This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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2
votes
1answer
127 views

Can I refer to a period of more than 24 hours as “my day”?

Can I use "my day" to refer to a period of more than 24 hours? Let's say I worked non-stop for 30 hours, could I refer to this period as "my day"? From a dictionary, the only two usages I was able to ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Can an affirmation be negative?

I'm angry. I'm not angry. Are both (1) and (2) affirmations? I ask because Merriam-Webster defines affirmation as 'a positive assertion', so this make me confused as to whether (2), which ...
2
votes
1answer
812 views

Is an areligious person secular?

An areligious person is one who is: unconcerned with or indifferent to religious matters. A secular person is one who is: in the state of being separate from religion, or not being ...
0
votes
2answers
227 views

Meaning of “he answered zip”

Someone who is not a native English speaker wrote this in an email to me. I didn't get it clearly in the beginning, so I just asked for the meaning and he replied back he meant "he answered ...
7
votes
5answers
11k views

Viewpoint vs. Point of view

A student of mine has asked me if there is any difference, both in meaning and usage, between point of view and viewpoint. Now, according to the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, there is ...
-1
votes
2answers
185 views

Past - past perfect [closed]

In what way do I represent the task which I did yesterday night? I want to know the usage differences between "Past" and "Past perfect" tenses Can anyone give me idea to clarify this? Last night, ...
-1
votes
3answers
479 views

When we should use “freak out” & when “afraid”

What is the difference between freak out and afraid? When should we use freak out and when afraid? OED definition for freak out: (occas. without out): to undergo an intense emotional ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What does this phrase mean?

You must not lament in conversation with your savior over the trifles of an average boy. what does it mean?
0
votes
1answer
318 views

You throw no low blows and rise above the rest

You throw no low blows and rise above the rest. What does it mean?
0
votes
2answers
4k views

“In appropriate time” or “In THE appropriate time”? [closed]

Which one is correct ? I mean should we use "THE" between "in" and "appropriate" or not ?
2
votes
3answers
105 views

“Drove to the main road,” or “drove off to the main road?”

After helping with the dishes, Eri swung her purse on her shoulder and said goodbye to her mother, promising she'll come back to see her soon. Keys in hand, her dad led Eri to the car, and then ...
0
votes
3answers
815 views

Use of “approximately” [closed]

Is approximately used correctly in the following sentence? Our congregation is comprised of approximately sixty to eighty different ethnic and cultural groups.
0
votes
1answer
449 views

What does “post-production” mean? [closed]

Pudget Systems has a computer called Genesis: A cutting edge, highly reliable workstation optimized for post-production and design. What exactly does post-production mean in this sentence?
6
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

'logical errors' or 'logistical errors'?

I am reading a novel which has lots of those lol, where some of the events do not make sense at all. Should I call them logical errors? or logistical errors?
5
votes
3answers
784 views

Are effect and affect related to efferent and afferent?

In my work I occasionally write about neurons. A common description of the relationship between two populations of neurons is to describe one as being "afferent" or "efferent" with respect to another. ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

difference between “to share in” and “to share”

The following is part of a Washington Post article of today. This may be Obama’s military intervention, but if she is a candidate in 2016, Clinton could share in whatever credit or blame the ...
1
vote
3answers
921 views

Is it ok to use the word “killer” as an adjective in a semi-formal text?

Is it ok to use the word "killer" (as an adjective) in a semi-formal or even formal text like an ebook? For example, "this is the killer part," which essentially means that it is the most significant ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Can one be “convicted” if one has a strong opinion?

Can "convicted" be used to qualify somebody who has a conviction (in the sense of strong opinion)? In that context it would be a close synonym of convinced or opinionated for example. It possibly ...
10
votes
9answers
30k views

Confused by the British having “dinner” in the afternoon” and “tea” in the evening

I’m having problems with meal names in the UK. I’ve just learnt that dinner can refer to the afternoon meal, and that tea can refer to an early evening meal. Is this specific to a certain area in the ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between “area”, “zone”, and “site”? [closed]

Is there any difference between area, zone, and site? If there is some difference between them? When do I have to use (nor not use) each of these constructions?
3
votes
3answers
659 views

deity / divinity / god

I'm translating some Buddhist texts to English and I'm wondering if there are any subtle differences in usage between the words deity, divinity, and god (in the lower case sense)? What is the word ...
10
votes
17answers
787 views

Karma, Kudos, …?

I'm looking for a word that I can use to describe the following: A point system where I give points to my kids to incentivise them to do some tasks they don't really want to do. I don't want ...
4
votes
1answer
317 views

Is an embankment always man-made?

Is it possible for nature to create an embankment or is the word used exclusively for the result of human activity?
-2
votes
2answers
5k views

Is incharge/encharge a word? [closed]

I always thought the word incharge/encharge existed but I noticed my spell check kept marking it as wrong. Examples: "Who is encharge around here!?" The secretary is encharge of taking notes. I find ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
4
votes
1answer
848 views

Why does “lemon” mean “inferior”? [duplicate]

Please see this example. The poster uses the word lemon in the last sentence. I understand in a general sense that this is being used to indicate something bad or more specifically of inferior quality....
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Can one say “find sanctuary”?

I'd like to use the expression find sanctuary instead of find refuge. Would it be fine?
1
vote
6answers
1k views

Repeated structures vs. repeating structures

I'm writing a paper about data mining. When I find some pattern periodically occur in some dataset, should I say: Repeated structures are found in the dataset. or Repeating structures are ...
1
vote
3answers
460 views

Can two automated systems “interface” between each other?

I'm trying to indicate unlimited interaction between two applications. Would the following work? Our developer API allows you to interface with [product] without limitation!
1
vote
1answer
176 views

Usage of the word “envy”

If Joe envied something, would it be proper to call that something "Joe's Envy"? Considering the usage in a team name but I am not sure if it makes sense.
2
votes
2answers
10k views

Use “you” or “one” in formal writing?

Sometimes people tell me that I should avoid using "you" in formal writing and insist on telling me to use "one" ("One should not use 'you'" as opposed to "You should not use 'you'"). Are there any ...
0
votes
3answers
404 views

one word for shocking and clever?

I am looking for one word which means both shocking and clever. Example sentence: Shocking and clever revenge story.
6
votes
5answers
63k views

Detail or Details? Read on for more detail/details

I'm writing a newsletter and have been given the following text: New stock has arrived & we're giving you the chance to grab it at 20% off for this weekend only! Read on for more details. I'...
2
votes
5answers
502 views

Opposite of “to put a good word in for”? “Backstab” doesn't work

I know that when I have an associate who I think highly of and is very capable of performing the job (or person for a relationship) [s]he is pursuing, I will want to find the "recruiters" and put a ...
5
votes
7answers
7k views

Is there a word that describes the swift and skillful covering of the natural emotions?

Some people become adept at completely hiding their natural reaction to a situation. Some may call this lying, or just control. Neither of these describes when it is done swiftly in the moment, and ...
6
votes
8answers
30k views

What is the difference between “Sofa” and “Couch”?

Is there any difference between the two? Which one is more common? Which of the two words is more appropriate if the "piece of furniture" is big, comfortable and expensive?
1
vote
2answers
287 views

Adjective “displaced” applied to an object

Can I apply the adjective displaced to an object, when I mean it is being used out of its typical environment? For instance: "the displaced ball floats around". (Assuming we're talking about a ball ...
1
vote
2answers
119 views

What does “sell x for value” mean?

In the sentence "We sell you clothes for value.", what does "for value" mean? Is the above sentence even grammatically valid?
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Differences between “fortification nouns”

What are the practical differences between these nouns? Fort Fortress Fortification Stronghold Citadel Castle Palace Context In Norway we have a lot of old stone buildings, typically built for ...
2
votes
1answer
212 views

to be unfamiliar with something how to express it while writing an academic essay [closed]

Is it true to say we are new to social media (in order to say that we are not familiar with social media) thanks
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone

What would you call the following: Speak now or forever hold your piece.
11
votes
3answers
107k views

“In respect of” / “With respect to”

Is there a difference in meaning between, "in respect of" and "with respect to"? Is it grammatically correct to use, "in respect to...."? The full context I am concerned with currently reads: "My ...
2
votes
1answer
963 views

Is the use of 'has' appropriate with first person singular?

We have been learning since childhood that Has can only be used with third person singular but I have seen and heard people using has otherwise. For example, the other day I was reading that ...
3
votes
4answers
38k views

'upper-left corner' or 'top-left corner'?

In a square, which is the correct term: 'upper-left corner' or 'top-left corner'? To be more specific: in the context "the x-coordinate of the upper-left/top-left corner", which should I use?
1
vote
1answer
336 views

How to Reference a Figure Based on a Corresponding Table?

I am currently writing a thesis. So far, when I put a caption under a figure which was based on a preceding table, I worded the figure's caption to something along: Figure 1.2: Graphical ...
1
vote
4answers
424 views

Using “concrete” as synonym to “real”

Can I use the word concrete as a synonym to real in a phrase like this? Russian beer is a concrete shit. Maybe this phrase sounds like drivel for a native speaker?
2
votes
1answer
509 views

Is “closed press (remark / ceremony / meeting)” a popular English word?

I saw the word, “closed press” in Time magazine’s (August 15) article titled “Chris Christie lays out argument for 2016.” “Christie spoke at length about his record in New Jersey, emphasizing ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Stack of Paper vs. Stack of Papers [closed]

I question the usage of "stack of paper" vs. "stack of papers". I purchase a ream of paper, and set it on a desk. In that process, does it change from a ream of paper to a stack of papers - changing ...
5
votes
1answer
17k views

“Would it be” vs “Will it be”

I was writing an email to my colleague and as part of it I wrote Would it be possible for you to help me with this? I felt a bit awkward after sending the mail. Should it be would or will? I ...