This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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2
votes
4answers
841 views

Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

“Get a scare” or “catch a scare”

A friend of mine insists that you can 'catch a scare', but I've only ever heard 'get a scare'. I googled the expression and mostly got 'catch a scare card' or 'catch a scare crow', with only one ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

What is the practical difference between ignorant and naive?

Defined in online dictionaries, Ignorant means a lack of education, while Naive means a lack of worldly experience. What is the practical difference between these two? When would I use one and not the ...
1
vote
1answer
390 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
0
votes
2answers
576 views

How to use word “emanate” [closed]

Are these two sentences correct? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate itself?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Can food be described as “nice”?

Can food be described as 'nice'? This food is nice; This dish is nice. I always thought it could be, but I was speaking to a few friends and they argued (and strongly may I add) otherwise.
5
votes
1answer
278 views

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box,

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs:1918 through 1920;... Why (Daddy) in this sentence was written with a capital D?
3
votes
1answer
80 views

Is it “the humanities” or just “humanities”?

I.e., would I use "I hate the humanities" or "I hate humanities"? On that note, would the complementary statement be "I love the sciences" or "I love science"? "I love sciences" just sounds wrong, ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...
-1
votes
2answers
422 views

Can I use “progress” in this way? [closed]

I saw the following sentence: Something unknown has blocked the progress of the biggest diameter tunnel. Then, can I replace these words as follows: Seattle has progressed the biggest ...
7
votes
1answer
767 views

Does “abstruse” carry a positive or negative connotation?

Generally, does the word "abstruse" give positive or negative (or neutral) connotations? For example, "daedal" and "profound" would generally be considered a word with positive connotations, whereas ...
2
votes
2answers
377 views

“I beg leave to assure you” — letter by John Marshall

Richmond May 1st [17]99 (Source of Letter) Dear Sir You may possibly have seen a paragraph in a late publication, stating that several important offices in the gift of the Executive, ...
0
votes
1answer
627 views

Meaning of “my having completed my packing” [closed]

I ran into this in a novel: This expedition began this morning almost an hour later than I had planned, despite my having completed my packing, and loaded the Ford with all necessary items well ...
1
vote
4answers
15k views

What is the difference between “responsibility” and “obligation”?

I must admit that I am confused with these two words. For so long a time, I have been using them interchangeably. I have consulted the dictionary (of course) but I can't seem to pinpoint the glaring ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

Looking for the inverse of “frictional”

Does frictional means "that which is produced by friction"? Or is there a better word that means "that which generates friction"?
0
votes
2answers
486 views

Was the verb “bring” once used as a noun?

In the book of Amos (KJV, Amos 4:1), we find the verb bring is capitalized in the middle of a sentence. This is in sharp contrast to the same verb written in v. 4 in lower case letters. Finding a ...
2
votes
3answers
138 views

Is “iterate over” being used correctly in “we briefly iterate over related work”?

Is this a correct use of the phrase "iterate over'? In Section Three, we briefly iterate over related work.
2
votes
1answer
991 views

go there vs go up there

What is the difference between 'go up there' and 'go there'? Examples: The boys want to go up there. He didn't want to go there. Are they interchangeable in the above examples?
1
vote
1answer
133 views

The Usage Domains of “why” and “how”

This question was inspired by the this thread over at physics.se. What are the correct uses of "why" and "how" as interrogatives? Do questions that begin with "why" necessarily pursue answers which ...
2
votes
3answers
132 views

Can I say that a scientific field has been “polymorphic” if it has changed dramatically over time?

The field of artificial intelligence, abbreviated as AI, has been quite turbulent and polymorphic since its creation. If not, what other word or construct could I use? By polymorphic I meant ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Harmony as a state usage

Can we say works in harmony with other groups. I understand the adjective is harmonious and all what I found in web is using as harmony as a name here. Can we use it to express state. Further, is In ...
0
votes
3answers
236 views

Akward sounding paragraph [closed]

The valves, by way of the flaps are able to control the flow of blood through the heart because the flaps open and close during the contractions of the heart. I think the bolded part especially, ...
1
vote
3answers
130 views

“… nor X either” and “… or X either”

My question is: are the following sentences acceptable in English? "I have never had a car, nor a bicycle either" "I have never had a car, or a bicycle either" I am not asking what the best ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
47
votes
6answers
32k views

How long can you say “the late so and so”?

When you refer to the deceased, you say "the late so and so." How long can you say that? Is JFK referred to as the late John F. Kennedy? How about Abraham Lincoln?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
0
votes
2answers
163 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
-2
votes
1answer
551 views

Can 'repercuss' be used as a verb?

Lord Owen, the former British Foreign Secretary, in a BBC interview tonight with Jeremy Paxman used the word 'repercuss' as a verb. It was with reference to President Obama's handshake with Raul ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How far down the ancestry line do you call a person your “cousin”?

Should individuals on your family tree, 8 or 9 generations, still be called cousins? After aunts & uncles, should you call all individuals on a family tree "cousins"?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Do we have to use any article before job title?

If I have to introduce myself within the organization where I am working what is the correct sentence: I am Senior IT Engineer Or I am a Senior IT Engineer? Also what is the general rule to ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “yearslong” a word?

The New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
2
votes
3answers
420 views

Is “vacuous” offensive? [closed]

I am not an native English speaker and I would like to know if the use of the word "vacuous" is offensive. I am writing a reply to a request where I am asked to do something that has no sense at all ...
0
votes
1answer
193 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
1
vote
1answer
216 views

How common is the word “nostalgia”? [closed]

I have spent most of my life not knowing the meaning of the word nostalgia. I have looked it up. But as I was talking to someone about the experiences he had, he used the word as if it were a common ...
-1
votes
3answers
77 views

Can 'though' introduce a clause?

I'm a newcomer. Nice to see you. Is the following sentence right? "There was little money left, we felt happy though." I'm not clear whether,"though", as an adverb, can introduce a clause. In other ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

When is 'over and above' used?

When is the expression 'over and above' used instead of just 'over' or just 'above'?
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Is 'already' + (simple past) + (time of action) correct?

meta: I asked this question yesterday but it was marked as a duplicate of a previous question. But none of the answers to the previous question answered what I wanted to know. So I deleted that ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

How to categorize vocabulary for practical use?

What classification scheme exists for grouping words by their meaning, e.g., "words that describe food," "emotion words," and "types of people"? My concern is pragmatic; grouping words with similar ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a rule or pointer explaining where to put '_even'_ in a sentence?

You don't even have a chance. You don't have even a chance. You even don't have a chance. You had no chance. (where?)
1
vote
2answers
173 views

Is “Math Calculation” redundant when describing how to solve a problem?

I was corrected by another individual when describing the solution to a problem as a "math calculation". Is math implied when using calculation in a sentence therefore making my statement redundant?
2
votes
2answers
158 views

Usage of myriad as a noun

Can the word myriad be used in a stand-alone fashion, without a subsequent of prepositional? He rose to address the myriad, and wept. The word is a noun, and this usage sounds poetic to me, and I ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Using “such” + article form

When we use the word 'such', is there a rule to dictate whether we need to add article a/an behind? For example: I did not expect such cold weather. and I did not expect such a cold weather. ...
0
votes
1answer
350 views

Aloof proper usage

So is it a good use of the word aloof to say "She is not aloof to their harsh judgements"? The intent is to say that a person is aware of the perception others have of them. Thanks.
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of 'agendum' today

A wild guess tells me that agenda vs agendum is like data vs datum (former is a collection of the latter), but what is the use of agendum in today's English? If part of my party's agenda is to get ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Incredulous proper use

Is it valid to say 'I'm incredulous." all by itself as a standalone sentence? The intent is to convey that I am in disbelief. Thanks.
2
votes
3answers
493 views

The use of “who” on non-human subject such as a virus

A question struck me one day when I was writing a blog post and wanted to use the relative pronoun who on non-human subject such as a virus. I had seen many examples before where this pronoun, which ...
1
vote
2answers
501 views

strong will or strong wills? [closed]

Idiomatically we do say "a strong will". But can we say "strong wills"? The context is The optimism and (the) strong will(s) of the handicapped children touched me deeply. Also, do I need a "the" ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

He/she or what else could fit in a sentence referring to a transgender person?

The transgender, who secured 75 per cent in B.A. through distance education programme, said she had applied for the examination soon after the publication of the notification. On reading that ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

The difference between per person and each person

What's the difference between the two? 'It costs $50 per person' 'It costs $50 each person'
1
vote
2answers
20k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...