This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
vote
1answer
61 views

“Tease” or “tease with”

Does this headline from Toms Hardware use a correct sense of the verb "tease" (the main sense of which in this area being to tantalize especially by arousing desire or curiosity often without ...
-2
votes
3answers
307 views

What is the meaning of unhighlight [closed]

What does the word "unhighlight" mean? Alternately, is it even a word? What would be its usage? I can't find it in my dictionary or on the internet. I am using it in the context of if you highlight ...
2
votes
3answers
113 views

IMHO, I am great? [closed]

I am not a native English speaker. I was wondering if the phrase "in my humble opinion, my proposal is interesting because ..." is contradictory? I am trying to say that something I proposed/said ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?

My NGO and partners are producing a feature film about Russian speakers in the world, and to explain its point as bias-breaking, we came up with the name out, that's nicely expanded in the slogan as ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Use of the “&” symbol [duplicate]

When is it academically correct to use "&" ? In university standard writing can you every use & instead of the word "and"?
1
vote
1answer
74 views

What's the appropriate way of integrating the expression “full stop” into a written sentence?

What's the appropriate way of integrating the expression "full stop" into a written sentence? For example: The USS Enterprise isn't just a great "Galaxy Class" starship, it's a great starship - ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Where to place “among other things”?

I'll be placing a short introduction on a web site and the introduction includes a sentence similar to this: I'm – among many other things – a hobbyist coder. I'm unsure about the ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Is checklist or tick box (or something else) more common in British English?

When referring to a list of items that you check off as you complete, would the British say, "checklist," "tick box," or something else?
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Can I say, “I can answer your apprehensions.”

Is it proper to say that you can answer someone's apprehensions?
53
votes
8answers
5k views

“My personal opinion is…” Is it always pointless to use the words “personal” and “personally”?

Is this kind of redundancy acceptable in both speech and writing, formal and informal ? Would the following sentences have their meaning changed if we omitted "personal" or "personally" ? Would they ...
4
votes
3answers
159 views

When and where did the exclamation “Snap!” originate?

Recently I heard and an explanation for what the exclamation "Snap!" meant. He stated that it comes from the kid's card game where you yell "Snap" at a certain time to win the card pile. I'm vaguely ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Are “till” and “until” perfectly interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence?

In the following sentences, would one of these conjunctions sound better than the other ? Until/Till my daughter got married, I had never been abroad. Until/Till you change your mind, I won't ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

“You could do it better” Past/Future?

While showing my work to my adviser, he uttered a sentence, "You could do it better!". Is it analogous to: You could have done better OR You can do it better (so improve it)? It seems to me this ...
1
vote
2answers
150 views

About the usage of “with” in “There are grey goos everywhere, with many consuming the haemocoels of tardigrades”

Is the sentence below grammatical? There are a lot of people, with many wearing tuxedos. There are some cute teenage girls in the club, with many of them being PhD graduates in topological ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

turn right backward or turn slightly right backward?

Please see the image. When giving directions, how should I describe what the arrow indicates on the road? My ideas are turn right backward turn slightly right backward I'm not sure if they ...
1
vote
3answers
112 views

Near in its verb form

Is it correct to say David does not near women. Meaning that he does not go close to them or approach them.
1
vote
3answers
207 views

Are the words “backdrop” and “background” interchangeable?

Are the words "backdrop" and "background" interchangeable?
0
votes
2answers
94 views

Can a person have a “dextrous mind”?

Can we say that a man has a dextrous mind? This would mean that he has a highly skilled brain which is capable of excelling at a certain mental activity, or that he as an individual is capable of ...
3
votes
6answers
365 views

Is it common to use the word “tiptoeing” even if the person is just standing?

Definition by Google: tip·toe walk quietly and carefully with one's heels raised and one's weight on the balls of the feet. But can I use it in a situation where the pension isn't walking?: ...
-1
votes
1answer
131 views

Is it correct to use the word “devastated” to refer to the pain we feel towards other people? [closed]

I think the word devastated is mainly used when something bad happens to oneself (maybe I'm wrong?) Say, can I use it in the following way? I felt devastated after watching the survivors of ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Use of 'which' to combine clauses

Is there anything wrong, in terms of either grammar and/or usage, with the following sentence: "The information age has ushered children into a global society, which is the cause of educators ...
2
votes
2answers
220 views

Lean in and lean out

There was an article titled “Forget Leaning In, Let's Talk about Leaning Out” in Forbes magazine (April 2. 2014) in which the author, Caroline Mayer says: “I don’t know about you, but I’ve heard ...
1
vote
1answer
806 views

Is complimentative a word?

Is 'complimentative' a word? There are a bunch of definitions online but I couldn't find it in the British National Corpus or the OED (from searching oxforddictionaries.com). Does this mean I should ...
2
votes
1answer
341 views

Incidences vs incidents

I will analyze the number of incidents of traffic accidents which occurred last year. I will analyze the incidences of traffic accidents which occurred last year. Are these sentences using the ...
0
votes
3answers
74 views

“Security was a privilege of expensive locks” [closed]

Can I say "security was a privilege of expensive locks"? I am rechecking a translation, and the use of privilege in this context seems too weird to me. Isn't "privilege" used only with people?
0
votes
2answers
101 views

What is the meaning of “… to felicit you …” [closed]

Recently I have received some comments about my work, and it used "... felicit you and your work". What is the meaning of this word? Is is positive or negative?
3
votes
1answer
374 views

“Minutes later” vs. “a few minutes later”

Can I say this: I forgot about it minutes later. Or do I have to say it this way instead: I forgot about it a few minutes later.
2
votes
2answers
347 views

“Do so” vs “do it”

Example: I don’t know why I didn’t go back to my hometown. I didn’t have any reason not to—maybe I didn’t have a reason to do [so/it], either. Should I use do so or do it in the example above? ...
2
votes
3answers
256 views

Can a human “bless” anything?

Does the word "bless" apply only to God? For example, can a human bless anything (such as "bless the day")? Or can only God bless? Note, I am asking about the usage of the word "bless", and not about ...
2
votes
2answers
259 views

Usage of the phrase “We have been made.”

I was watching a TV show in which they showed this two friends who were hiding in disguise to escape from bounty hunters. Then one friend upon realizing that the bounty hunters have recognized them ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

What is the word for adjectives like 'correct' which may not provide complete meaning without previous sentence?

While working on my project, I came across this sentence: Obi is correct My question is can we say that 'correct' in the above sentence defines the state of a man, since is is a form of 'be' - ...
0
votes
1answer
151 views

“Seriously speaking” or just “seriously”?

Is the expression seriously speaking redundant? For example: [A asks a question] [B replies with a joke] [A and B laugh] B: No, seriously (speaking), I came to visit my mom. I ...
-1
votes
1answer
31 views

A key is bound to a function or a key binds to a function?

For example, I have a shortcut Ctrl-x that executes "Cut" action when press. Should I say "Ctrl-x is bound to Cut" or "Ctrl-x binds to Cut"?
1
vote
2answers
183 views

What two words best describe these features?

I am in the middle of developing an app. I'm having some trouble trying to decide the best usage for two features in particular. I know what both of these words mean, but I am becoming increasingly ...
2
votes
2answers
136 views

“Our subconscious” or “our subconsciousness”

Example: There are many hidden things in the unreachable depth of our subconscious/subconsciousness. What's the most common choice? Is the first option ungrammatical?
0
votes
1answer
72 views

When to use had rather [duplicate]

I had rather go home than stay out too late. I had rather listen my parents or get in trouble. Is had rather refers to past? Can anyone explain 2nd sentence in other words?
0
votes
2answers
61 views

“Pouring from the window” vs “pouring in from the window”

Mary woke to the soft light pouring from the window. Mary woke to the soft light pouring in from the window. What's the difference? Do they mean exactly the same?
0
votes
3answers
761 views

'I thought', 'I would think', 'I would have thought'

I'm going to show you three examples. 1. A - Have you got any change?     B - Do I have change? What for?     A - For the vending machine! ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Co owns with me in official letter to Home Office

I have couple of sentences as, I confirm that my brother, Name, DOB 01/01/0001, Nationality Indian co owns property 00 Same Road, Manchester, UK with me and I have no obligations for his wife to ...
0
votes
4answers
92 views

One word for “change of requirements”? [closed]

In software or in Any Industry the change of requirements is often seen. Is there a particular single word that can describe the "change of/in requirements". Apart form updation, editing, amendment ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

The usage of “with whom” [closed]

I would like to write a sentence to thank a number of colleagues. I would like to express the idea that it was a pleasure to spend time with them. Which of the two sentences below is better? I ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Crib: to Complain [closed]

People in India use crib as a word for complain as in 'Don't crib about it'. I always thought this was wrong usage, but I recently checked in OED online and found that sense 9b says b. To ...
0
votes
2answers
144 views

Can the word, “art” be used as a verb to mean “create” art?

In the Washington Post (July 27 issue) article titled, “Figuring out what matters in a midlife ‘Is this all there is?’ crisis” the columnist, Carolyn Hax writes as follows: “Tweak as you need to, ...
2
votes
2answers
562 views

“More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage

What is the correct usage of the adjective "loud"? Please sing louder Please sing more loudly I came across this in one of the quizzes at office, and as per them, the correct answer was option 2. ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Committee, Association and Assembly — What's the differrence?

I'm confused by these 3 words and I'm not quite sure what the differences are. I know how council, commission and committee differ, but I can't find it for Assembly and Association. I'm using it for a ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
1
vote
2answers
569 views

Disproportionate vs. disproportional

Which is correct in which contexts? "My head is disproportional to my body." "My head is disproportionate to my body." "My head is disproportional." "My head is disproportionate." I have the same ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Are “perchance” and “by chance” interchangeable?

Merriam Webster's defines "perchance" as: "maybe but not definitely" Similarly, the fifth definition of chance on Merriam Webster has "by chance" defined as: "in the haphazard course of ...
2
votes
7answers
113 views

What would be a valid replacement of “as”?

Say I want to write something to say: John looked over his shoulder as he opened the door slowly. However, for stylistic reasons I don't really want to use as in that sentence. There must be ...
0
votes
3answers
219 views

''We average 8 hours’ work a day.'' Is this a correct sentence? [closed]

"We average 8 hours’ work a day." Is this sentence correct? This is just a sentence written from my friend and I'd like to know the usage and form of the word, "average") Please give me some ...