0
votes
1answer
142 views

Should I add a 'that' to this (provided in the body) sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there rules about using "that" to join two clauses? In the sentence below, should there be a 'that' after 'realized'? I was feeling really awkward about the ...
10
votes
2answers
24k views

What is the origin of “Robbing Peter to pay Paul”?

I know what this means: "To pay one debt by incurring another" or other variants of it, but where did the saying come from. I'm not aware of any biblical instance of this. Deep down I want this to ...
8
votes
3answers
13k views

“Aeroplane” or “Airplane” - Which are people more familiar with? [closed]

I'm considering creating an application which has the word "Aeroplane" in the title. However, I have noticed in Google the following trend: Aeroplane: 16,700,000 results Airplane: 119,000,000 ...
5
votes
3answers
10k views

“In the outskirts” versus “on the outskirts”

Which of the following sentences is correct, and why? I bought a house in the outskirts of the city. I bought a house on the outskirts of the city.
4
votes
4answers
1k views

“Injunct” vs “Enjoin”

The injunctions (and super-injunctions) that occasionally make the headlines restrain a defendant from doing something. It is fairly clear (e.g. OED) that the word was formed as a noun from enjoin in ...
5
votes
1answer
5k views

Is “submittable” a valid word?

Is "submittable" a valid word to describe something that is eligible to submit?
13
votes
8answers
10k views

What's the origin of “[X number of] souls onboard”?

In nautical (and aeronautical) contexts, a vessel may declare a number of "souls onboard". I've googled around for origin of that phrase, but haven't found a definitive explanation. Most discussions ...
7
votes
4answers
6k views

What's the difference between “false”, “counterfeit”, and “forged” when describing a document?

I'm reading Schengen Borders Code (2006R0562—EN) and in the Annex V Part B there's a list of reasons for refusing entry that includes (B) has a false/counterfeit/forged travel document As far as ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Agreed” or “agreed to”

Should agreed or agreed to be used in the example below? The member countries agreed the bailout package for the sovereign. NATO will enforce the sanctions agreed in May. The member ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“Scar Tissue” vs. “Scar Tissues”

When is it appropriate to use "Scar Tissue" vs. "Scar Tissues" He applied ointment to the scar tissue. He applied ointment to the scar tissues. Are both correct or only the first one?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Antonym of “low-ball” as price

What is an antonym or popularly used phrase meaning the opposite of low-ball used to refer to a price?
10
votes
5answers
70k views

What does “waive off” mean?

I understand that when you waive something you forego it or give it up. e.g. I waive my [right to] free coffee. I also understand that a waiver is a document stating that you waive your rights ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

Difference between “size” and “magnitude”

Following the comments to this answer to another question, what is the difference between size and magnitude? I know there's a difference, but can someone put it in a nutshell for me?
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Etymology of “Threshold” [closed]

I found myself accidentally writing "threshhold" today, thinking semantically on the meaning. Was there a time when "threshold" was spelt "threshhold"? Or is the etymology of this word really an ...
1
vote
1answer
698 views

Word-order and meaning - which is correct for this notice? [closed]

I'm creating some signs for the office car park, and one of these signs is to control access. What I'm trying to get it to indicate is that cars aren't permitted between 10 am and 4pm except for ...
2
votes
2answers
332 views

Should I use “in” or “on”?

Which is the correct form in this sentence: "in" or "on"? "I'm sending you the requested permission for using my photographs in/on your project"
3
votes
8answers
3k views

Word or phrase meaning “working hours have ended, and it's time to go home”?

What word or phrase is used to signify that the work day has ended?
0
votes
2answers
17k views

When should I use “is”, and when “does”? [closed]

I know this is really basic, and I know the answer internally, I just find that I can't articulate it. When would you use "is", and when is "does" more appropriate? E.g. "The sun is green", vs "The ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

How to interpret the phrase “no more” in “Don't love no more”(Craig David's song)?

How should I interpret the phrase "no more" in one of Craig David's songs? or "no more" in the lyrics of the song shall not be deem as a phrase? Lyrics -- Don't Love You No More: I’m sick and ...
1
vote
5answers
17k views

Higher, greater or bigger distance?

Which of the following is most correct? The distance of the shortest path must not be higher than 10km. The distance of the shortest path must not be greater than 10km. The distance of the ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Can commoner be used as an adjective? I thought it was a noun. Can we say something is commoner?

I thought "commoner" is 'a person not of royal birth', but saw "commoner" used instead of "more common". Is this correct?
-4
votes
2answers
6k views

Difference between “field of inquiry” and “field of endeavor” [closed]

These two kinds of phrase frequently pop out in the topics of GRE analytical writing. Is there any substantial difference in meaning? EDIT: I know the difference between the word "endeavor" and "...
1
vote
1answer
805 views

Comma after “intuitively” at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

In the following sentence, do I have to put a comma after "intuitively?": Intuitively, it represents the concept of something.
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “he plays the piano” stative or dynamic?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stative_verbs: The same verb may act as stative or dynamic. An English phrase like "he plays the piano" may be either stative or dynamic, according to context. ...
5
votes
7answers
10k views

What would you call a person who farts a lot?

I came across one word that is "gas-bag." Are there any other specific (not slang) words?
8
votes
7answers
11k views

Are particular seasons proper nouns?

Should fall be capitalised in the following? If yes, is it because Fall 2011 is a proper noun? Where should an app be released in Fall 2011? Context. In a Wikipedia article, Avatar (2009 film)...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the complement considered a part of the predicate?

Is the complement a part of predicate? For example, in the sentence: "He was the strangest person she had ever met" - "he" is the subject, "was" is the link word and "the stangest person she had ever ...
0
votes
2answers
369 views

What’s the meaning of ‘wipe slime from his mother’s boots’?

I’m afraid this question might turn out to be stupid, but I’ll give it a try. I’d like to know if it’s a set phrase and its meaning. ”My mother didn’t have a heart, Kreacher,” Sirius snapped. “She ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

’He was off’ vs. ‘He started’ (in terms of their effect in story telling)

I’m feeling something more energetic from ‘off’ than from ‘start’ because of its shortness and pronunciation, but I don’t know for sure what effect ‘be off’ has in story telling. Is it exactly same as ...
2
votes
3answers
12k views

“The one who wants” vs. “the one who want”

I am getting confused with usage of 's' with verb- consider following 2 sentences- I am the one who wants to stay with you. I am the one who want to stay with you. According to me, first ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

A better way to express this sentence to clarify its meaning?

I apologize if this is a broad question. My friend and I have been arguing about the following sentence for 2 hours. I think that there is something missing in the following sentence. Though, I am ...
-2
votes
1answer
885 views

Does the root -batic have a source meaning? [closed]

I'm curious about the words aerobatic and acrobatic. They seem of Latin origin and I wonder if anyone could enlighten me as to the meaning of the "-batic" portion of these words. Edit: I stand ...
6
votes
2answers
49k views

Looking forward/forwards to your reply [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Forward vs Forwards I always wonder whether I should say "looking forwards to your reply" or "looking forward to your reply", which one should I say in a email?
2
votes
7answers
2k views

“Deus Ex Machina” for Misfortune

I'm looking for a word or phrase like "deus ex machina," but to describe misfortune rather than resolution. It needs to communicate that the situation "came from out of nowhere," and/or feels "tacked-...
2
votes
4answers
7k views

Can I say “trees were shaking” because of the wind? Or should it be “moving” or something else?

The strong wind blew and all the trees in our mini park were ... What word should I use here? I mean that situation when the wind is strong enough to cause the trees to make some motions, yet not be ...
8
votes
2answers
7k views

Why are you “reading” a particular subject at university?

I've always wondered why the verb "read" is used to basically mean "study" when describing somebody's university course. They might say: I'm reading History at university. And it might be said ...
14
votes
6answers
23k views

What does “Sunshine,” when it’s placed at the end of sentence mean?

I came across a peculiar (to me) usage of the word, “sunshine” that was placed at the end of sentence in the short story, “High Heels,” written by Jeffrey Archer. “Sunshine” appears in the following ...
1
vote
3answers
85 views

What would be a good way for referring to the property of being a Home/Visitor Team?

Is there a word to define the property of being the Home Team? In Brazil we say that the Home Team has the "Mando de Campo" which means "Field Ownership", as in the Home Team HAS the Field Ownership ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we say someone who has read many books is “widely read”?

Why do we say someone who has read many books is "widely read," or "well-read"? (Though the latter has a hyphen, and it could be called a separate word. Still, it has its etymology.) Why didn't we ...
8
votes
5answers
24k views

When to use words quite, rather, pretty, fairly etc

Is there any logic to this or just decision? I would use the following combinations: quite amazing rather large pretty good I would not use the following combinations: pretty amazing quite large ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Should I use the phrase: “to + verb-ing” or just “to + verb”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use to + V-ing I don't know what is correct in the two sentences below: I work everyday to learning new technologies. I work everyday to learn new ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Have or Hold Open House

Could you guys tell me which one is correct? We are having an open house. We are holding an open house?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Can I say “medium-term”, as with the adjectives “short-term” and “long-term”? Do they need prepositions?

I would like to use an adjective to express something in between the two adjectives short-term and long-term. Does medium-term make sense here? What is the adjective I can use? What preposition, if ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Is describing someone as “higher-educated” awkward?

I’m updating my résumé and would like to convey in a condensed manner the fact that I have a Masters degree in a particular branch of the humanities (politics and society of the Middle East, but that’...
1
vote
3answers
11k views

What does “dorsal” mean? [closed]

I'm having trouble with the adjective "dorsal", as different authorities have seemingly conflicting opinions. Tortora and Derrickson write in Principles of Anatomy and Physiology that the adjective ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Some sentences in the beginning of movie “Forrest Gump”

In the beginning of movie "Forrest Gump", Gump said: 1. I wish I had shoes like that. Why did Gump said "that"? Is it correct? And what about "I wish I had shoes like those?" 2. She said they was ...
3
votes
4answers
26k views

Difference between “unto” and “to”

What are the differences between "unto" and "to"? It seems that in many contexts where the word "unto" is used, "to" could be substituted and would be perfectly correct. It reminds me of flammable/...
19
votes
1answer
52k views

Independent/independently of/from

Which of these are correct, and why? Suggestions for rephrasing it are also welcome. [noun] was developed independently of [noun] [noun] was developed independently from [noun] [noun] ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

How do noun clauses work when they seem to leave no independent clause?

Another thing that was raised in conversation with my ESL friend is noun clauses. I was aware of Adverbial and Adjectival Clauses and thought that the things he was demonstrating to me were in fact ...

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