This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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2answers
8 views

I want to know how is the word sir used with the name of a person

e.g. if I want to refer to Bill Gates in writing or speech with respect what should I say sir Bill Gates or Sir Bill , sir Gates, Bill sir/gates sir(this is the way it is used in India) and if I'm ...
2
votes
5answers
611 views

Is “real-time” a term known to every English speaker?

Real-time is a common term in engineering texts. It means a system that produces output within a very tight deadline. I am writing a proposal to be read by non-engineers. I just wonder if it is clear ...
1
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2answers
52 views

what is the difference between later and latter?

As cited above what is the difference between later and latter? Latter : occurring or situated nearer to the end of something than to the beginning, the meaning of latter is similar to later only. so ...
1
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1answer
16 views

Impel and compel and the finer nuances

I was contemplating over the two words - impel and compel. consider the examples: 1. she impelled me to take the job 2. she compelled me to take the job. is the word compel somewhat derogatory or ...
2
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1answer
40 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a 'small' nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take 'light' naps
5
votes
5answers
919 views

What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?

We are being taught English by a native speaker from Alaska. He states that many of modal verbs we were taught are outdated and have been replaced. E.g.: We must ➙ We have to May I ...
2
votes
3answers
63 views

Is “womb owners” an accepted word?

I was a bit surprised to find a word, “womb owners” in the article titled, “Women can be funny, admits Jerry Lewis (sort of)” in Time Magazine’s online edition (April 15, 2014). The article begins ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

When to use “rather than” versus “instead of”?

I never really gave a deep thought at this but recently a teacher of talked about language and there was an implicit question in it. something like there is a difference between "rather than" and ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is “cheese-stick (operation, manufacturing, building) current word?

I was drawn to the word, “cheese-stick” appearing in the article titled, “The book that didn’t exist” in the Opinion Pages of New York Times (April 14), which deals with the art and craft of writing. ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Difference between “I will call you” and “I give you a call”?

What is the difference between I will call you and I give you a call?
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Use of “discriminate” as verb

Is the following sentence correct? They are discriminated because of their skin colour. My gut feeling tells me discriminate (in this sense) has to be followed by against. Dictionary examples ...
5
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7answers
5k views

What is the difference between “Sofa” and “Couch”?

Is there any difference between the two? Which one is more common? Which of the two words is more appropriate if the "piece of furniture" is big, comfortable and expensive?
1
vote
1answer
66 views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

The use of “as” [on hold]

My question: In the following sentence, what part of speech is the word as? He visited the United Nations, or the UN, as it is more commonly called. Is it merely a conjunction? If it is not, ...
7
votes
6answers
477 views
+100

Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?

In the following sentence I prefer saying relatives but I am unable to explain why. It's going to be a small wedding. Only a few friends and relatives have been invited On doing research I ...
3
votes
3answers
69 views

Does the type of play on words in “Some people are immune to good advice” have a name?

On Breaking Bad, Saul Goodman remarks, "Some people are immune to good advice." Similarly, a friend of mine described a weekend as "a celebration of procrastination". Does word play that juxtaposes ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Difference between “Generally, I am…” and “I am generally…”?

Revisiting my CV, I have stumbled over a small question. I originally wrote: “I am generally willing and able to relocate worldwide.” Today, I noticed I could also write: “Generally, I am ...
16
votes
4answers
4k views

Is “evidence” countable?

As a native English speaker, I am often asked by friends and colleagues to correct their manuscripts. One of the most common mistakes I find is the use of the noun evidences. Now, the dictionary ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

“All you battery needs can be found here” Is this correct?

I found this on the battery stand in a supermarket: "All your battery needs can be found here". I don't remember the exact wording, but what surprised me is that needs can be found on a supermarket ...
1
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0answers
28 views

Prima Facie: How would you use this in a sentence? [on hold]

I understand that 'prima facie' is 'at first glance', but how would you start/use the word in a sentence? Thanks.
1
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2answers
32 views

Usage of “In present-day”

Does the sentence In present day technology, the method can be broadly applied. correctly translate the idea that Now, with the development of inexpensive desktop computers, the method can be ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Usage of “whereabouts”

Is a noun "whereabouts" used not only for something moving (e.g. person) but for something still? For example: Do you know his whereabouts? vs Whereabouts of the building they searching is still ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What is meant by “communities of colour”?

When referring to the race and ethnicity does the word "coloured" mean anyone who is not white? For example "a distinct form of racism simply associates communities of colour with pollution." Also, is ...
2
votes
6answers
186 views

Is the “will” in “can and will” necessary?

Anyone who's ever seen much American film or television has heard some variation of the following sentences countless times: You have the right to remain silent. If you choose to give up that ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

“I'm to arrange the meeting”

The principal told me to arrange a meeting. Which of the following (if either) is correct, and why? The principal says I'm to arrange the meeting. The principal says to me to arrange the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Entertainment-related compounds

Ok I just want to ask and confirm a few compounds. 1) games shop or game shop - a place where you can buy video games 2) amusement arcade or arcade - a place where people went to play arcade ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

Meaning of “appreciate the calm”

From a web development book: Instead of taking a moment to appreciate the calm, developers have taken advantage of the stabilizing front-end platform to pile on a whole new wave of front-end ...
0
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2answers
40 views

What does the word “institutional” mean in this context?

Racism and sexism are examples of institutional practices that result in discrimination against individuals on the basis of their race or gender. The dictionary definition of institutional is ...
4
votes
2answers
89 views

The urban are urbanised, the urbane are ?

The two words 'urban' and 'urbane' are of related meaning; according to etymology one the child of the other. But how do we form verbs from these separate adjectives? We can speak of 'urban' ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

Insert or Enter? [migrated]

What is the difference between Insert and Enter? If I have a form to fill in, which legend is better? Insert your data or Enter your data Thanks, Nk
1
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4answers
50 views

Ways to say “Can't be bothered!”

How else can I express a feeling similar to "can't be bothered!" Words or phrases would be appreciated as well as variations from across the English speaking world.
0
votes
1answer
51 views

“Fast” vs “Quickly” vs “Speedy” vs “Rapidly”

A similar question has been asked. However, is it possible to give (general) differences in usage of fast, quickly, speedy and rapidly? And with respect to the top answer: Are quick and fast ...
11
votes
3answers
3k views

“Before” vs. “in front of”

Especially in speeches I often hear a sentence like I stand here before you... However during my English classes in school (I'm German) we were told that before should only be used if you're ...
2
votes
1answer
109 views

Are “kinda”, “sorta”, “oughta” and “sposta” acceptable in formal writing?

I get that sorta, kinda, sorta-kinda (this one I quite like though) oughta and sposta imitate speech but it still annoys me to find them "in print", especially when the overall tone is formal. ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
5
votes
6answers
32k views

What is the proper usage of the phrase “due diligence”?

I have encountered the phrase "due diligence" in the business world. The usage examples I have seen (mostly emails) cannot exactly be considered grammatical canon. An internet search produces ...
2
votes
3answers
49 views

Correct use of bound/bounded

I am not sure how to correctly use the word bound in this context: All partial sums of two given sequences are bounded by a positive constant. All partial sums of two given sequences are ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

The video will start presently

Presently * meaning "in a very short time, soon", is a widely accepted term, but why does its usage meaning "at the present time, currently" still remain an open area for dispute? Disputed usage: ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What is the meaning of “here” at the end of a sentence and how should it be used?

I have had a few international friends ask about "here" when used at the end of a sentence such as "I could use a little help here!" or "buy me some time here!". I would like to better explain this to ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

Is a comma necessary before “for which”?

Is a comma needed in this sentence? Is for which used correctly in this sentence? We define message codes for which security is well defined.
2
votes
2answers
56 views

I am allowed back in a week, am I banned or suspended?

The past few years I have noticed the increase of the word "banned" when a person gets suspended, especially in the context of American sports. 10 years ago I never heard that someone was banned for ...
1
vote
3answers
555 views

Which word to use, “again” or “anymore”?

I'd like to describe an action which I'm used to do but I won't do it in the future. Which word is correct, for example: Just a little more work, I'll never need that tool again. Or: Just a little ...
1
vote
3answers
62 views

Word that means “able to be prioritized” suitable for scientific publication?

I'm looking for a single word that means "able to be prioritized" that is suitable for use in a scientific paper. "Prioritizable" is essentially what I want, but in my searching this does not appear ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Where is the term clockwork used?

I was watching some cartoon show with a bunch of rugrats over the weekend and the term clockwork toy was used. It seemed to be referencing a wind-up toy. Is there any part of the English speaking ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Usage :Does consider mean Think? [migrated]

I consider cellphones are a nuisance. i consider cellphones as a nuisance. Cellphones are considered as a nuisance. which of these sentences are acceptable as standard English.
6
votes
4answers
17k views

“In school” vs “at school”

I sometimes get confused whether to use in or at. For example, Children were not at school yesterday, because yesterday was a holiday. Children were not in school yesterday, because yesterday ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Usage of “being” in sentence

Why is being used in the sentence below, and what does it mean? Lisa is upset about not being invited to the party Are they trying to use the passive voice? If yes, how would the sentence look ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Initial “See, …” or “Look, …” usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in ...
12
votes
4answers
516 views

In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?

I'm genuinely confused about this because at first I thought a spatula was a cooking tool resembling a flat pallet attached at an angle to the handle that could be used for activities such as flipping ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

“Offer an opinion” or “give an opinion”

Our company is about to relocate. Employees have been asked for input on the new campus. My thought was to preface my email with I would like to offer my opinion ... but should it be I ...