This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
2answers
49 views

“results” vs “is resultant from”

So there I am, reading, when I hit this sentence: Repeated studies have shown that having excess body fat, type 2 diabetes and weight gain are resultant from eating and storing more calories than ...
1
vote
3answers
145 views

Informal word for someone who likes to keep to themselves

I always thought that anti-social describes someone who keeps to themselves. But according to Wikipedia, anti-social is not the right word. What, then, is the correct word to describe someone who ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Serial is produced by … and me

At the end of every episode of Serial, Sarah Koenig says: Serial is produced by Julie Snyder, Dana Chivvis and me. The word "me" sounds wrong to me there. Is it? If it's wrong, what is correct ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Cutover: adjective, action noun, state - all the same?

I'm a product Manager writing about a technological system in which a computer system is cutover (switched from one location to another). Cutover is the action. Is it also the state that the machine ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

The Word Bastard - Origin and Meaning [closed]

How offensive is the word Bastard? And when did it become more of an offense than a term used for child out of wedlock?
1
vote
1answer
75 views

How etiquettical is it to start off a professional email with 'Hey'?

I've been wondering, why whould folks avoid the usage of Hey to greet someone/team as the mail starts, did that really read grotesque? What could be the alternatives other than the conventionals?
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Is it now standard to refer to February 29th as a “bissextile day”?

I've noticed the obscure word "bissextile" showing up with greater frequency, especially in the past few leap years. In the past, the word would occasionally show up to refer to leap years as ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Distributive property of 'and' for a set

If I did 'x' for two years and then did 'y' for one year, can I correctly say that I did 'x' and 'y' for 3 years? Or would that be false since I hadn't done 'y' for more than one year? Would it be ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

Is using the word “snafu” instead of the word “problem” correct? [closed]

Snafu : Wow, you got yourself into one hell of snafu. Problem : Wow, you got yourself into one hell of problem. Are the both sentences above equal ?
1
vote
1answer
57 views

pass on - pass down / passed on - passed-on

What is the difference between pass on and pass down? E.g. "Local knowledge is passed on orally or within practice from one generation to the next." or "Local knowledge is passed down orally or ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Help me understand the use of “would ” in a particular sentence (in IELTS Book) [duplicate]

Examiner: Describe a place you have visited in the past. Candidate: [...] When I was a student, I would go there all the time and hang out with my friends. I don't understand what "would" ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

'Why you did that' and 'Why did you do that' difference [duplicate]

I asked one person 'Why you did that' referring to something he did in the past, and he responded something like 'Why are you saying that, are you a little kid?'. I was confused and asked him why ...
4
votes
6answers
166 views

Goodbye forever

Is there any word in English that you should use when you want to say : "goodbye" for a person and both of you know that you'll never see again? "Farewell" ? or Something else?
3
votes
2answers
59 views

Is there a valid English word for “playability”?

I edit a lot of writing on the topic of cue sports, like pool and billiards. The word "playability" comes up a lot. For example, if one is trying to explain that a pool cue is excellent in feel and ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Natives of a Country: Norway Native vs. Norwegian Native

I want to describe someone who comes from Norway. I feel like it's better to say "Norwegian native," but I'm almost certain that I've heard nouns come before "native," like in "San Francisco native." ...
5
votes
3answers
375 views

The difference between “Many a man” and “Many men” [duplicate]

Many a man died in that battle. My understanding of many mean more than 2 and a man mean 1. But in the sentence above, these two words are put together and I wonder what does it really mean? How ...
2
votes
3answers
71 views

Where is it relevant to use the word “sucks” and where is it not? [closed]

Intuitively, the statement Yeah, it sucks! Doesn't seem to be a legitimate statement. Or is it? If it is not then where should I not use such statements? At office? With acquaintances ? With the ...
9
votes
6answers
1k views

How can I say “bon appétit” or “smakelijk” in english? [duplicate]

In the most cultures, some people say something before there meal. In French they say "bon appétit", In Belgium and The Netherlands "smakelijk" and in Polish "smaczny". But how can I say the same ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Can the word God be colloquially replaced with f***? [closed]

I stumbled across these lyrics from "Enter Shikari - The Last Garrison": Head's up and thank fuck you're still alive! It sounds like that there was "God" replaced with "fuck". It even sounds ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Can we use word “travel” for flying? [closed]

Is it correct to use word "travel" for flying by the airplane? What I understand is, travel is a general term that can be used for any type of travel while flying is the specific version of it.
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Correct way to use “who” in an introductory sentence about a movie

Today I wrote the following introductory sentence about the movie “Outsourced”: The movie “Outsourced” produced in the year 2006 and directed by John Jeffcoat deals with a part of a company being ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

The audience who or which? [duplicate]

If I want to say something like: The audience,...,who is deeply affected by her loss. Should I use "which is deeply affected by her loss." or "who is deeply affected by her loss."
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Usage of “place” for business premises

In my circle, Manchester, UK, many refer to their work habitat, be it office, shop or worshop, as "my place" or "the place". as in "I'm going to the place", or I left it in my place" Is this usage ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

“It is just enough” or “It just is enough”? [duplicate]

Where should I put the "Just" in a sentence? Before be or after be? It is just enough. or It just is enough.
4
votes
1answer
82 views

If I'm not sure about the gender of Brown may I write “Brown was merry and their cat was sad”? [duplicate]

If I'm not sure about the gender of Brown may I write: Brown was merry and their cat was sad. ... ? I met such a construction in "Harry Potter", but I don't know whether native speakers are ...
3
votes
3answers
68 views

“Per person” versus “for each person”

Ok, so I'm a native English speaker and some non-natives have asked my help clarifying a particular phrase. The phrase is, "Receive $100 per friend you refer to (name of company)" for me it sounds ...
40
votes
11answers
5k views

Has “hacker” definitely gained a negative connotation?

The American Heritage Dictionary defines a hacker as: One who is proficient at using or programming a computer; a computer buff. One who uses programming skills to gain illegal access to a ...
4
votes
2answers
143 views

Is it correct to use “git” as verb?

I know that the word git is used for describing an unpleasant person. Also Git is a name of a version control system which is quite popular among software developers. I thought this word did not ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

When should the word “NOW” be used in a sentence…? [duplicate]

Consider the following 2 sentences:- "Now the application is working fine". "The application is working fine now". Which one is grammatically correct and why?
2
votes
2answers
52 views

“the same as” or “the same thing as”

When comparing words, do you say "X means the same as Y" or "X means the same thing as Y" I understand you could get around this and be more clear by saying : "X has the same ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

What's the difference between “client” and “user”? [closed]

I want to know the difference between client and user. When should we use client, and when we should use user?
0
votes
1answer
82 views

What is generally considered the youngest age at which it's normal to call a girl a “young woman”? [closed]

It would obviously be ridiculous to call a 6-year old girl a young woman. What's the youngest age when it's no longer weird to call a girl that?
2
votes
1answer
59 views

How to use “In the span of”?

I'm writing an essay regarding the concept of Carpe Diem and I'd like to start my introduction with the following sentence: "In the span of the universe, a human life is an incredibly short period ...
2
votes
5answers
199 views

Is “rotate” in “Earth rotates around the sun” the correct word?

Earth rotates around the sun. Is rotate an acceptable word in that context or should I use words such as orbit or revolve instead?
1
vote
2answers
85 views

I did it fast or quickly? [duplicate]

I have read many books say that they ran fast. But that sounds wrong compared to they ran quickly. Which should it be?
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Can I use the word “sceptical” this way? [closed]

I am sceptical about my vacation plan. Is this the correct way to write? I wanted to express doubt about my vacation schedule. I have to tell someone that my vacation schedule has yet to be ...
3
votes
2answers
44 views

Word for blog / article / tutorial

I'm building a site with two main categories. One side is portfolio work, the other is written work. Among the written work, there will be personal blogs, tutorials, more in-depth articles, etc. I'm ...
0
votes
5answers
701 views

What's a single word for someone who writes literature?

As the title suggests, what's a single word to call someone who writes literature? (By Literature, I refer to great works such as those written by Keats, Joyce, Faulkner, Bronte, etc.) Exempli ...
2
votes
4answers
52 views

Can “dissolute” be plural? [closed]

I have a text I'm proofreading that lists certain types of people, and in the list is the word "dissolutes" ("highwaymen, loners, children, dissolutes"). My Word processor is telling me that while ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

Is it “ignorance in something” or “ignorance on something”? [closed]

Let's eat grandma. Let's eat, grandma. Over millions of grandmas die each day because of our ignorance in using commas. Commas save lives! Use commas now! Should that in actually be on? How ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

Is there a word for tasks specified in a regimen?

For example, here is a diet regimen : Breakfast: eat cereals, milk, banana. Lunch : eat Rice, curry and vegetables. Evening : eat a Sandwich. or a day long schedule : 6: 00 - 7: 00 ...
1
vote
3answers
201 views

Is “dictator” a negative word?

Recently, I was discussing something about open source software in the FOSS stack exchange and to explain a certain technical concept (permissive licenses), I made the analogy of dictatorship vs ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Is there a “name” called for a same word used in different scenario? [duplicate]

For eg: If you marry a wrong girl, you are finished. and My work is finished. So, I just wanted to know if the word "finished" here got any name like "multiple usage of an English word"? Is there ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

When does 'okay' work as an answer to a question to replace yes?

For example, asking a question like: "Do you want to go to the shop with me?" can be answered with "Yes", but can it be answered with "Okay"? A similar example that I think doesn't work is: "Do you ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Is it correct to say “to be so”?

My teacher said "Are you one of my students?". Can I reply with " Fortunately, and I am glad to be so". ? Another queation about English accent. English don't pronounce the letter R when it is ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

“Accommodate” vs “accomodate to”?

Searching on Google shows both forms: We will do our best to accommodate you. They accommodate to you and are very encouraging. Sometimes they appear together in one sentence, thus makes me think ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Adjective to describe a strikingly smart person (Prodigious?)

I am a non-native speaker in need of a term to describe a strikingly smart person. That is, one who is extraordinary intelligent or has amazing abilities or qualities. I know that a prodigy is used as ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Proper use of “delineate” [closed]

Is this the proper use of delineate in this sentence? "In order to properly discuss the differences between amateur and professional critics it is necessary to delineate between the two." Or should ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Meaning of the word “dating”

Someone said to me, "Adrian is dating Michelle" But actually what he meant was that they were going to have the first date in the near future. Can I state that I am dating someone if we never did it ...
2
votes
1answer
190 views

Should I use the word “that” in a sentence when it is not required? [duplicate]

In this sentence My sister told me that she didn't want pancakes for breakfast. The sentence would still make sense even if the word "that" is taken out. How would one decide to use the word ...