1
vote
2answers
24 views

Is “all in all” the right choice for the following sentence?

(Long description about the person.) All in all, he didn't look like an army man. Maybe I'm wrong but I think all in all is more commonly used to give a good-and-bad judgement? Example: ...
3
votes
4answers
59 views

What is a good word for all sentient races?

I'm creating a historically inspired campaign where the standard fantasy races are extremely intermingled, and conflict is usually based on politics or religion, rather than species divisions. I ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Sentence explanation “Eve says that she inspired by tutorial clips she had looked up and learned from”

I'd like to ask for an explanation of the sentence in italics. I came accross this sentence and I was not completely sure whether it is grammatically correct or not. I assume it is, because I ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Meaning of a “snatched Saturday afternoon”

From On Chesil Beach, by Ian McEwan (an English author): This was a snatched Saturday afternoon. They knew that it was one of the last days of full-blown high summer—it was already early ...
-1
votes
0answers
23 views

Grammar and phrasing

I’m working on two different essays that must have a subjective tone. These two paragraphs are at the beginning of the essays. I wonder if they both read well. 1.) The so-called "joint economic ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Why do people in the scientific community use terminology such as renal, hepatic, and cardiac instead of kidney, liver, and heart?

Why is there the need to map these everyday words onto another set of words when it seems to complicate matters? Is it just done out of tradition, or is there some underlying logic to it?
4
votes
5answers
370 views

What is the word for a group holding back one of its members trying to rise above the group?

I know that there is a word which specifically describes the following pattern: When a group will censor, cast bad votes, shout down, keep down or hold back one of its members trying to rise above ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

The Difference Between “not unknown to” and “known to”?

An non-native English-speaking friend of mine came across the phrase "not unknown to" as in "tragedy is not unknown to the Kennedy family" and asked the question, "What's the difference between 'not ...
0
votes
3answers
58 views

Word for “less far” meaning the opposite of “further”?

Is there an equivalent like "further" of "less far"? "I still have energy, so I want to run further." vs "I am out of energy, so I want to run [word meaning less distance]"
0
votes
0answers
28 views

A date “is”,“was”, or “will be” a Monday?

March 1st, 1999 is a Monday March 1st, 1999 was a Monday March 1st, 2099 is a Sunday March 1st, 2099 will be a Sunday Is there a preferred version? Do they have different meaning?
12
votes
6answers
948 views

A Pyrrhic defeat?

Is there a word, phrase or allusion which represents the opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory: a tactical defeat which led to a strategic victory, either accidental or intended? After all, there must be one ...
6
votes
2answers
260 views

Why “thanks” Can Never Be Singular as a Noun?

While looking at the part of speech of the noun "thanks" in an online dictionary I noticed that it was a plural noun and wondered if it could be used in singular form. Glancing at the origin it ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Mutual posession with “each other”

If there are two parties and each person is in possession of something belonging to the other, how do you express this in a sentence? For example, if we give them names, we can say: Alice is ...
3
votes
2answers
45 views

What's the present day status of “kempt”, has it survived in usage?

I am looking for a possible positive form of unkempt. My first choice was kempt. But I am not convinced of its usage. I want to be double sure that kempt has survived in day-to-day usage.
0
votes
3answers
42 views

Can you say “a lot of variety”?

I just want to know whether this sentence is correct: "method A introduces a lot of variety in the structure of X"
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Use of prepositions in and for with Present Perfect tense

I would be thankful if any native could tell me whether the following sentence is correct - I am learning the language -. I haven't spoken to my sister for / in a few days. Are for and in both ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

The difference between issue, matter, affair and question

I'm analyzing a text on marketing and I found this paragraph that has four lexemes which are synonymous and yet there seems to exist some difference between them. This is the text (the numbers ...
2
votes
2answers
38 views

Shake 'em on down

In 1937 Bukka White recorded a blues song under the title of "Shake 'em on down". Part of the lyrics are cited on Wikipedia: Get your nightcap mama, and your gown Baby 'fore day we gonna shake ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Is the grammar proper for this statement going on the back of a tee shirt for a labor day celebration [on hold]

I’m a union member We live here and pay taxes here! We work hard to support our families We’re not the problem and we’re not the enemy! The rich created this problem, and they’re pitting middle ...
13
votes
3answers
645 views

When is it appropriate to use 'admixture' rather than 'mixture'?

I saw the word admixture used in a sentence recently and looked it up in the Paperback Oxford English Dictionary only to find that its definition is "a mixture". This is the sentence: The ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views
1
vote
2answers
30 views

“…demands of us that we not lose sight…”

What are those weighty moral and intellectual demands? For one thing, I think the Holocaust demands of us that we not lose sight of the fact that it was not just another tragedy in war-torn Europe ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Use of “play” followed by an adjective

English is my second language so there are a lot of new things to me. I just came across several sentences containing the phrases "play dead", "play sick" and "play cute" so I wonder if the verb ...
5
votes
4answers
66 views

Can “Claptrap” be used to mean low quality?

In this article in The Age, boats being used by asylum seekers are described as being "claptrap": The boat, like many of the claptrap vessels flooding Italy's shores each week with migrants ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

“Being” or “to be”? [duplicate]

Which is better structured? "She loves to be herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being and not appearing"
1
vote
3answers
38 views

Do State-of-the-art and Cutting edge have the same meaning?

Do state-of-the-art and cutting edge mean the same thing or do they have different meanings? If they have different meanings, which is used when?
1
vote
2answers
35 views

as best I can vs as well as I can

I have to say I have an issue with the phrase "as best I can". After all, "best" is the superlative form of "well" and does not belong in the comparative construction "as... as" - not to mention that ...
18
votes
5answers
3k views

Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?

Is "I like dogs but cats" a valid sentence? This question comes from a debate with my friend. She says this sentence must be valid and gives an example of the Visual Studio string: "Close all but ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Is there a word called Deboarding? [on hold]

Is this a correct usage: "When you deboard the train,..."
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What is the opposite of boarding? [on hold]

When you enter into a flight, its called boarding. So what is it called to exit out of a flight?
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Why do programmers say: “Did you meet the Spartans?”

English is not my maternal language and on development/IT forums, I've found the expressions "Did you meet the spartans?" or "I've met the spartans?". To set the context, they are speaking about a new ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Why don't we accept the fourth person perspective as valid?

People in general, including myself, are quite likely to make statements which include everyone (like this one). The form that they use when doing so, I call "the 4th person indefinite", because it ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Is there a word for “near in time” (both past & future) that doesn't also imply geographical proximity?

I'm currently writing a program that finds the "nearest sensible job", in terms of time. The only problem is that that phrase could also mean that the program is finding the nearest geographical job. ...
-2
votes
2answers
62 views

Is 'how come the sky is blue?' considered proper English?

I intensely despise 'how come' but I see it quite regularly. Is it considered proper English?
0
votes
1answer
17 views

articles before two adjectives

If we describe a child as friendly and enthusiastic where should we use article?Is it she is a friendly and enthusiastic child or she is friendly and a enthusiastic child,
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Can “apocryphal” be used to mean “not true”?

I always thought that apocryphal should just mean "of doubtful authenticity". But more and more I am noticing that people use it positively to mean mythical or untrue, especially in phrases such as ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

classification of consonants (English linguistics) [on hold]

such as friction consonants, plosive / Stops, affricates, nasal, liquids-alveolar and post alveolar glide ,and semi vowels.
1
vote
1answer
31 views

How should I phrase this question correctly? [on hold]

I am having trouble phrasing this question. Are both these versions grammatically correct? Which one is the best? Any suggestions would be very helpful. Thank you. What are mandatory, recommended ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Please, is it correct (meaningful) this expression? [on hold]

Obviously, when two individuals share many points of interest, they appreciate more often each others publications.
0
votes
2answers
34 views

Location - sentence constructions

Having studied English from an early age, I've been always taught that English has a fixed sentence structure and words within it appear in a fixed order. For example, one is supposed to say: A pen ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

'Please revert back if any questions', is this statement grammatically correct? [on hold]

I used Please revert back if any questions, is this statement grammatically correct?
0
votes
0answers
48 views

English analogue for russian aphorism parody “for seven troubles there is single reset” [on hold]

There is such Russian aphorism-proverb as "Семь бед - один ответ". It has English analogues: "As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" or "In for a penny, in for a pound". To be clear, literally ...
-2
votes
0answers
31 views

“proxyfing” vs. “proxifing” vs. “proxying”

Is the process of getting something to work through a proxy server called proxyfing, proxifing, or proxying?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

How to refer to United States of America? [duplicate]

My sentence is: ATC experienced rapid growth between 1880 to 1911. In 1890, their five main competitors joined their consortium and by 1910, the American Tobacco Company had absorbed 250 ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Is the phrase “…could only know by then” correct?

He told me he would give me the answer after the trip. Was there something he could only know by then? I don't know why but it sounds a little weird to me. Anyway, to make sure I searched on ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

What is the correct visualization of “first left down the hallway”?

I hear a lot of native speakers say something like this: Once in the arena take first left down the hallway Take your first left down the hallway. When you come to the second floor, make a left and ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

On professional bias

The well-known expression professional bias appears to date back to the very first years when professions started to exist: "Professional bias" designates a mental conditioning brought ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Alternative to Without further ado?

It's a cliche talk in nearly all public speaking events, regardless of the type of the gathering (academic, business, wedding) and the level/class (top League school, fortune 500 company, 200 bucks ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

“Singapore and HK look more stunning at night” is this correct? [on hold]

"But Singapore and HK look more stunning at night" is this correct?
0
votes
4answers
62 views

What do you call a group (collective noun) of programmers?

What do you call a group (collective noun) of programmers? I've raise this questions on programmers group but nobody could give me a definitive answer. Probably the ones that make sense are ...

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