1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is the idiom “in order” in order here?

A user at my site can offer to delete an article, she can add an explanation to her deletion proposal if she feels her proposal isn't clear enough. The message for asking for an explanation would be: ...
-5
votes
3answers
331 views

If you call somebody or they call you, what is the name for that person?

This can also be applied to client-server interactions (which is what I need it for). For example, if you (the client) send data to the server or retrieve data from the server, what is the name of ...
1
vote
4answers
464 views

Word for ground-level hotel?

When my family went to Maui, we rented a room at a local __. I have no idea what to call it. It was like a hotel room, but it wasn't in a hotel building, it was only one story.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside” [closed]

In Ben Harper's song, "Diamonds on the Inside", there is a verse that goes She made herself a bed of nails, And shes plannin' on puttin' it to use. I don't quite understand its meaning, ...
5
votes
6answers
4k views

Can “what kind” be plural?

Is it correct to say, "What kind of patents are being issued in these sophisticated times?" It seems like it should be What kind of patents is being issued..., but that sounds wrong. What kind of ...
5
votes
5answers
231 views

Is it widely accepted to use ‘gridiron’ as a verb and gerund?

Time magazine (September 30) carries the article titled “Christie to Watch Football” followed by the lead copy: “Garden Stater in no rush to decide, will mull while gridironing this weekend. AP ...
4
votes
2answers
8k views

What is a “hens party” and where is this phrase commonly used?

Where does the term come from, where in the world is the term used? I came across the usage in this article, with this paragraph as quoted: Keara O'Neil was on a shopping trip to find bridesmaid ...
5
votes
2answers
628 views

Is there a verb that doesn't take the participle form when used in Present Perfect?

I remember about a month ago I was speaking to a friend and I said a Present Perfect sentence like "I have [VERB]". I forget the verb but I remember it was an everyday verb, not something exotic. But ...
3
votes
2answers
8k views

Does “up to [date]” include the end date? What about date ranges (“the week of…”)? [duplicate]

The quiz covers all the material up to the week of the quiz Sept.30 - Oct.6. Does this mean that September 29 is the last date, or that the week Sept.30 - Oct.6 is included in this span?
10
votes
1answer
154k views

How should “please find enclosed” be used?

In business writing and especially email, the phrase is often used as: Please find enclosed our price list. Please find attached the updated contract. Please find herewith my expense ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Forward” as transitive verb

When casually writing email I find myself using forward like this: I forwarded him the email with your info. Is the above version grammatically correct? I forwarded the email with your info ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

British English phrase “dot and carry one”

I've been re-reading 'Treasure Island' by Stevenson, and, at one point a character says, "... my pulse went dot and carry one" meaning, I think, that his pulse started racing. Has anyone heard this ...
2
votes
4answers
252 views

Plurality of a group also referenced using we/our/us

This question (migrated to writers.se) uses an example sentence along the lines of ABC is expanding our operations overseas. As a Brit, I'm quite comfortable with either ABC is or ABC are in ...
9
votes
4answers
4k views

What is the verb for the action of a coward?

I wonder what the verb for the action of a "coward" is. I remember there seems to be a verb form similar to coward, but coward cannot be a verb.
1
vote
3answers
31k views

“When did you born?” [closed]

When did you born? Can you please tell me which of the items below is the literal translation of the question? When did you give birth? When were you given birth to? Also, how do we answer to ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Origin of “stop-gap”

What is the origin of the expression stop-gap? stop-gap: A temporary way of dealing with a problem or satisfying a need Where and how did this expression originate?
0
votes
1answer
11k views

Meaning of “art historical context”

I am writing a critical report where I'm comparing different definitions of art. I came across this one: Danto's definition has been glossed as follows: something is a work of art if and only if ...
9
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the opposite of “Coexist”?

Is there a good phrase or word that means the opposite of "coexist"? The phrase I am using it in is similar to "these two ideas need not (be) __."
4
votes
5answers
21k views

Alternative colloquialism for “Best of both worlds”?

I'm looking for a phrase that means the same thing as "best of both worlds", except isn't so overused. I'm looking for the semantics to remain intact; for example, "Awesome!!" would not be an ...
0
votes
1answer
28k views

“Major” vs “majoring”

Which one is correct and what is the difference? Majoring in Information Technology, xxx University Major in Information Technology, xxx University
4
votes
2answers
641 views

What does “the Gettysburg Address would have stinkethed” mean?

I came across the word stinketh in the following sentence of the article titled, An American King: Noah Webster’s Holy Bible in New Yorker September 29 issue. Abraham Lincoln, born in 1809, sucked ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Using “TM” for trademarked term - every time or just once?

I am writing an email announcement to my company's customer base, and I will be using a trademarked product name several times throughout the email. It seems awkward to use the TM every time I write ...
0
votes
3answers
146 views

“Needs to be X” vs “Needs X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using -ed vs. -ing in the “needs washed” construction I've always used the following construct: The book needs to be read before Thursday. But I've heard ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Does “flattered” have a negative meaning in this context?

When I finished my business trip, my customer unexpectedly invited me to his home for dinner. Can I say "I am flattered" to show my unexpectation of their kindness? And what else can I say in this ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Response-uncountable?

I am an elderly Australian teaching translation from Chinese and Korean to English at an Australian university. A Korean student's translation read: There have [sic?] been much response to ... ...
26
votes
6answers
82k views

Word meaning “to make more efficient”?

I think this question came up in a conversation with a friend...we were discussing how serving lunch could be made more efficient. They could _____ the lunch line by doing this or that. The only ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

How did “strike” get its baseball meaning?

Strike as an English word (meaning to hit) is certainly older than strike as a baseball term (meaning not to hit), so what puzzles me is that the word adopted for the action is the exact opposite of ...
6
votes
1answer
4k views

An alternative to “stakeholder”

Here's a sentence taken from an executive memo, "Action item: get feedback from stakeholders on SuperDongle 9000". Is there something that can replace "stakeholder"? The word is not being used ...
10
votes
5answers
2k views

Word for someone who loves to create and organise noisy, lively, chaotic events

Some people love creating or fostering the creation of events that are noisy, chaotic and fun, such as parties, arguments, reunions, etc. Sometimes there's a negative connotation to this (like in ...
5
votes
4answers
6k views

“Coquette” vs. “flirt”

What is the difference between coquette and flirt? They seem to mean the exact same thing; is it only their historical or etymological baggage that determines different usage?
7
votes
1answer
18k views

Proper way to handle plurals with “whose”

I came up (re)phrasing a question like this : What's so special about directories whose name begins with a dot? But now, I'm wondering whether this is correct handling of plurals or not. Should ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

What's with the third degree?

Where did the phrase "third degree" (referring to intense interrogation) originate? Additionally, how did "grill" come to have its related meaning?
1
vote
2answers
116 views

Scrape Data from Somewhere

Lets say I have such a data in somewhere on my computer: HELLO WORLD NANO TECH YAHOOO OOO GOOGLE 1111 MICROSOFT It is a .txt file and has the value above. I want to say: I scraped some of ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

What does “as you are able” mean?

I feel like it could mean either "what you are capable of doing," or "what you are willing to do." Do one of those better represent the meaning of this phrase or are they both right?
10
votes
3answers
1k views

What's a good opposite of “keep track”? [closed]

How can I say the opposite of "keep track"? I was trying to keep track of something but something happened and I lost the track. I'd like to say "lose track". Is it possible to say it this way or is ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Usage of “nonviable person”

I was reading a document about disabilities recently, and came across a term that confused me: Myth: People with disabilities are handicapped. Fact: The terms "disabled" and "handicapped" are ...
0
votes
0answers
80 views

Should I use `a SSTP` or `an SSTP`? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? First of all let me clarify that SSTP is an abbreviation of a technical term. I want to know, when using in ...
4
votes
4answers
57k views

Is saying “I had a fever” correct?

I'm sure this might have been asked, but couldn't find it, so forgive me if it is a duplicate. Is saying "I had a fever" correct ? I've also heard people saying "I had fever", but don't ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Do “want to” and “have to” mean the same thing?

Which one of the following is correct? To shine like a sun, you want to burn like a sun. To shine like a sun, you have to burn like a sun.
5
votes
2answers
13k views

Why is “my giddy aunt” an exclamation of surprise

The mental picture that forms in my mind is of fancy English ballrooms, a fainting lady and smelling salts. So someone shouting "My giddy aunt" would rather be an expression of concern. Does anyone ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

In what senses are 'at' and 'all' used in the phrase “at all”?

I understand that the phrase at all means in any way or in the slightest, e.g. What is the opposite of “to stink” (v)? Is there one at all?, or Not bad at all I don't understand how the individual ...
1
vote
3answers
14k views

'During today' or 'During the day'?

The instructions will be up during today. The instructions will be up during the day. Which one is correct?
6
votes
5answers
17k views

An idiom for deriving pleasure from another's suffering

I believe it is what the Germans call "Schadenfreude". English itself has no such equivalent word. (Although it has been adopted as a loanword.) Does an idiom exist that describes it?
1
vote
2answers
789 views

Can ‘them’ be used for ‘their’ in front of a noun?

I’m having a difficulty understanding “could they just have that for them unreachable pleasure” in the following sentence. If them means their, my questions will be solved. I’ll take it like this: if ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

The article “a/an” with uncountable nouns

Sometimes I read in books sentences where uncountable nouns are used with the article "a/an". For example She fades like a dew before the sun. Is it out of the common rules? Sorry if this ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Which one can be named or acknowledged as the elder brother (sister) between twins who was born earlier and later in UK and America?

There is the following sentence in Jeffery Archer’s detective story False Impression: Arabella was so wise and sensible. If only her beloved twin had been born a few minutes earlier rather than a ...
1
vote
3answers
497 views

What’s the meaning of ‘get ploughed’ in sports?

A dictionary says plough means to form furrows with a plow, so I thought those who got ploughed in sports had deep cuts. However, my understanding might be a little strange in the following context (...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Subsequent, Consequent… Presequent?

Imagine the following: A -> B B is consequent (and subsequent) to A, because A implies B. How might one describe A relative to B? "Presequent" gets a few search results... but perhaps there's ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

What’s the meaning of ‘go on’ here?

‘Go on’ has a lot of meanings in dictionaries, which makes me confused. What’s the omitted words and meanings of ‘go on’ in the following scene? (They are gambling on a sport in the magical world.) ...
4
votes
5answers
13k views

Is there a word for the desire or emotion of wanting to prove someone wrong?

Is there a word for the motivation to do something only because of the desire to prove someone wrong? When someone is using reverse psychology like: You won't do this chore, you'll probably just ...

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