Tagged Questions

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
votes
2answers
60 views

What's the difference between the verbs “recruit” and “employ”? [closed]

What's the difference between the verbs "recruit" and "employ? Why is it used so in sentences "Our company is flourishing and we recruit more than a handred workers. Every year we employ 10 more."
2
votes
2answers
86 views

What is the word for “technical usurpation of an old word”?

Is there a word for "usurpation, rather than merely borrowing, of an old word by later, technical usage"? If so, what is it? For example, of old, the English word summer meant "that season of the ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Is oaken really a word? [closed]

I read a lot. I occasionally see "oaken" used to describe something made out of oak. It's used more frequently in historical or romantic fiction. Does common usage make it right?
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Why not “virtual estate” instead of “screen real estate”?

In English usage in many disciplines, like articles on Web designing, people frequently use the word "screen real estate" or "viewport (browser window size) real estate" or even "mobile or browser ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Is knowledge of the meaning of the word “ubiquity” ubiquitously considered to be ubiquitous? [closed]

Please pardon the pun. I was in a conversation on a game’s online chat, talking about how common an item was, and used the word “ubiquitous” to describe it. But, much to my surprise, the point of ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

What does this usage of “with” mean? [closed]

I'm sorry for asking what will be such a simple question but I'm not sure exactly how With is used in sentences where that's the first word. Is that what it took to fall in love with someone? ...
3
votes
2answers
62 views

Use of the word conciliated in Call of the wild

"as he looked at each brutal performance, the lesson was driven home to Buck: a man with a club was a lawgiver, a master to be obeyed, though not necessarily conciliated" from Call of the Wild. I do ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

What is the origin of “Why don't you…” as a suggestion or command?

Frequently, in spoken dialogue one hears the above phrase used as a suggestion to the listener (or sometimes more strongly, as a command): Why don't you give me that book? Why don't you go to the ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Participation/participating and a couple more questions

I'm helping my sister to prepare a cover letter for her job application and I have problems with a couple of sentences: 1) Something seems wrong in the sentence and I don't know what exactly: The ...
2
votes
1answer
335 views

What is a word for doing something that you don't want to do?

I am reading Of Mice and Men, and I am trying to come up with a word that describes how George manages to shoot Lennie at the end of the book. I have come up with Self Discipline, and Overcoming ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

How do you use the word “arguably”? [duplicate]

Does arguably mean "something could be argued", or "could be arguable, is debatable or questionable"? But more often it seems to emphasize an adjective, for example: It is arguably the best, the ...
2
votes
2answers
183 views

When is it appropriate to use “to receive someone”?

In what cases we can use the verb receive to refer to a person and not to an object?
3
votes
3answers
648 views

“I hardly/highly doubt it” [closed]

I always thought "I hardly doubt it" was a correct sentence, but it seems that it isn't. I do find a lot of occurrences though. Should it be "I highly doubt it"? I know the difference between hardly ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Usage of “prevalent” in reference to a disease [closed]

Is it ok to use word 'prevalent' in the following sentence: Flu is very prevalent in the third world countries, that nobody cares about it.
1
vote
2answers
164 views

A word/phrase meaning the “house where I was born”?

For instance, to refer to the place you were born you say "my hometown." How about when referring to the house where you were born? I thought of "my parents' house", but I think it'll sound strange if ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Can I omit “one” in the following case?

Rich people's lives are the most complicated (ones)—and also the most meaningless (ones). Can I omit both? If not, which one should I keep?
1
vote
3answers
101 views

Adverb for “multiple”

Say that I have a Pokemon with 2 types: Fire and Flying. One could say this Pokemon has "multiple types." That is because the designer of this Pokemon "typed" it that way. Is it correct to say the ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

be intended to vs intend to

I see a lot of examples of be intended to and intend to. Both of them mean plan to do. Some examples: Selling was my game and I intended to be a winner. The ban is intended to be permanent. ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Can I use the word “school” when referring to something that belongs to a university?

For example, can I refer to the main gate of a university as the school's main gate? Or say school begins in September instead of university begins in September (especially in informal speech)?
0
votes
3answers
90 views

Dough, paste, or pastry? [closed]

I'm a bit confused here. Could you help me to differentiate between the meanings of these words?
0
votes
2answers
144 views

Barkeeper, or bartender? How to address them?

I dunno if I'm right about the meaning of these words. What do you call the person who owns a bar, or a pub? And the person who serves you with drinks at the counter? [As the two may not be ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Oxymoron Examples [closed]

I am trying to write some new oxymoron examples. If a grammar school stops teaching grammar (drops grammar from the curriculum), would this be called oxymoronic?
10
votes
2answers
154 views

What exactly is an idiom?

A recent question on the phrase "take my word for it" sparked a tangential discussion about calling it an idiom. I disagreed with the word since "take my word for it" is not figurative. Wikipedia ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Can “unto” be used instead of “onto” in American English?

Is there a difference in how the preposition "onto" is used in British and American English? I always understood it to match the following dictionary definition I found online, and was not aware of ...
0
votes
3answers
440 views

“For the time being” vs. “in the mean time”

I am confused when to use "For the time being" and when to use "In the mean time". Are they interchangeable. Can you please explain with some examples?
1
vote
4answers
71 views

Injective / injectional: mode of operation of a pump

What is the best matching word for the mode of operation of a pump doing injections into a pipe system? By "injections", individual short feedings with no (temporal or other) relation to each other ...
1
vote
0answers
4k views

“With regard to” vs. “with regards to” vs. “in regards to” [closed]

I found the following usage notes in the Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary (emphasis mine): The phrases as regards, in regard to, and with regard to are standard and occur in all ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Replacements for “though”

Examples: Mary thought the man was nice-looking. It wasn't enough to lower her defenses, though. Tom crossed his arms on the table. He did it so hard, though, he hurt his elbows. ...
1
vote
0answers
308 views

“unconservative” or “inconservative”? [closed]

Which one is correct: "unconservative" or "inconservative"?! If both are incorrect, what word should we use instead?
6
votes
3answers
268 views

Is it ok to use fraught in a sentence without saying what the thing is fraught with?

Ex. is it ok to say such and such is fraught. Full stop? In a case where the context makes it clear what its fraught with?
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Is the following use of “nonetheless” correct?

I was so down and unmotivated, nonetheless, that even thinking about getting up the chair seemed like a tedious and burdensome task. I'm having my doubts because at first I used however, and ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Should we say “the sun is risen.” or “the sun has risen”?

Of course we can always say "the sun is up", but is it acceptable to say "the sun is risen" just as we use verb "to be" before other past participles like "she is gone"? Or should we say "the ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

industry problems or industrial problems

Should we say industry problems or industrial problems? Which is incorrect? or maybe each of them has specific meaning, then what is that meaning? I myself think the "industry problems" means the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

“As per” and “in the case being”?

Take the following text into account: These airstrikes would not only be punishment for Assad's use of chemical weapons against civilians amid the three-year-long Syrian Uprising (according to ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

University research or Academic research

What do you call researches that are carried out in the universities as thesis or...? academic researches university researches researches in university
2
votes
3answers
331 views

“Birthday” vs. “anniversary”

Are there general guidelines for using "anniversary" vs. "birthday"? E.g., birthdays are generally for... well, birthdays. It's also used for some notable historical dates regarding countries ("Our ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

use of “not on purpose”

I was told that "not on purpose" cannot be used in the middle of a sentence. For example: I was showering and, not on purpose, I participated in the #icebucketchallenge. I am aware of the fact ...
2
votes
4answers
849 views

“Being myself of the feminine gender…” Gender ? Or sex? [duplicate]

From the section of letters of a woman's magazine: "Being myself of the feminine gender, I suppose..." Can we say a person is of "the feminine gender" ? Shouldn't we say "the feminine sex"? ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
2
votes
3answers
161 views

Adjective form of “foreign policy”?

Is there a adjective form of "foreign policy" or "foreign relations"? It needs to fit in with: There were contrasting political, social, and ??? systems. EDIT: By "foreign policy", I really mean ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

How to use “posthumous”?

I know that "posthumous" means "after one's death." But how would you use it to say: This is shown by his posthumous weakening of the monarchy. What I mean to say is that after his death, other ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

Use of 'swag' as a verb

I came across this post on swag (the slang word): Attempt to swag should ideally be accompanied by apt spellings. I have seen swag being used only as a noun. I know swagger is a verb, but is ...
0
votes
1answer
243 views

loud, aloud, loudly?

Which one of the following should I use ? Speak loud. Speak loudly. Speak aloud. I heard once a teacher say 'speaker louder', so I think 'speak loud' should be no problem. What's more, ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Is it correct to use “yonder” as equivalent to “those”/“these”

I want to write: "The methods can be divided according to the theories underlying the process and also differ on the statistical methods to evaluate those theories." Would it be correct to use yonder ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Usage of too while comparing two places

While in a conversation about a place xyz which is facing water scarcity, if another place abc is also having water scarcity, which sentence would be correct:- I know xyz has water scarcity, but is ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

Is usage of the word epitome in a negative sense correct?

Can the word epitome be used in a negative context like in this statement He is the epitome of corruption. And should I be using the epitome instead of an epitome?
3
votes
2answers
59 views

Word for a follower of a Pied Piper

The phrase Pied Piper is often used to suggest one who leads others down a questionable path. I cannot, however, think of the best term to use to describe a "child" following said Pied Piper, in a ...
0
votes
0answers
60 views

“We're pregnant!” [duplicate]

I noticed a rash of couples recently who will announce to friends and family, "We're pregnant!" At first I thought this was just a cutesy way of announcing a pregnancy that was intended to be ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

Using 'ride' vs. 'drive' when it comes to a motorcycle

Suppose I am offering someone a ride home. I know "I'll give you a ride home" would be correct. But can I also use ride as a transitive verb, as follows? Come, I'll ride you home. I'm asking ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

“Tease” or “tease with”

Does this headline from Toms Hardware use a correct sense of the verb "tease" (the main sense of which in this area being to tantalize especially by arousing desire or curiosity often without ...