6
votes
2answers
4k views

How do I correctly use the possessive apostrophe with a parenthetical citation?

Is the apostrophe in the right place in the following sentence? Pendleton, et al. (2002)’s research implies that extension of treatment allows for greater weight loss.
4
votes
2answers
10k views

What does “lost sales” mean?

What does "lost sales" mean in the sentence below? The most important quality cost, lost sales, is often omitted from quality cost reports.
0
votes
2answers
142 views

Metonyms in American football: the National Football League [closed]

Wikipedia has a great definition of metonymy here, but I have a more specific question. The biggest user of NFL metonyms appears to be Gregg Easterbrook, writer of the Tuesday Morning Quarterback at ...
1
vote
2answers
571 views

Metonymy in Professional European Football (Soccer)

Wikipedia has a great definition of metonymy here, but I have a more specific question. Can I have a list of metnonyms used in Professional European Football (Soccer), particularly the English ...
42
votes
6answers
270k views

Is it “Yours faithfully” or “Yours sincerely”?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
2
votes
3answers
233 views

Is “unexpected repercussion” repetitive?

Is the phrase unexpected repercussion unnecessary redundantly repetitive? When I looked up repercussion I see that unexpected is implicit in its meaning. Should I prefer to say unexpected ...
8
votes
6answers
6k views

Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?

Is it correct to say "cold temperature"?
0
votes
1answer
818 views

Avoiding the possessive form of words ending with “s”

This question deals with the proper possessive for words that end with s. I am wondering how common it is to restructure a sentence as to avoid the awkward possessive form. For example: I ...
12
votes
5answers
3k views

What does “What price [noun]?” mean?

I've come across phrases like "What price freedom?" a lot. I speak British English and it doesn't read nicely to me. It seems some words are missing. Does it mean "What is the price of X?"? Where did ...
16
votes
4answers
4k views

What did Old English writing (letters and formatting) typically look like?

I am wondering if there is a specific kind of writing that people would typically associate with Old English language. Are there well-known manuscripts that typically represent the kind of writing ...
1
vote
2answers
349 views

Names for automatic machines' programs

A machine can be programmed, and different programs can be chosen for different tasks. One such task may be to initialise the machine, while the main purpose of the machine is to manufacture ...
39
votes
2answers
73k views

“Content” or “Contents”?

Content or contents — when do I use which form? I realize that the one is the plural form of the other, but they seem to be used interchangeably.
1
vote
2answers
428 views

When should I use “can” and when should I use “will”?

This sentence talks about capability. I can never do that. This sentence talks about a choice. A personal preference maybe? I will never do that. Is this correct or can we use it ...
17
votes
5answers
49k views

€10 = “ten euro” or “ten euros”?

Which is the correct form: "ten euro" or "ten euros"?
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Stone in the middle?

When I read a Children's Illustrated Dictionary, I found an example sentence as this, Apricot An apricot is a soft round fruit. It has a big stone in the middle. How to replace the stone with ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

What is a “one-note joke”?

What is the definition of a "one-note joke"?
7
votes
4answers
785 views

What do you call this type of elevator?

See picture -- is there a better term than glass elevator?
4
votes
2answers
14k views

When to spell out numbers [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do English writers avoid explicit numerals? Based on my previous question regarding spelling out monetary amounts, is there a rule of thumb when a number should be ...
6
votes
2answers
7k views

Answering your own question

I have been wondering if this particular speaking device had a specific name. My wife uses a speaking technique where, instead of just making a statement, she presents it in the form of a question, ...
7
votes
2answers
7k views

Where to put the periods when using a parenthetical sentence?

I have two complete sentences; the second is in parentheses, essentially a comment on the first. Where do I place the periods? I would use this: They played opera. (I covered my ears.) Is this ...
1
vote
4answers
16k views

How to write dollar amounts in a narrative

What's the best way to write dollar amounts in a narrative (such as a novel), particularly if the amounts are large and/or fractional? I would use this: "The national debt just hit 14.6 trillion ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

Does “Perfect Storm” have a positive meaning?

English is not my mother tongue. I've read an article with these sentences. I have no idea if the phrase "perfect storm" is supposed to be positive or negative. “Social gaming is sitting on ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

What does “to phrase it another way” mean? [closed]

What does "to phrase it another way" mean?
5
votes
2answers
43k views

Should it be “concerned person” or “person concerned”?

An office colleague wrote the following in an email: Kindly log a ticket for the same and assign it to the concerned team. I wrote back the following: I believe it should be "Kindly log a ...
5
votes
3answers
32k views

“Wasn't” vs “weren't” [duplicate]

Which one would be correct? I wish it weren't raining today. I wish it wasn't raining today. I wish it were raining today. I wish it was raining today.
5
votes
3answers
3k views

What does ‘government shutdown’ mean exactly? [closed]

Today's Washington Post has the article Congress, Obama Brace for Showdown as Government Shutdown Looms, which contains the following sentence: The prospect of a government shutdown appeared ...
6
votes
3answers
512 views

What does “quadrants” mean in an article stating that Obama's birth facts “do not seem to matter in many quadrants of Republican Party”?

I found the word quadrants in the opening of a New York Times Opinion column, titled This Just In… President Obama Is an American Citizen. Its opening paragraph: President Obama is not a ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What to do if a sentence ends with “Yahoo!”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to handle a name that includes an exclamation point (or other punctuation)? Just like the title of this question. I was reading an article about CAPTCHAs on ...
3
votes
7answers
12k views

Who were the 'pros from Dover'?

I was reading Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy this morning, and he compares his characters to the 'pros from Dover'. This was a phrase that I also remember hearing in the movie M*A*S*H - so it seems to be ...
5
votes
3answers
64k views

What punctuation belongs before a list?

What is the correct punctuation in English: There are two types of insectsXX a) white b) black Should the punctuation at XX be “;” or “:”?
7
votes
3answers
26k views

Difference between “solicitor” and “barrister”

What is the difference between solicitor and barrister?
1
vote
1answer
146 views

“Observe” vs. “oversee”

The operator of a machine solely needs to be in control of the machine controls. Thus, they need to be physically in a location near the control panel, and in order to make sure nobody else pushes the ...
2
votes
4answers
200 views

Is the construct “Strength cannot beat MORE strength without …” correct?

Is the following quote correct English? Strength cannot beat more strength without ju jitsu
3
votes
4answers
739 views

Is there a stronger word than “incite”?

I am looking for a word that conveys the strongest level of inciting someone, pushing someone to do something: Their boss VERB'd them to work as hard as possible. The strongest I can think of is ...
7
votes
9answers
34k views

What word(s) describe a woman's voice as “sexy”?

I am looking for a word (or two words) to describe a woman's voice that is "sexy" in a slightly deep, smooth, alluring way. The best I could come up with is mellifluous, but I'm looking for something ...
3
votes
0answers
127 views

Usage of 'and' with commas [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Comma before last item in a list I grew up learning British English rules and we were taught that while using commas to list or enumerate items, there should never be a ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Proper use of “replete”

Is replete used appropriately in the following sentence? His office was like a Hollywood museum, replete with an autographed photo of Marilyn Monroe. Or should replete only be used with ...
4
votes
4answers
667 views

“The very minute after”

In which cases is very used with the same meaning it has in a phrase like "the very minute after"? Is it a set phrase, or are there other similar phrases? The very minute after I leave, they start ...
3
votes
2answers
363 views

Jig or template to hold a workpiece

Technical English for a foreigner - please correct and rephrase if you can come up with better alternatives. A machine in manufacturing usually is fed material or a workpiece to be processed. ...
15
votes
4answers
4k views

Is there a shorter term for “divided by” in American English?

Given the following expression: 5 (+-×÷%) 4 You would say "5 plus 4," "5 minus 4," "5 times 4," "5 divided by 4," and "5 mod(ulo) 4" respectively. As far as I know, "divided by" does not have ...
2
votes
2answers
10k views

What are the differences between “server”, “workstation”, and “desktop”?

From a book on Linux, I found the following text: A typical Linux system will run six virtual consoles and one graphical console Server systems often have only virtual consoles ...
2
votes
3answers
12k views

Origin of the word “bootleg”

What is the origin of the word “bootleg”?
2
votes
3answers
851 views

Do you agree with these intermediate gradations between “frank” and “evasive”?

While consulting the version of the New Oxford American Dictionary provided with Mac OS, I came across the following “word spectrum”, which its says “show shades of meaning between two polar ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“Protein-coding” or “Protein-encoding”?

The reason I am asking this is the following. Some time ago I performed proofreading of a book, and there was a phrase containing "Protein-encoding genes". I wrote a post on my blog, detailing why ...
9
votes
4answers
22k views

Is “holiday” derived from “holy day”? [closed]

I'm just curious if the word "holiday" is derived from "holy day".
2
votes
1answer
309 views

Usage of the word “head”?

Why is the word "head" used in the following context? Daddy he once told me 'son you be hard workin' man' and Momma she once told me 'son you do the best you can' but, then one day I met a man ...
4
votes
12answers
1k views

What is the term for accusing a person of mischief through invented, twisting and changeable terminology?

What is the term for accusing a person of invented wrongdoing in such a way that he cannot respond or even clearly understand the accusations? For example, frequently reversing the definitions of the ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “as oft” a valid contraction of “as often”? If it is, then why doesn't it have an apostrophe at the end?

Is "as oft" a valid contraction of "as often"? If it is, then why doesn't it have an apostrophe at the end?
8
votes
9answers
4k views

Incorrect grammar versus different dialects

My girlfriend, someone from southern New Jersey, constantly says phrases like "I'm done my homework" or "I'm done my dinner." I try to correct her and say, "I'm done with my homework" or "I'm done ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

Is to + ing (to becoming) correct?

I have read in a newspaper, the writer is using 'to becoming'. eg: "We're on track to becoming developed nation." Is this sentence really correct?

15 30 50 per page