0
votes
5answers
18 views

Is there any word for a person who doesn't want to connect with others?

What is a word to say someone who doesn't want to connect any person?
1
vote
0answers
10 views

Do we need to put extra sound W or J in front of L in the case of /ei+L/ or /ee+L/ or /ai+L/ or /oo+L/ or /oi+L/ in American English?

Ok, let see the sale /seɪl/, that is from IPA but when speak American English, do we have to put /seɪ-jl/ (sound like sei jo) Similarly, feel /fiːl/ will become /fiː jl/ or mile /maɪl/ will become ...
3
votes
2answers
21 views

On the grounds that

Which is correct: "on the grounds that" or "on the ground that" if only one 'ground' is given?
1
vote
2answers
28 views

Is “also was” a correct construction?

I had an editor who was very picky about the use of the adverb "also" used with the past tense of "to be." According to her, there was a difference between "was also" and "also was." For example: to ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

what does “to walk at grade” mean?

"John was walking at grade and slipped on a patch of ice. When John slipped he did not fall to grade as he caught himself with his right hand [...]" Does "at grade" mean "on an uneven/inclined ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

In search for universal formal greetings

I am dealing with a system which is supposed to autoreply to certain emails. It cannot start with 'Dear (forename)' as it cannot parse a forename from email address or original email. It also cannot ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Is it true you should never put a comma after “then”? Please explain [duplicate]

I would like to know what the rule is, if there is one, behind the use of commas after all sequence words except then. I have seen "then" written both with a comma and without one, but I remember ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Comma Problem: I removed the commas from this sentence because I can't determine where to put them and was hoping for some help

Your relationships change based on the decisions you make when talking with each crewmember and in a few specific instances with decisions you make on which mission to take or how to resolve a ...
2
votes
2answers
46 views

Word for telling about events of a movie/book etc

When someone reveals details about surprising events which will happen in a movie or book to someone who doesn't know about them, we nowadays say that's a 'spoiler.' I'm looking for a verb for that, ...
1
vote
0answers
60 views

What are the different uses of “of course?” [on hold]

There are many uses of the English phrase "of course." What are the different ways to use the phrase "of course," and what do these uses connote?
6
votes
3answers
655 views

What do you call this elevated road structure?

I'm looking for an English term for this: Notice it's a single piece of road that is elevated, having another one pass underneath it. I wouldn't call it a bridge since a bridge usually goes over a ...
0
votes
4answers
85 views

Word for a short promotional video

I know that usually a short video with audio is called "clip", but at least for me, it's associated with a music video, MTV, etc, and doesn't sound professional enough. So is there a single word for ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Origin of the word “couch”? [on hold]

what is the origin of the word COUCH - the only link I can think of is accouchment (fr for lying in/birthing?)
1
vote
3answers
37 views

To have ALL + adjective + noun

I am wondering whether the sentence That school has all smart students is a valid alternative to All the students of that school are smart. Is it idiomatic/grammatically sound? (Let's ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

Collocations of “Uncertainty”

I'm trying to find the right preposition to go after "uncertainty", as in statistical uncertainties. I'm guessing that it might be "the uncertainty on the prognosis", but I'm not sure. Can anybody ...
-1
votes
3answers
67 views

Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers? [on hold]

It's quite easy to find lists of commonly misused words. They are all over the internet. But it's not clear which of them are the MOST commonly misused words. This article says that there are 38 ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?

I'm trying to phrase a sentence where I want to refer to the god and the devil/satan by using a combination of pronouns and adverbs rather than their names or nouns such as "good/evil", "divine power" ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Word stress: Sorry to keep you waiting

When I heard the phrase: "Sorry to keep you waiting" [sɔri tə kip jʊ weɪdɪŋ] in an American movie it sounded to me that: Sorry, keep, and waiting are the stressed words. I may be wrong because I'm not ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

What to rek means?

I believe its somewhat offensive, but I'm not sure. Examples I'll rek her tonight Get rekt
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

Why is English used internationally?

Why is English so globally prevalent, including its pervasiveness on the web? Is this because Britishers ruled the world decades ago, thereby disseminating English to those respective regions?
-2
votes
2answers
66 views

Might have, may have, could have, must have, would have

Yesterday there was a driving test of my friend. But I have not contacted him since yesterday. Now I am predicting about the result of his driving test. Please help me to correct my following ...
3
votes
3answers
70 views

A novel/book equivalent of the term off-screen

Off-screen can be used to describe events in a movie or tv show. For example, "Harry's father dies off-screen" What term or phrase can I use if I'm talking about events in a book? "Harry's ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

have resulted in people injured, cars ruined, and horses dead or hurt

In an American news story titled "Judge Orders NYPD Turn Over Public Records On Horse-Drawn Carriage Incidents", there's this passage: On Monday, carriage opponents said the judge’s ruling is sure ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Email replying way

Could you please help me replying this particular conversation? A: I will be out of the office until Wednesday 1 April 2015. If your matter is urgent, please call my office and leave a message with ...
11
votes
3answers
801 views

What's the difference between “archaic” and “obsolete” in dictionaries?

I have come across both of these terms when searching words via google. Is there a difference between these two terms, or is it just a case of one dictionary prefering one term over another?
6
votes
1answer
61 views

Name for balls of dirt made by rubbing hands

When your hands are dirty, you can rub them together vigorously, and small pills of dirt and oil will form that fall away. I have an inkling that there is a name for these things, or this action, but ...
-2
votes
0answers
24 views

What's the difference of Looking forward, looking up , looking after and looking out? [on hold]

What's the difference of them and how to use it in a sentence?
1
vote
3answers
59 views

What type of literary device is this?

What literary term is applicable to "I can see pain in your eyes."
-4
votes
0answers
44 views

Spelling vs. Pronunciation of “hawk” and “walk” [on hold]

Why are the words 'walk' and 'hawk' spelled differently? They sound the same so they should be spelled the same.
3
votes
3answers
264 views

Can a text read itself or can it only be read?

Is it correct to write or say for example that As it reads on the first page of the book, ... or only the following sentences are acceptable? As it can be read on the first page of the ...
15
votes
6answers
1k views

Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?

North wind tells the arrival of spring season in Japan. And incidentally, we have an idiom, “馬耳東風,” of which literal translation is ‘the east wind to the ears of horse,’ meaning a person who doesn’t ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Are epigraphs allowed in a technical essay? [on hold]

I am writing a technical essay as a coursework studying computer science degree and I want to put an epigraph in my article, is this allowed? Or technical essay doesn't allow to use such thing?
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Usage of the word “where”

I am not a native speaker. So please excuse my "silly" question. I have learned in my school that one can only use the word "where" in contexts describing locations, positions [or directions]. But I ...
-4
votes
0answers
37 views

If “can't” is the contraction for “cannot,” is “don't” short for “donut”? [on hold]

My English tutor said: If "can't" is the contraction for "cannot", "don't" is the technically correct contraction for "donut". I thought it was the contraction of "do not".
2
votes
0answers
35 views

English vis American spelling by 1888 [on hold]

Just a quick question - at lease I hope so. I'm writing a book about an american author writing a novel in 1888. By that date, would the author primarily spell with american or english spelling? ...
-5
votes
3answers
63 views

How is 's/he' pronounced? Do we say 'She or he should …“ or ”He or she should …"? [on hold]

How is 's/he' pronounced? Do we say 'She or he should ..." or "He or she should ..."? Ex.: When a person applies for a job, s/he should always bring a resume.
3
votes
4answers
96 views

A linking word that expresses contrast but in a positive context

Is there a linking word that expresses contrast but in a positive way in this sentence, I have thought of ( Fortunately) but am looking for something more formal This fact raises questions as to how ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

“But for all his foolish pranks, he was worshipped in the ranks”

But, for all his foolish pranks, He was worshipped in the ranks The Green Eye of the Little Yellow God As a native English speaker, it was always clear to me that Mad Carew was worshipped ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Is it acceptable to lowercase 'google' in all verb forms? [on hold]

Is it acceptable to lowercase 'google' in all verb forms? For example: He googled the information. He is googling the information. He googles the information. Please google the information. Is it ...
3
votes
3answers
105 views

is “modus operandi” singular or plural?

Is the phrase (as used in English) "modus operandi" singular or plural? And if the former, what is its plural form [or vice versa]? (To my untutored eye, "modus" seems to be a singular form, while ...
0
votes
2answers
15 views

Which tense to describe the analysis on a dataset?

It is normal to analyze a dataset in a paper. I am not sure when to use present/past tense to describe how you analyze the data and what your results are. Here I use a short example text to illustrate ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Red Moon in Germany [on hold]

I currently live in Berlin, Germany. I started to have interest in watching the sky lately and all these things about energy and the world and nature. I'm looking for a good place in Berlin or near ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Which is more grammatically correct; [on hold]

Which is more grammatically correct - a guide to things to do or a guide of things to do?
3
votes
2answers
47 views

What is the plural of “corpus callosum”?

The Latin "corpus callosum" is also the common English name for a bundle of nerve fibers that connect the hemispheres of the cerebrum. Should the plural be the odd-sounding "corpa callosa" or the ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Why do ESL speakers sometimes use “sir” to women? [migrated]

When I use a website with a large numbers of users for whom English is not their first language (specifically, fiverr.com), I often get addressed as "Sir", even though I am a woman. How come? My ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

“Myriad” for describing unquantifiable things? [on hold]

Is it possible to use the word "myriad" to describe a great amount of something that is not quite quantifiable? Specifically, I'm wondering about "a myriad of misinformation".
0
votes
3answers
35 views

Could help but curse(d)?

I have a sentence here: Tom couldn't help but cursed when he saw Sam dressed like that. I feel like there's something off about the sentence, but I don't know how to change it to make it sound ...
0
votes
4answers
46 views

perfect infinitives

It is said to have been a great place. In the preceding sentence, is the perfect part of have been a great place implying that the place has been great up till now — as the sentence is in ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

4 tables or 4 table? [on hold]

I am preparing a technical documentation. I am facing problem to frame a simple sentence i.e; "The database deals with 4 tables" or "The database deals with 4 table". Which one is correct. Kindly let ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

How did the spelling of 'mien' evolve?

I ask only about mien's definition of 'A person’s look or manner', and not the Yao people. OED: Etymology: Probably a merging of two words of distinct origins: (i) shortened < demean n.; ...

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