1
vote
1answer
9 views

like a duck takes to water" vs like a fish takes to water

I am aware of the idiom- like a fish out of water, what intrigued me is an article using like a fish takes to water. Sentence: Teo Zhen Ren, the swimming sensation from Singapore, took to swimming ...
2
votes
0answers
9 views

Valid from and valid to or until?

Would valid to make sense when refering to an expiration date? I've got this text right now: Valid from: 01/10/2014 Valid to: 10/10/2014 It doesn't sound correct. Should it be until? In which ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

Need someone to explain the structure of the sentence for me

For the following sentences: It is invalid, however, to apply both attributes to the same settings property. Such an attempt will cause an exception to be thrown. First, are the above ...
3
votes
4answers
205 views

Is there a word analogous to 'shooting yourself in the foot'?

Specifically I'm wondering if there's a word that describes the phenomenon where some party takes some action to remedy a situation and the result of that action makes the original situation worse. ...
2
votes
2answers
237 views

What kind of fallacy is it when someone points out the main flaw in his proposition before anyone can criticize it?

e.g. "I know some of you might consider this question general reference, but think of all those people who will be reading it all over the world and how it will enrich our data bank." "Of course we ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

Are nouns like 'Create' appropriate in a compound?

I'm solving a problem where I must choose between 'CreateMethod' and 'CreationMethod'. The first one fits me better because I want to indicate an action, not the process invoked by that action. I'm ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Trendy fashion phrases in press releases

How appropriate is it to use trendy fashion words in a press release? A fresh season truly requires a new wardrobe for the fashion-forward style setter. The surest bets? Stripes, lace, leather, ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Is “happened Tuesday” (without “on”) a valid pattern? [duplicate]

The album was released Tuesday and has been well-received by […] Shouldn't it be "released on Tuesday"? Where did the "on" go? I think dropping the preposition is confusing, but I see it ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Word for who professes discrimination based on culture

A person that professes discrimination based on race is a racist. What is the word for defining a person that discriminates based on culture (pretty sure it is not culturist) or social habits? E.g., ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

Is 'againsting' a [new] word?

The wikipedia article on linguistic competence says: Againsting the syntax-centered view of generative grammar(syntactocentrism), he specifically treats phonology, syntax and semantics as ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Ambiguity of “bag down for a better ride”

Today I saw a sign on the train that said Bag down for a better ride. There was an accompanying picture of someone carrying a large bag on his back, possibly causing inconvenience to others: ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What does this mean? Especially the word “ahead” [migrated]

I had dates ahead that I disliked to cancel. If there were no “ahead”, I would assume it means there were dates the speaker wouldn’t like to cancel. With “ahead”, however, I can't clearly ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

“Have been having classes” or “have had classes for three months”?

Which sentence is correct: "I have been having classes for three months." or "I have had classes for three months."
3
votes
1answer
50 views

Can you have a strong milky coffee?

At work today a debate got rather heated between myself and a colleague, so I've turned to stack overflow. He says that if you have a lot coffee and a lot of milk its a strong milky coffee. My ...
5
votes
2answers
81 views

Adverb clause: his delight evident

I recently have come across a clause, his delight evident, reading a novel. Which I have found tricky to understand. I have been able to get to the meaning yet not to the structure it possesses. Here ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

What is the difference in meaning between the sentences?

"She works in the paper business." "She works in paper business."
1
vote
3answers
48 views

Length or duration?

I'm writing a web application in which you can make bookings. When configuring a booking I need to know for how long the session will be. I'm wondering if the best word is length or duration? Length: ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Objecting 'to'?

Is the 'to' in He objects to being treated like a child. absolutely necessary, or is He objects being treated like a child. equally valid?
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Accommodate a problem to solution?

The topic is the following: I present a problem and a potential solution to it. After explaining the solution is it correct to say : "In order to adopt this approach in our evaluation .." Or ...
4
votes
3answers
712 views

What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?

I scratched my head in understanding the meaning of the following passage in the article titled, “The tragedy of Ferguson” of Time magazine (September 1 issue). [Some excerpts appear at ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Plural with many modifiers

I am wondering if in the following situations we have to use plural noun or not: "Peter's and David's book" or "Peter's and David's books" I do appreciate in advance if you help me with this, I ...
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

How might I correctly place the commas in these sentences? [on hold]

Prior to the night that changed my life, I had neither faith nor hope. I never knew what to believe in terms of how life came to be. I constantly felt consumed by my doubts and paralyzed by ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

What 's meaning of “ Business fit, not best in class ”?

I have seen in a HR magazine that "HR should focus on 'business fit, not best in class', says Panasonic HRD ". and i dont understand what is " business fit" and what's "best in class ". Please help me ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

An abrupt change of tense in a dialogue

Here is the script of a dialogue between the presenter Lucy Worsley and Alexandra Loske, from the University of Sussex, talking about Princess Charlotte's laboring Lucy: He's talking here about a ...
11
votes
3answers
797 views

What is the opposite of engraved text?

The name of the building is [opposite of engraved] above the entrance. I'm looking for a word to describe characters that are raised above the surface - the opposite of engraved or sunken text
0
votes
1answer
32 views

An 'are' that does not feel right [duplicate]

There is a quote by Maria Razumich-Zec that reads: "Your reputation and integrity are everything. Follow through on what you say you're going to do. Your credibility can only be built over ...
-1
votes
0answers
35 views

Pseudo-subject verb agreement [duplicate]

Please, I want to know the meaning of pseudo-subject and its agreement with verbs. Please, show me the rules even without examples.
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Streets or Street?

When writing and address as the corner of two streets, do I use singular or plural for "street"? As an example, should it be "the corner of Grafton and Spence Street", or "the corner of Grafton and ...
0
votes
6answers
243 views

Word meaning “to fall down accidentally?”

Example: The bridge's parapet was thick so I could sit on it without feeling dizzy, fear of [...] down. Is there another word other than fall? I thought of tumbling but I think you can only ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What does this quote by Shane Koyczan mean? [on hold]

“We grew up learning to cheer on the underdog because we see ourselves in them.” ― Shane Koyczan Would someone please explain this quote to me? I am not exactly sure what this quote is trying to ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Just as there are a few nicknames for the U.S. (“Uncle Sam”, “Columbia”, “Yankee Land”), are there nicknames for England, or the U.K. for that matter?

This may look like General Reference, but I've googled "list of nicknames for England", "list of nicknames for the United Kingdom", and all I got was "list of city nicknames in the United Kingdom" or ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Into or in? Grammatically correct or not

Since I belong to a hilly state in India, I'm going for 4 days vacation and want to update my status. Is below status grammatically correct? Thanks in advance. Into the hills. May not be reachable.
2
votes
2answers
741 views

Any word followed by “proof” means that something is protected against that word

I was wondering if you combine any word and add "proof" at the and, does that automatically means that it is protected against the first word? For example: Bulletproof - means something that can't ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Dont have or doesnt have [on hold]

Which one is correct from the below statement? He dont have knowledge about others. He doesn't have knowledge about others.
0
votes
1answer
19 views

For or Of? When to use? [on hold]

Attached document for Mr.john Attached document of Mr.john Pls tel me th difference of above? Let me knw when to use of and for
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Quotation marks in dialogue within dialogue over multiple paragraphs

I understand that one omits the closing quotation mark in dialogue until the speaker is finished his turn, so I speak. My question is this: Speaker is talking and during the conversation, begins ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Can or Shall? When to use? [on hold]

When to use Can and Shall? Pls confirm which of the statement below is correct. Can we meet? Shall we meet?
2
votes
2answers
47 views

Is there a pre-defined way to describe this grammatical mistake?

I'm wondering if there's a dictionary defined expression for expressions like: "There are many facets to the world in which we live in". One of those "in"s is redundant. But I'm curious if there's a ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

What is the meaning of “highway shops”?

I was curious what the meaning of "highway shops" is. It's related to the software industry, but I could not find much information about it. Also, I only found it being used in 2 places. From this SO ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Alternative word usage for “I have a degree in”

In my resume, I'd like to say something other than "I have a degree in" Are there other ways to state this?
1
vote
4answers
87 views

is there a word for super general advice?

Is there a single word or short phrase that roughly means: "super general advice" Advice that is so general and obvious that it is not really useful. To give some background I am a new hire at a ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

When to use “on” and “in”? [on hold]

I have a hard time deciding which to use on various occasions, e.g. "there is a piece of news on/in TV", "the responsibilities stated in/on the contract", "the man on/in the tree". I really want to ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Punctuation within parenthesis [duplicate]

How would I go about putting a period within a parenthesis sentence: (Code is subject to change. Refer to tips below.) Do I put a period after "below" or do I remove it: (Code is subject to change. ...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

Politics - singular or plural?

I am having difficulty deciding which of the following is correct: Politics both fascinates and repulses him. Politics both fascinate and repulse him. I think, in part, this is because I ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Where to put the adverb of time in “meeting at the store or the fountains” [on hold]

I'm trying to ask someone which location out of two we are meeting tomorrow at. Which of the following should I write? Hey, are we meeting at the store or the fountains tomorrow? Hey, are we ...
0
votes
3answers
33 views

What kind of punctuation would I use for this sentence?

The sentence: Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%; higher than Amumu's. I am not sure if I should put a semi colon, period, or comma in between "60%" and "higher."
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Better phrasing for “the sum of cost of all the rows”

I have added up the cost in several rows and I want to write "The sum of cost of all the rows", but that sounds off. I have a feeling it's wrong. Any suggestions? Likewise, if money were replaced ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

“I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”

Even if there are four fan headers on the motherboard my computer case accommodates six fans (3x140mm, 3x120mm) so I actually might have to purchase an external fan hub. Where should I put the ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Is 'resting stably' right?

This part is designed for resting stable on the curved surface Is 'resting stable' right?
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Verb ing + adverb or adjective? [on hold]

A good reading or a well reading? Verb ing + adverb or adjective?

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