This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
votes
1answer
68 views

Multiple vs Multi

What is the usage difference between "multiple" and "multi"? I have an algorithm that uses more than one agent. Should I call it multi-agent or multiple-agents algorithm?
1
vote
5answers
402 views

A word for a group of people in a church

Is there a a single specific word for a the group of people when they assist at Mass in a church? Religious assembly (Ngram) is a common expression whose usage appears to have been decreasing in ...
2
votes
3answers
47 views

Is a single factoid a trivium?

I was writing a comment on another website, and considered introducing it with a piece of trivia. My classical education kicked into gear, and I wanted to say "Relevant trivium: ..." I realize I ...
0
votes
3answers
86 views

Word to describe remembering some text [closed]

I am reading Chapter 1 very loudly in order to remember the text because tomorrow I need to ____ it [read the text without open the book] in front of my teacher.
2
votes
3answers
124 views

What is the difference between “match” ,“suit” and “fit” [closed]

Could you tell me what is the difference between match, suit and fit. I know their usage for clothes (color,size e.t.c.), but I'm wondering about other cases. For example: When your skills don't ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

What is specific usage of “to be of service”? [closed]

Can you let me know specific usage of that expression?
3
votes
4answers
558 views

“Practice amp” or “practise amp”? [closed]

I'm rather confused as to whether you say I have a practise amp or I have a practice amp when referring to an amplifier that you use to practise your guitar playing. I understand that the verb form ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Project included or involved orconsisted of? [closed]

Is it correct to say "the project included fundraising and construction of ..."? Shall I use other synonyms of "included"?
0
votes
0answers
61 views

“color of each subject” or “colors of each subject”?

I'm confused about the usage of "each" in the structure"xxx of each xxx". Fro example, I want to discuss some subjects. When it comes to their color, should I say: The color of each subject is ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

I need to know how to phrase part of a sentence containing the word of [closed]

I'm editing a document that has the following phrase: <. . . could have garnered the respect, much less the votes, of Southern conservatives.> I am wondering if this should be reworded to be the ...
-1
votes
2answers
53 views

Is it 'rerun' or 're-run'? [closed]

If you want to run a program you have previously, do you say "rerun" or "re-run"?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Usage of the word “conniption” [duplicate]

I was reading an article on buying stereo amplifiers and I ran into the following sentence: My dad has an unmitigated conniption if the sound ever climbs above 90 dB or so... I am bit confused ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

The same [noun] v. The very [noun] v. The very same [noun]

I'm having a bit of trouble explaining to a friend whether or not there's a big difference between the three modifiers in the title. Same and very on their own are different enough, but when combined, ...
4
votes
1answer
130 views

Is “augmented with” or “augmented by” preferable?

Which is the preferred preposition to use after the word "augmented", as in the sentence "A is augmented with/by B"? Does this depend on context? For concreteness, I am interested in mathematical ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

What does “non-white-haired audiences” mean in “Tony Awards, filled with desperate pleas to get non-white-haired audiences”?

Vanity Fair (June 8 issue) carries an article under the title, “Larry David wasn’t nominated but he stole the 2015 Tonys anyway.” It starts with the following passage: “It was a long and ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Is “cacheability” a word (technical word)?

Alternate spelling - "cachability" (seems perhaps less popular/proper) In Computer Science, the word "cache" is used in a specific sense to mean a place (usually in a specific memory location) where ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

The word for a person who orders something (Wrong: Orderer) [closed]

What's a word for a person who orders a parcel to be delivered; for example if there is a case where an individual orders a courier company to deliver a parcel. Are there any words for it?
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Proper term for “cross-section area”

What is the proper term for the area of a cross section? I am looking at these two formulations: cross-section area cross-sectional area As in A is cross-sectional area of the pipe [...] I ...
0
votes
3answers
128 views

Can 'Yes' and 'No' be used other than to answer questions?

Is there any way you can use the words 'Yes' and 'No' without it being in the context of answering a question? Both words can be used to answer yes/no questions like 'is X true' or 'are you X'. Is ...
4
votes
1answer
109 views

Is it technically correct to describe normal figures and text figures as upper case and lower case numbers?

There is a recent question on the Graphic Design SE asking: Why don't upper case numbers exist? There is also a heavily upvoted answer saying that upper and lower case numbers do exist, and that what ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Incisive: Noun use

Incisiveness is the noun of the incisive adjective, but in this sentence: Communication has to be incisive. It seems to me that Incisiveness doesn't work here, and incisive sounds correct, ...
-2
votes
1answer
107 views

“Thanks for VERB + ing” vs. “Thanks to VERB”: which is correct? [closed]

Should I use Thanks for being here or Thanks to be here? I have read that the first one is correct. However, I am not sure about these usages. Please tell me which one is correct and why it is ...
3
votes
7answers
1k views

What word describes the process of a ship being slowly “swallowed” in the sea?

Trying to find a word which will describe the slow process of the absorption of a ship by the sea. Metaphysical words are also welcome. Sea water swallowed the ship.
4
votes
3answers
383 views

Are androphilic males persons with a homosexual erotic development?

I come across the following piece and don't understand the last sentence in the light of the first one. This suggests that the resulting proportion of true pedophiles among persons with a ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Does “invertebrate” have a figurative meaning?

In Oxford Dictionary of English I looked up the word "invertebrate" and I only saw its zoological meaning: noun An animal lacking a backbone, such as an arthropod, mollusc, annelid, ...
7
votes
12answers
2k views

A verb meaning “Answering question in a way that doesn't answer it” [duplicate]

Take an example: Me : Where can I find the best pizza in the city? Friend:1000s of people are dying of hunger and all you care about best pizza. In this case he does reply to my question but it ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Tyrion Lannister Acquits Himself? Guess Again!

If I were to say that, in his perilous negotiations with the slavers (transcribed below), Tyrion Lannister had “acquitted” himself, would I be saying that Tyrion had A) repaid or settled a debt or ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Is there a single word to denote “arguments on words, word meanings, and their registers”

I often get into arguments with my colleagues on the difference between formal and informal words. Example: He was felicitated on bagging the first prize. I tried to explain to my colleagues ...
2
votes
3answers
353 views

Word for someone who has accepted something

I was programming away today when I needed a variable name, the variable holds people who have accepted something. So my question is, is "Acceptee" a word? And if not what is the acceptable word?
-5
votes
1answer
46 views

Does the English verb 'project' correctly represent the Latin 'columna'?

kel-2 [=] To be prominent; hill. [...] 3. c. extended and suffixed form * kolumnā‑ . colonel, colonnade, colonnette, column, from Latin columna, a projecting object, column. [M-W:] ...
1
vote
4answers
74 views

'Chargeable': Where else, besides Singapore, is this word commonly used in this particular context?

In Singapore, the word chargeable is used in the sense of it being something that can be charged for. Example: Customer asks, "Is the green tea free?" Waitress responds, "Sorry no, it is ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

Why is 'real' and 'really' interchanged? [duplicate]

I thought 'real' was an adjective and 'really' was an adverb? Is it not improper usage to say things like, "I think the cake is real good" ? Or to have a [news] websites called ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Is there the difference between “I was determined to overcome stage fright” and “I determined to overcome stage fright”?

The New York Times’ article titled “Overcoming a Lifetime of Stage Fright” in its Sunday Review page describes how a female pianist who has suffered stage fright in her lifetime felt when she played ...
3
votes
1answer
186 views

Taxi Fraud or Taxi Scam? [closed]

I've heard people said both terms to mean that when the taxi driver is trying to rip you off by tampering the meter or taking a detour. But which usage is more common or correct in terms of ...
17
votes
12answers
3k views

Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?

In a sci-fi movie from 1957, an astronaut says he's "going to palaver" with the cave-dwelling natives. I'd never heard the word before, but my husband—a history buff—knew it by its ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

It was comprised of five ingredients. It comprises five ingredients

I have always used the term the first way, as in "comprised of five ingredients," but someone I work with regularly uses it as in "comprises five ingredients." Are both usages correct? If no, which ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

augment something by some percentage

I am wondering if this sentence sounds natural to a native speaker "We augment SOMETHING by 2% to 23K." ? I have already assumed it sounds natural to use increase and raise in this case. Is it a ...
0
votes
3answers
320 views

“Pass me by” or “pass by me”?

Should I say he passed me by or he passed by me? I think it's passed me by, but I'm not sure.
3
votes
8answers
1k views

Single word that describes a boat stop / drop off point

I am looking for a single word that describes that act of a boat stopping to allow passengers on and off. For example, if it was a bus. The bus might arrive at a bus stop. On route, there are many ...
-1
votes
3answers
207 views

“Thanks, my lovelies!” [closed]

I was looking for a phrase to thank multiple people. It's supposed to be an endearment for friends but not super close friends. Is this an appropriate reply to compliments or birthday wishes, e.g. on ...
2
votes
3answers
160 views

Is it correct to say “the said meeting”? [closed]

Is it correct to use "the said meeting" as a way of referring to what people were told at the meaning?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“Replace the position of the object” vs. “replace the object”

How should I write «replace the position of the object» or «replace the object» will be enough and the first variant is verbose? Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
51 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
0
votes
3answers
150 views

What is a good word for a lack of knowledge on a particular subject matter?

I would like to know if there is a word for the above situation. Particularly, I would like a word that replaces "X" in the following sentence: You are so computer-X. If it has to, it could fit ...
3
votes
5answers
587 views

What were stalkers called before they were called “stalkers”?

A stalker is commonly referred to as: a person who harasses another person, as a former lover, a famous person, etc., in an aggressive, often threatening and illegal manner: Hollywood stars ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Opposite of a requiem [closed]

The definition of a requiem is a song which plays on one's funeral. I was wondering, is there a word which means the opposite - a song which is used as a celebration of one's birth? Thank you!
2
votes
0answers
33 views

A quote from The Lord of The flies [duplicate]

There's a sentence within a novel that I don't understand. Can you break it down for me? The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

What does 'closing the distance between' mean? [closed]

In the larger context: The poet showed how bad war is. Therefore, closing the distance between the audiences views and the reality of war itself
3
votes
2answers
293 views

Who needs a haircut?

Haircut is a relatively recent term, considering that Romans began to cut the hair about A.U.C. 454, when Ticinius Maenas introduced Barbers from Sicily: (Etymonline) also hair-cut, 1887, "act ...
2
votes
3answers
136 views

Is “coin” still used to mean “money”?

To clarify, I'm NOT talking about money solely in form of metal coins. (As in: I then proceeded carefully to count out the entire 14 pounds 78 pence in coin - Oxford). I'm talking about using 'coin' ...