This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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1answer
113 views

Might “equivocal” be applied to our scientific understandings?

I just read the question and answers about the meaning of "equivocal". Might "equivocal" be used to describe the wave and particle appreciations of light? The results of all inquiries and ...
0
votes
1answer
273 views

Invoices status, Invoices statuses, Invoices' status or Invoices' statuses

According to this, statuses is the plural of status. However, I am not sure here which one to use, my logic is statuses is more proper as each invoice has different status. But seems awkward word or ...
2
votes
2answers
87k views

parent vs parents, which is the correct word to use? [closed]

i would like to know which of these is exactly correct or is both allowed ? i see people use parent and also as parents in day to day communication.
7
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6answers
637 views

Ways to Memorize “Discreet” and “Discrete” [closed]

I have a question about discreet and discrete. People tend to get these two words mixed up, and I would like to help them memorize these two words. Discrete: unconnected; separate Discreet: ...
0
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3answers
601 views

Fair or Fare? - Which is right in this sentence? [closed]

Recently in a newspaper article, I read this line phrase "to conduct a fare probe". Shouldn't it be "to conduct a fair probe" ?? If the former is correct grammatically, can you explain why ?? The ...
0
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2answers
180 views

Who uses the term 'freehold'?

I am interested to discover in which countries, where English is used, the term 'freehold' and 'freeholder' is in everyday use. I know the question of 'freehold' has come up on this site before in ...
1
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3answers
166 views

Is the use of 'researched X for answering Y' to mean 'checked with X to answer Y' a good usage?

When one uses the word research transitively, the subject of the research is normally used as the object of the verb research (e.g. He researched the effects of acid rain for nearly a decade). Another ...
9
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5answers
1k views

Why is it a good idea to avoid 'like' in English?

In the video JULIA BOORSTIN -- Interview a Broadcaster! -- American English (0:34 to 1:20), a reporter from an American news television channel mentions that it's not a good idea to use the word ...
-1
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1answer
158 views

Set your journey to the wellness.. “set” used as “begin” , goes right here? [closed]

Using 'set' as 'begin' or closely similar way. The sentence "Set your journey to the wellness.." is ok? Set goes right here? From definition, I want to use "set" for this purpose.. cause (someone ...
1
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3answers
3k views

“Thou” or “You”? This is the problem!

In some eastern Indo-European languages like Persian specially in its northern accent Gilaki, the words "thou", "thee", "thy",... have a same meaning and pronunciation as English. But there is a ...
1
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2answers
673 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
12
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9answers
20k views

Word for when one uses the wrong word in a sentence

Specifically, I'm looking for the term for when a person uses a word correctly, but intends a different meaning. For example: I empathize with you. When the person really means: I ...
5
votes
2answers
171k views

When to use “respectively”? [duplicate]

I have been wondering what it means when people use "respectively" in, before, and after sentences. For example: We are looking for a babysitter to pick up and supervise our kids ages 6 and 3, ...
2
votes
1answer
343 views

Proper usage of the word “racism”?

It seems that historical definitions of the word "racism" use it to mean something similar to "racial prejudice" and "racial discrimination", without any reference to which race has power or doesn't ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“Nothing but” usage [duplicate]

I have seen the phrase "Nothing but" used in many places. e.g.: Inertia is nothing but the mass of the object. Time is nothing but a line How did nothing but come into existence?
1
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2answers
249 views

Definition clarification for “effervesce”

I was wondering about one of the meanings of effervesce, "give off bubbles". I wonder if you could use effervesce for a solid, and how it's used in a sentence.
4
votes
2answers
6k views

What does “Not to be a dick, but—” mean? Is “Dickishness” an accepted, stand-alone English word?

There was a recommendation of a new book, How Not to Be a Dick: An Everyday Etiquette Guide in www.Goodreads.com followed by this next sentence: “On the one hand, nobody wants to be a dick. On the ...
3
votes
2answers
202 views

Is “surveillance” adequate for observing a patient in a hospital?

Can this word be used to mean observing the patient's condition in a hospital in order to make a diagnosis?
2
votes
2answers
395 views

sewer pipeline or sewerage pipeline

Would one say: The sewer pipelines are old and need to be replaced. or ... The sewerage pipelines are old need o be replaced additionally: The sewer infrastructure ... The sewerage infrastructure ...
1
vote
2answers
767 views

How to use the word 'contrary'?

Is it right to say contrary to our interest to reduce the size of the paper I want to say that we want to reduce the size of the paper but we cannot do it, due to specific reasons.
1
vote
2answers
209 views

Strange sentence structure from a piece by Paula Gunn Allen

This lesson is in a pattern book. I want to know why the word about is repeated quite a few times in the text: My mother told me stories about cooking and childbearing; she told me stories ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Three formal ways to express “we got very good comments”

A question from a non-native speaker: For some reason I have to find at least three different formal ways to express "we got very good comments". The context is like "our paper got published and the ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Erf as term for plot of land in a town or city. Is this word only used in southern Africa?

The Free Dictionary website states and so does Wikipedia: erf [ɜːf] n pl erven [ˈɜːvən] (Engineering / Civil Engineering) South African a plot of land, usually urban, marked off for building ...
1
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2answers
339 views

Is automobiles only a “car”

If we go by the word it should be anything which can move(mobile) on its own. The etymology section under wikipedia suggest so. But dictionary, wikipedia etc. says that its meaning is car. My ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“as such that” vs. “such that”

I would like to see if the following sentence is correct: (context: the tool performs an analysis during which alarms may be raised) 1. we had set up the tool such that a raised alarm stops the ...
12
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2answers
90k views

“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
1
vote
1answer
238 views

Are words like 'dog whistle', horse box', etc compound nouns?

Why do we say 'dog whistle' but 'dog's lead'; 'horse box' but 'horse's bridle'?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between sophisticated and complicated

All, I see these words are used many times literally or verbally. But I really don't know what is the difference between them. Please review one of them which I got from a read. After an ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What English words employ the Spanish suffix '-ista'?

The Spanish suffix '-ista' denotes someone associated with something. This has been adopted into English in one example I can think of, namely a 'fashionista'. One would have expected many more but I ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“Raising your voice”. Correct definition and usage

Raising your voice is speaking loud and clear (with emphasis), to point something out, mostly in a discussion (e.g. out of excitement). Raising your voice is speaking loud and clear, sharp, more of ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Error vs mistake and transmission vs transfer

I original message: Create a log file when mistakes occurred during transmission data between device and PC I think this wrong and should be: Create a log file when errors occurred during ...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
1
vote
2answers
8k views

Should I say “more exact”/“more precise”?

My understanding with the words exact, precise and accurate is that they are absolute. Meaning, there cannot be less accurate or more accurate. Is my understanding correct? If it's exactly 1 meter, ...
0
votes
3answers
997 views

Is this the right way to use “wouldn't”?

I apologize if this is a duplicate or anything for that matter but I didn't locate any questions on it. I have this phrase I wrote and it is confusing me a little bit. An OAHU Agent can help at ...
1
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3answers
582 views

Build, manufacture, produce - differences and contexts

to build, to manufacture, to produce something Are these synonyms, and what is the appropriate context for each of them? What would be appropriate in context of a complex product built in small ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

What's the difference between “if” and “whether”? [duplicate]

Using whether is far more common. It is certainly more formal. I would like to know whether it is a true story or fabricated. But we can use if as well in the same sentence. I would like ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Can I use the verb “attached” for a piece of information supplied in the email body?

Please find attached the detail for my application. Is this sentence correct if I supply the detail in the email body, not in a separately attached file?
1
vote
1answer
556 views

'though however' used together

I have come across a video in which the speaker says something like What the Commons is, though however, is ... Why use 'though however' together? Is the sentence with double 'is correct? You can ...
0
votes
1answer
682 views

Usage of “withal” to mean “in addition”

I understand that 'withal' can be used as a preposition at the end of a clause to mean 'with' or 'therewith' but it can, I think, also be used to mean 'in addition' or 'together with'. Concerning the ...
3
votes
9answers
3k views

Use of the word “issue” as a euphemism for “problem”

I am submitting to a journal, and the guidelines require me to avoid use of the word "issue" as a euphemism for "problem". Thing is, as far as I know the two words are (or can be) synonyms: ...
1
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2answers
2k views

Lately, I keep hearing and seeing “embarrassed of…” used instead of “embarrassed by…”

It seems very awkward to me. You never hear "thrilled of you", it's "thrilled by you," so what happened to "embarrassed by you"?
7
votes
9answers
2k views

Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?

In the following sentence I prefer saying relatives but I am unable to explain why. It's going to be a small wedding. Only a few friends and relatives have been invited On doing research I ...
-1
votes
2answers
117 views

Is “homogeneous…as” grammatically correct? [closed]

Here is the sentence: "A is made of a homogeneous material as that of B" Is this sentence grammatically correct?? or is there any more appopriate phrase?? Please help me out..
3
votes
1answer
348 views

Using pond as a verb to describe the formation of puddles

"The tenant complained that water is ponding in the parking area." or, "Due to the ponding of water in the lower lying areas, mosquitoes became a nuisance." "ponding" is not accepted by spellcheckers ...
3
votes
2answers
231 views

When it's OK to omit “where?”

When it's OK to omit "where?" For example, is it OK to omit it in the following sentence? This is the one of the few places (where) you can breathe real air. In which situations one's not ...
1
vote
3answers
15k views

“misunderstand” vs “misunderstood”

If speaking or writing to someone and it becomes apparent they did not interpret something correctly, is it correct to inform them "you misunderstood" or "you misunderstand"? I'm not sure because the ...
0
votes
5answers
2k views

A better verb for “cement” in “cement one's interest”

Is there a better word for cemented in the following sentence? All the experiences I went through have cemented my interest in this field. I was told "cemented" doesn't quite fit in and I was ...
2
votes
2answers
217 views

Is it common to use MRT to refer to subways all around the world?

According to The Free Dictionary: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mass+rapid+transit Noun 1. mass rapid transit - an urban public transit system using underground or elevated trains rapid ...
1
vote
2answers
251 views

Finding the correct interpretation of “Every X [units of time], at maximum/minimum.”

I've recently been involved in a discussion over different interpretations of the following sentence (paraphrased): Users may update their information every two weeks, at maximum. The intended ...
1
vote
5answers
503 views

Is “unsane” a word understood by a casual English speaker?

I have heard it used by some people e.g. Jacque Fresco, for example here. I know that people understand the meaning of the word "insane", but what about an average Joe and his understanding of the ...