This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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0answers
3 views

To outstay vs. overstay one's welcome

I came across the expression "outstayed my welcome" in the following excerpt of a novel I glance around and see that the café has filled up with people ordering lunch and that a couple is queuing ...
0
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3answers
61 views

Does the phrase “Santa just isn't” make sense?

As the title says, does it make sense? It feels right. Not just though.
0
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2answers
37 views

Usage of “indisposed”

I have sometimes heard the word "indisposed" use as synonymous for "unavailable." Especially in the context of leaving a message. For example: "Hello. You have reached X. I am currently ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Why is “fastly” not a word?

As well as being an adjective, fast is an adverb. We use it all the time as such: He ran fast. However, though slow is definitely an adjective, it sounds wrong when used as an adverb, because ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Usage of care: can I say that “I care about how the news paper wrote about me”?

Can I say that "I care about how the news paper wrote about me" I am sure about the usage that I care about my family. It implies that I love my family, I am emotionally attached with them, and they ...
8
votes
4answers
26k views

Is 'useable' preferred in certain regions, or just an alternate spelling of 'usable'?

I rarely use spell checkers, but today when I did use one, it suggested changing the word 'useable' to 'usable' (i.e. to drop the first 'e'). This seemed immediately intuitive and I thought I'd just ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

I love you for like ever [on hold]

Can I say: "I love you for like ever" or I should say "I will love you for like ever" or both forms are correct? Thank you very much!
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Mars orbits Sun [duplicate]

Why do we call the star in our solar system "The Sun" when all other celestial bodies are addressed simply as Jupiter, Neptune, or Sagittarius A Star? Ex: The Saturn has many rings. Incorrect Ex: ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

What do you call this “Rain rains” [duplicate]

Saying things like "rain rains" "thunder thunders" etc
3
votes
2answers
835 views

Fox and dog terms as applied to women

My curiosity here arises from the fact that it seems bizarre that "fox" and "dog" (not terribly dissimilar creatures - see Belyaev's fox experiment) would have such opposite meanings when used in ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Can threshold implies minimum requirement in formal essay? [on hold]

Can threshold implies minimum requirement in formal essay? Thank you very much!
1
vote
3answers
876 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
1
vote
2answers
111 views

“Lying supine” vs. “supine”

Is it natural to say "lying supine"? The word supine, by definition, already suggests lying [See: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/supine]. However, I was just confused because one of the ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is the use of the word “recognize” accurate in these sentences?

The following are some learning outcomes a freshman student should achieve. Is the use of the word recognize accurate in these sentences? Or, is there a better way to say this? Recognize the types ...
1
vote
2answers
101 views

Does the word zealous have an implicit religious connotation? [duplicate]

Earlier today I was describing someone to a friend. I said, "I never realized how zealous he was." I meant for the meaning of zealous here to be religiously zealous. Without an adverb, I would ...
3
votes
10answers
1k views

Better word for blackmail or extortion

A while ago I used the word blackmail in a situation, just to learn that the word didn't fit. I am left wondering whether there is a better choice. I probably have to explain the situation (I'll try ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?

Another Skeptics.SE user and I are discussing the meaning of the word "prescriptivism". (Yes, we are aware of the recursion involved.) In particular, I have cited a couple of examples of scientists ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

How to use his/her about a general group of people [duplicate]

Is it customary to use his instead of her even if you refer only to women like in my example below. It is a comment to a woman from a woman, likely referring to only women. Shouldn't you say "her own ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

What does “Towards Reference” phrase mean? [on hold]

I wrote a conference paper about technical requirements of mesh networks in smart grids. Originally I named it "Engineering Requirements for Mesh Networks in Smart Grids", but a reviewer changed its ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

Why the correct answer is Choice(A), not (C) [on hold]

The___of companies that now take orders over their Web sites us remarkable. A. Diversify B. Diverse C. Diversity D. Diversion
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votes
0answers
18 views

Why use “functional”? [on hold]

We need to have a spare copier since the only one that is__(functional)___is on its last leg. A. Functioned B. Functions C. Functional D. Function
-1
votes
1answer
18 views

What are the differences of store(n.) and storage(n.)? [on hold]

Store ex: The store's inventory has to be entered manually into the database. Storage ex: Storage closet is where you will find all our office supplies.
3
votes
2answers
372 views

Why 'aye aye sir' instead of 'yes sir' in naval response?

From Wikipedia, I know Aye aye sir is used in a naval response. I want know the origin of why Aye aye sir is used here? Another question: when I saw TV series A Song of Ice and Fire, I found Aye is ...
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

If pogonotrophy means to grow a beard, is there a term for shaving a beard?

If pogonotrophy means "to grow a beard", is there a term for shaving a beard? How would you use pogonotrophy in a sentence? And if there is an antonym for this word, how would you use it in a ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

Is this grammatically correct? [closed]

John Appleseed, an old family friend. He has influenced my life in so many ways. One of them being where I would like to go in life. He has inspired me into becoming a teacher and pushing me to work ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Is “dissecting the anatomy of x” a correct expression? [closed]

I wonder whether one can dissect anatomy, or if dissection is something you say of anatomy, or something like that.
5
votes
8answers
15k views

What is the difference between “Sofa” and “Couch”?

Is there any difference between the two? Which one is more common? Which of the two words is more appropriate if the "piece of furniture" is big, comfortable and expensive?
1
vote
1answer
134 views

“Don't fall in anger”, I heard you say

If the phrase rang a bell, it's because the actual Oasis song lyric is "Don't look back in anger", I heard you say. But did my question title sound very strange or only slightly off? I might argue ...
6
votes
9answers
20k views

New (slang?) meaning of bass?

I have come across the song "About that bass" by Meghan Trainor, and was wondering what "bass" and "treble" mean in the chorus, which goes: Because you know I'm all about that bass, 'Bout that ...
14
votes
4answers
23k views

Recur vs. Reoccur

Is there any difference between the verbs reoccur and recur? Several sources suggest that they are synonymous, but some fine-tuners suggest that there is a nuanced difference, such as Grammarist, ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

What is an adjective synonym for “discretion” or “up to you?”

This has been bothering me for some time, and I apologize for any mistakes here. What I'm looking for is another word for discretion without possession. It's almost like saying the phrase "up to ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Are poor and rich both relative terms? [closed]

Are words poor and rich very relative and depends from person to person in context of perspective ?
1
vote
2answers
87 views

I saw this notice in a bank today. Is this an oxymoron? [closed]

Fresh coins / banknotes are available *Subject to availability I know what they mean to say but shouldn't they be using some other word instead of available in the first part of the notice? ...
5
votes
4answers
328 views

Capitalization of the word universe

Playing around with Google's Ngram viewer, where you can see how many times a word is used in books, I stumbled on this: It shows how often universe and Universe have been used in books. I think ...
-4
votes
0answers
25 views

Writing e-mail to a supplier [closed]

How can I politely ask a customer to find attached a purchase order? Is there more than one possibility?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Use “them” or “it”, when refering to the abstract concept, fears [closed]

Use "them" or "it", when refering to the abstract concept, fears. "Let’s put our fears in a little bottle and use it as a garnish for meals, or sprinkle some on popcorn for scary movies." OR ...
0
votes
2answers
940 views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
2
votes
2answers
300 views

“She hasn't said but a few words to me…” or “She has said but a few words to me…”?

"She hasn't said but a few words to me since last winter." or "She has said but a few words to me since last winter." Which of these is right? I think the latter is heard more often, but ...
-3
votes
2answers
72 views

What does “pitting folk” mean? [closed]

This is from the Economist (Jan 3, 2015). (You can see the full article here - ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

Is “what a pity” used as often as “what a shame”?

As an ESL speaker, I'm puzzled by these two phrases... Is "what a pity" used as often as "what a shame" in an English-speaking country? Is there any difference between them in meaning or usage?
0
votes
2answers
61 views

An .exe or a .exe? [duplicate]

In speech .exe translates to dot e-x-e. In writing, however, should one say an .exe or a .exe?
-1
votes
3answers
66 views

Can “crouch” be used to indicate motion?

Can "crouch" be used to indicate motion? Example: I crouched to the edge of the cliff and stayed there, still. (So in this example I'm using crouched as a synonym for walking "crouchley" Is ...
1
vote
3answers
100 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

“mid” without a following hyphen in these words?

The Chicago Manual, 16th edition, says that "mid" is followed by a hyphen only if a capitalized word (mid-Atlantic) or a number (mid-1950s) follows. That said, I believe that all of the following ...
16
votes
4answers
941 views

Can I use “US-American” to disambiguate “American”? If not, what can I use?

Based on this question, I wonder: as an alternative to USAian (which is very nonstandard) is it OK to use US-American to more clearly indicate "inhabitant of the USA"? According to Google Ngram, this ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

A word for the state of a object which does not work

I want to describe a state of a object of not being functional and being not likely to work normally unless being fixed. How do i describe it? Is break implys that something physically breaks into ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Is there such a word as staticness?

I want to use the word staticness but can't find it on a dictionary. I've seen it though been used in my google search.
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Which one is correct “Facilitate easy operation” or “Facilitate operation”?

The dictionary says Facilitate means ease and I have seen many people using facilitate easy operation, facilitate easy learning etc. What is the correct usage??
2
votes
3answers
257 views

What is the word for the movement you make when you give someone your hand?

When someone falls down and you give your hand to her but she doesn't hold your hand, what's the proper word for the gesture you've done. You extend your hand? Is "extending a hand" right usage as a ...
1
vote
3answers
585 views

Is “my place” correct and common in British English?

I was recently told that "my place", such as in "let's go to my place" is not commonly used in British English? Is that the case and what would you say instead?