This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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7
votes
3answers
17k views

Which is correct: “anytime” or “any time”?

Is it "any time" or "anytime" or are those two things different?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

What words are trending?

Google graphs word usage in print by year. It was interesting to see "cardinality" show a sharp upwards trend. What other words have become vastly more popular in recent years? Is there a resource to ...
2
votes
4answers
38 views

'Fine Results' is fine?

I'm currently working in a slogan and my outcome so far is something like Fine Results, Simple Methods However, by googling "fine results", the search results shows me that there is little to ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Can you use “perhaps” at the beginning of a sentence and omit the verb?

For example: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. Perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. This is ...
-1
votes
2answers
52 views

What connotations does the word “semblance” have?

Is the meaning of the word "semblance" closer to that of "fake" or that of "illusion"? I mean, does it have the negative connotations that "fake" or "counterfeit" have, or is it something that can be ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Which phrase is grammatically correct?

Which phrase is grammatically correct: "working under a tight schedule" or "working with a tight schedule"?
6
votes
3answers
18k views

“Popular with” vs “Popular among”

Prof. Sat is not popular with/among his students. Which usage is correct here and why?
4
votes
1answer
567 views

Does “abstruse” carry a positive or negative connotation?

Generally, does the word "abstruse" give positive or negative (or neutral) connotations? For example, "daedal" and "profound" would generally be considered a word with positive connotations, whereas ...
4
votes
5answers
126 views

Can “some” be more than 50%?

The word "some" has often the sense of "few" if given in a bound. Does this mean more than 50%? It would be good if some historical account mentioned, who uses "some" to be more than 50%?
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Is it common to use 'time slot' to refer to days/weeks?

How would you say to a client that you a have a 'free time slot' (like days or weeks) to take a job? Is it common to refer to 'time slot' even if I'm thinking about days or even weeks?
4
votes
2answers
58 views

“Queuing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many.” Is this correct?

Or should I say "(...) once too often" or "(...) one time too many" instead? Or perhaps, "queuing twice for a cup of coffee is one queue too many?" My issue with once too many is that it makes once ...
5
votes
4answers
8k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
0
votes
3answers
337 views

“Martyr To” vs “Martyr For”

This book specifies the difference as: martyr for something: smb. who is made to suffer severely for a cause martyr to something: smb. who is acutely inflicted by something Oxford ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“confine” versus “boundary” [on hold]

Is anybody aware of the difference between confine and boundary? Both are translated as having the same meaning. Any clear tips?
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Can I use “US-American” to disambiguate “American”? If not, what can I use?

Based on this question, I wonder: as an alternative to USAian (which is very nonstandard) is it OK to use US-American to more clearly indicate "inhabitant of the USA"? According to Google Ngram, this ...
4
votes
3answers
59 views

Is it “tomorrow” after midnight? Or is it still “today”?

Let me start with an observation: Let's say it's half past 12 and you're heading off to bed, I personally would say Tomorrow I have to get up early for work And as far as I know all my friends ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
4
votes
2answers
167 views

Comprehensive subject?

I was baffled to find this in the introduction to a textbook: We hope that readers will find this text offering them a useful introduction to and a basic treatment of [...], as well as preparing ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Is there any specific word to describe this selfish idea?

"I support using cleaner energy source in moral, but if it harm my profit,eg:pay extra fee, I would not support" Is there any specific term to describe such idea?
0
votes
4answers
84 views

A rare currency

For example: When I am writing an article about friendship, and want to say it's difficult to find a good friend, it is possible to say it's like finding a rare currency today?
2
votes
3answers
168 views

Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?

A friend of mine for whom English is a second language told me that I am the only person he knows who uses the word "dislike", and asked me what the difference was from saying that I "don't like" ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

What's the function of 'adding to' here [on hold]

As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to pay their tribute to the dead, adding to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral. I just read this and I wondered what adding to means ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

“Could you please, let us know when this issue is fixed?” correct usage

Is this correct usage? I would like to ask someone to let me know when issue is fixed thanks
1
vote
2answers
41 views

To prolong vs to protract

What is the difference between the words to prolong and to protract? Can we replace the words with each other without losing their meanings in the following sentences? To protract means: Prolong: ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

The difference between remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace [on hold]

what are differences between the words remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace in a historical sense? A trace or remnant of something that is disappearing or no longer exists ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

to emanate from vs to stem from

Are the words to emanate from and to stem from synonym in the following sense? Do you think I can swap with each other without changing the meaning of the following sentences ? 1 (Of a feeling, ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

I want to know the difference between can I and could i

I am learning grammar and I feel some confusion between the usage of can I and could I. Is there some rule I should use?
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Difference between 'to seem' and 'to appear'

Is there a difference between the sentences "The general case seems to be open." and "The general case appears to be open." ? Or are they interchangeable?
5
votes
6answers
4k views

Do Americans use the term “garburator” or is there a better equivalent?

Is it obsolete to use the term garburator to refer to a garbage disposal unit in a kitchen? If it is, do we have a better term to replace it with? Also, what is the etymology of this word?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Linking words doubt

Is the following sentence correct? Can I use both linking words separated only with a comma? Additionally, although the quality is...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
4
votes
2answers
132 views

What line do they refer to in the idiomatic expression “on the line”?

The idiomatic expression on the line has two main meanings according to the American Heritage Dictionary: Ready or available for immediate payment. (A related expression is Cash on the ...
-1
votes
0answers
38 views

The differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly

What are the differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly in terms of meaning and usage ?
1
vote
1answer
65 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Keep on discussing vs Keep on discussing it

We kept discussing. We kept discussing whether God exists. Is an object (in this case, God's existence) necessary in this sentence? For example, with writing, it seems that an object ...
16
votes
1answer
2k views

Logically, could the word “University” mean the opposite of “Diversity”?

DI- twice; two-; double. DI-VERSE: showing a great deal of variety; very different. DI-VERS-ITY: the state of being diverse; variety. UNI- one; having or consisting of one. While, by ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

does the word PERSONS exist? Should I only use it for singular? PERSON [duplicate]

I need to know the correct use of this word, I am quiet confused about the plural form and singular form due to some people use it as plural persons and I was taught that the plural is people1
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Can I say a ligament has been ruptured?

In basketball, when you tear your achilles tendon, it can be said that it has been "ruptured." I understand what rupture means, so in the same context, can I say, I ruptured my ACL? In sports, I have ...
-2
votes
0answers
44 views

the word “annoying” in official documents [closed]

how do I call something annoying for user experience for example in official document?
0
votes
3answers
55 views

Which is most correct: “untransparent”, “un-transparent”, “intransparent”, “in-transparent”, or something else?

I want to say that something is not transparent. Which is most correct: "untransparent", "un-transparent", "intransparent", "in-transparent", or something else?
0
votes
3answers
47 views

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? [closed]

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? for example the word Archive can be written as arXve, where X is the Greek letter chi.
1
vote
1answer
140 views

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair or sofa - in a way that you can be approached from behind?

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair of sofa - in a way that you can be apporached from behind ? I've heard several times that you should place all the sofas and tables that ...
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Which is correct, “to take refuge in” or “to take refuge with”?

Concerning refuge with a higher existence such as an Omnipotent being, what is more befitting to use, English wise: To take refuge in [Omnipotent being] To take refuge with [Omnipotent being] ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

To gain/acquire/obtain comfort with something abstract - is this idiomatic, or at least acceptable?

I am encountering the expression "to gain comfort", "to acquire comfort", and to "obtain comfort" more and more lately. Example: "This issue was looked at in depth in 2013 and we obtained comfort at ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Can I use “more younger” in a sentence? [closed]

For example: Who looks more younger in this image, me or you?
13
votes
3answers
5k views

Usage of “many” vs “many a”?

Can someone please elucidate the difference between "many" and "many a"? In what context of usage should we add an extra "a" beside the word "many"? For example: Many times, I had seen that . ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Is it common to say X color filled Y shape?

I ask this because I couldn't find any instance on Google. Here's an example to illustrate the usage: The logo featured a cartoon whale drawn as a lower half-circle. Blue filled the shape, with ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

How can you use Fuzzily in a sentence? [closed]

I typed fuzzily in a spell-checked field on a website and was surprised to see it said it was correct. I looked it up on Merriam-Webster, and sure enough they list it as a word: fuzz·i·ly ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

What do you call this fraction?

Is this how you write these fractions in words? 5/21 is five twenty-ones, 1/21 is one twenty-one. Can someone please clear this for me? I know 1/4 is one-quarter or one-fourth and 2/5 is two-fifths ...