This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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2answers
23 views

“At peak” without implying it'll never improve again?

If something is currently at it's highest state ever achieved (so the right-most point on a graph would be the highest point) I have a tendency to want to say that it's "at its peak", but as far as I ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Usage of the word “refuse”

I have a question regarding the proper usage of the word "refuse" Let's say someone made a request to me, and my desire is to grant the request to the person. However let's assume that I am unable to ...
1
vote
3answers
42 views

Does 'lure' have a negative connotation

I'm looking for a name for my website which has the purpose of attracting people. I stumble across the word 'lure'. But I was wondering if the verb 'lure' has a negative connotation. Can any native ...
0
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3answers
39 views

Any kind of + plural word

I have a question about any kind of. Results can be applied to any kinds of drawing or texturing applications In the sentence above, should I use any kind of applications or any kinds of ...
-4
votes
3answers
31 views

What is the effect of 'stiff' in this sentence? [on hold]

In Ray Bradbury's A Sound of Thunder, there's this part that goes "...there's a stiff penalty..." What is the effect of 'stiff' here? It supposedly has some effect on the reader. Stiff means firm ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

How did the term “esquire” come to be used for lawyers?

Esquire, as I understand it means "mister." But in modern usage it is an abbreviated American appendage to names that indicates one is a lawyer, and it is used for men and women. How did that happen? ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

Gerund Separate Words

My friend and I have been debating if adding 'ing' to a word makes it its own word. We said Webster would be the final answer for the debate. A search on Webster though brought back the root word as ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Using the word “guess” in a scientific paper

I wonder if one can use the word guess in a scientific paper in the following context: "... to provide the best guess on answer response time ..." Would the usage of prediction or estimate be more ...
-2
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0answers
14 views

''Much more powerful than enough'' İs this phrase correct? [on hold]

''İf you are willing, you will be much more powerful than enough.'' Can ı say something like this?
1
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2answers
256 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

Difference between “difference” and “discrepancy”?

For quite a long time I have been using these two words interchangeably without thinking of their difference, even if it is slight. So can someone differentiate the former from the latter, please?
0
votes
2answers
40 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
1
vote
3answers
116 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
0
votes
4answers
351 views

Meaning and Origin of word “Pantheon”?

I spotted the word "Pantheon" here on the first and second paragraph on The Hindu but not able to understand the editor's view. On the 125th birth anniversary of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, on April 14, ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Fox and dog terms as applied to women

My curiosity here arises from the fact that it seems bizarre that "fox" and "dog" (not terribly dissimilar creatures - see Belyaev's fox experiment) would have such opposite meanings when used in ...
2
votes
4answers
86 views

How do you describe the 'darker side' of someone? Context given here

Context: Foster child learns to manipulate people to make them love her. She meets a kind mother for once, and she doesn't need to revert to her 'psychopathic' (for lack of a better word) side. I am ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Does the word “validator” exist?

Microsoft Word said it didn't exist and the online Oxford, Cambridge and Merriam dictionaries do not bring it up. Google Translator does translate it into portuguese, but I'm afraid it was a ...
7
votes
3answers
666 views

Capitalization of the word universe

Playing around with Google's Ngram viewer, where you can see how many times a word is used in books, I stumbled on this: It shows how often universe and Universe have been used in books. I think ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

“Good for Me!” as a response to someone doing something nice for you

I have done many nice things for a relative (e.g. reorganize the outdoor deck space) and upon seeing whatever I try & do nice for her she replies "Good for Me!" I find this offensive—am I ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How to say “Go ahead, I will follow you later” in other ways?

My friends are going out for lunch and ask me to go with them. I haven't finished my work. I will follow them 10 minutes later. Normally, what will you say? beside "I will follow you later."
2
votes
2answers
35 views

What is the difference in usage between “sports meet” and “sports meeting”?

In the past I had only heard the term "sports meet" and I assume it is American English. Recently, though, I have heard some English language learners call it "sports meeting." Is that British ...
6
votes
3answers
658 views

Is it ok to use fraught in a sentence without saying what the thing is fraught with?

Ex. is it ok to say such and such is fraught. Full stop? In a case where the context makes it clear what its fraught with?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Using “Whether” or “Whether or not”

I read the information about using whether or whether or not on your web site; however, I am still not certain about making the choice. Could you please tell me the specific rules for using whether ...
2
votes
9answers
122 views

Word meaning “someone who does all the work”

Is there a word for someone who does all of the work? Or for the person who is exploited when someone else steals the credit?
6
votes
1answer
73 views

Is the use of the positive anymore considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
1
vote
1answer
406 views

Are “kinda”, “sorta”, “oughta” and “sposta” acceptable in formal writing?

I get that sorta, kinda, sorta-kinda (this one I quite like though) oughta and sposta imitate speech but it still niggles me to find them "in print", especially when the overall tone is formal. ...
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votes
0answers
43 views
0
votes
3answers
58 views

word for someone who laughs things off? [on hold]

Is there a word for someone who laughs things off? In other words, someone who does no work but when told to do something they just laugh it off.
-4
votes
1answer
33 views

How can I use “accumulate” word in english? [on hold]

could any one explain me how to use accumulate word in english and in which context. Yesterday I tried to use it as in the followig example The banks will begin accumulate intrests on debtors ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Can we use patient as a verb?

Patienter is verb in French for to be patient. Why can't we have a verb too. It should be pronounced as in French - peshi-ent. Sentence: Could you please patient another week for your payment?
-2
votes
1answer
27 views

who among you vs. which of you [on hold]

What is the difference between who among you and which of you? Is it correct to say Which of you lives here?
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Do we use 'competent' to indicate the person or body responsible for something?

EU texts often refer to the 'competent body', 'competent department or 'competent official', meaning the body, department or official that is responsible for the activity in question. For example: ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

“Details on” or “Details about”? Use in technical writing

I'm writing a technical text about the information in a report, dealing with telecommunication procedures. I want to highlight that the information field I'm referring to doesn't provide any ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair or sofa - in a way that you can be approached from behind?

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair of sofa - in a way that you can be apporached from behind ? I've heard several times that you should place all the sofas and tables that ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

“Sorry excuse for a” VS “Sorry excuse of a”? [closed]

Which of the two is the correct sentence: You are a sorry excuse of a magician OR You are a sorry excuse for a magician If both applies, then what is the difference between the two and when should ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Can unthinking entities be “informed” in the sense of “being provided with information”?

In scientific papers, I read something along the lines of the following at times: Our results on banana transmogrifation may inform studies on apple transmogrification. Given the context, I am ...
1
vote
4answers
16k views

Understanding “as of”, “as at”, and “as from”

I'd appreciate your assistance in helping me particularly understand how to use the phrase "as of" properly. What is the proper interpretation of the following sentence? "I need you to get me all ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Is “all in all” the right choice for the following sentence?

(Long description about the person.) All in all, he didn't look like an army man. Maybe I'm wrong but I think all in all is more commonly used to give a good-and-bad judgement? Example: ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Is “indifferent of” correct in this sentence? Is it ever correct? Should I replace it with something?

Is "indifferent of" correct in this sentence? Is it ever correct? Should I replace "of" with something? "In regards to hacking, do you approve, disapprove, or are you indifferent of the practice?" ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Can “apocryphal” be used to mean “not true”?

I always thought that apocryphal should just mean "of doubtful authenticity". But more and more I am noticing that people use it positively to mean mythical or untrue, especially in phrases such as ...
11
votes
5answers
9k views

What preposition should one use with “redundant”?

I realize it's usually better to just say "A and B are redundant". But, I've also seen A is redundant with B ... to B ... of B all with basically the same intended meaning. Are any of these more ...
-2
votes
2answers
68 views

Is 'how come the sky is blue?' considered proper English? [on hold]

I intensely despise 'how come' but I see it quite regularly. Is it considered proper English?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Is the phrase “…could only know by then” correct?

He told me he would give me the answer after the trip. Was there something he could only know by then? I don't know why but it sounds a little weird to me. Anyway, to make sure I searched on ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

How should I join the following sentence so it becomes an adjective?

Wow, that was the most philosophical I-don't-care-that-you're-not-a-virgin explanation I've ever heard. Should I write it like this? Or should I omit some words?
6
votes
2answers
15k views

Which preposition should I use here: “thinking of” or “thinking about”?

Thinking of getting an external keyboard Thinking about getting an external keyboard Which one is grammatically correct and why?
0
votes
4answers
62 views

Can “guilty” be used to express remorse without preceding it with “feel”?

Example: The affair left her emptier than she thought, guiltier than she thought. I'm hesitant to write something like that. Because I think guilty in these situations is usually preceded with ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Is there a word that means “having to do with genre” or “with respect to genre”?

I'm trying to write a paper about artistic genres and adaptation, and it would be many times easier if I knew a word that meant "having to do with genre." I'd thought of using the word "generic," ...
-2
votes
1answer
36 views

You can vs. You may [closed]

I'm struggling with the use of "can" or "may" in this sentence. "Maybe you can encounter one of our relatives" or "Maybe you may encounter one of our relatives." Which is correct? Or are ...
-2
votes
0answers
61 views

Please help to improve my sentence in this paragraph - my daily writing [closed]

I am studying English by practicing everyday as much as possible. Below you can see my daily writing, it's completely simple because my level is in basic. Please help me to improve these sentence and ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Is the expression “the location of a previous bench” correct?

So I've been correcting an architectural piece translated into English, wherein a sentence befuddles me: ...A wooden table... marked the location of a previous bench. What the author tried to ...