This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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2
votes
1answer
856 views

Do astute and acute have identical meaning and usage? [closed]

Do astute and acute have identical meaning ( - quick or shrewd) and usage? Thanks. EDIT: From the comments below there appears to be significant disagreement about usage and a discussion seems ...
1
vote
2answers
424 views

Usage of drove off in the following sentence

"I'll drive you to the MRT, then," her father said. After saying goodbye to her mother and promising to come back soon, Naomi got into her father's car, and drove off to the main road with ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

Words to separate value from counting

I'm a software developer, and as such I often come in contact with situations where I need to name variables related to the following context: 4 apples for $3 each equals $12 My problem is the ...
5
votes
3answers
501 views

Need help figuring out a word for a certain situation

I know there is a word for this! Person A is a seller. Person B is a buyer. Person A is worried Person B will take the her product and not pay. Person B is worried of the inverse. These two hire an ...
0
votes
1answer
462 views

Exclusive “from” or “to” [closed]

If I want to let a customer know that she/he can only buy spare parts from us, and put this into legal documents by using the word "exclusive", which proposition should I use? "from", "to" or ...
0
votes
2answers
477 views

what does “harmony” mean in the context in Marshall McLuhan's global village video? [closed]

I found this interesting video here http://nickbogardus.com/post/10698767773/mcluhan-on-the-global-village "The global village is a world in which you don’t necessarily have harmony. You have ...
6
votes
3answers
51k views

“parentheses” vs “parenthesis” [closed]

What is the difference between "parentheses" and "parenthesis"?
1
vote
1answer
5k views

“Did you” vs “Do you” for questions about the past

Which of these is more correct for American English in a professional context: Did you have any other prior marriage that lasted at least 10 years, or any other prior marriage that ended due to your ...
5
votes
3answers
839 views

Was I correct in my use of “whatever” over “something”? [closed]

Background: I have an undefined, informal and ongoing relationship with someone where we often meet in the late evening at his place. Occasionally, we might go to a bar first but we don't really ...
0
votes
1answer
654 views

What is the difference between a Summit and an Apex? [duplicate]

Summit, Peak, and Apex are often interchanged. What is the difference between Summit vs Apex or Peak vs Summit
1
vote
3answers
552 views

Usage of “Prohibited” vs “Prevented” in a given sentence

Is the following usage of "prohibit" correct? The disk crash prohibited me from saving the file. I have an opinion, but want to hear what others think before I share it.
-1
votes
2answers
327 views

Usage of “Who” and “whom” in the given sentence

In the given sentence,"There’s Mr. Som, who they say is the best singer in the country" is "who" is the correct word to be used or "whom"
2
votes
2answers
528 views

Can we use “saccade” as a verb to describe eye movements

Saccade is the term to describe rapid eye movements. I just want to be sure that saccading could be used as a verb, or if not, which term would you recommend using?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the usage of idiom, “get hold of the wrong end of the stick” situation specific?

I came across the idiom, “get hold of the wrong end of the stick” in the following sentence of the scene where Barry Calvert, an FBI agent tells his colleague, Mark Andrews about the statement of an ...
2
votes
3answers
656 views

“all the way down to” phrase with geographical locations

Is the following usage correct: I drove from Los Angeles all the way down to San Diego. given that San Diego is at the south of Los Angeles? Can it be used for geographical directions?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Does the word “exgest” exist?

A colleague of mine found reference to the word "Exgest" in a contract. In context, this appeared to mean the opposite of the word "Ingest" which was used earlier in the contract. These words were ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Why do the British refer to things as 'posh'

Why do the British refer to something very smart, or people who are very well-off as being 'posh'?
0
votes
1answer
47 views

“Succeeded out of luck” and “Is out of luck” To be out of luck [closed]

I understand the usage, but "out of luck" itself I don't quite grasp. Where does it come from? I want to know the etymology of "out of" in the sense of not having.
1
vote
4answers
5k views

Is 'disinstruct' or 'de-instruct' legitimate usage?

When you engage a lawyer or an estate agent, for example, you instruct them. What is the most appropriate word to use when you decide you've had enough and want to get rid of them? There are several ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

Do we “hear” our tears?

I was drawn to the expression, “How to make you hear our tears” in the following sentence of the comment written by Sonia Sanchez under the caption, “Remembering Brother Martin” as a part of special ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

Use of the word “fit”

Is it as correct to say, "That closet will fit all my clothes" as it is to say, "All my clothes will fit in that closet"?
-1
votes
1answer
660 views

Eager to know, synonym - What's he saying?

What are Jeeves' exact words at 13.31 in this episode?
-2
votes
2answers
550 views

Use of word late

If Mr. Peter Smith has died, is it ok to use "Mrs. Peter Smith (late)" for his wife?
1
vote
1answer
400 views

word to describe a quote often attributed to but not verified to a person

I have seen this word many times but can't for the life of me able to remember. The word refers to a quote which is often attributed to someone but no one can verify whether the person actually said ...
1
vote
2answers
192 views

“He shot it” versus “he shot at it” [duplicate]

Is there a difference between these two, or is only one correct? I shoot him. I shoot at him. She will shoot you. She will shoot at you. How about these two? The plane shot missiles at the ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is “irrespective of” interchangeable with “regardless of”?

If Kinsella were to go on a binge, he would drink his way down to the last penny of whatever money is available, irrespective of who it belongs to. (The killing frost. Thomas Hayden, 1991) I think ...
2
votes
1answer
934 views

Can “so” and “thus” be used interchangeably?

Example: Although Karla had been in this area many times before, this was the first time she'd seen this coffee shop. So she decided to give it a try. Can I use thus instead of so in the ...
0
votes
3answers
297 views

Is the “went” in the following sentence redundant? [closed]

As Eri closed the laptop, her stomach started to growl. That's right. She hadn't eaten breakfast yet. She'd been so absorbed in the video that she had completely forgotten about it. Eri stood ...
2
votes
2answers
276 views

Can I use the term “ageographical” to refer to multinational corporations?

I came across the following sentence and checked it in the Corpus of Contemporary American English: Ideologues, be they left or right politically, are fundamentally ageographical. I know that ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

What term has replaced the term “microcomputing” from 1986?

Why has the term "microcomputing" been used less and less since 1986-87 (ngram)? What term has replaced the term "microcomputing" since 1986?
1
vote
2answers
18k views

To be “glad of” or “glad about”? [closed]

I was wondering about the correct usage of the term "glad". It seems to me it can be used (at least) in two different ways: "to be glad of something" or "to be glad about something", indeed I found ...
0
votes
5answers
359 views

Can 'embellishing' be used adjectivally?

Can one use embellishing as an adjective? For example, “He gave an embellishing speech.”
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“Positive” synonyms for 'problem' or 'worst'

I need to find a positive synonym for 'problem' or 'worst' for some copy I am writing. The context is that these are ratings for student performance in a tabular format (as in, "problem topics: lorem ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Using “I had rather” instead of “I would rather”

While commuting to work, I encountered a bumper sticker that said "I had rather be on/Cape Point Fishing". I found this curious, since I always thought that the correct expression would be "I ...
4
votes
3answers
103 views

Can you refer to public venues as rooms?

For example can I say something like: "We were at the restaurant. Then Bill came with the birthday cake. Applause filled the room." If not, what's a better word to use?
2
votes
3answers
472 views

Difference between *splendid* and *splendiferous*

I just read a post where someone was using the adjective splendiferous and even remarked he would not use that word lightly. So I did a quick search and found that it has the same meaning as ...
3
votes
3answers
183 views

Is “cast the balance to some/someone's side” a standard usage or a figure of speech?

...this biass, though, perhaps, it may not appear in a few throws, will certainly prevail in a great number, and will cast the balance entirely to that side. (David Hume, Of the Rise and Progress of ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

The difference between “delimit” and “limit”

In an article I came across the following sentence: "To delimit the responsibility of the police means to delimit human reason" I was just wondering why did the author use "delimit" instead of "limit" ...
-3
votes
3answers
3k views

Is the word “indeed” being properly used in the following passage?

Scene 1 Yuki laughed. "You know, sometimes I wonder if you live in the same city as the rest of us." Scene 2 "That's right," Takeshi suddenly said. "Did you feel the earthquake last ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Usage of the word concurrence

Is it correct to ask "Are we all in concurrence?" synonymously to "Are we all in agreement?"
5
votes
5answers
27k views

“visceral” vs “emotional”

What's is the difference in nuance between visceral (relating to deep inward feelings rather than to the intellect) and emotional? How do we decide when to use one over the other?
1
vote
3answers
7k views

Is 'lackness' a valid word? [closed]

Firstly, I'm not a native speaker. My question is about the word 'lackness'. I've heard it many times. Is it a valid word or do we use just 'lack'? For instance: "... lack of something..."?
1
vote
4answers
239 views

Smart used as expensive, why?

I sometimes see phrases like "smart hotel", "smart restaurant" (especially in guide books). From context I usually understand it as "expensive but worthy". Is it correct understanding? Why is word "...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Time: Move “backwards” or “forwards”

Let us pay attention to the terms back and forward in the quote below. On the 4th of June they had the drill for independence day. But if you go back further you'd find that around mid-May, they ...
-1
votes
2answers
371 views

What's the meaning of “as your concern allows”

What is the meaning of "as your concern allows" in this context: Keep in touch as your concerns allow. The above sentence was preceded by the sentence: We seem to be out of sync in reading ...
2
votes
1answer
127 views

Can I refer to a period of more than 24 hours as “my day”?

Can I use "my day" to refer to a period of more than 24 hours? Let's say I worked non-stop for 30 hours, could I refer to this period as "my day"? From a dictionary, the only two usages I was able to ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Can an affirmation be negative?

I'm angry. I'm not angry. Are both (1) and (2) affirmations? I ask because Merriam-Webster defines affirmation as 'a positive assertion', so this make me confused as to whether (2), which ...
2
votes
1answer
812 views

Is an areligious person secular?

An areligious person is one who is: unconcerned with or indifferent to religious matters. A secular person is one who is: in the state of being separate from religion, or not being ...
0
votes
2answers
227 views

Meaning of “he answered zip”

Someone who is not a native English speaker wrote this in an email to me. I didn't get it clearly in the beginning, so I just asked for the meaning and he replied back he meant "he answered ...
7
votes
5answers
11k views

Viewpoint vs. Point of view

A student of mine has asked me if there is any difference, both in meaning and usage, between point of view and viewpoint. Now, according to the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, there is ...