0
votes
1answer
5 views

Meaning of “go to!” as an (old) exclamation

I'm reading (well listening to an audio book really) Ivanhoe (19th century) and there are some old expressions and words that have rather fallen out of modern use. Most of them I can google, but the ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

Punctuation for nested quotes at the end of a sentence

This is something I've gone back and forth on with a couple of writer friends and nobody is ever really sure what the correct punctuation format is, or whether there really is a format that's ...
1
vote
0answers
8 views

certain (humorous) quote about revision of an organization’s bylaws

I’m looking for a certain (humorous) quote that goes something like: “The demise of an organization begins when it revises its bylaws.” After 15 minutes of googling for it, I have given up and am ...
0
votes
3answers
20 views

Synonyms for “walking on thin ice”

It's tough to find synonyms for whole phrases as opposed to single words. I'm trying to think of at least a couple for "walking on thin ice." So far the only one I've come up with is "playing a ...
0
votes
1answer
7 views

Suggest Indirect speech

Please tell me what will be the indirect speech of this sentence The boys shouted, "Don boscho school well played?"
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?

This is a follow-up to this question: Why is "violated" being as future perfect with a person as the object? Does this type of thing have a name? Are you aware of any other verbs that have ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Use of pronouns her

Which is correct English? Jane's mother taught Jane to keep herself clean. Or Jane's mother taught her to keep herself clean.
1
vote
0answers
31 views

How should I use “so” and“ too” for showing agreement in this example?

This is a conversation between two friends, one is 30 the other is 25. They are speaking about their school time: First conversation: A: Do you remember Mr. X? He was my English teacher. B: ...
2
votes
5answers
137 views

Word to describe someone who goes to all the events in town!

I'm looking for a short word that could describe people who are always going to every event in town. It doesn't need to be an existing word, feel free to create one of your own. It can also be made of ...
-3
votes
1answer
18 views

Do you use the word 'overwhelmingly' or 'extremely' often?

Do you use the word 'overwhelmingly' or 'extremely' often? Overwhelmingly vs Extremely?
0
votes
3answers
31 views

What's the opposite of reckless? [on hold]

What is an adjective to describe someone who is the opposite of reckless other than 'cautious' or 'careful'?
0
votes
2answers
28 views

What is the opposite of indented (because “exdent[ed]” appears not to be a word)?

I've always used the word "exdented" when describing a paragraph of text (or, more usually, a section of computer code) where the first line is set further left than the remainder of the ...
-3
votes
0answers
16 views

every boy and every girl singular/plural verb [on hold]

a/''Every boy and every girl has to do this homework.' b/ Every boy and every girl have to do this homework.
1
vote
1answer
9 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Using “beau geste” as an opposite of sin

Beau geste defined here seems to be a noble act and from what I know to be the definition of sin, which has the word "immoral" in it, "beau geste" should be its antonym. Even if it isn't the perfect ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Why has “Caucasian” remained in use, while similar terms for other races have fallen out of use?

Why has the term "Caucasian" remained in use, while equivalent terms, such as those used for Asian people, African people, and Australian Aborigines have fallen out of use in polite society? I came ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

“hugest” grammatically correct?

I saw an article on yahoo yesterday and thought I'd ask, is "hugest" a real word? I assume whoever wrote the article understands what they are trying to say, but it just seems wrong and foreign to my ...
-3
votes
2answers
25 views

can we use `localite` for business entity?

if any business was started in particular area, can we use "localite" for that business entity? For example: This business is localite to this area.
0
votes
0answers
42 views

“before I get it” or “before I got it”

I wrote the following sentence and my native proofreader corrected 'before I get it' to 'before I got it': I would like to know why this package was sent back to the sender at the transit center ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

plural or singular of verb following staff [duplicate]

Is it: A number of staff who was not able to attend. or: A number of staff who were not able to attend.
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Simultaneous usage past & present Part. in the same sentence

I have a doubt to be clarified. Kindly refer following sentences and suggest, which one correct and why? Is there any specific rule on that aspect? he who never failed, has never tried.< he ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Is it insight in, or insight into?

Is the correct form - gaining insight in, or gaining insight into - or are both right? The context is: "Focus on your interactions to gain decisive insight in your emotional reactivity."
0
votes
2answers
28 views

“We're sorry for the delay in reply.” or “[…] delay in replying.”?

There's an office debate going on over this. We're all non-native english speakers so none of us can make a good case for either option. So, the debate goes on about whether the "delay in reply" ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Is this free indirect speech ? “ …and would I please … ” And why is “please” necessary?

I would like to ask a question about the expression, “...and would I please .... . ” Which appeared in a mystery novel. I’ve been wondering what the expression means. And why is the word “please” in ...
1
vote
0answers
9 views

Post genitive usage

I am writing an introduction to a mathematical text and have to convey the authorship of certain ideas and theorems. However, I am unsure which of the phrases I wanted to use are actually proper ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Do I use “were”, “was”, or “is”?

Sorry for the elementary question, but I am confused. Suppose I am telling someone about a conversation I had with a friend the previous day. Which would be correct? "I asked him if he were well" "I ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Have any words experienced sustained frequency growth greater than the word “sustainable”?

XKCD comic 1007, "sustainable", has indicated that the frequency of the word "sustainable" has undergone significant growth. According to explain XKCD, it has gone from 0.000005% in 1960 to ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

How to say 24 of book titles?

I would like to say 24 of this book title but i'm not sure if it's grammatically correct. For example, I have a book titled "Lord of the ring". How would I say I want 20 of that in a letter. Is it ...
7
votes
1answer
40 views

Can someone “proofhear” an audio?

I'm preparing an application where people can proofread other people's texts, but they can also review other's audios as well. Review could be a good word to use, but I'm already using this to... ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Difference between “depend” and “depends” [migrated]

Could someone explain me the difference between "Depend" and "Depends"? When I need to add the "s" at the end?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Cry and cried - drop the y and add ied

I understand the usage of the two, but I'm looking for how to describe these types and rules for when you drop y and add ied. If that makes sense Thanks
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Is 'verb + so + adjective' correct?

I've by chance learned the following sentence: Why does the idea of progress loom so large in the modern world? It confuses me a great deal,as I think that it should've been 'loom so largely'. Could ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Em dash and quotes

While I toss up between the em dash and the en dash, I am consistent throughout one document. However, one thing I have noticed when using the em dash is that when I write something like: Firstly, ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. I arrived home. Arrive is intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object but 'home' is adverb of place and I think we can't use any preposition before it as we were ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Single word for “winner takes all”

Is there a single word for the phrase "winner-take(s) all"? Need to mention a single word heading for a issue within a Business report, explaining how a new technology release would mean winner takes ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Usage of presumed [migrated]

"Everyone presumed that I am weak person" Is this wrong? vs. "Everyone presumed that I was weak person" Is this always right?
4
votes
2answers
48 views

“It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?

Consider this exchange: A: Your story wasn't funny at all. B: Maybe it was the kind of story where you had to be there. I encountered something like that a few days ago, and wondered if the ...
5
votes
2answers
54 views

General term for location or event

I thought I would try my luck here. Is there a general term that encompasses locations and/or events? For example, music festivals and towns?
3
votes
4answers
50 views

Word describing the one flaw in an otherwise perfect crime, plot or plan

I am wondering if there is a noun or phrase that articulates how a crime, plot or plan was foiled. I am interested in a noun or phrase that relates to crime in particular. For example, They two ...
0
votes
2answers
22 views

Does “intimate” = “imply + infer”? Or just “hint at”?

I'm not clear on how intimate (in verb form) is perceived. Until I looked it up, I never would have believed (never seen) it used with inanimate objects as subject...I thought to intimate something ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

What's a word for someone who is constantly asking for same thing?

Hi I'm looking for a word for someone who is constantly asking for something and keeps wanting updates about it. The closest words I can think of is pushy and, to a lesser extent, annoying. But ...
9
votes
3answers
7k views

What does it imply when someone is called “Lucifer in the flesh”?

Washington Post (April 28) carried an article under the headline “John Boehner just called Ted Cruz ‘Lucifer in the flesh.’ He does this sometimes,” and the Stanford Daily (April 28) detailed the ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What does “there” refer to in the sentence?

I've read a sentence in a Burmese story. "The medico went to the nearest village and there in the bazaar he found various kinds of meat and fish" I wanted to know whether "there" refers to "the ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Is using the word “us” allowed in an academic essay?

I am attempting to write a review essay on the book of Job and want to write the phrase "Let us not forget the many people and live stock that have died". Is it proper to use us in that way or should ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is the sentence “I wonder where he's?” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

The sentence "I wonder where he is?" has no contraction and, in my opinion, feels like it naturally flows compared to using the contraction. Are there any rules that are violated with the contracted ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Is there a shorter/better term for disagreement in number than singular-plural mismatch?

Consider someone mentioning "a bacteria", where the number of the pronoun doesn't match that of the noun. I suppose one could say there's disagreement in number, or the pronoun doesn't match its ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

The phrase “supposed to”

Why does "supposed to" have a different pronunciation in the middle of a sentence and at the end of a sentence? I've been learning about phrases, but I'm still confused about this one. Examples: ...
1
vote
6answers
59 views

what can we call someone who gives false promise to someone repeatedly but intentionally break the promise?

someone promised me to help solve my problem but he did not help me. he promised me again but still intentionally make excuses. or someone borrowed money from me and gave me many dates to repay but ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

The phrase “Warp and woof”

If warps and woofs are threads of fabric, why does the phrase use them in singular?
1
vote
1answer
10 views

for a long time+ negative?

Is it correct to say ''For a long time I haven't visited Tom'', without continuing the sentence? Isn't there any grammar rule to state that the order should be : ''I haven't visited Tom for a long ...

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