This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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1answer
23 views

The scope is enlarged?

I would like to say that the project was going well and so it was decided that the scope would be 'made bigger/enlarged'. Is this correct or how else can I say it? Thanks in advance.
4
votes
3answers
80 views

Is the difference in English between height and length based solely on perspective?

In particular, I find it odd that a newborn baby is given a "length" whereas I as an adult am given a "height" even though the same dimension is being measured. The difference in use seems to be that ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Can “nor” be used after “and”? As in “and nor”?

I came across this post on Facebook: "Well, if it makes you feel any better..." It doesn't, and nor do I think you intended it to. Can "nor" be used after "and" like that? Doesn't look ...
4
votes
2answers
109 views

Does somebody's “lady” mean somebody's wife?

I recently visited a historic Buddhist temple in Japan and a grave there was in honor of the wife of a feudal samurai lord. The woman was referred to as the lord's "lady" in English. Is it an ...
1
vote
3answers
59 views

Can the word “unsettling” be used in a positive sense?

For example, in the phrase: John told Mary something unexpected and thoroughly unsettling - but in the best way a person can be unsettled Is there something wrong (meaning-wise) with this? Can the ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Scientific/Technical paper: enumeration/listing questions

I have a couple of questions for writing a (computer science) scientific/technical paper about the recommended style to enumerate or give a list of things. This is my current sample: Sharing IoT ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

The correct usage of to and in when asking if this is a person's first time in a city [closed]

I'm not sure how to explain this to my student. He is asking which of the following sentences are correct: Is this your first time TO Tokyo? or Is this your first time IN Tokyo? I'm thinking the ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Use of 'this' – relates to the directly preceding noun

I am a german native speaker. I am currently in the finishing stages of writing a thesis. One of my advisors (English is his mother tongue) provided feedback on the language of my writing. One point ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Word choice in this sentence: trajectory vs. vector

I'm editing a short piece of fiction where the author has left brackets around specific items that they want looked at, and this one has me a little bit stumped. In the scene, a character has jumped ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Application of this phrase [closed]

Where is this phrase generally used : "in arrears to" meaning indebted to . I am eager to know its usage . Is it just used in context with Banking or in common use also.please provide reference ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Making a fetish of something [closed]

Could you explain what making a fetish of society means in the following context please? French conservatives—who in the years preceding World War I turned against the Sorbonne, which they ...
3
votes
3answers
68 views

How to say if coffee is diluted and not strong?

For instance, a cup of cappuccino was made with too much water and because of it its taste was not that strong. What are correct words to say it? Dictionary returns many options, but which ones are ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Is “rewirings” a word?

Is "rewirings" a word? I recently found myself at need for its use and every location I search says it's spelled incorrectly / doesn't exist, yet I'm fairly certain this would be the correct word to ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Has there been a decrease of use of the word “rend” in literature?

The word "rend" (Verb: "to tear (something) into pieces with force or violence") is such an effective word. Descriptive and visceral. Yet it seems to me it's fading from literature and becoming an ...
5
votes
1answer
80 views

Does “the flip side” refer only to the negative aspects of something?

I understand that the expression "the flip side" is generally used to refer to the "negative" aspect of someone or something. I think the expression comes from the meaning of the "flip side (of a ...
5
votes
2answers
99 views

Positive connotation of “fluke”?

Many sources (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, for a start) suggest the word "fluke" has mostly positive connotations when used in the sense of "accident." That is, "a fluke" properly describes a lucky accident, not ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

An excellent novel in its own right [closed]

What does the following sentence mean? An excellent novel in its own right. Somebody can be rich in his/her rights but how can a book be excellent in its own right. At the end books are ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

What do we call “A person who disowns during bad times and claims during good times”?

Is there any single word to describe a mentality of a person who disowns something during bad times and claims the same during good times?
1
vote
2answers
69 views

How do I write about “fun” without using that word? [closed]

I'm a fortunate writer in that I get to write about toys. I get to describe games, puzzles and many more fun things for kids and adults. But I'm feeling like a broken record that's relying on the word ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Can 'residential context' be used interchangeably with 'domestic context'?

I know that when I am referring to a home, I can refer to it using the words - in a residential/domestic context... Is it the same for different places of stay like hostels, old age homes, refugee ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

Is the use of the word 'damn' to express frustration offensive?

For example, will a sentence like 'It's so damn hot' be considered offensive by the person whom it is being said to?
1
vote
1answer
157 views

Can the word “mundane” be used in positive sense

Mundane means ordinary.The word is mostly used in negative sense.Can the word "mundane" be used in positive sense too? Like"Mr.K is not a wasteful man.He leads a very mundane life."Another example can ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

Have versus Has

Which is correct? For example, is it "When one of you have a moment, please..." or is it "When one of you has a moment, please..."
-2
votes
2answers
53 views

Need someone to clear this up

If one is 'beyond reason to deal with' then wouldn't this mean that they are more than reasonable to deal with? In other words, I'm assuming to be 'beyond reason' or 'below reason' is the same thing, ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

Usage of 'that of' [closed]

Vishal invested 2/11 th part of his monthly income in stocks share and that of 4/11th part in mutual fund This is a mathematical question (source). I am confused about the usage of 'that of' ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

“The one what is blue” - WHAT versus THAT

I have a student who consistently uses "what" for "that" as in "The one what is blue." I need to come up with a rule(s) that would work for a 3rd grader, and am having difficulty finding anything. ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Usage, origin and the possible Hollywood influence on “terminate” meaning “to kill.”

Terminate is an old term, but its connotation meaning "to kill, assassinate" is quite recent ("to assassinate" is from 1975. ) unlike finish, whose meaning "to kill" is from 1755, according to ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

How to name process of illustrating definitions for words?

So lets imagine that I have many words. For each I would like to see how they are looking more or less. For this, I am planning to request google like: illustrating definition for word 'football' ...
2
votes
3answers
54 views

He who gives Information?

What is the person who gives you information called? Basically I have read a play in which there are two characters that provide you information of the happenings in the play like the information that ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

“Respectively” and implicit word ordering

I was recently told that the use of the word "respectively" in sentences like the one below is unnecessary because the reference is implicit through the ordering. "Jack and Jill are a boy and a ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

How would you describe the word 'tron'? [closed]

I have searched the meaning of tron and found various results. I though it would be related to working people like robots. Can you please answer me the various possible meaning of tron?
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Can anybody tell me what “the stake” in this question means?

I'm doing an assignment for my English class, and I don't understand what my instructor is asking. What are the stakes of the various objections to teaching Fun Home (promotion of a lifestyle, ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

A word to describe a person who has gone astray [closed]

What is a person who has gone astray called? This basically refers to the person who is not following the path to success but has gone astray . For instance these lines from the psalm of life depict ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

What does “resemble similarities” mean (if anything)?

I know that "to resemble something" means "to be similar to something", but how can something "be similar to similarities"? I have the feeling that this is wrong, but a web search turned up quite ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

If something with no specific time associated with it is called timeless, what would you call something with no specific place associated with it?

I would, quite simply, like to know what the word is for something that could happen in any place; similar to the word "timeless", though that refers to something that could happen during any time. I ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Use of the word “read”

I'm writting a short-story and I'm describing a character who is sitting down and reading a book. (...) grabbing a small book lying on the floor beside her. The title read Dark Flame (...) Is ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Is there a term similar to “country” which would also include a union like the EU?

I'm working on an interface where users can make selections from a few different groups of items. One of them is currently split because it comprises both European countries as well as the European ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Can I use “rank” as synonym for “level” for a creature's power?

In a game's rulebook I have heroes fighting monsters. Both have numeric "levels" to indicate their overall power/strength. Usually there are a lot of creatures of the same level, because they are ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

why come ing with verb after preposition

why we use "ing" with verb that comes after preposition? For example: he is accused for breaking a new vase. here breaking is being used after for
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Using 'in charge' as a noun?

I have seen this similar question here, but my particular case seems to differ still. I wish to use the word or phrase in charge as a noun, not as a verb. So for example, I have this usage scenario: ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

What is the wrap on a coffee mug or a thermos called?

When I buy a cup of coffee for taking away, the seller usually wraps the cup with tissue for reducing the heat or coldness when I hold the cup in my hand. There are also thick wraps that are made of ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Proper usage of the phrase “lost as to”

In writing I came across a dilemma concerning the phrase "lost as to". I'm not sure exactly when to use it. I believe this is correct: She shrugs, lost as to how to stop the two from fighting. ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Training program or training programme

I hope that professionals would be able to answer the following question related to writing the word of 'program' / 'programme'. As far as I know the first one is used in AmEN while the latter in ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

“impairment” vs. “impediment” (and derivatives)

Today I wrote the phrase "free from any procedural impediments" and am wondering how the meaning would change if I instead wrote "free from any procedural impairments." What is the difference between:...
33
votes
13answers
8k views

Is the use of the term “bugged” to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

In the 1950's, the primary uses of the word "bugged" was to describe a room that contained a hidden microphone, or to refer to a telephone line that was being tapped. Over the last few years, I've ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What or Which? Which one is more suitable?

Let's say I want to ask someone "How many Colleges are there in particular area that I can apply for?" So how would I ask the question 1) What colleges are there that I could possibly join? 2) Which ...
12
votes
4answers
478 views

Usage of “hysterical” meaning “very funny.”

One meaning (I am personally not very familiar with) of the adjective hysterical is: causing unrestrained laughter; very funny: Oh, that joke is hysterical! (Dictionary.com) No other ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Why is “attention payment” incorrect?

I have been wondering why some people think that "attention payment" is an accepted phrase. The argument is that you "pay attention", therefore you can learn "attention payment". This sounds incorrect,...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“Entitled to” usage [closed]

is the sentence "what kind of jobs are you entitled to" correct? Or should it be eligible for? If both are wrong kindly suggest the appropriate word to be used.Thanks in advance
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Use of MOREOVER

My English literature teacher says "moreover" should be used only when you write a lengthy passage, such as a dissertation, to add an extra point after many points have been written. Is that true?