This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1answer
506 views

Compliments — for people, things or both?

Are compliments applicable both to people and things, or to people only?
2
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3answers
1k views

What's another word for “perfect analogy” / “non-analogy”?

Is there a word to mean an analogy so perfect that it is no longer considered an analogy? For example, what may be a suitable word in the sentence below? : ...The analogy eventually breaks down, ...
2
votes
3answers
545 views

Is the adjective “nothing loath” still in common usage?

Google Ngram Viewer shows a decline in the use of “nothing loath” since the 1970s unlike its antonym “loath” which is still widely used. Would it be appropriate for me to use it or has it become ...
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3answers
2k views

Which word to use, “again” or “anymore”?

I'd like to describe an action which I'm used to do but I won't do it in the future. Which word is correct, for example: Just a little more work, I'll never need that tool again. Or: Just a little ...
-1
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1answer
89 views

designtime vs. design time, are both valid?

I have seen people using Runtime and designtime for a computer program. Is designtime a valid word?
0
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1answer
459 views

Is it correct to say “under the shelter of X, a Y was taking place?”

Is it correct to say the following? All that could be heard was the wind blowing, and giant waves crashing against the rocks in the beach. Under the shelter of the inn, a barbecue was taking ...
1
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2answers
16k views

How to use the word “petrichor” in a sentence? [closed]

What are the ways in which the word petrichor which means scent of the rain, might be used? Can we use a phrase like "the pleasant petrichor"?
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1answer
6k views

Can “in its own right” be used to mean “in itself”? [closed]

I’d like to use the phrase “in its own right” to mean “in itself” as in: This subject has no practical application, but is interesting in its own right. Is this a correct usage of the phrase? ...
1
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2answers
12k views

“by myself” against “ by my own” [closed]

As a Spanish speaking person, I think I have a very good level of English, but I still get confused with the use of “by myself” versus “by my own”. Can someone please give me some key ideas (and ...
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1answer
4k views

Use of “to be having”

I am confused with the usage of "to be having". He is assumed to be having the diamonds. or He is assumed to have the diamonds. Which one is correct?
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1answer
4k views

What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”? [closed]

The insulting names jerk, a--hole, bit-h, cu-t, and dipsh-t are defined by most dictionaries as to generally used to describe someone who is foolish, contemptible, obnoxious, and disagreeable, but ...
2
votes
2answers
416 views

“She hasn't said but a few words to me…” or “She has said but a few words to me…”?

"She hasn't said but a few words to me since last winter." or "She has said but a few words to me since last winter." Which of these is right? I think the latter is heard more often, but the ...
0
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3answers
325 views

What part of speech is “righteous” in this sentence?

I'm wondering about the word class. It does not mean to make righteous just, but to declare or pronounce righteous. As far as I know the word "righteous" or "just" is an adjective. But in the ...
0
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4answers
339 views

Usage of “channelize”

Do you find this usage wrong? Instead of channelizing our energy to fight against poverty we are promoting industrialization, which will continue to increase the rich-poor divide.
0
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2answers
2k views

“off of the counter” vs “off the counter” [duplicate]

Is the word of necessary? For example: Take the towel off of the counter. vs. Take the towel off the counter.
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2answers
1k views

“I bicycle” - “I ride bikes” - “I bike” [closed]

What's the best way to say it? "I like to ride bicycles" is correct but pretty lame sounding... Is "I bicycle" correct? Or is it too obscure to be good usage?
4
votes
1answer
964 views

How do we write years before AD 1000?

For years with 4 digits, usually we write it this way: George was born in the year 1732. or George was born in 1732. What about years with three, two, or even one digit? Are these ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Can the word “facing” be used both ways?

Can the word "facing" be used both ways? To write major water problems facing the world or challenges and opportunities facing low- and middle-income countries and their citizens ...
0
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3answers
962 views

Can the acronym “R.N.A.” be used at the end of an e-mail? [closed]

There was the following statement in New York Time’s (June 1) article titled, “Sabbath Gasbags, Speak up.” - http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/opinion/sunday/sabbath-gasbags-speak-up.html?hp “My ...
20
votes
7answers
3k views

Can “wet” be used for liquids other than water?

Wet can be used to describe being dowsed in liquids such as beer, milk, juice, urine etc. All of these, however, are water-based. Can wet be used for a liquid that has no water? Can you be wet by ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Is it ok to use “Why” as “Why do you ask?”

Is it grammatically correct to use one-word sentence "Why?" as "Why do you ask?", for example in such context: – Did you visit that shop yesterday? – Yes. Why?
3
votes
6answers
1k views

Is the “will” in “can and will” necessary?

Anyone who's ever seen much American film or television has heard some variation of the following sentences countless times: You have the right to remain silent. If you choose to give up that ...
13
votes
1answer
9k views

What is the difference in usage between “lethal” and “fatal”?

This cropped up when I was in a conversation with a friend. I guess fatal must talk of something which has necessarily resulted in death, while lethality is more about potential to cause death. Yet I ...
5
votes
3answers
880 views

Using 'Gravity' As A Verb

Does anybody else use 'gravity' as a verb besides people in mining and engineering? Example: We have to move the tank up the hill so water can gravity to the flotation cells rather than needing to be ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Can “respectively” be used to refer to more than two items in a series?

Is the following a proper use of "respectively"? And if it is not, what is the proper construction of this sentence: Counts 10, 12, and 14 of the indictment charged Mr. Client, along with Mr. Co-...
2
votes
3answers
869 views

To worry about vs To be worried about - difference

Which one of the following is recommended to be used, and what is the difference between both of them? You do not have to worry about anything. Or You do not have to be worried about ...
1
vote
2answers
130 views

Is it correct to say: too homogeneous?

This is the context: "I missed the diversity of church, it felt rather like a French-only church, or an under-21’s church may feel like—too homogeneous." I want to use the word homogeneousitic, but I ...
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3answers
2k views

People can ‘abide by’ the law, but can the law ‘abide people’?

Time magazine copy chief and copy editor pointed out the grammatical errors of many movie titles, and suggested corrections in the article of Time magazine (May 24) titled “Writing Wrongs: 10 Movie ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Does the word “umpty” have two different meanings?

I happened to learn the word “umpty” in association with “umpteen” appearing in the following sentence in the article titled “Obama’s Gitmo Problem” in May 24 New York Times: Late Wednesday ...
0
votes
2answers
156 views

Should “Have your peer partner send you her plans” be considered a directive?

If you tell a person to have someone do something, is that considered a command? Our boss sent an email which told us to "have your peer partner send you her plans". Should that be considered a ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Usage of “would” instead of “used to” [closed]

I sometimes lurk on "AskReddit" and when people are telling stories, they often read like this: "After I would cook dinner for us, we would sit at the large dining room table and he would make a ...
1
vote
1answer
366 views

Are both ‘Hit a raw nerve’ and ‘Tip sb. the wink” predominantly British English idioms?

I was drawn to both of idioms,‘hit a raw nerve’ and ‘tip sb. the wink” being quoted as British skewed English idioms in the following scenes describing verbal exchanges between Captain Richard ...
6
votes
3answers
401 views

Is there a word for selecting yourself as the target audience for an invention or product?

Let me explain this with an example. An inventor faces a problem, he decides to develop a solution for it. Initially, he is the main target audience for his invention. I was wondering if there was an ...
4
votes
2answers
613 views

Does “Paraphernalia” have a negative connotation?

By definition, the word paraphernalia does not portray either negative or positive emotions. Does it, in everyday usage? In my particular case, I am making a website about programming. I have a ...
0
votes
3answers
164 views

Does “an accordingly big army” sound awkward?

Is it just me or does this sound weird? To protect such a big empire with wide borders, an accordingly big army is required When I wrote it initially it seemed a bit off, but I read it again ...
4
votes
2answers
733 views

The proper usage of “putative”?

I'm trying to write the sentence, Lower-grade soldiers made up two-thirds of the putative high quality army. My original sentence was: Lower-grade soldiers made up two-thirds of what was ...
1
vote
1answer
464 views

Would you say “wanna” when you want something? [closed]

Would you say "wanna" when you want something? For example, "I wanna a new PC", instead of "I want a new PC"?
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Usage and spelling of “wordlength” and “bitbreadth”

As far as I know, these are the meanings: wordlength — for instance, 4 bytes when the bitbreadth is 32 and 8 bytes when the bitbreadth is 64. bitbreadth — for example, 32 or 64 or 4 bits for a ...
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votes
1answer
2k views

What word/title should I use in an email asking for updates [closed]

I would like to contact my recruiter (via email) asking for updates on my application. What should I put in the title so it is informative, but also at the same time does not sound like I am too ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Hypernym for injured and dead

I'm working on some project that deals with natural disasters. I need to find the most proper word that can be used to refer to someone who either was injured or died in a disaster. Can I use ...
6
votes
1answer
88k views

Is it correct to say “I would like to inquire about something?”

When I make a call to get some information regarding a matter, I generally start the conversation with "Hello, I would like to inquire about something." Is this a correct usage? If not, what would be ...
1
vote
1answer
189 views

“Oblong to Allantoid” — is it valid? [closed]

I read in a paper: One such genus is Dinemasporium which ... characterised by superficial, cupulate to discoid conidiomata with brown setae, and phialidic conidiogenous cells that give rise to ...
1
vote
2answers
267 views

Usage of “voted in”

Is it correct to write voted in in the following sentences? Members may vote in a new leader. Board members will be nominated and voted in by the team.
6
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2answers
10k views

Does one eat soup or drink soup? [closed]

What is the correct verb associated with the consumption of soup? I've come across both the version.
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3answers
158 views

Does one say “conciliate with death” or “conciliate death”?

I am trying to say that he came to terms with death but in a more formal way. How can I put it? Is conciliate the right word to use?
1
vote
2answers
460 views

Meaning of the word “findings”? [closed]

I need to find a word to define the products you see in the capture. The best match I've found is findings. Is this word the correct one? Is there a better word for these products?
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votes
1answer
5k views

How do I use “Baby Steps” in a sentence [closed]

I want to convey that I am putting myself to something new to achieve a dream/goal. Hence I thought of using the phrase "baby steps" in a sentence as follows: "As I am laying my Baby Steps towards ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Phrase for “suddenly wake up from a dream”

What is a natural thing to say when you suddenly wake up from a dream? The impression I have in mind is of something like burst/tear apart or escape from the dream scene by waking up.
2
votes
1answer
378 views

Usage of “accrue” in “it accrued to me to gently ask” [closed]

A newage hippie Facebook friend just sent me this. I was just wondering if it was syntactically correct, It accrued to me to gently ask if you could consider extending the same respect, you would ...