonym for Utilitarian

I was thinking about the phrase form over function today. A person who values function over form I would call utilitarian. What about the opposite, when someone values form over function? I could ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

WC Formal phrase for “trademark” (tendency)

The Russians influence the Ukraine in politics, culture, and with their trademark imperial greed. Russia is known in the Western world for being very greedy and power-hungry (no offense to Russians ...
1
vote
0answers
10 views

What other words can I use for unexpected? [on hold]

Like this sentence for example "Destiny is [x], you know it's going to happen to you but you don't know when or where it would."
5
votes
3answers
298 views

About the phrase “ pick someone brain”

Does the phrase " pick someone brain" have the meaning of "ask someone" and is it often used?
-2
votes
1answer
24 views

Are these 2 sentences same. minor different, moderately different substantially different or completely different

1 (.plant if Syria obtained a nuclear power reactor and needed fresh fuel...) or2.(plant if Syria obtained a nuclear capacity reactor and needed fresh fuel..).
1
vote
3answers
64 views

Is there any phrase or word to relate time, location and event? [on hold]

I'm working on a research paper, I need a word or phrase which is related to users' location, time and event. If there's isn't exact word or phrase then any best fit would also work out.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

The use of indefinite aricle with abstract nouns with adjectives [on hold]

What is the use of indefinite aricle with abstract nouns with adjectives unknown, peculiar, certain, better, brilliant, special, unusual, worse, warm, and great, small, little, late, complete, ...
-2
votes
1answer
28 views

Is this what these sentences mean?

"I don't like neither of you" -> In this sentence I think the meaning is that the person doesn't dislike any of the other people. "I haven't done it neither" -> This is just a confusing double ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Adverbial Placement [duplicate]

I'd like to seek your opinions about the following two questions. Does there exist any difference between (a) and (b)? If so, how would you spell it out? Which do you find grammatically acceptable? ...
3
votes
2answers
50 views

Which rule to follow for defining an intersection as an ordered pair of streets? [on hold]

Explanation Sometimes, for the sake of simplicity or speed, I need to list a location as a pair of intersecting streets. Let's use Luckie Street Grocery Store in Atlanta, Georgia as the example for ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

No one + plural verb

The sentence is: No one forget about the issue, please. From what I've read on the internet, 'no one' always takes a singular verb, but somehow 'no one forgets' doesn't sound right to me. But I ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

“I don't want him knowing…” vs. “I don't want him to know… ” [duplicate]

There is some dialogue in a movie I saw: I don't want him knowing about this. I always thought it was I don't want him to know about this. I've been confused for days. What is the ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is there any differences between “I suggest doing” and “I suggest you do?” [duplicate]

I know that both "I suggest doing this" and "I suggest you do this" are grammatically correct. But I wonder if they have same meaning or there are subtle difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

How would I punctuate a run-on sentence like this?

How can I punctuate this sentence to establish clarity without having to sacrifice cohesiveness? In general, there are four distinct castes that one could be born into: Brahmans, the highest ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

Mental lapse preferred to Synapse lapse? [on hold]

My friend used the term 'synapse lapse' the other day to describe what would be usually called a 'mental lapse'. Is this an acceptable term? I found no results in the Ngram viewer. It doesn't seem to ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Like (adjective) vs As (adverb) [duplicate]

May you please tell me which one is the correct usage: Run like the wind - common Run as the wind - grammatically correct?
6
votes
2answers
111 views

Apart from the intensity of the feeling, is there any other difference between “surprised” and “astonished”?

EDITED Surprise (verb) Cause (someone) to feel mild astonishment or shock. Capture, attack, or discover suddenly and unexpectedly. ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Name of formal form of address [duplicate]

In some languages, such as Italian, when addressing someone who is senior to you or at a higher level with respect to some social hierarchy, it is customary not to use the second-person singular ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is there a rule about placing semicolons versus periods? [duplicate]

Example: I ate a sandwich. It tasted bad! I ate a sandwich; it tasted bad! Wrong? Right either way?
5
votes
4answers
114 views

What is a word that means “the people in place when an organization ended”?

When an organization ceases operations, what is the word to describe the people in place at the time that it ended? "The ??? President" My first inclination is "final" -- "The Final President" ...
12
votes
5answers
935 views

1700s term for “a technology”

Today, I could use "a technology" to mean a mechanical or industrial development: The most important transportation technology during that era was the railroad. According to etymonline.com, ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Vocations and what people are famous for

The lead section on Wikipedia biographies tend to contain: Their birth name Their date of birth (in brackets) Their vocation(s), and/or the thing(s) they are famous for I'm aware this is called ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

If I hyphenate first-order conditions should I also hyphenate higher-order conditions?

It seems to me that the hyphens in "first-order conditions" and "second-order conditions" are correct, but I'm editing an article that also mentions "higher-order conditions" and "lower-order ...
5
votes
2answers
91 views

sound and noise from across a wall dividing two rooms [on hold]

What is the word used to describe the disturbing sound/noise hear across an adjacent wall where a couple are engaging in sexual intercourse?
0
votes
0answers
65 views

What is the exact difference between “irony” and “sarcasm”? [on hold]

What is the difference between irony and sarcasm?

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