4
votes
4answers
32k views

Noun for “receive”?

Receipt? Receiving? I'm trying to come up with a name for "the acceptance of a delivery." I'd like to be able to say Ten deliveries were made but there are only five [fill_in_the_blank_here] ...
6
votes
4answers
40k views

Which is correct: “So far as I know” or “As far as I know”?

Which is more appropriate: "So" or "As"?
5
votes
4answers
6k views

Is there a word that means “as its name would suggest?”

Does there exist a single word that more or less means "as its name would suggest?" For example, is there a word that appropriately might replace the bolded portion of this sentence? Computer ...
3
votes
3answers
736 views

Why is it “either . . . or” and “neither . . . nor”?

Do we say it this way because of some connection with French and the "ne . . . pas," "ne . . . ni" constructions? I'm thinking that it might be a direct importation from Old French by the Normans, or ...
4
votes
3answers
352 views

Why is this show called “Singapore Idol”, not “Singaporean Idol”?

In other cases, a [country] Idol show titles use the demonym: American Idol, Malaysian Idol or Indonesian Idol. Why is this show called Singapore Idol, not Singaporean Idol?
3
votes
3answers
167 views

How can I phrase a question about a theoretical event in the past, which cannot happen anymore?

I'll try to give some specific examples, as this one is rather difficult to explain. Example 1: Imagine you have been attending a kindergarten in Canada. Now you are 30 years old, so you won't go to ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?

Is the phrase "move over" an official English idiom known worldwide? I would like to know: Is it an official English idiom (not slang or colloquial)? Is it known outside of the US (e.g. in the UK, ...
2
votes
2answers
776 views

What does “Man of the room” mean?

I am in the process of translating Sister Sledge's "B.Y.O.B" song into Russian. Could you please help me to grasp the meaning of the "Man of the room" idiom used in this song?
2
votes
6answers
6k views

“systematize” vs. “systemize”

Merriam-Webster defines "systemize" as an alternate spelling of "systematize." Is there any reason to choose one over the the other (besides "systematize" sounding a little weird to my ears)? I did ...
6
votes
1answer
448 views

“To be” differences with other languages

I am a native speaker of Portuguese, and in latin languages there are two verbs representing "to be", one which is a permanent state of being ("esse") and another that is a transient state of being ...
9
votes
4answers
25k views

Usage of the verb “provide”

Does the verb "provide" always have to be used with "with"? For example, Can you provide me with some good examples? Can you provide me some good examples? Can you provide some good ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Do people in Miami really talk like they do in the television series “Dexter”?

as I'm far from being good English speaker, I use to watch series to improve my skills. I'm fan of various genres, from Star Trek to How I Met Your Mother and I can say until now, I felt "aligned" ...
10
votes
6answers
396 views

What is the counterpart to 'reply'?

So if someone posts a message, and someone responds to it, we call that a 'reply'. However, I am struggling to think of a good phrase for the situation where you have the reply, and you want to see ...
3
votes
4answers
427 views

What is the difference in meaning and usage between “excoriate” and “execrate”?

Both nearly mean to criticise. So, what is the difference in usage?
8
votes
4answers
4k views

What do I call a person who submits content?

There is a section on my site, where users can submit content. I'm not sure how to call it. There are three cases: 1) user can submit own content, so he could be an author 2) user can submit ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Either of two [subject]s was/were?

Is it correct to use "were" or "was" in the following? whenever either of two somethings [were/was] applied [...]
7
votes
6answers
2k views

Do you have English counterpart to “To ask a question is a shame of a moment. Not to ask the question is a shame for whole life”?

I doubt whether my question is worth asking or being answered every time I’m posting a question, and ask myself, “Doesn’t it look too naive or primitive a question?” However, I keep posting questions ...
4
votes
3answers
32k views

Which of the following phrases is correct? [closed]

Which phrase is correct: "Nice to hearing from you again" or "nice to hearing you again?"
3
votes
5answers
579 views

Why use “at” in this way?

I always see signs such as Men at work or Children at play I was wondering why we use "at" in this way. Is it just a formal way of saying Men Working / Children Playing? Saying "At ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

How might I name the items of a Likert scale?

I'm using a Likert scale that has 5 possible items: ++ for "I strongly agree" + for "I agree" +/- for "I'm indifferent" - for "I disagree" -- for "I strongly disagree" Now I think that "I'm ...
2
votes
3answers
583 views

Is “is” an auxiliary verb?

John is working now. Is the verb 'is' in this example an auxiliary verb?
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Why is “help wanted” phrasing used in job ads?

It's quite typical to see "Help wanted" signs in cases some business has an open position. That can be some temporary position or even a permanent one. Why is it called "help"? Why not "we're hiring" ...
17
votes
8answers
1k views

Why do we say “Japan earthquake” and not “Japanese earthquake”?

Isn’t earthquake a noun and the preceding word an adjective? Isn’t “Japanese” the adjectival form of “Japan”?
3
votes
2answers
826 views

A “human cue tip”?

I am watching the excellent documentary "Nobelity" by Turk Pipkin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobelity http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turk_Pipkin 4 minutes into the movie, there is a bit that I ...
3
votes
3answers
59k views

“Tug at your heart” or “tug at your heart strings”?

Are they the same, meaning to make people feel emotional?
6
votes
1answer
30k views

To capitalize “department” or not

When using the word "department" after the name of a department, does one capitalize it? For example, "Advertising Department?"
6
votes
7answers
398 views

Single word for “village of dreams”?

Can someone suggest a single word for "village of dreams" in any language except the word "leonesse" as it has connotation of a place known for wines.
5
votes
2answers
20k views

Can “itch” be a transitive verb, i.e., can an itch be itched?

Can itch be used as a transitive verb? In other words, can you itch an itch as you would scratch an itch? Dictionaries differ, with the bigger hitters saying no. Are they bearing the proper standard ...
2
votes
2answers
278 views

“For every day” vs. “with every day”

Consider (…) and they were getting stronger with/for every day What's the difference/the correct one to use?
1
vote
5answers
469 views

Should I pause before or after the “that” of an object clause?

For example, if I want to pause in speech, which way is better: I {a very long adverb phrase} realized | that English is so useful but not easy to master. or I {a very long adverb phrase} ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

The meaning of “no more … than”

These two attitudes are no more contradictory than those two. Which of the following interpretations is right (or give me a better one if possible): Relatively, these two attitudes are not ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

How often do words change meaning then revert back to their original meaning?

Words can change meaning over time. A good example of this would be 'gay' which has changed from meaning 'merry' to 'homosexual'. Over the past decade, it has also taken on pejorative connotations. ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Can you rephrase this sentence (about storing files)?

Starting from this date all such files will be stored in folder B. Is it possible to re-phrase this sentence without changing its meaning in such a way that it would start from "Starting from ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it possible to say “as you can”?

Is it possible to say that "someone does something as he or she can" to express that he or she is doing it with full enthusiasm or is this just badly translated German? Edit: Unusual language ...
5
votes
4answers
602 views

Can I say “I (have) dropped the chair”?

If I accidentally pushed a chair and it fell down on the floor (it is no longer in the upright position), can I say "I (have) dropped the chair" or I should use another verb for that?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

In the movie “Meet the Fockers” does the word “Focker” really sound different?

In the movie "Meet the Fockers" does the word "Focker" sound really different from the four-letter word? I don't hear any difference. Do all the actors pronounce this word really differently from ...
4
votes
3answers
8k views

“The more often — the better.” Is it possible to say that?

The meaning I want to show with this phrase is that you do something more times and it produces better results. Is "the more often — the better" correct? Or maybe there are any set expressions instead ...
6
votes
3answers
13k views

Difference between “town”, “city” and “metropolis”?

Is there a certain size for each of these terms?
71
votes
8answers
22k views

What's the difference between “null” and “void” in legal language?

In the legal term "null and void," what is the difference between null and void? Why not just use one of the two terms? And can either term be used without the other?
17
votes
8answers
23k views

British usage of “cha”, “char” or “chai” to mean “tea”

By happenstance, I stumbled upon the words cha, char and chai in the dictionary today, all defined as meaning tea in informal British English. I lived and worked in London for some time, but never ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

Should I say this forum is a free 'voting discussion' or 'voted discussion' site?

I'm building a forum where people can ask questions and get replies. Those questions and replies can get votes but no one can be targeted as best answer. What's the right way of saying that? This ...
1
vote
2answers
17k views

How does the “partial” in “I'm partial to” relate to the “partial” in “partial fraction”?

The two senses of this word seem very different. One sense is just another way to say like, and the other is an adjective describing the state of being divided into different portions. I can't see ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

Difference between “in” and “into” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? I often get confused about which one to use: in or into? Kindly tell me what the ...
1
vote
2answers
419 views

Could “extraordinary few exceptions” be correct?

In his 1991 book, historian J.B. Russel writes: with extraordinary few exceptions no educated person ... believed that the earth was flat Should extraordinary be an adverb, or could this ...
5
votes
1answer
434 views

What does “shooting trout in a demitasse cup” mean?

I came across the phrase, “shooting trout in a demitasse cup” in the New York Times’ columnist, Maureen Dawd’s article titled Coffee Cups in Hell. Incidentally, I as a non-native English speaker often ...
2
votes
2answers
526 views

How are certain technical words used in British English?

I have noticed that many terms in software come from American English, as the US was responsible for much software engineering terminology. I want to know how Britishers use these terms in these ...
7
votes
3answers
11k views

What's the origin of the phrase “around the horn”?

Yesterday as we were sitting in traffic, my husband said he would have gone "around the horn" had he known traffic was so bad, meaning to take a longer way. What is the derivation of this phrase?
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Valid or not: “Treat others with the same respect you’d want them to treat you”?

Is this valid? Treat others with the same respect you’d want them to treat you. I'd normally phrase this as: Treat others with the same respect you'd want them to treat you with. Or, ...
3
votes
3answers
344 views

Does “someone appeared to help me” have two meanings?

Someone appeared to help me. If I get it right, this sentence can either mean: "It seems like someone was helping me." (seems like = appear to) "Someone showed up to help me." (show up = ...
11
votes
1answer
40k views

“Did you find” versus “have you found”

What is the difference between "Did you find?" and "Have you found?" When should I use the first sentence, and when the second one?

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