This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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2answers
195 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

Use inland or foreign

If we want to let the world know about our country, Shall we say "To improve foreign trips" or "To improve inland trips"
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Would an “affector” be appropriate for an event driver?

I'm trying to come up with a better word to describe a "driver" or "conditional"; basically, the name of an object or event which is a trigger for something else. Would it be appropriate to say that ...
2
votes
1answer
109 views

The word “cooker”

According to Merriam-Webster, one of the definitions of the word "cooker" is "a person who tends a cooking process (a cook)." The dictionary provides the following example sentence: Dad was the ...
0
votes
3answers
176 views

What do you call a person placing bets? [closed]

I'm trying to figure out the proper word for a person who is placing bets on various matches at a betting company. I've found only these: bettor / better , punter, but I have literally no idea about ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Correct preposition for geographical location [duplicate]

I'm working in the United Arab Emirates. I want to know how to make a sentence describing my (city) location with the correct preposition. For example, should I write: I'm in Dubai, or I'm on Dubai, ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

Does one say “allegory for” or “allegory of”?

How does one correctly use the word "allegory" in a sentence? For example: This story is an allegory [for|of] pride. I have seen examples of both: the long poem is an allegory of love and ...
4
votes
3answers
202 views

How was 'hone in on' bastardised to mean 'home in on'?

The comments under this CBC article impelled me to check the definitions of the verbs home in on, under which a para discusses this debasement, vs hone in on. Yet it doesn't explain this corruption's ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

I cannot understand the word “curry”

I cannot understand the meaning of this sentences. This is in the article titled as "Let England shake" (The Economist Sep 27th 2014) -article about Scotland's independence referendum The prime ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Word, expression for copying someone who inspires you

All of us have a person; our elder siblings or friends or any one who we are inspired by. For example my elder sister, I love the way she carries herself, her personality, her poise, that I try my ...
2
votes
3answers
72 views

'On' vs 'at' are there any principles that advise using one instead of the other when expressing the location of something?

The building is located on the corner of Bank and Butler. Vs. The building is located at the corner of Bank and Butler. Is there any reason why one is more appropriate than the other?
-2
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1answer
194 views

Correct English: “Get sick” or “fall sick” [closed]

Whats the correct English "I got sick last night" or "I fell sick last night"?
1
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8answers
191 views

Word for very limited communication between races/religions/cultures

There is a country in which there are many different religions, races and cultures. In that country, people are cold and they only care about themselves or their community. There is little or very ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Language Evolution

Language changes all the time, most often in usage but also in spelling and grammatical form. At what point does a widespread misspelling or incorrect grammatical usage become acceptable and correct? ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

“In” after “happiest” or “content”

I feel the happiest and most content knowing I can always count on them. OR I feel the happiest and most content in knowing I can always count on them. Is it correct both ways? or does this ...
0
votes
2answers
117 views

Reflexive pronoun (myself) grammar issue

I was writing in MS Word 2003, and it put a green underline under the word "myself", as used below. Don’t trust people, even myself, trust the code. I ran the spell and grammar check, but it ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

What does it mean when someone has “golden pipes” and how did it originate?

I believe I saw this mentioned in an article/blog post I read a while ago. From what I remember, the article was about a person's amazing singing voice. However, I looked it up recently and didn't ...
0
votes
1answer
142 views

“in fact” vs “indeed”

This might sound silly, but are "indeed" and "in fact" interchangeable? Here's a case: Q: Is that a nice house? A1: Yes, it's really nice indeed. A2: Yes, in fact it's really nice. It sounds to me ...
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votes
3answers
175 views

Can somebody recommend a good word to describe somebody with great responsibility

I'm looking for word that would describe a ruler or any leader with great responsibilities which has shown themselves to be very caring and ready to go the extra mile. could the word magnanimous be ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Usage of 'stand' [closed]

I heard a person saying 'The guest room stood empty' It sounded a bit weird to me perhaps because English isn't my first language. Buy what does it mean here? Obviously the room stands. Can't we ...
0
votes
2answers
107 views

Difference between 'voting' and 'casting a vote'

What's the difference between them? A man was talking to another person while the elections were being held. I overheard them. But I'm confused here. English is not my mother language and I have ...
-1
votes
2answers
103 views

Usage of tenure vs term

I'm trying to express someone has completed his tenure/term in office. What is the difference between the following phrases: President Obama has successfully completed his tenure as president. ...
-5
votes
1answer
113 views

Tolerance in English for names with vulgar everyday meaning? [closed]

Why does English (and perhaps other languages) allow collisions between names and nouns with vulgar/offensive meanings? I'm thinking of course of Dick vs. dick. Possible explanations (in no ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Acid vs. Acidic

I’ve always been taught that when a substance has the properties of an acid, it is considered acidic. However, recently I’ve noticed various things describing such substances as very acid as if the ...
1
vote
4answers
330 views

What is the expression for “high fever”?

It can not be high/low according to my understanding. Fever is fever. He is suffering from fever of high temperature. He is suffering from high fever.
1
vote
3answers
377 views

Can fiction be called prose?

I am categorizing ebooks and audio books of fiction and non_fiction works. For this I have created folders named: audio_fiction audio_non_fiction prose_fiction prose_non_fiction Does it ...
0
votes
2answers
230 views

“at the cost of” vs. “at the expense of”

I usually use "at the cost of", but my editor made it "at the expense of". For example, the following sentence: The counts in Table 2 are all based on implementations that are optimized for ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Why is “be” here? People be like [duplicate]

In so-called memes and vines, I've seen sentences such as "People be like", "Boys be like", and so on. Every time, I wondered how be was in those particular sentences. Grammatically, how can be be in ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Et cetera and Et alii

As et cetera states "and the others" and et alii does "and others", it occurs to me that using etc. would need any specification which makes "the others" clear. I've usually seen times as many etc. as ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Can “extremely professional” have a negative connotation? [closed]

If someone is described as extremely professional, might there be a negative side to it? This is how I would take it in many contexts, and I'm wondering whether it's justified. If some chap at work ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Is it correct to say “audio sound”? [closed]

Is this sentence technically correct? I have to find audio sounds in a lot of multimedia data I want to know is it correct to use audio & sounds together ?
0
votes
5answers
68 views

Usage of “persons”

I know pretty well that the plural for 'person' is 'people'. But my literature professor used once the word 'persons' because, he said, he was using the word the same as it will be used 'individuals'. ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Man in blue shirt [closed]

Is it possible to omit the "shirt" and still have the same meaning? What if it wasn't "shirt" and it was some other type of clothing, would it still be possible? Edit: I meant as if there is no other ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Is it common to use the phrase “come with” without specifying with whom [duplicate]

We’re going to the pub. Want to come with?” I have heard this from an American colleague. Though this sounds odd to the majority of us, however, since I am not sure of the usage, I am asking how ...
1
vote
3answers
117 views

Season's Greetings usage

Season's Greetings: exclamation, noun [plural] UK US something written on a Christmas card as a way of expressing a Christmas greeting. (dictionary.cambridge.org) A ...
-2
votes
1answer
79 views

“I find myself” usage [closed]

Is this phrase correct? "You go home while I find myself something to eat" or should I use: "You go home while I will find myself something to eat" or "You go home while I find something to eat ...
0
votes
3answers
49 views

Last Thanksgiving

Would "last Thanksgiving" at the end of 2014 refer to November 27, 2014 or November 27, 2013? Technically, the most recent Thanksgiving would be the former but the Thanksgiving in the last year would ...
-3
votes
1answer
135 views

How to use “abhorrence” in a sentence? [closed]

How do I use the word abhorrence in a sentence? In my case, this is to express my extreme disgust of the Java programming language to a college. (no hate ^-^) I wrote it as: Is my abhorrence ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Is “to drape a medal” correct usage?

I am trying to describe the act of an official attaching a medal to a recipient's clothing (chest) during an awards ceremony. Is "to drape a medal" the correct usage? I don't think "to pin a medal" ...
1
vote
2answers
215 views

Meaning of the phrase “you're a caution”

I have encountered the phrase "you're a caution" in a movie in a suggestive, possibly judgmental context. How is this to be understood and where does it come from?
4
votes
1answer
127 views

Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Kudos Vs. bravo

Has the word kudos outdated the word or exclamation bravo! Here's what Google Ngram shows: ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

“Amazed by how” vs “amazed how”

I am amazed by how friendly these people are. I'm amazed how friendly these people are. What is the difference between the usage with by and the usage without?
0
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2answers
95 views

Is asking for the “proper” use of the word “chemical” a case of linguistic prescriptivism?

Another Skeptics.SE user and I are discussing the meaning of the word "prescriptivism". (Yes, we are aware of the recursion involved.) In particular, I have cited a couple of examples of scientists ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Which answers are correct among five expressions? or have the same meaning? [closed]

A: I think she has had plastic surgery. B: Yes. She definitely is not a natural beauty. Yes. She definitely is not the natural beauty. Yes. She definitely is not in natural beauty. Yes. She ...
2
votes
1answer
171 views

What is the meaning of “others” in this sentence?

I came across a sentence on a Wikipedia article, where "others" seems to have been used as a noun. Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says it can either be noun or pronoun. The sentence in question ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Conspicuous v. Ostentatious

Conspicuous means: 1. Easy to notice; obvious: a conspicuous flaw in the construction. 2. Attracting attention, as by being unusual or remarkable; noticeable. Ostentatious means: characterized by ...
0
votes
2answers
135 views

Do the following three expressions have the same meaning?

My flight is scheduled for 7 p.m. from New York. My flight is scheduled for New York at 7 p.m. My flight is scheduled for New York, 7 p.m.
1
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0answers
80 views

Descry, Espy, Spot, Spy

I know as a general rule that no two words are identical in meaning and use. I was wondering if I could get help in understanding the different meanings and uses of descry, espy, spot and spy. I know ...