This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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2answers
129 views

Is it correct to say: too homogeneous?

This is the context: "I missed the diversity of church, it felt rather like a French-only church, or an under-21’s church may feel like—too homogeneous." I want to use the word homogeneousitic, but I ...
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3answers
2k views

People can ‘abide by’ the law, but can the law ‘abide people’?

Time magazine copy chief and copy editor pointed out the grammatical errors of many movie titles, and suggested corrections in the article of Time magazine (May 24) titled “Writing Wrongs: 10 Movie ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Does the word “umpty” have two different meanings?

I happened to learn the word “umpty” in association with “umpteen” appearing in the following sentence in the article titled “Obama’s Gitmo Problem” in May 24 New York Times: Late Wednesday ...
0
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2answers
154 views

Should “Have your peer partner send you her plans” be considered a directive?

If you tell a person to have someone do something, is that considered a command? Our boss sent an email which told us to "have your peer partner send you her plans". Should that be considered a ...
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1answer
1k views

Usage of “would” instead of “used to” [closed]

I sometimes lurk on "AskReddit" and when people are telling stories, they often read like this: "After I would cook dinner for us, we would sit at the large dining room table and he would make a ...
1
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1answer
361 views

Are both ‘Hit a raw nerve’ and ‘Tip sb. the wink” predominantly British English idioms?

I was drawn to both of idioms,‘hit a raw nerve’ and ‘tip sb. the wink” being quoted as British skewed English idioms in the following scenes describing verbal exchanges between Captain Richard ...
6
votes
3answers
397 views

Is there a word for selecting yourself as the target audience for an invention or product?

Let me explain this with an example. An inventor faces a problem, he decides to develop a solution for it. Initially, he is the main target audience for his invention. I was wondering if there was an ...
4
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2answers
604 views

Does “Paraphernalia” have a negative connotation?

By definition, the word paraphernalia does not portray either negative or positive emotions. Does it, in everyday usage? In my particular case, I am making a website about programming. I have a ...
0
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3answers
163 views

Does “an accordingly big army” sound awkward?

Is it just me or does this sound weird? To protect such a big empire with wide borders, an accordingly big army is required When I wrote it initially it seemed a bit off, but I read it again ...
4
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2answers
724 views

The proper usage of “putative”?

I'm trying to write the sentence, Lower-grade soldiers made up two-thirds of the putative high quality army. My original sentence was: Lower-grade soldiers made up two-thirds of what was ...
1
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1answer
444 views

Would you say “wanna” when you want something? [closed]

Would you say "wanna" when you want something? For example, "I wanna a new PC", instead of "I want a new PC"?
0
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1answer
105 views

Usage and spelling of “wordlength” and “bitbreadth”

As far as I know, these are the meanings: wordlength — for instance, 4 bytes when the bitbreadth is 32 and 8 bytes when the bitbreadth is 64. bitbreadth — for example, 32 or 64 or 4 bits for a ...
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1answer
2k views

What word/title should I use in an email asking for updates [closed]

I would like to contact my recruiter (via email) asking for updates on my application. What should I put in the title so it is informative, but also at the same time does not sound like I am too ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Hypernym for injured and dead

I'm working on some project that deals with natural disasters. I need to find the most proper word that can be used to refer to someone who either was injured or died in a disaster. Can I use ...
6
votes
1answer
84k views

Is it correct to say “I would like to inquire about something?”

When I make a call to get some information regarding a matter, I generally start the conversation with "Hello, I would like to inquire about something." Is this a correct usage? If not, what would be ...
1
vote
1answer
188 views

“Oblong to Allantoid” — is it valid? [closed]

I read in a paper: One such genus is Dinemasporium which ... characterised by superficial, cupulate to discoid conidiomata with brown setae, and phialidic conidiogenous cells that give rise to ...
1
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2answers
264 views

Usage of “voted in”

Is it correct to write voted in in the following sentences? Members may vote in a new leader. Board members will be nominated and voted in by the team.
6
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2answers
10k views

Does one eat soup or drink soup? [closed]

What is the correct verb associated with the consumption of soup? I've come across both the version.
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3answers
153 views

Does one say “conciliate with death” or “conciliate death”?

I am trying to say that he came to terms with death but in a more formal way. How can I put it? Is conciliate the right word to use?
1
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2answers
447 views

Meaning of the word “findings”? [closed]

I need to find a word to define the products you see in the capture. The best match I've found is findings. Is this word the correct one? Is there a better word for these products?
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1answer
5k views

How do I use “Baby Steps” in a sentence [closed]

I want to convey that I am putting myself to something new to achieve a dream/goal. Hence I thought of using the phrase "baby steps" in a sentence as follows: "As I am laying my Baby Steps towards ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Phrase for “suddenly wake up from a dream”

What is a natural thing to say when you suddenly wake up from a dream? The impression I have in mind is of something like burst/tear apart or escape from the dream scene by waking up.
2
votes
1answer
370 views

Usage of “accrue” in “it accrued to me to gently ask” [closed]

A newage hippie Facebook friend just sent me this. I was just wondering if it was syntactically correct, It accrued to me to gently ask if you could consider extending the same respect, you would ...
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votes
1answer
1k views

Correct use of “happen”

A friend of mine told me that the following sentence is incorrect (copied from an exercise) Do all sentences tell us what the speaker would like to happen? He claims that it should read: Do ...
2
votes
2answers
189 views

“My late friends” — they're not dead!

Context: We're discussing about how we used to get penalized in school for being late to classes, many years ago. I wanted to say: In my old school, it was hilarious to see my late friends get ...
0
votes
2answers
833 views

Can we say “probable” where we have to say “possible”?

Can we say probable where we have to say possible? What is the exact meaning of that? I have searched this, but I didn't get the perfect example of that.
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2answers
50k views

How to say hello to a group of people?

When entering a place or meet a group of people or starting a speech, how do you say hello to the audience (from a few to thousands of people). I know that this depends on the situation. I think it is ...
4
votes
1answer
393 views

“puzzled why” vs “puzzled as to why”

Is "puzzled why" correct as well? Is it just a choice of style? Or is there a difference in meaning? And if so, I'm curious (as to) what that difference is.
1
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2answers
20k views

Is it correct to say: please refer to my resume? [closed]

In my cover letters, I give a summary of my resume. Then, I want to say that if you need more info about my resume, please refer to my resume. I feel that this is not the correct usage. If that is ...
1
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5answers
34k views

Understanding “as of”, “as at”, and “as from”

I'd appreciate your assistance in helping me particularly understand how to use the phrase "as of" properly. What is the proper interpretation of the following sentence? "I need you to get me all ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Why are animal names used as vulgar slang for body parts?

Asking this question in strict propriety out of genuine curiosity, why is that in (American) English animal-related names are used for vulgar names for the private body parts? In fact, all of the ...
1
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2answers
92 views

How frequent is the use of 'Appropriation' in American English compared with British English?

How frequently is the word 'Appropriation' used in American English? In what contexts might young people commonly hear it?
2
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2answers
2k views

Did I use “albeit” correctly in this sentence?

Did I use "albeit" correctly in this sentence? Here is the essay (which is word-for-word, albeit some segments I took out).
3
votes
2answers
611 views

Which word is technically correct in English: debrick or unbrick?

With certain electronic devices if you make a mistake you can brick (used as a verb) the device, so it ends up in a defunct state. So the device ends up being bricked. What is the correct term to ...
3
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4answers
10k views

To give someone the 411

"To give someone the 411" is short for information but is this phrase common in the US and/or in Britain and is it still up to date or outdated?
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2answers
11k views

Do I use a comma before “that” or “which” here?

Let's say I'm describing what some person is currently doing, and I say: He is reading articles which he is summarizing in his blog. Is this sentence (and specifically, this usage of "which") ...
1
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1answer
226 views

Usage of the word “implies” when sure of a result

If I have a proven without a doubt that drinking cyanide means certain death, is it correct to write the following? The result of the study implies that drinking cyanide leads to certain death.
0
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1answer
840 views

How should I use the phrasal verb “to d**k around”?

To waste time Stop dicking me around and get to the point. Would you please stop dicking around with her? To take advantage of You're dicking him around, you know? Don't ...
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1answer
3k views

Objectivity vs. Objectivism vs. Objectiveness [closed]

What are some clear-cut distinctions between objectivity, objectivism, and objectiveness?
1
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1answer
227 views

“Curious X”: X is the subject or an object

When 'curious' is used as an adjective (e.g., in the construction "A is a curious B"), there is ambiguity as to whether the noun it modifies is:- The subject: A feels curious (e.g., "Humans are a ...
4
votes
2answers
915 views

Word for 45° rotated

We are writing a mathematical article. We are describing objects (unit squares) rotated only 0° and 45°. For easier use we call 0° rotated "axial". What should we call 45° rotated? Using just ...
2
votes
1answer
199 views

Is “to circuit” a common verb in colloquial language?

My boss asked me to have a look at a presentation he'll be giving next week; checking if he didn't forget anything. While skimming over the document, the following sentence was somehow bothering me: ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Word meaning relating to or involving humans or people

I need a word to fill the blank in this sentence: "The hurricane was one of the most blank-deadly events in history." The human death count was recorded, but not the death count not for other ...
2
votes
5answers
790 views

“stop to do something” vs. “continue to do something”

A transcript of a recent speech by Barack Obama contains the following sentence: Boston police, firefighters, and first responders as well as the National Guard responded heroically, and continue ...
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votes
4answers
5k views

Can “predeceased” be used before any event?

When a person dies, it is common to say the person was predeceased by other people such as his parents, his brother, and others. However, I am wondering if these statements are correct: His ...
18
votes
3answers
159k views

How to use “no pun intended”?

The phrase "no pun intended" is often added after someone made a pun or something that could be considered a pun. If this should be taken literally (i.e. it really was unintentional), then I'm not ...
3
votes
2answers
342 views

Is code written by a programmer “handcrafted”?

The immediate definition of "handcrafted" that I found was: "Make skillfully by hand.". In the same way a woodsman would craft a wooden toy with tools, a programmer using tools such as a computer and ...
2
votes
1answer
10k views

Could “Instead,” be used as the first word of a sentence without any following “of”?

Would the following sentence be correct? If not, I am looking for an adverb to express the meaning of “instead”. Our team could have won the match if our coach had interchanged the goal keeper ...
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1answer
756 views

Why is the noun 'sex' uncountable? [closed]

According to the definition of the noun 'sex' in dictionaries, it means 'the PHYSICAL ACTIVITY that two people do together in order to produce babies or for pleasure.' If so, why isn't it countable? ...
5
votes
1answer
5k views

What does “maze-bright” mean?

From searching online, I haven't found any dictionary entries for this phrase, however it seems it has something to do with Tryon's rat experiment, and it's often used in HR to describe a certain type ...