This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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5answers
153 views

Would this qualify as “racism” or would it be called something else? [duplicate]

I was listening to an Aboriginal women speak about indigenous rights and the government. She made a few references juxtaposing Christianity and their beliefs. For example, it is perverse and ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Is it wrong to use “genocide” as a verb?

Just so you people don't think of me as a monster. I ask this question because recently I was playing NetHack and there is a magic scroll that allows you to genocide a species of monsters (usually ...
1
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2answers
7k views

In what context would I use the word “availabilities”?

In what context would I use the word “availabilities”? I believe it is a valid English word, in how could it be used? Many thanks
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What is meant by “the fifth estate”?

I've found several definitions that seem to be incompatible From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fifth+estate A class or group in society other than the nobility, the clergy, the middle ...
5
votes
2answers
775 views

What is the adjective corresponding to Venus?

What is the correct adjective corresponding to the noun Venus?
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4answers
1k views

Feminine equivalent of “priapic”

For a male, if you are enumerating your sexual conquests, you might refer to it as your priapic conquests: The pirates joined on deck and exchanged stories on their own priapic conquests. Is ...
0
votes
2answers
108 views

The use of “though”

I'd like to know why the use of though in this sentence is wrong. Besides this he just gives money to the man and lets him walk away though of his bad injuries.
5
votes
2answers
380 views

What does Chris Christie is “350 pounds of toast” mean?

Maureen Dowd quoted Bill Maher’s description of Chris Christie as “350 pounds of toast,” in her article titled, “Christie puts the gloves on” in New York Times (February 22): “I tend to agree with ...
1
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3answers
291 views

“Half” for unequal divisions

A topic came up today concerning the usage of the word "half". I was describing a separation of labour into two obviously unequal groups. A colleague corrected me, saying that the word "half" ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
2
votes
2answers
114 views

Can “about” and “around” be used interchangeably in some cases?

Example: He paced about/around the room. Can those words be used interchangeably? If that's the case, which one is more common?
1
vote
3answers
5k views

What is the difference between “Employment” and “Job”?

I cannot understand the differences between the nouns (they both seem to mean "work"). For example: when we hire an employee, we have to define payroll and benefits for them. So which word better ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

'Hope' vs. 'wish' in unlikely situations

Although 'hope' and 'wish' have many different uses, I've seen the basic difference often summarized as: 'wish' is for imaginary, unlikely or impossible things, whereas 'hope' is for more likely or ...
2
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2answers
1k views

How to use namely correctly

Is this a correct use of namely: We will investigate two different research questions: 1. Is there a correlation between age and income? 2. Does university education lead to higher income? ...
3
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4answers
585 views

Does “nattering” have a negative connotation?

I hear people saying that they're "having a natter" with their friends, or 'If you want to have a natter about starting a project, give me a call!'. On different websites there are different ...
8
votes
3answers
32k views

Did they “ask” or “pose” a question?

I am currently in the process of writing a paper in computer science and I wanted to know if I solved a question posed by those guys or asked by them. When should I use "posed a question" and when ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“I'm to arrange the meeting”

The principal told me to arrange a meeting. Which of the following (if either) is correct, and why? The principal says I'm to arrange the meeting. The principal says to me to arrange the ...
-2
votes
3answers
125 views

Is “They won't tell me where is the office” correct? [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct? They won't tell me where is the office. They won't tell me where the office is.
2
votes
2answers
105 views

Can I say “disbursal of information”? Can one disburse anything other than money or assets?

So, as the title says: Can I refer to the disbursal of abstract things like information? Should I? If I were to write "the disbursal of information" to imply that people were being tightfisted with ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

Agreement of articles and prepositions

Which of the following sentences would you consider most acceptable, and why? Please assume knowledge of the difference between the definite and indefinite articles here and that they are used ...
1
vote
3answers
215 views

Difference between “The car is” and “The car is blue” in the word “is”

I, being a native English speaker, and having snoozed through some of my grammar lessons in elementary school, sometimes cannot express differences that I feel exist in certain grammatical constructs. ...
2
votes
2answers
613 views

Do you say “I have gone diving before” or “I have been diving before”?

Which is correct and common expression, "I have gone diving" or "I have been diving" "Have you ever gone diving?" or "Have you ever been diving?" As for skating, snowboarding, snorkeling and ...
4
votes
1answer
12k views

Are “the fact of the matter” and “as a matter of fact” the same?

For a long time, I had only known the phrase "matter of fact" to be used in "as a matter of fact..." However, for quite a few days, I have also been hearing, "the fact of the matter is..." in news ...
0
votes
3answers
776 views

“Martyr To” vs “Martyr For”

This book specifies the difference as: martyr for something: smb. who is made to suffer severely for a cause martyr to something: smb. who is acutely inflicted by something Oxford ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

'Blowback' with 'much'

Jawad Sukhanyar & Rod Nordland, In Prison Release, Signs of Karzai’s Rift With U.S. (NYT): The amount of people advocating for a long-term relationship with Afghanistan is pretty small in ...
0
votes
1answer
505 views

Is it correct to use the word “wrongdoing” in this sentence?

Is 'wrongdoing' used appropriately in this sentence? The wrongdoing of spying on students is not only in the boundaries of law, but it is also morally inappropriate.
1
vote
3answers
336 views

Need help simplyfying sentences containing economic information

I am not very knowledgeable about economics and am trying to reword these two sentences: In 1964 the CDC 6600 cost around $7 million USD, though some sources site prices of up to $10 million. ...
30
votes
11answers
7k views

Is there a word/term for a question where the asker knows he'll criticise any answer?

What do you call it when a person asks somebody a question when they know they'll criticise any answer regardless? For instance, a man asks you something like "If you were recruiting staff would you ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Assist or/vs Attend?

Is it correct to say: it's very important to assist to the meeting? Is it similar to say It's very important to attend the meeting? if not, in which context is the word "assist" used? I ...
1
vote
2answers
720 views

Is this expression correct: “It is A and B who [verb]”?

I have no problem with the following sentence: In this book, [it] is the father who tries to murder her However, what if I want to substitute a plural noun (or two names) for father? Are the ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

Can I use “appearance” in this context?

I have found the phrase "How Many Times Does a Word Appear in the Bible". In an XML document I do not want to use the verb appear, but rather the corresponding noun. For Example: Appearance of ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

One word for (have same size)

I am looking for a word that expresses same size characteristic. To be specific, we can say that "both DVD's are identical". However, identical might imply all characteristics resemblance. I am ...
3
votes
2answers
17k views

Is it correct to say “copious amount of”?

Which of the following are correct? I drink copious coffee I drink copious amounts of coffee I frequently hear people say #2 but it doesn't sound right to me (though "a myriad of X" doesn't either)...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Term for a body cast maker

What is the word used for a person who makes body casts? Is compounder a good word?
3
votes
3answers
763 views

Does “moonlighting” have a negative or neutral connotation?

We all agree that "moonlighting" denotes having a second job. However, Merriam-Webster and Oxford Advanced Learner's don't define it in exactly the same way. For example, Merriam-Webster attaches a ...
0
votes
1answer
258 views

Passive voice in this sentence

I am a bit confused about these sentences below. The word "encumbered" baffles me. "Encumbered" is usually used in passive sentences. I am not able to understand the agent in these following ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Using “on” before days or dates

I've noticed that on many American TV shows, the speakers generally don't use the word "on" before names of days or before dates. For example: I'll see you Monday. Shouldn't it be: I'll see you on ...
16
votes
7answers
8k views

Another meaning of the vulgar word “slut”

I guess people who speak American and Philippine English will unanimously agree that the word "slut" is a very offensive term referring to a promiscuous woman. However, Merriam-Webster and Oxford ...
2
votes
2answers
142 views

Is the verb “dose” used correctly in “an agent can be dosed into the tanks”?

Is this correct: For process stabilization an anti-foaming agent can be dosed into the tanks. I use "dose" because I want to emphasize that the amount of stuff put into the tank is carefully ...
0
votes
2answers
929 views

Why “would” instead of “will” in this sentence? Is it a rare use?

The goal for these negotiations is to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iran's nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. What does would imply here? If ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Is the following usage of the word “suggest” correct/common?

Sharing the first hours of the day with someone suggests you want to spend the rest of your life with that person. Is it correct/common to use the word like this? Does it sound weird? If so, what'...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

The word “afterclap”

Merriam-Webster defines "afterclap" as "an unexpected damaging or unsettling event following a supposedly closed affair." However, a pastor from Oregon, John Mark Comer, wrote an article about ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

How to use “yet” to express something hasn't happened until current time

If I want to tell somebody that something hasn't happened yet, I'm not quite sure how to use/put the word "yet" correctly in the sentence. Sentence 1: I'm not sure that we will have a meeting ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Academia — Correct Interpretation?

When someone says, "It's all academic" or "This one's academic", I believe that, certainly within the realm of sports context, the outcome of a game has finally been decided. The end result is a given;...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

all but.. none but.. usage

I'm a bit confused with the usage of all but and none but: "We are all but defenseless" – should mean we are definitely defenseless? "None but misfortunes follow" – only ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Which verb is used for the word “activity” - “do” or “play”?

In an English test I had recently, there was this multiple choice question: There were lots of different activities for Jay to ... there. A - Make B - Do C - Play There was no extra ...
0
votes
1answer
236 views

Why do we no longer refer to Muslim and Hindu women as being 'in Purdah'?

The term purdah is used metaphorically in Britain for anyone who stays out of sight. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is said to go into purdah (away from the press)before he delivers his annual budget ...
14
votes
9answers
10k views

Does the word “master” denote masculinity?

The other day, I had a little argument with a friend. He asserted that if the principal of a school is a female, she would not be called a "headmaster", rather - a headmistress. But I disagreed with ...
1
vote
5answers
361 views

Word usage: feeble

Is it correct to say Feeble people are more at risk of flu-related complications. to convey the idea that there are different levels of risk in the population at risk? I could have said old ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Usage of “walking out clean”

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? "I just hope he walks out clean from the probe" If not, what is the correct form? EDIT: The context of the above sentence is a situation where you ...