0
votes
3answers
12 views

“Well-being” or “wellbeing”?

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word and I used the word "well-being". Word told me to correct it to "wellbeing". When I do, Word tells me to correct it back to "well-being". Which is correct? I ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

“which I have a basic knowledge of”

Is the phrase in the title idiomatic of English? Or is it just an Italian phrase construction I inadvertently transposed into English? I did some research on Google and it seems only non-native ...
1
vote
1answer
11 views

Difference between “content” and “contentment” ?

Is there a difference between the words: content and contentment? For example should one use content or contentment in this sentence: I find (content/contentment) when sitting on a crowded subway ...
3
votes
0answers
15 views

RP English pronunciation of 'the', 'this' and so on. Diphtong /əʊ/

I'm learning, that pronunciation of words like 'that', 'this', 'the' and so on is through /ð/ consonant. And I get it. But how native speakers say words like that in everyday speech? While listening ...
2
votes
1answer
20 views

What does “curfew” mean in the context of a concert?

I am going to buy a ticket for a concert, and the show description says: Door time: 7pm Curfew: 10pm I was thinking that curfew means the latest time you can access the venue, is this correct? ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

'You are not your f***ing khakis' - what does khakis exactly mean? fight club movie

"You are not the car you drive" "You are not your fucking khakis!" I absolutely love Fight club - this is a cult movie. What does khakis mean?
0
votes
0answers
12 views

How should I capitalize “Keep On Running/Keep On Moving” and “Walk On Down”? [duplicate]

These are the song titles by Spencer Davis Group/Deep Purple and Aerosmith accordingly, I know that if a preposition is a part of a phrasal verb it is capitalized, but everywhere I look, I see "Keep ...
1
vote
3answers
118 views

What does the word 'Joll' mean in 18th century English?

What does joll mean in the following sentence? ... give him the upper or right hand, and walk not just even with him cheek be joll, but a little behind him, yet not so distant as that it shall be ...
-4
votes
1answer
26 views

Meaning of paint out [on hold]

I came across with the following sentence while reading my book; George O.may paints out the following major users of financial statements What is the meaning of paints out here?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

“Grown substantially” or “substantially grown”?

a non-native speaker with a simple question here. I want to say that a research field has become much bigger in recent years. Is it correct to write Since _____, the field of ______ has grown ...
1
vote
1answer
17 views

Have been awarded or was awarded?

My question is which one is correct: a) I have been awarded the science award 5 times or b) I was awarded the science award 5 times Thank you :)
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Meaning-based taxonomical data on English words

Words can belong to abstract classes, based on their meanings. For example, 'red' and 'blue' are both elements of the abstract class 'color'. I'm looking for general, meaning-based taxonomical data ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

What's going on with *nuthin' doin'*?

The phrase nuthin' doin' in American slang means "There's nothing interesting or exciting going on". How does doin' come to mean "happening"?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Computing: 32 bit or 32 bits? [duplicate]

This question comes from this other debate at SuperUser Forum. I have asked it here too because: It appears not to be only a technical question, but a language question too. Most of the answers in ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Request for recommendation of texts [on hold]

Could someone kindly recommend a small set of freely accessible texts on the Internet that together could be considered as a fairly good collection of representatives of the sentences being employed ...
2
votes
2answers
161 views

Is it permissible to omit “is” in the following case?

Denial. One of the strongest, most stubborn human feelings. It has nothing to do with logic; its function (is) to prevent us from completely falling apart, going insane. Can I omit is in the ...
5
votes
5answers
153 views

Releasatory? Releaseful?

What would be a good word to describe something (like sex) which gives a lot of release. The sense is "rewarding, emotionally fulfilling and physically ...releaseful?"
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Unusual adjective position and evolution of Present perfect

In English, an adjective is usually placed on the left side of the noun it describes. But there are some exceptional phrasings here and there. I had so great a time. The English present perfect ...
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

That or where I can see the future?

Do we say, I have this magical power that I can see in the future or I have this magical power where I can see in the future? why and why not?
-1
votes
0answers
37 views

Is this question written correct? Thanks [on hold]

Would you please send me a description of the case where your gun came into Watson Bros? Thanks
0
votes
3answers
37 views

Is there a noun for the verb thrive/flourish/prosper/burgeon?

Consider the following sentence: "The government strongly profited from the company's ..." I could use the term "well-being" here, but it doesn't quite seem to capture the same meaning as a noun of ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

“See you later” in chat [on hold]

I'm not English mother toungue. In a chat conversation, even if I can't obviously see the person on the other side, is it correct to say "see you later"? What can be used instead in case I'll be back ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

Why is an adverb not an adjective used? [migrated]

In the sentence: He did not pass the course as easily as he thought he would. Why is easily (an adverb) used? Why is easy (adjective) not correct?
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Is there a grammatical term for 'extra information' in a sentence?

Sorry if this is a basic question, but is there a grammatical term for the 'extra information' in the sentences below? He was giving a presentation to the finance department She was having lunch at ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

collapse vs minimize

Is it right to use the word "Collapse" to describe what this button do or "Minimize" is more correct? What the difference in meanings of words "collapse" and "minimize" in context of computer ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Word or phrase for the opposite of a distraction?

I'm looking for a word or short phrase that means the opposite of a distraction. More specifically, something previously distracting that has since faded into... well, I don't know into what. So I ...
3
votes
2answers
383 views

Word for “opening and closing the mouth?”

Example: The stranded fish were flapping desperately on the sand, their mouths closing and opening, seeking for the water that wasn't there. Is there's a word that means opening and closing ...
-2
votes
1answer
58 views
0
votes
0answers
21 views

'As Per' in english communication [on hold]

Please tell me if below statements are correct or not? As per standards. As per your convenience. As per previous version. I just need to know is it correct to use 'as per' in context when it has ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

relaxed grammar rules in résumé?

Business schools or law school application résumés are typically concise at around 1 page. My question: Is it acceptable and considered ok to ignore some grammar rules to save words/space on a ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

lady sitting in the car vs lady is sitting in the car [migrated]

I believe that the second and the third sentences are grammatically correct and the first one is incorrect. I would appreciate if you could clarify the issue here. Thanks in advance. Sentences are ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

‘Concern of’ vs. ‘concern about’ [migrated]

Commercial builders downplayed ______ a bust in the superheated housing market. 1) The concern of 2) Concerns about The answer is number 2, but why does number 1 not work?
0
votes
2answers
16 views

pre-customer inquiry/ post-customer inquiry

I'm translating titles of paragraphs from Japanese to English. A pragmatic translation of the titles can be: "Before Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers" and "After Receiving Inquiries from ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

One word for the thing that other things depend on? [duplicate]

If a have a sentence: "A depends on B", then I can describe A as a "dependent" (adj.). How can I describe B with one adjective?
0
votes
2answers
15 views

Usage of spending time

Which one is correct? a)Thank you for the time you spent on reading this letter. b)Thank you for taking the time on reading this letter.
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Where can I find a good idiomatic dictionary with explanations and examples in plain text format?

I found dictionaries of this kind but in pdf format. I'm searching for one in plain text format ( well organized ) to build an app.
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Capital letters + Blame on

I'm Mohammad. I would be grateful if you could answer to my questions: 1- "Talkative" and "Sad" are negative or positive? 2- Can we write all letters of names of countries with capital letters? Is ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What is a courtesy message?

I have seen the term a few times in notification e-mails. Does it mean just a polite notification?
0
votes
0answers
7 views

In respect to process the order [on hold]

Can I write a sentence like " We looking forward your approval in respect to process the order"
4
votes
2answers
287 views

Is it correct to use “or” in place of “and/or”?

Consider the following sentence: A project is a large and/or complex undertaking. To me, the expression “and/or” seems redundant since in formal logic “or” implies ...
3
votes
11answers
2k views

What do you call a woman who's feeling “emotional”?

It's that time of the month, your female partner has begun to fault pick you, for no explicable reason she becomes weepy, and anything you say or do will be criticized or misinterpreted. Is there a ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Brush up on as a Tri-Part

Is "brush up on" technically a tri-part phrasal verb?
1
vote
2answers
87 views

What we call the next consecutive question in series of problem

on stack overflow we can edit the questions and this problem is based on that. Scenario I was asking problem A and got the solution of A but face a new problem B. How do I mention (reference ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

What is “unilateral superiority over the public”

What does it mean? Is it when one party had complete control over the other?
0
votes
0answers
27 views

My using gerunds [on hold]

I do hope that you are able to impart your forthright laconicism onto my writing below by paying particular attention to my use of gerunds. I had been lying atop my bed pondering my intelligence ...
3
votes
3answers
112 views

Can One Jump To Good Conclusions?

Jump To Conclusions is noted in the free dictionary's entry for jump a few different ways: To form an opinion or judgment hastily: jump to conclusions. to proceed abruptly, ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

The right time to use semi-colon

Below is an example of how I normally use semi-colon in sentences and I truly do not know if it's correct. Open the gate; let the dogs out, then close the gate.
0
votes
1answer
22 views

When should I use a comma before the word “who”?

Should I use a comma before the word who? This sentence is confusing me: I made this blog because I want to help all of the other people who have problems that are similar to mine. If I did ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

When did “to forgive” lose its primary meaning for pardoning and become solely about an emotional response?

During a recent debate I was having with a peer, I was shocked to find out that the word "forgive" no longer carries a primary association with the act of pardoning another individual (i.e., ...

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