0
votes
1answer
58 views

service record translation [closed]

How do you say "El servicio militar" in English?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How can I give a project quote politely?

Someone sent me an email, asking for a quote for the project. How can I reply to him in a more polite way? I can quote you $100 for this project. I charge you $100 for this project. I ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do we say Undisclosed or Non-Disclosure instead of Closed or Closure

According to Wiktionary, disclosure's etymology comes from Latin dis-+clausus, literally away+enclosed. I wonder why do the term closed is not in common use as the term undisclosed. Not Not True is ...
1
vote
2answers
517 views

Idiom: quoted books

If there is, what idiom is used to refer to a book, which is famous and/or has interesting ideas, so that it's often quoted in speech, books etc. Maybe something like "divided into quotations" ? I'm ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

What does “persona non grata” mean? [closed]

In Gossip Girl, there’s a line like this: Spotted, Lonely Boy going from Teacher’s Pet to persona non grata in the pitter-patter of a heartbeat. What’s persona non grata?
1
vote
6answers
947 views

What are antonyms of “tolerant” or synonyms of “cautious”?

I posted the following on Meta Stack Overflow, and I believe that there was a better word that I could have used rather than "a little too harsh". Considering that my post fails all but possibly ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the meaning of 'probe' in the Linux command 'modprobe'?

My understanding of modprobe is that it is a command to load kernel modules. Based on this, I'm wondering what the meaning of word probe is in general English?
12
votes
4answers
45k views

What's the difference between “egotism” and “egoism”?

I am interested in the difference between these two seemingly synonymous terms.
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Definite article — “on television” vs. “on the radio”

Why are these different? We heard the news on the radio. We watched the news on television. In this book, the author says we must use television without the. Why? It makes me crazy. Is ...
6
votes
11answers
124k views

Good movies for learning English [closed]

Sometimes, I find it easier to learn so many English vocabulary and expressions and usage by watching movies. If you're a non-native English speaker, you probably noticed some of them that help you ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

Family name pluralization

When pluralizing family (last) names that also happen to be common English words, does the pluralization follow the same rules as the common word? For example, "the Smith family" can be pluralized as ...
3
votes
1answer
8k views

“Your company name” or “Your company's name”?

Which way is correct here? Some explanation would be appreciated.
3
votes
3answers
302 views

“Taiwan visa” or “Taiwanese visa”?

Which way is correct? Is there any rule for such cases?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

One-step Stop or One-stop Shop?

"Foobar: Your one-step stop for assorted candies." "Foobar: Your one-stop shop for assorted candies." I am really confused about which one sounds right. I've heard the second one before, but came ...
2
votes
3answers
13k views

Can “whatever” be split into two words?

I tend to write, "say whatever they want", but I'm always tempted to write "say what ever they want". Is it acceptable to split the word in this context?
4
votes
3answers
920 views

“The (Cobra)” vs. “An (elephant)”, articles with nouns denoting a class

[ 1 ] tells on p.5 that "Singular nouns denoting a class" are preceded by the definite article "THE" (Example: "The Cobra is dangerous"), while on page 7 (Table 6. THE INDEFINITE ARTICLE) it tells ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of “parley” meaning to convert?

I sometimes use the word "parley" as a verb effectively meaning "to convert from one language or system to another". Such as Stargate parleys the Egyptian deities into villainous star-faring ...
8
votes
3answers
4k views

What's the story with the British use of “miss not having” vs. “miss having?”

This one has bugged me for years. When an American English speaker wishes to express regret that Joe doesn't come around any more, they would typically say, "I really miss having him around." It ...
14
votes
2answers
4k views

How did the slang meaning of “owned” come to be?

Why does Dude! I just owned you! mean that the speaker did really well against "Dude" in some sort of competition or game?
6
votes
4answers
3k views

Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
-2
votes
3answers
369 views

Why “who is” sounds “whiz”?

Please elaborate, when we say "who is", why does it sound "whiz"? Also one more example I would like to include: why "visit us" sounds "visi-tas"?
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What is “soft skill”?

Please elaborate what does it mean by soft skill in term of English language.
4
votes
2answers
782 views

How to obtain “diligence” from crossword clue “horse-drawn vehicle industry” [closed]

Cryptic clue: Horse-drawn vehicle industry Answer: Diligence How do we figure this one out?
8
votes
1answer
28k views

Difference between the use of “for” and “of”

I am always confused by the difference between the use of for and of in cases like these: Principal component analysis of microarray data. Principal component analysis for microarray data. ...
11
votes
5answers
11k views

How should I pronounce “Worcestershire” as a rhotic English speaker?

I'm aware that the English county of Worcestershire is pronounced in Britain as ['wu:stəʃə], more or less. However, this is a non-rhotic pronunciation, and it feels very unnatural for me to use this ...
18
votes
4answers
35k views

Which is the correct idiom: “First thing's first” or “First things first”?

I've gotten into a debate over which usage of an apostrophe in the phrase "first thing(')s first" is correct. My thinking is that one would take the first thing and give it priority, hence the first ...
7
votes
4answers
18k views

Is either “can” or “could” more polite? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “can” or “could”? I wonder which of the following is more polite: Can you please change my email address? Could you please change my email ...
0
votes
1answer
259 views

Contraction for “owe on”; would it be “owe'n” or “ow'n”?

What would the contraction for owe on be, owe'n or ow'n?
5
votes
3answers
45k views

Is “I also don't know” less correct than “I don't know either”?

When do you use "I don't know either" and when "I also don't know" (or any other verb instead of "know")? I've been taught that "I also don't know" is not as correct as "I don't know either" - just ...
4
votes
5answers
23k views

Difference between “World” and “Universe”

What are the differences between the two? I thought that "World" means everything, i.e the same as "Universe". But people seem to think it means the same as "Earth".
6
votes
4answers
5k views

How are diminutives formed in recent English words?

A large variety of suffixes were used to form diminutives in English. The Wikipedia page on diminutives shows these: * -k/-ock/-uck: balk, bollock, bullock, buttock, fetlock, folk, hark, hillock, ...
0
votes
7answers
1k views

Word that means common element

What's a word that means "common element"? Cars and Bikes share the common element that they are both wheeled vehicles.
2
votes
2answers
532 views

why differences in Object vs Subject

We have different pronouns to express objects vs subjects: he vs him who vs whom etc. What's the point? What extra information is communicated by expressing object vs subject? Shouldn't it be ...
19
votes
2answers
21k views

Can “due to” and “because of ” be used interchangeably?

Is it fine to use due to in place of because of ? How about the other way around? Are any of these sentences ungrammatical? He was lost because of the storm. He was lost due to the storm. He lost ...
8
votes
2answers
26k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Using had twice [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does “had had” mean? How does this differ from “had”? Is this correct usage? I had had enough food?
3
votes
8answers
14k views

Would you say “quote/end quote”?

A girl said, quote, I want a lollipop, end quote, as she walked past the candy store. Would you say it like that out loud?
5
votes
6answers
7k views

Simple yet interesting English game for class? [closed]

I'll be hosting an English activity this week. Could you share some interesting English games which impressed you the most?
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Difficulty v. difficulties

Which form of "difficulty" should I opt for in the following sentence: They have immense difficulties easily accessing the texts. or They have immense difficulty easily accessing the texts. ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

a word like “visual”, “auditory”, except for touch

for smell it would be "olfactory". What is it for touch?
11
votes
10answers
19k views

How do you remember the difference between a “stalactite” and a “stalagmite”?

Is there a good mnemonic for remembering the difference between "stalactite" (hangs down) and "stalagmite" (points up)?
6
votes
6answers
38k views

Is it “end quote” or “unquote”?

When reading something that has a quote in the middle of it, is it proper to say "end quote" or "unquote" to signal the end of the quote? I've heard both ways.
3
votes
1answer
258 views

Usage on farewell remark

I found several forms of farewell remarks like these: Goodbye Good-bye Good-by Bye Bye-Bye Are these remarks equivalent in both written and spoken English ?
6
votes
1answer
16k views

“Answer to my question” or “answer on my question”?

What's the right usage: an answer to my question or on my question?
3
votes
1answer
174 views

“crenelated” writing?

What would it mean for writing to be "crenelated"? From this review: Lisa Zeidner of The New York Times Book Review elaborated: As usual, Gibson's prose is ... corpuscular, crenelated. I ...
4
votes
2answers
513 views

Books and other things with the same name

Is it proper to say "the book and movie Of Mice and Men" even though the two identical terms "Of Mice and Men" do not refer to the same entity? An alternative would be "the book Of Mice and Men and ...
13
votes
7answers
6k views

“Fluids” versus “liquids”?

What is the difference between fluid and liquid? I'm thinking of this in the context of drink plenty of fluids.
1
vote
3answers
384 views

Can you get files off-line?

Often times I hear people say "I got it offline" to mean they downloaded it from the internet, is this an accepted term or should it be "I got it online"?
7
votes
3answers
408 views

Usage of word “meat”

I am not a native English speaker and never lived in an English-speaking country, so I wonder how you would apply this word. Would you apply the term "meat" to the following things? Muscle tissue ...

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