2
votes
3answers
230 views

What should I call this kind of animation?

On opening this link you will see a car that has a kind of glowing bulb on it. I am talking to my client and we both are not good in English. I have to find this kind of animation from a search ...
18
votes
4answers
25k views

When did Greenwich begin to be pronounced as “Gren-ich”?

I just read an interesting question here on Greenwich Mean Time. I'm interested to know when Greenwich received its peculiar pronunciation. Has it always been pronounced as "GREN-ich" (/ˈɡrɛnɪtʃ/), ...
3
votes
1answer
14k views

South vs Southern - difference? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is the use of “north” more appropriate than “northern” and vice versa? Are there any differences in meanings of South vs Southern, North vs ...
7
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “premises” always plural?

On-premises ... On-premise I see these terms frequently used to describe software systems hosted within a company's datacenter vs. software systems hosted externally by a third party (in the "cloud")....
12
votes
4answers
977 views

What are the possible meanings of positive “any more”?

Ordinary any more [usually with negative or in questions] to any further extent; any longer: she refused to listen any more Positive any more is the use of the adverb any more in an ...
6
votes
4answers
8k views

“You could do worse than [x]”

I can't really tell what someone means when he says "you could do worse than [x]." Live example: If you are just interested in a simple command line processor which uses MSXML 6 then you could do ...
2
votes
1answer
428 views

What is the equivalent of “noughties” and “tweens” for 1900-1920? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: What is the name of the first decade in a century? “nineteen-hundreds” I have often heard the period between 2000-2010 called the "noughties", and the period ...
93
votes
1answer
355k views

What's the difference between “requester” and “requestor”?

Both are in dictionaries. I've heard people insist "requester" is correct for a person who requests something, and that "requestor" is wrong there, leaving me to wonder how it is used. Requestor ...
8
votes
4answers
6k views

To what do the “letters” in the title “a man of letters” refer?

The term man of letters, as I understand it, was used in the 18th and 19th centuries to describe an individual who lived a marked intellectual life; who might, for example, own a large library, ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

What does it mean to describe someone's chin as “pugnacious”?

If one were to describe someone's chin as "pugnacious", what would that chin look like? EDIT: In the context where I read it, it was used as a purely physical description I believe; it wasn't ...
6
votes
8answers
2k views

An antonym for “continuum” to describe a limited set of possible options

I came across this sentence while reading Wikipedia and the second occurrence of "continuum" stood out to me as totally wrong since a continuum is specifically a range which can be divided into an ...
26
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is there a “mean” in “Greenwich Mean Time” (GMT)?

What's the meaning of the word "mean" in "Greenwich Mean Time"? Shouldn't we simply say something like "Greenwich Time"? I don't understand what the word "mean" is doing there.
4
votes
4answers
7k views

Correct response to “Pardon me”

My young son recently started saying "Pardon me" after, for example, burping. We try to praise, or at least respond, when he does something right, as encouragement and as a form of learning. This ...
6
votes
5answers
424 views

About using singular as food

Consider the following : He likes dogs. He likes dog. (1) would mean he likes dogs as pets and (2) refers to dog as food. My question is, does the same apply to nouns such as orange and ...
11
votes
3answers
41k views

Where should the apostrophe go in “three days work”?

Which is correct? 1 Three day's work 2 Three days' work 3 Three days work I would probably guess (2) is right, since the work belongs to the three days ("three days of work"). But I'm ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“Ta” and “ta-ta”

If "ta" means "thank-you", how did "ta-ta" come to mean "goodbye?" Isn't it basically repeating "ta?", in which case, wouldn't it mean "thanks, thanks!"? Is there a reason why? Does it lie in their ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Where does the phrase pattern “X! Whiskey! Sexy!” originate?

From around 2006-2007, the blog “Crazy Apple Rumors” sometimes used the phrase “Technology! Whiskey! Sexy!” in its posts (see e.g. http://crazyapplerumors.com/2007/01/09/post-keynote-keynote-live-blog/...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the correct plural of “chaise longue”? [closed]

Is it "chaises longues" or just "chaise longues"? Both examples exist in different dictionaries. Or should it be something else entirely?
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Why does “love child” imply “out of wedlock”?

The etymology of love child says it derived as a polite form of "love brat" which was used around the 18th century. My question is when two people are in love and they have a child, could you not ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

Damage vs. Damages

The word damage is non-count and its plural turns into a different definition (court-awarded money). Am I incorrect in thinking that damages can also be used to indicate various types/kinds of damage? ...
2
votes
2answers
961 views

Success is not something that just happens (by accident or by chance)

Which word is more appropriate? And why? Success is not something that just happens by _. A. accident B. chance
4
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the subject of a survey called?

For example, the subject of an interview is an interviewee. So, I was wondering what the subject of a survey might be.
6
votes
3answers
5k views

Where is the root in these words: miniature, minimal, minimize?

Is it possible to identify one and the same root MIN in all these words: Miniature, minimal, minimize, minimum minor, minority, minus, minute ? From etymological point of view they all came from one ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between “information”, “data”, “knowledge”, “science”? [closed]

I know it may be dumb but what is the difference between the following words? information data knowledge science Especially the difference between data and information? I know it but cannot ...
7
votes
9answers
5k views

Is there an English word meaning “snacks eaten as an accompaniment while drinking alcohol”?

I'm currently travelling in Korea and Japan and learned that both languages have words specifically for snacks that accompany alcoholic drinks, or at least go with beer and spirits such as sake or ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Does “generosity”/“generous” - as character quality - imply connotations “giving of your OWN resources, not someone else's”?

The question is about the context attached (or rather not attached) to the term "generosity"/"generous" (defined in Merriam-Webster as "liberal in giving"). The question is, is there a widely/...
17
votes
7answers
2k views

Gender-neutral equivalent for “Take it like a man”

I'd like to find some gender-neutral equivalents of the phrase Take it like a man I'm not looking only for existing phrases -- any interesting ideas for expressing the sentiment "be tough", ...
4
votes
2answers
33k views

Origin of “s--t eating grin”

What is the origin of the phrase shit eating grin? How did it come to mean showing smugness or self-satisfaction of an individual's actions?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

How did “roughly” come to mean approximately?

"Roughly" is used as in "He just pushed me roughly." How did "roughly" then become used as in "They're roughly the same weight."?
7
votes
7answers
23k views

Is there a single word for speech with a double meaning?

How could one put, in a single word, language that has multiple meanings at once?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Present tense for future events

Why does it sound perfectly natural to say Our flight leaves tomorrow at 6pm but weird to say It rains tomorrow at 6pm? What kind of scenario, if any, could make the rain sentence sound natural?
2
votes
4answers
885 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “duly require”?

Is it the same as "need"? What meaning does "duly" add to "require"? EDIT: Adding example I found online from the 1957 Penal Code of the Empire of Ethiopia: Art. 326. Capitulation. A ...
5
votes
3answers
489 views

Does “fathers” in RP exclude R and unvoice the S?

In received pronunciation, the word "father" ends in /ə/. I haven't found an IPA transcription of the plural form, and am wondering: RP being non-rhotic, is the "r" here excluded? Is the S voiced (/...
7
votes
9answers
3k views

What to call certain types of vague words that trigger strong emotions

I guess I can call them 'politician words' but.... What do you call a word/phrase that has a lot of emotion behind it, but doesn't necessarily have any specific meaning. E.G.: Freedom, Liberty, ...
5
votes
6answers
525 views

Defining profit loss in laymans terms - without using loss in the explanation

I'm updating a training manual and need to define loss (in the context of a business) in a simple sentence. Currently it reads as (previous author): Loss: Loss is profit loss due to product theft, ...
8
votes
1answer
55k views

This weekend vs Next weekend [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What day is next Tuesday? Imagine that it's Monday, the 1st. The weekend would be the 7th & 8th. How do you refer properly to the coming weekend, "This weekend" or "...
2
votes
4answers
574 views

What is it called phonetically, when Americans change the pronunciation of “pronunciation” to “pro-*noun*-ciation”?

I used to have quite a bit of trouble spelling the word pronunciation because it's a long word, and because the way I pronounce it misleads me — I say "pro-noun-ciation" instead of "pro-nun-...
5
votes
2answers
17k views

Is the -re “supposed” to be silent in the pronunciation of “macabre”?

Is the "-re" supposed to be silent in the pronunciation of the word macabre? I'm aware that dictionaries give two pronunciations, \məkäb\ and \mekäbrə\, but is one of them just a fixed "error" of the ...
12
votes
6answers
2k views

Does the letter C serve any unique purpose? [closed]

Does the letter 'C' make any sound that cannot be made by other letters? "Cat" could be spelled "Kat," "Cinder" could be spelled "Sinder," and "Watch" could be spelled "Watsh." Edit: An excerpt ...
18
votes
11answers
28k views

What do you call a group of people that move a lot?

I can't think of the word to describe it. Something similar to "wanderer" or "roamer". It's often used to describe people that don't stay in one place... not "migratory"...
4
votes
2answers
819 views

What is the correct word to accompany “ A survey…”?

As in, do we say "A survey on xyz systems" or "A survey of xyz systems"? My initial thoughts were to use " A survey on..." because I thought "A survey of..." would refer to survey conducted by XYZ; ...
9
votes
4answers
15k views

Why do courts use “What say you?”

... instead of "What do you say?" I am not sure if "What say you?" is even grammatically correct.
2
votes
4answers
23k views

What is the correct plural of “stadium”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which style of Latin plurals should I use? If my memory of Latin lessons serves me correctly, it should really be stadia However, I think most people would probably ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Pronunciation of double consonants

How do you pronounce double consonants in American English? For example: Daddy - Do you say "Da-di", "Dad-di" or "Dad-i"? Mommy - Do you say "Ma-mi", "Mam-mi" or "Mam-i"? Swimming - "swi-ming", "...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

What is the difference between “get it over” and “get over it”?

I was wondering if there are grammatical differences between "get it over" and "get over it"? If "over" is an adverb, "it" as a pronoun must be between "get" and "over", which is what I learned from ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “farewell reception” correct?

I was recently invited to a "farewell reception," a gathering to celebrate a couple who are soon leaving the community. And it occurred to me that "farewell reception" is an oxymoron. Is "reception" ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Common root of “practice,” “practical,” and “practicum”

When someone practices something, they do it often/as a habit. When someone says something is practical, they usually mean it is pragmatic/sensible/applicable, yet not necessarily practiced. And my ...
8
votes
3answers
840 views

What do I call a word with roots from multiple languages?

As best as I can tell, a good example is sociopath: sociopath — from socio- on model of psychopath socio- — combining form of [Latin] socius pathos — from [Greek] ...
1
vote
2answers
491 views

The use of “for” and “of”

Are for and of interchangeable in these circumstances? Is the meaning affected at all? He was the Minister for Education. He was the Minister of Education. The Institute of Medical ...
3
votes
3answers
509 views

“Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? "One-Day Only Promotion" or "One-Day-Only Promotion" Which ...

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