-1
votes
2answers
1k views

Apostrophe for words ending with the letter S [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? When did it become correct to add an 's' to a singular possessive already ending in 's'? I always had this difficulty ...
5
votes
3answers
496 views

What is the difference (in terms of usage and connotation) between “loath” and “loathe”?

I'm having difficulty in understanding the differences in usage (and understanding which one is used from pronunciation/context) between "loathe" and "loath" - could anyone help clarify it ?
4
votes
3answers
18k views

What is meant by “sth”?

I came across this line in a site: Can u make sth effective for a sports betting related product? I can't understand what is meant by sth effective here. I tried to google it but was unable to ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

What is the plural form of “phoenix”? [closed]

I have found several different variations. phe·nix·es phoenīcēs There is no plural form. Which is correct one? Is there anything else?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Multiple comparatives of different types: how to choose?

I have an eight-month-old daughter. Her experiments in mobility led me to contemplate phrases like the dirtier and messier, the better. What happens if one (but not both) of the adjectives ...
6
votes
7answers
83k views

Is there a difference between “vice”, “deputy”, “associate”, and “assistant” as descriptive job titles?

When vice, deputy, associate, or assistant is collocated with a job title, such as vice manager, deputy manager, associate manager, assistant manager, I wonder how to rank or differentiate their ...
34
votes
7answers
12k views

Using “utilize” instead of “use”?

My friend has been raising a ruckus about the abuse of the word "utilize" in place of the word "use." He complains that it just makes your sentences sound pretentious. u·ti·lize [yoot-l-ahyz] verb ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

How to properly use “lump sum”

How is the term lump sum properly used? Do I work for a lump sum or on a lump sum? Can I work lump sum based, or can I offer a lump sum price?
4
votes
3answers
9k views

Is ''thanks'' singular or plural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Special thanks go to” or “Special thanks goes to” I heard a lot of time the following two sentences. Many thanks also goes to xyz and abc for [....
0
votes
2answers
162 views

Expression for the connection between RNA strands

I'm searching for proper expressions that mean connection of RNA strands. Up to this time I came with strands connection, strands conjunction, and strands ligation. Are my expressions proper, or do ...
36
votes
21answers
6k views

What is the word for an action that is “considered to be frowned upon”?

I'm looking for an adjective to describe a behavior or action that is considered to be a faux pas, or is frowned upon. Picking your nose is [word]. Wearing socks with sandals is [word]. ...
4
votes
6answers
6k views

In what contexts would one use the slang word “minging” in British English?

I was watching a Youtube video on English accents, and in the middle of a Yorkshire one, I think, the author of the video used the word "minging", in what seemed to be an insult. So I have two ...
11
votes
5answers
18k views

What's the difference between “these” and “those”?

First of all, I'm not a native English speaker, but in school I learned that these is used if referring to something near, and those is used when referring to something far away (temporally or locally)...
4
votes
2answers
73k views

What do first, second, and third person perspective mean? Why are they so called?

I am aware of the terms first person, second person and third person from grammar, but I have also seen them used in other contexts, in particular first person perspective with regard to video games. ...
2
votes
3answers
414 views

When using the preposition “for” should it be followed with the subjective or objective case?

The activity we engaged in was good for she and I. or The activity we engaged in was good for us both. or The activity we engaged in was good for her and me.
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Different ways to pronounce “augh”

In the word laugh, it is pronounced "aff". In the word naught, it is pronounced "aw". Are there any other ways to pronounce "augh"? Bonus points for etymology explaining from where these ...
5
votes
7answers
2k views

What's a word for a group of questions asked together?

Is there a word for a set of questions that are asked together and are related? For example, one asks the question: Do you go rafting? And follow up with: If yes, where? If no, what do ...
0
votes
0answers
678 views

“A user” or “an user”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” “A” becomes “an” before a word beginning with a vowel, does this apply to “u”? Is it “a ...
1
vote
3answers
31k views

Do I use italics for hotel and restaurant names?

I'm writing a bio for a friend, and I mention many hotels and restaurants, some of which are foreign. Should I use italics?
9
votes
3answers
4k views

Does “hieroglyph” only refer to the ancient Egyption form of writing or to any writing system whose basic elements represent words?

If somebody refers to Chinese or Japanese characters as hieroglyphs are they right or wrong? Aren't there many hieroglyphic writing systems? If somebody says hieroglyph refers only to Ancient Egyptian ...
8
votes
3answers
13k views

Recognizing a Welsh accent

For an American, I'm pretty good at UK dialects. I can immediately tell an Irish or Scottish accent from a typical (educated, Londoner) English accent. But I'm on shaky ground with Welsh accents, ...
5
votes
2answers
20k views

“Please let me know.”

Is it okay to answer "Please let me know", short (without "when...", "if...", "what...", etc.)? Consider for instance -- I can check that for you tomorrow morning. -- Yes, please let me know....
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Inhabitants of Vatican City would be referred to as ____

Keep that blank clean. No religious flaming. What I mean is this: inhabitants of America are Americans, inhabitants of Ohio are Ohioans, and inhabitants of Cincinnati are Cincinnatians. But what ...
7
votes
7answers
766 views

Is it correct to say “consecutively in time”?

I'm writing a technical report and I want to emphasize that each sample that I have stored in a buffer has been collected before the following one. Can I say, The samples from the buffer are ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

Rules for capitalization in presentation titles [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which words in a title should be capitalized? Hi everyone, I am German and the German language follows very strict rules of capitalization: A word starts with an upper ...
5
votes
9answers
8k views

Is “New and Improved” an oxymoron?

It irritates me that advertisers often claim a product is "New and Improved". Surely, if something is new (ie, has not existed previously), it can't be improved! And vice versa!
5
votes
3answers
1k views

“If it hadn’t been for the rock, the ship wouldn’t have gone aground”

If it hadn’t been for the rock, the ship wouldn’t have gone aground. What does this idiom mean, exactly? From The Economist.
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“cannot” vs. “must not”

It's pretty common, especially in video games' mission objectives, to state: A person X must not die. Would this be rapidly different if constructed like this? A person X cannot die.
2
votes
2answers
855 views

Difference between “had [verb] not to” and “hadn't [verb] to”

When we talk about things that we intended to do, but didn't or will not do in the future, we can use past perfect. I did a question in a reference book: I hadn't intended to become a doctor, I ...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Synonym for “media item”

I am looking for a synonym for "media item" by which I mean a single photo, article, video, document, etc. I need one term as a handle for one of any of these types of items. I am honing my domain ...
22
votes
2answers
115k views

“Farthest” vs. “furthest”

My spellchecker insists on replacing "furthest" with "farthest". I was under the impression that farthest is strictly speaking in terms of distance, whereas furthest is more abstract. A poster on ...
7
votes
5answers
7k views

Origin of “I kid you not”

What is the origin of the phrase "I kid you not"? And, on a related note, is the sentence, Can't I kid you? or Can't I kid with you? incorrect?
4
votes
3answers
9k views

What is the difference in meaning and usage between the words “topic”, “theme”, “subject”?

I'd like to get a feel for the difference between these words. When are they interchangeable and when is only one of them appropriate or preferable?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Difference between “output” and “outcome”?

What is the difference between output and outcome? Please suggest the proper usage.
1
vote
2answers
459 views

“fail to convey it”

Does "I fail to convey it" mean "I know but I don't explain it" or does it mean "I know and I try to explain it, but not well enough for people to understand it" or can it mean both? What's another ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is the singular of “year” used in phrases like “72-year-old” and “20-year jail sentence”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Pluralization rule for “five-year-old children”, “20 pound note”, “10 mile run” 72-year-old Giselle Gilbert was taken to hospital. ...
10
votes
3answers
12k views

Singular or plural following a list

Can anyone tell me if I should use inspire or inspires in this phrase? An extraordinary leader whose vision, values, integrity and boundless curiosity inspires all who follow in his footsteps.
25
votes
7answers
91k views

“Insecure” or “unsecure” when dealing with security?

Which is the appropriate word to be used in the sentence: The system we were testing was determined to be insecure/unsecure. The usage is in the context of security, specifically a lack thereof....
4
votes
4answers
4k views

“I can't get the message across.”

What are some other ways to say, "I can't get the message across?" This is explaining a situation where someone doesn't communicate what they're thinking, or they try to communicate what they're ...
4
votes
7answers
3k views

“convey” vs. “say”

It's easier than it seems, but I don't convey it well. My friend says that I should change that to read It's easier than it seems, but I don't say it well. However, this doesn't seem quite ...
23
votes
7answers
5k views

Is it true that iambic pentameter is “natural” to English? If so, why?

When I first read Dante's Divine Comedy in high school, I remember once being puzzled at what I thought were strained rhymes in the translation, and mentioned it to my English teacher. In reply, she ...
15
votes
6answers
14k views

Why do Americans say “tuna fish”?

I mean, it's not like there is a tuna vegetable or animal that it can be confused with.
3
votes
0answers
185 views

Acronyms: “a” vs “an” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use "a" or "an" before acronyms? When there is an acronym such as NSFW (Not Safe For Work) as in the following example This is an NSFW link ...
6
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “uncarefully” a word?

Microsoft Word is telling me that is isn't. If it isn't, what is a suitable alternative?
3
votes
1answer
38k views

What do “a.m.” and “p.m.” stand for when talking about time? [closed]

What do a.m. and p.m. stand for when talking about time?
59
votes
8answers
38k views

Is there a reason the British omit the article when they “go to hospital”?

Why do British speakers omit the article in constructions like "go to hospital" or "go on holiday"? Pretty much all American speakers would rephrase those as "go to the hospital" and "go on a holiday",...
8
votes
8answers
877 views

Opposite of 'contaminate'

Contaminate (transitive verb) means "to add a little bit of bad stuff to (something), rendering it bad". Or thereabouts. Is there a word for "to add a little bit of good stuff to (something), ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“Would” with a present meaning—is this correct?

A great example I can think of: "Please, leave! I would be alone!" With would meaning something like, "I want to be alone." Is this correct, or not? EDIT: To further clarify, I am not aiming ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

What is the formal version of “8 a.m. until”?

Is there a formal version of the term "until," used in the context of "The event will run from 8 a.m. until," signifying an indeterminate end time?
8
votes
8answers
1k views

A polite substitution for “lamer”

Is there a polite word that can be used to designate someone who didn't really understand what he or she was doing? Or, in general, someone who is intentionally ignorant of how things work. A "lamer" ...

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