0
votes
0answers
5 views

The relative pronoun “which” and the omission in this sentence

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
-1
votes
0answers
9 views

Does this sentence bear two definitions/interpretations?

It says: Sad sometimes what happens when kids stop being kids and grow up to become the kind of adults we simply detest. I can't appreciate the exact meaning of this nice sentence. To ...
-1
votes
1answer
12 views

and would be a professionally paid engagement

Which is correct? "This would be a professionally paid engagement." or "This would be a professional paid engagement." Maybe "professionally" as paid is a verb and "professionally" is an adverb? ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

Which one FROM VS. OF?

both of and from are possible, with different meanings, of course. ....a magnificent picture in a book, called True Stories of Nature, about the primeval forest. This means that the stories are about ...
2
votes
3answers
44 views

What is the opposite of an Epiphany?

I think of an Epiphany as a "Eureka Moment" as in a goldminer crying out, "Eureka!" upon discovering a vein of gold (I'm a native Californian (and former resident of Eureka), so that example comes ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

The usage of “with whom” [on hold]

I would like to write a sentence to thank a number of colleagues. I would like to express the idea that it was a pleasure to spend time with them. Which of the two sentences below is better? I ...
3
votes
6answers
66 views

Antonym of “apathy”

I'm looking for a word that describes a general feeling of concern for things. Preferably not with a negative connotation (ie. neurotic), but for use as a description of someone who expresses interest ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Business meeting jargon- a “walkthrough” of a document

I'm writing a document and I need to discuss sessions during which one party presents a document and walks the other party through the document, reading each sentence out loud, asking for any comments ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

Pronunciation of “relative” versus “relatives” [on hold]

What is the difference in pronouncing the word relative in the following situations: a relative clause I visited some relatives.
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Do all letters need to be written in a formal register? [on hold]

In letters variously written to a friend, an office manager, or a school dean, do all these letters need a formal touch, or does how you address them depend on each letter’s recipient?
2
votes
1answer
50 views

“An hilarious” vs. “a hilarious” [duplicate]

Which of these is correct? This is in the context of buying a surprise gift for someone and you think your gift is hilarious. I bought myself a hilarious one! or I bought myself an hilarious ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

What’s one word that means “worth visualizing” or “worthy of visualization”?

I’d like to find a way to explain in just one single word (it can be a neologism) that something will be so awesomely good-looking that it’s “worth visualizing”, that it is “worthy of visualization”. ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

“Dream, dreamt” and “learn, learnt” irregular verbs: correct or not?

Often when I am writing emails or any other documents, I would like to use the irregular forms of dream (dreamt) or learn (learnt). But the computer spellcheckers always underline these words as being ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

It can be happened.. is it false to utter it?

is it wrong to use this expression " It can be happened...". In fact many of colleagues said that the right expression is " It can happen". Do you have any comments on this?
3
votes
2answers
161 views

Are peas countable or non-countable?

Frequently in my childhood a conversation would arise at the dinner table that went something like this; "How many peas would you like?" "About sixty please". (Laughter ensues). The question befits a ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

A slang term derived from another slang term

Is there a word that describes a slang term that was, itself, derived from (or riffs on) another slang term? I was under the impression that the term Snowclone described ths phenomenon, but it seems ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Is the apostrophe usage in the following sentence correct? [on hold]

If you and your loved ones' lives have been affected by crime, please get in touch.
0
votes
0answers
26 views

word for “almost the same but not exactly the same” [on hold]

Is there a word to express the meaning in the title: "almost the same but not exactly the same"?
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

which one is correct: Internship activities or Internship headlines?

I am a trainee. I want to draw a table on my report to describe the main activities that I did during my internship period. So I put as a title for this table :Internship headlines. My question: is ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

why is it “one European institution”, but “European Institutions” (with capital i) if talking about several authorities?

I found this spelling differentiation on the website of the EU commission and you can see it on wikipedia, too: "There are a range of European Institutions in Strasbourg (France), the oldest of which ...
0
votes
5answers
56 views

Acronym for ACRONYM describing acronyms as being numerous and/or overwhelming? [on hold]

I'm interning in a large organisation, and acronyms are everywhere. On my first day, I felt overwhelmed by them and now that I'm coming to the end of the internship, I want to come up with an acronym ...
-1
votes
4answers
113 views

What's the adjective form of “etiquette”?

As in, fill in the blank: Alice is courteous because she acts with good courtesy. Bob is ________ because he acts with proper etiquette. What's a good word for the blank?
2
votes
0answers
58 views

The meaning of “hemorrhoidal sensations”

The Swede, like the Frenchman, prefers in Poetry the light, the clear and the transparent. The profound, indeed, he demands and values also; but it must be a depth that is pellucid. He wishes that ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Crib: to Complain [on hold]

People in India use crib as a word for complain as in 'Don't crib about it'. I always thought this was wrong usage, but I recently checked in OED online and found that sense 9b says b. To ...
0
votes
3answers
68 views

Apartment building - flat building?

Does anyone in the UK say 'flat building'? I live in the US, mind, so I have no clue. It sounds a bit funny saying that. Do they say 'apartment building' instead, maybe? Or is there another word for a ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

What does “circumstantial consequence” mean?

How can of the phrase "circumstantial consequence" be explained? I vaguely understand the probable meaning, but it doesn't quite come into focus. Is it something like (unintended) side effect?
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Can more options use “is”

So I've been learning German on Duolingo (great app by the way if you want to learn a language). I know you guys don't want translations here, but this is more about the English. Of course, not all ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

What's the meaning of “ a blue berserk”?

Dis married Jokul Ironback, a blue berserk. From "The Saga of Thorstein Viking's Son" by R.B.Anderson. It's a norse saga that I'm reading. What's the meaning of "a blue berserk", I know the word ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

“Exigent” derivation

I'm working through a book in which I'm to define words using their prefixes, suffixes, and roots, and I ran across "exigent." adjective \ˈek-sə-jənt\ : requiring immediate attention : needing ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

the meaning of 'evil which seem blessings to the memory'?

Soon after this eventful day, I became the husband of Bertha. I ceased to be the scholar of Cornelius, but I continued his friend. I always felt grateful to him for having, unaware, procured me that ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Is it correct to say “remarkable culinary skills” in a résumé? [migrated]

I’m writing a résumé for someone and under skills I’d like to say that they have excellent skills at baking, cooking, and other kitchen-oriented things. Not sure if I’m phrasing it right, but I want ...
1
vote
3answers
75 views

“Took the Russia out of Vodka” or definitive articles with country names

I'm trying to better understand the meaning of the phrase in the Skyy Vodka ad ("Vodka so filtered we even took the Russia out of it"). AFAIK the name Russia is never used with a definitive article, ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Can the word, “art” be used as a verb to mean “create” art?

In the Washington Post (July 27 issue) article titled, “Figuring out what matters in a midlife ‘Is this all there is?’ crisis” the columnist, Carolyn Hax writes as follows: “Tweak as you need to, ...
6
votes
5answers
828 views

How do I greet someone in a different timezone when my morning is his evening? [duplicate]

I am in Nepal and my father is in America. When we talk with him it is our morning and his evening. Now how can I greet him and how can he greet me saying, where one would typically say 'good morning' ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Those Two are Triplets

Is the sentence "Those two are triplets" proper? It seems like it would not be correct, because triplets come in 3 and this only references two people. A similar case would be "He is a twin." I ...
6
votes
3answers
304 views

Is “since-folded (TV network)” an accustomed English word?

Time magazine (August 29) reports that Sara Palin has launched her own Internet Television network in its Entertainment TV section. It says; “Palin’s not the first candidate to lose an election ...
2
votes
0answers
52 views

If we can say 'Where are you going to?', why don't we say 'Where do you live in?'?

In most cases 'where' seems to be substituting for a prepositional phrase. As in: - Where do you live? / I live in Brighton. Where does the train stop? / It stops at Reading and Bristol. So why is ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

When using “Used To” in a sentence with two clauses, do you change the verb tense in the second clause?

I was helping a friend proofread one of her essays on the short story The Lottery. She had written this sentence: I think the lottery used to have a specific reason and represent something in the ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

The word entropy [on hold]

Could someone define the word entropy for me in the context below. "I have journeyed through the darkness between the most distant stars. I have beheld the births of negative-suns and borne witness ...
2
votes
6answers
546 views

What is an official collection of laws/books/etc. called?

What do you call an official collection of passages, laws, books, etc.? I'm thinking of a very official-sounding word, like "The ___crux" "The Index" or "The Axiom" or something sounding like that... ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

Using future simple tense in a thesis

Being a non-native speaker, I have of course a bit of a problem with writing my thesis in English. In the thesis, I propose a software solution and I describe it. What I am not sure is: should I use ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related? [on hold]

I've been wondering recently, the past perfect tense (the "have"+particip form) seems to be used both less in American English than in "European" English and in "Latino" Spanish than in "European" ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Fronted adjuncts

Is it correct to begin sentences with adjuncts? To which degree are the sentences below acceptable? Do you need a special context to license this word order, or can you start a text with these ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What's a British equivalent to the more American expression 'Kiss my ass'?

I have the feeling that 'kiss my ass' isn't as widely used in the UK as it is in the US. I'm looking for a more British sounding equivalent.
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Is it correct to use “for” with “required”?

I am editing a sentence that is of the form: A has required for B to effect a change. To my ear, this sounds better: A has required that B effect a change. Am I wrong in my dislike of "has ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

«Said I» vs «I said»

Are «said I» and «I said» interchangeable? «Said I» is pretty uncommon, or so I thought. The sentence in question looks like so: «"It's not going to be your way," — said I.» Or it could be «"It's not ...
0
votes
3answers
49 views

Precise meaning of “fourfold”

I got into a disagreement with someone about the meaning of the word "fourfold." His contention is that it means up to four times as many whereas my contention is that it means four times as many, no ...
3
votes
2answers
52 views

Proper Punctuation for “Over” in Radio Communication

Given the statement "Vickery to Crann, Over" as radio communication, and knowing that over, as a radio procedure, is used to request a response from the person/group in which the radio procedure had ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Programming concision: “To replace the use of deprecated methods, for more up-do-date methods”

I was refactoring some old code and a lot of it used deprecated methods which had to be re-written to use more appropriate non-deprecated methods. When writing a changelog, it felt awkward writing ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Does capitalization change the meaning of the word coke?

Does capitalization change the meaning of the word coke? Does Coke mean the soda and coke mean the drug? Is there a grammar term that denotes this behavior? Or is there no rule and it's simply the ...

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