0
votes
1answer
7 views

Why is a young surfer called a “grommet” or a “grom”?

The title says it all, I think. But, that first sentence by itself apparently does not meet the site's "quality standards". So I have to copy and paste to make the machine happy. Again, then: why is a ...
1
vote
0answers
10 views

Can a remote conditional have “might” in the protasis?

In the Cambridge grammar of English language by Huddleston and Pullum, the authors write: A remote conditional must have a modal auxiliary as the apodosis verb (usally would, should, could, or might) ...
1
vote
2answers
13 views

A similie / metaphor for the concept that an entity is formed from a wide range of factors

I would really appreciate any help with the following. I am trying to explain that health is not simply determined by biological factors. Instead it is shaped by a whole host of variables: ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Proper usage of vote against and vote for

Case study: You are a part of a game, say 'Mafia', if you know how it is played. Here, a moderator selects a 'Mafia' and a 'God'. The Mafia can kill anyone, the God can save anyone. All happens under ...
2
votes
1answer
14 views

Single adjective for containing a lot of text (digital)

I was wondering if there is a word for a graphic, screen, picture, document, etc. that contains a lot of text. Specifically for digital media. The context is that I've noticed that the Walgreens pin ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is “to wear” also used as an “dynamic verb” meaning “to don”, “to put on”?

My intuition was that the verb to wear could be used in two ways (besides all its other senses that is.) A "stative" sense related to the state of having clothes (etc) on. A "dynamic" sense related ...
0
votes
2answers
18 views

correct usage of the single quotation mark? [duplicate]

So I was reading a book one day and I saw this. He gave her the 'Shut up look' is that correct? And, if so why? btw it was not in bold in the book.
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Example of this type of book

So I'm writing an essay about families that are "different" and how they have a hard time in life. Could anyone give me any examples of popular novels which have this? Edit: Sorry! I just realized ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Word ordering for sequels of works whose titles start with 'The'

Hopefully a simple one, but my Google-fu is letting me down. Typically, when alpabetising titles, I would move the 'The' to the end of the title but, in the case of a sequel, should that be moved to ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is the most appropriate opposite of “Select All”?

Is it more appropriate to use "Deselect All" or "Select None" or some other phrase to indicate the opposite of "Select All"? Context: A toggle button in a piece of software that will select all items ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

Definition of 'middle-class'

Is a waitress a middle-class or lower-class worker? Can a waitress be defined as belonging to the proletariat?
3
votes
3answers
48 views

Why does “smashing” mean “very good”?

Smashing is a BrE slang which means "very good" or "impressive". Most folks might know this already, due to its use as a catch phrase by various BrE characters in media. However, from the usual ...
-2
votes
1answer
30 views

“It is me whom she loves” or “It is I whom she loves” which one is grammatically correct?

It is me whom she loves or It is I whom she loves Because I know that "It is I" is grammatically correct.
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Definition of proletariat

What is the definition of a proletariat. The dictionary tells me any working person, but in the roman empire it was a lower class citizen. Can middle class be considered proletariat?
0
votes
1answer
15 views

What is the antonym of “result” or “consequence”?

A "result" or "consequence" is the what happens as a result of the concept of the word. For example: War -- death, suffering, winner, looser, etc. Is there a word that can describe the opposite ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

the usage of “insalubrious”

Does it make sense to say an insalubrious relationship between two countries? If not, what would be a better replacement? hey this is my first post on this website.. I'm a non-native english ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“The Sultan of Swat” is to nickname as “Babe” is to what?

Trying to name things in a computer data model. People have a variety of name roles, such as legal name, maiden name, etc. "The Sultan of Swat" is a nickname or pseudonym of George Ruth. It seems ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What word could be used to mean “de-humanized” (not a word)

What is a good word for "dehumanized" Ehrenreich argues that the workplace has been ------- by corporate capitalism. I would want to put something in there that means it has become inhuman
0
votes
0answers
8 views

The meaning of “Alexis” in Pope's Second Pastoral

"Alexis" comes from Greek, meaning "to help, defend." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_(given_name) Alexander Pope seems to use it in a different sense. His Second Pastoral is entitled Summer ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What language technique is “I am gone though I am here”

I am writing an essay about Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' and I was wondering what language technique is used in "I am gone though I am here". Is it a juxtaposition, oxymoron or what?
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Word for “Workingness”

I know "workingness" is not a word, but I am looking for a word that means it. For example: Evaluate the workingness of capitalism?
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Oxymoron Examples

I am trying to write some new oxymoron examples. If a grammar school stops teaching grammar (drops grammar from the curriculum), would this be called oxymoronic?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Pronunciation of “influence”

What's the correct pronunciation of "influence"? Specifically, which syllable is stressed? I always thought it was INfluence, but recently I heard it pronounced inFLUence by some people. Which one is ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

What is the term when a phrase means just the opposite of what it used to mean?

'At glacial speed' used to mean something that went very slowly, but with global warming, the glaciers are retreating at a much greater and increasingly faster rate. What is the term that describes ...
6
votes
1answer
38 views

What exactly is an idiom?

A recent question on the phrase "take my word for it" sparked a tangential discussion about calling it an idiom. I disagreed with the word since "take my word for it" is not figurative. Wikipedia ...
5
votes
3answers
228 views

What's the proper American English and British English word for the wind shield used on beaches?

In England, the beaches can be windy. I have seen people put up a "wind shield" like this. I haven't seen people use this in America or Europe, but I haven't been to many beaches there. I'd call ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

In the 2010 film “Easy A”, there is an exchange between several characters:

Rhiannon: Aren't you supposed to be like, eternally in love with him, and shit? Olive Penderghast:Yes, I believe so. If I was "A Gossip Girl in Sweet Valley with traveling pants". What does Olive ...
3
votes
1answer
12 views

Which vs. What in regards to Continuous Numbers (like Temperature)?

As this question makes clear, "which" is used when there is a set number of choices available, while "what" is used when there is not a set number of choices available. Which term do we use, however, ...
4
votes
1answer
94 views

“The way in which”: a grammar mistake or not?

I'm studying English pronouns and my book says that the sentence "the way in which" is incorrect and I have to use, instead, only "the way". Is it true? And if so, why? Here are some sentences: ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Can “unto” be used instead of “onto” in American English?

Is there a difference in how the preposition "onto" is used in British and American English? I always understood it to match the following dictionary definition I found online, and was not aware of ...
-1
votes
0answers
21 views

Do you make money “in” test.com or “by” test.com?

If test.com is my website name, which one is correct: In test.com you can make money By test.com you can make money How can I explain to someone that if you register on my site you can do ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

What preposition is preferred: December “of” or “in” the year 2014?

When making a certificate for an award, is it correct to write "On this 31 day of December of the year 2014" or should it be in the year 2014?
5
votes
5answers
332 views

Is there a word for a person who can understand difficult concepts or ideas quickly? [duplicate]

Just as the question asks. Is there a word for a person who can grasp difficult concepts or ideas quickly, especially if they are new? For example: "That person is new to finance, and seems to have ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

How do you pronounce 'vegan'?

Theoretically, there are four possible pronunciations of 'vegan' due to two syllables constituting this word, namely, 've'('vee' or 'vay'?) and 'gan'('gun' or 'gen' as in 'generate'?). The online ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

List of words to never use when writing [on hold]

Let's compile a list of words never to use in writing
1
vote
0answers
48 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Using localising adjectives + adverbial construction with 'where'

I am wondering whether it is possible to use an adverbial phrase with 'where' to describe words like 'ashore' or 'aground'. Examples: I stepped ashore where the sun was filling with a red ...
4
votes
0answers
31 views

Dictionary of English constructions

There is a family of grammars called construction grammar that started perhaps in the 80s with the work of Fillmore & Kay among others. Examples of constructions include: the time + away ...
-1
votes
2answers
34 views

Take my word for it or take my word for this?

Me and a friend got into an argument. He says that you can say "Take my word for this". I say that the proper use is "Take my word for it". Could someone elaborate on each of those and tell us who is ...
4
votes
9answers
389 views

Derogatory word or term for a peasant/lower class

What is a derogatory word or term for a peasant/lower-class person that is stronger or more insulting than pleb? It could be an archaic term used by nobles during the Middle Ages.
0
votes
0answers
36 views

gerund versus noun

I write an essay The subject is : retirees who wish to take their retirement abroad. As a title, I will choose between : Retirement beyond borders Retiring beyond borders Retirement without borders ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

'Understand and learn' or 'learn and understand' [on hold]

This may be a bit philosophical, but what is more correct: 'Understand and learn' or 'learn and understand'? Or: do you have to learn to be able to understand, or can you only learn something when ...
3
votes
2answers
46 views

Verbs with prepositions in subordinate clauses?

When I use verbs with prepositions like "to know of" in a subordinate clause like Examples (the 1st is wrong [genitive construction], the 2nd doesn't make sense but it's about grammar): "I wonder ...
2
votes
1answer
30 views

What does “all words are pegs to hang ideas on” mean?

I have searched for this quote's meaning by Henry Ward Beeccher, but couldn't find the meaning. What does all words are pegs to hang ideas on means?
0
votes
3answers
26 views

Further Training

Does the word "Further Training" exist in American English? Is it, for example, used when talking about training employees? Or do people prefer using "Training and Development" or "Corporate Training ...
1
vote
2answers
21 views

How does 'to partake of' develop to mean 'be characterized by'?

What's an intuitive derivation behind definition 3, that helps to internalise its meaning: 3. partake of = Be characterized by (a quality) [ODO] How does the etymology (listed in that link ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

The use of “to” in some titles

While I'm browsing Reddit, I sometimes find a title which contains "to" in the sentence even though it might be totally unnecessary. What is the difference between : Yahoo stops all new ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

Using “neither” without “nor”

I'm trying to improve on the last part of this sentence: "Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, although he did not provide the names of its authors, either." My first instinct is: ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

What does “Yeah, you did” mean?

This has been a question since I watched the episode Ted Mosby, Architect [HIMYM, Season 2] long time back. Yesterday I came across this again and I still don't get it. What does "Yeah, you did" ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Is there any merit to “Angry 'on' you”

Currently where I live there are almost ZERO English native speakers. I love that though. Not because I seek the attention of being the only native speaker around but because it gives me the perfect ...

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