This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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1answer
677 views

“I worked in a chemists” vs “I worked in a chemist's” vs “I worked in a chemist”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Store names & possessive What is the correct grammar for saying that I worked for a chemists (that is, a shop that sells medicine)? Is it I worked in a chemist ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Since more than six months

As per English grammar, 'Since' is used to show the time period in the past from which the event is happening. So, is the sentence given below correct? "Since more than six months, I have been ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

“Every” being used instead of “ever”?

Occasionally I'll see a comment on the internet along the lines of I don't think I have every heard of such a thing. Maybe not exactly that, but something equivalent where I would think that ...
-3
votes
2answers
227 views

'Fill an appeal' or 'file an appeal'? [closed]

I encountered both expressions but I am not sure which is correct. Should I use "fill an appeal" or "file an appeal"?
-1
votes
3answers
518 views

Does the word “government” in English mean the courts as well? [closed]

Does the word "government" in English refer to the cabinet and the ministries, or the courts and legislature as well? Is there a difference in usage depending on country? Can you say "the government ...
1
vote
1answer
459 views

Usage of “ain't” in formal conversation

Is it okay to use ain't in formal conversation? I know ain't can be used for am not, is not, are not, have not, has not. So if I can use it in day-to-day life, it will be easier for me I guess.
2
votes
1answer
236 views

Etymology of “Green Paper” and similar expressions [closed]

Is there any other similar expression beside White Paper, Green Paper, Yellow Pages and Blue Book? What is relation between their color and their meaning?
3
votes
1answer
202 views

When making a decision, how many “choices” are there?

Suppose I put a coin on a table. I can do this in two ways: heads up or heads down. Question: How many choices do I make? It looks like I have one choice in the sense of having one decision. ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

“The language of the question/answer”

Are these sentences correct? I have changed the language of the question, so that you may understand easily. I have changed the language of the answer, so that you may understand easily. ...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

“Go to the country”, “go to the countryside”

I'm a non-native speaker of English. A lot of people say although you would say 'I went to the country,' meaning 'I went to a rural area,' you wouldn't likely say 'I went to the countryside.' Is this ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What makes 'admix' different from 'mix'?

A friend of mine (who, as far as I know, doesn't have English as a first language, though is fluent) mentioned how odd it was that English had the word admix, and quoted a dictionary definition that ...
1
vote
1answer
224 views

Is there a collective term for charges & fees?

Say I have documentation of a particular account with both amounts credited & amounts charged(fees). What would be an appropriately descriptive term for the collection of credits & ...
12
votes
5answers
7k views

Amber or yellow lights

What is the difference in usage between amber and yellow, when it is the color of traffic lights or some derived meaning? Is this purely a difference between British English and American English, or ...
1
vote
1answer
589 views

Is this sentence correct with “irreverent”? [closed]

You people were irreverent to POP's speech. irreverent = disrespectful - flippant - impious Is it a correct sentence according to syntax and semantics? If it can be written in a better way, ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Can't understand the meaning of “facile” in these example [closed]

I found the meaning of facile is easy, getting something without effort. http://sentence.yourdictionary.com/facile I have read those sentences. But can't understand it clearly. I'm trying to ...
3
votes
2answers
381 views

Proper pronunciation of ordinal numbers?

Ok, so these few are easy: 1st (first) 2nd (second) 3rd (third) 4th (fourth) ...... And all other ordinal numbers ending in 1, 2 or 3 have their respective values, except ...
1
vote
1answer
404 views

How common is the misuse of “literally” to mean “figuratively”? [closed]

This question "Literally" and "Decimate" misuse addresses the misuse of the word "literally" to mean its opposite. I am curious as to how prevalent is such misuse. My hunch ...
1
vote
3answers
323 views

Proper format for listing criteria for a project

My team are going back and forth between the proper usage of a specific sentence in our project proposal. This project proposal is being presented to a school, so we want to make sure we are correct ...
25
votes
5answers
36k views

What does 'sucker for' mean?

I recently came across a couple usages of 'sucker for' which indicates that it means 'crazy about', 'enthusiastic for', or 'interested in'. For example, 'I am a sucker for sports.', seems to say, 'I ...
3
votes
4answers
495 views

How should the word “brutal” be used in marketing?

I noticed that some companies use the word brutal for marketing their products. Examples: brutal performance – a data storage software markets itself with this, they mean that their software is ...
9
votes
6answers
16k views

Coney and rabbit: what’s the difference?

Are the words coney and rabbit full synonyms in English? Are there any slight differences in usage or meaning? Are there any cases when one word is more appropriate in the modern writing or speech ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

A proper definition for “hogget”?

This is the meaning of hogget in the Collins English Dictionary: a sheep up to the age of one year that has yet to be sheared the meat of this sheep So, is a lamb a hogget? This ...
3
votes
1answer
13k views

horrible vs terrible [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between “horrify” and “terrify”? Since I am not a native English speaker, I always have trouble figuring out when to use ...
0
votes
1answer
10k views

What's the meaning of the word “tad”? [closed]

I always see the word in sentence like, "it's a tad faser". Or people say "tad", as if they are frustrated. So, what's the meaning of the word? When to use it?
14
votes
1answer
2k views

On the usage of “etcetera”

In Spanish, we use the word etcétera at the end of an enumeration to imply there are more things to mention, which may (or not) be important, but they will be omitted. Thus, I was fairly surprised ...
-2
votes
3answers
1k views

where to position the preposition in the phrase: “not only… but also”

I have the following sentences, of which I don't know whether the prepositions are correctly positioned: The solution depends not only on Condition A, but also on Condition B. But when C happens, ...
-2
votes
1answer
124 views

Are 'contemporary' and 'contemplate' related words? [closed]

Do the words contemporary and contemplate relate to each other in any way?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “scopperloit” a real word?

Bysshe, Bysshe, Bysshe! What are we going to do about you? I hope you'll pardon this mesonoxian and inaniloquent lamprophony from a nihilarian pronk; it is not so much a phenakist scopperloit ...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a particular name for this kind of “poster”? Is this called a poster?

I was talking to a friend and wanted to speak about a particular kind of "poster" that has small hanging strips of paper containing information about services, sellers, or in this case the cat owner: ...
3
votes
3answers
331 views

“to comment out” before the era of programming

I think many people here are programmers since stack sites started out as stackoverflow originally, which is about programming. My question here is about the phrasal verb "to comment out". It makes a ...
-4
votes
1answer
254 views

For the current vs in the current [closed]

I'm in doubt about the right preposition in the quoted sentence, may I use in or for here interchangeably ? Or, each one gives a different meaning to the sentence ? A worker exists that has at ...
21
votes
5answers
8k views

Is “what on earth” still commonly used in real life? Is there any alternative that is not cursing or obscene?

I'm a non-native speaker. When I was at school, we were taught that "on earth" is used for emphasis in questions such as: What on earth are you talking about? However, from my experience ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Follow the signings?

I saw a road sign today saying: "Follow the alt route signings." It struck me odd. I would expect: "Follow the alt route signs." Signings is obviously a legitimate word, but it's usually used ...
-1
votes
1answer
150 views

depends on or dependant on [closed]

Consider the following: The response time of a service depends on the network traffic, The response time of a service dependant on the network traffic. Which is correct?
0
votes
0answers
40 views

When the word period is used after a sentence, what does it mean? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'period' mean when someone says “something, period”? When the word period is used after a sentence, like so: Bacon is awesome. Period. ...
-2
votes
1answer
431 views

What does “incognita” mean? [closed]

American Heritage Dictionary reads: incognita adv & adj, with one’s identity disguised or concealed. Used of a woman; n, A woman or girl whose identity is disguised or concealed. ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Behind of or in front of?

We daily use terms like "I was sitting in front of the television" and "Spent the all day behind the computer". What is the most appropriate term to use and why is it that people sit in front of the ...
1
vote
1answer
778 views

Difference between *guile* and *beguile*?

According to the dictionary, guile as a noun means cunning or deceit, while as a tr.verb it means to deceive. Beguile, doesn't seem to have a noun form, and as a tr.verb means to deceive or to be ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Verb form of statistics

May I ask what is the verb form of statistics or is there any replacement word with the meaning of "the act of doing statistics"?
1
vote
1answer
560 views

Is there a software that can help my speech and grammar [closed]

Is there a software that can help me to improve my speech and grammar?...like learning the past participle,present participle and etc...also in constructing the sentences...or if there is no software ...
6
votes
7answers
579 views

Is the word “throwee” acceptable?

I wanted to have a word to refer to the thing being thrown, so I decided to use the word "throwee". I can't find this word in online dictionaries, so I guess this word does not exist in the English ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Can “origin” be used as an adjective?

I found the following on today's Wired edition: Apple’s Software Boss Reveals the Origin Story of iOS Can origin be used as an adjective or some sort of modifier for other words? I couldn't find ...
4
votes
2answers
181 views

Usage of “tenebrous” [closed]

Can the word tenebrous be used to mean ambiguous? Your statement is ambiguous. Your statement is tenebrous.
1
vote
3answers
685 views

How to use the word “duplicate” [closed]

I would like to warn my customers that names can be duplicate. How do I put it in words? In MS Word when I entered Name can be duplicate., it draws a green line under duplicate. Whats my mistake? ...
10
votes
3answers
521 views

Is the word “borderline lunacy” a ‘stand-alone’ phrase or just an accidental combination of ‘borderline’ and ‘lunacy’?

I saw the word borderline lunacy in the scathing comment of a Republican strategist on Mitt Romney’s statement en route to London, Israel and Poland in Washington Post’s (7/31) article titled “Does ...
1
vote
5answers
483 views

Are monkeys a subset of apes? [closed]

I wonder if "ape" is the generic, more general term than "monkey". Can one say that all primates (including monkeys) except lemurs, humans and some other few species are apes?
1
vote
3answers
795 views

What is the adjectival form of “primate”? [closed]

To say a man is close to a primate, what should I use, "primatic" or "primative"?
5
votes
3answers
13k views

Cause for vs cause of

I read this sentence somewhere today, but I think that the of would fit better here than for, don't you think? The cause for the original problem will be analysed in the normal maintenance hours. ...
8
votes
6answers
1k views

Which is correct or more common when talking about medicine: “buy drugs” or “buy medicine”?

I mean it in the sense of buying medicine, for example for common cold or other diseases. When talking about buying medicine, which of these sentences is more correct or more commonly used: "go to ...
3
votes
2answers
220 views

Quotation mark usage in the sentence given

A leading article in Britain's Independent newspaper has the following (my emphasis): It is also evident, albeit in a different form, in the Global Investment Summit that opened on Thursday with a ...