This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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1answer
698 views

Merry Easter to all of you! [duplicate]

It may sound strange, but why is Merry not used with Easter? Is there a reason why its usage has been so firmly fixed with Christmas?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
0
votes
3answers
516 views

What are other ways to express “something becomes more and more important”?

For example, if I would like to use the word "importance", how can I make the sentence?
-1
votes
1answer
271 views

Meaning Of Arrangement

I want to know the meaning of the word arrangement in the following sentence and the overall meaning of this snetence: “Reinforcers,” are rewards or punishments used to encourage desired ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

The very concepts of the “present” and “existence”

In the following sentence I want to understand the meaning of the bolded part: The light from most stars takes millions of years to reach us, so not only the present existence of these stars ...
1
vote
2answers
120 views

“Healthy” vs “healthful”— Do fruits and veggies work out?

The OED doesn't say much other than the two words have long been synonyms since the 1500s. healthful - promoting good health healthy - being in good health/condition Why do we say that ...
0
votes
1answer
173 views

using the word “croesus”

I came across the word croesus a long back but pondered over its usage recently. It has the two following definitions: 1. the last king of Lydia 2. a wealthy person Is it correct, formally, to say ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Using “such” and “as”, together and segregated

Here are two variations: I would like you to buy such fruit as apples and watermelon for me. Can you buy me some fruit such as apples or watermelon? Is there any blatant difference or a fine one ...
-1
votes
1answer
77 views

I need to comment on Bill Gates's blog. In my comments I would frequently want to refer to him (I don't want to address him) with respect [duplicate]

What should I add before or after his name to show respect? In India we do that adding sir after the name but I don't think it's done in standard English.
7
votes
2answers
24k views

what is the difference between later and latter?

As cited above what is the difference between later and latter? Latter : occurring or situated nearer to the end of something than to the beginning, the meaning of latter is similar to later only. so ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Impel and compel and the finer nuances

I was contemplating over the two words - impel and compel. consider the examples: 1. she impelled me to take the job 2. she compelled me to take the job. is the word compel somewhat derogatory or ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Is “cheese-stick operation, manufacturing, building current word?

I was drawn to the word, “cheese-stick” appearing in the article titled, “The book that didn’t exist” in the Opinion Pages of New York Times (April 14), which deals with the art and craft of writing. ...
12
votes
2answers
81k views

When to use “rather than” versus “instead of”?

I never really gave a deep thought at this but recently a teacher of talked about language and there was an implicit question in it. something like there is a difference between "rather than" and ...
0
votes
1answer
15k views

Difference between “I will call you” and “I give you a call”?

What is the difference between I will call you and I give you a call?
5
votes
5answers
1k views

What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?

We are being taught English by a native speaker from Alaska. He states that many of modal verbs we were taught are outdated and have been replaced. E.g.: We must ➙ We have to May I ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

The use of “as” [closed]

My question: In the following sentence, what part of speech is the word as? He visited the United Nations, or the UN, as it is more commonly called. Is it merely a conjunction? If it is not, ...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Is “womb owners” an accepted word?

I was a bit surprised to find a word, “womb owners” in the article titled, “Women can be funny, admits Jerry Lewis (sort of)” in Time Magazine’s online edition (April 15, 2014). The article begins ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
1
vote
1answer
384 views

Difference between “Generally, I am…” and “I am generally…”?

Revisiting my CV, I have stumbled over a small question. I originally wrote: “I am generally willing and able to relocate worldwide.” Today, I noticed I could also write: “Generally, I am ...
0
votes
3answers
419 views

“All your battery needs can be found here” Is this correct?

I found this on the battery stand in a supermarket: "All your battery needs can be found here". I don't remember the exact wording, but what surprised me is that needs can be found on a supermarket ...
3
votes
3answers
222 views

Does the type of play on words in “Some people are immune to good advice” have a name?

On Breaking Bad, Saul Goodman remarks, "Some people are immune to good advice." Similarly, a friend of mine described a weekend as "a celebration of procrastination". Does word play that juxtaposes ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “In present-day”

Does the sentence In present day technology, the method can be broadly applied. correctly translate the idea that Now, with the development of inexpensive desktop computers, the method can be ...
1
vote
3answers
184 views

Usage of “whereabouts”

Is a noun "whereabouts" used not only for something moving (e.g. person) but for something still? For example: Do you know his whereabouts? vs Whereabouts of the building they searching is still ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

What is meant by “communities of colour”?

When referring to the race and ethnicity does the word "coloured" mean anyone who is not white? For example "a distinct form of racism simply associates communities of colour with pollution." Also, is ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Entertainment-related compounds

Ok I just want to ask and confirm a few compounds. 1) games shop or game shop - a place where you can buy video games 2) amusement arcade or arcade - a place where people went to play arcade ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Meaning of “appreciate the calm”

From a web development book: Instead of taking a moment to appreciate the calm, developers have taken advantage of the stabilizing front-end platform to pile on a whole new wave of front-end ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What does the word “institutional” mean in this context?

Racism and sexism are examples of institutional practices that result in discrimination against individuals on the basis of their race or gender. The dictionary definition of institutional is ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Fast” vs “Quickly” vs “Speedy” vs “Rapidly”

A similar question has been asked. However, is it possible to give (general) differences in usage of fast, quickly, speedy and rapidly? And with respect to the top answer: Are quick and fast ...
4
votes
2answers
183 views

The urban are urbanised, the urbane are ?

The two words 'urban' and 'urbane' are of related meaning; according to etymology one the child of the other. But how do we form verbs from these separate adjectives? We can speak of 'urban' ...
1
vote
4answers
8k views

Ways to say “Can't be bothered!”

How else can I express a feeling similar to "can't be bothered!" Words or phrases would be appreciated as well as variations from across the English speaking world.
5
votes
1answer
128 views

The video will start presently

Presently * meaning "in a very short time, soon", is a widely accepted term, but why does its usage meaning "at the present time, currently" still remain an open area for dispute? Disputed usage: ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is a comma necessary before “for which”?

Is a comma needed in this sentence? Is for which used correctly in this sentence? We define message codes for which security is well defined.
2
votes
1answer
794 views

Are “kinda”, “sorta”, “oughta” and “sposta” acceptable in formal writing?

I get that sorta, kinda, sorta-kinda (this one I quite like though) oughta and sposta imitate speech but it still niggles me to find them "in print", especially when the overall tone is formal. ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Correct use of bound/bounded

I am not sure how to correctly use the word bound in this context: All partial sums of two given sequences are bounded by a positive constant. All partial sums of two given sequences are ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the meaning of “here” at the end of a sentence and how should it be used?

I have had a few international friends ask about "here" when used at the end of a sentence such as "I could use a little help here!" or "buy me some time here!". I would like to better explain this to ...
3
votes
2answers
82 views

I am allowed back in a week, am I banned or suspended?

The past few years I have noticed the increase of the word "banned" when a person gets suspended, especially in the context of American sports. 10 years ago I never heard that someone was banned for ...
1
vote
2answers
125 views

Where is the term clockwork used?

I was watching some cartoon show with a bunch of rugrats over the weekend and the term clockwork toy was used. It seemed to be referencing a wind-up toy. Is there any part of the English speaking ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Initial “See, …” or “Look, …” usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in ...
13
votes
6answers
6k views

In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?

I'm genuinely confused about this because at first I thought a spatula was a cooking tool resembling a flat pallet attached at an angle to the handle that could be used for activities such as flipping ...
-2
votes
1answer
134 views

Is this a correct usage of the word “only”?

"Only a single DVD movie is at least 4.7 GB, So there should be a lot of data on the Internet."
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Better name for filter condition operators?

I’m developing a data filtering system and am a little confused regarding how to name the condition operators for this system. Which of these cases are preferable (or quite applicable) for filter ...
0
votes
4answers
170 views

“Waiting on” and “waiting for” [duplicate]

While purchasing in Walmart, after sliding my card the card machine was saying "Waiting on cashier". What does "waiting on" mean in this case and how it differs from "waiting for"? Would that be ...
1
vote
3answers
310 views

Word that means “able to be prioritized” suitable for scientific publication?

I'm looking for a single word that means "able to be prioritized" that is suitable for use in a scientific paper. "Prioritizable" is essentially what I want, but in my searching this does not appear ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

Can something be “ratable”?

As I explained in my other question, I'm writing up specs for a website with learning materials for our alpha testers to comment on. Among others, I'm describing the rating system, which has multiple ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

Use of the word 'relishing'

Recently when talking to a friend about the lack of elevators in Asia he told me. You should be relishing stairs As a native English speaker the use of the word 'relishing' here sounded strange ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is 'biasedness' a real word?

I am curious about the usage of word biasedness, I am unable to find it in Oxford's advance learners dictionary but on the internet. When tried to consult some expert, he said that it's a colloquial ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between deep space and outer space?

Outer space is frequently defined as the area outside the atmosphere of Earth (or another planetary or stellar body). Deep space is defined as either a synonym for outer space (Google's definition) ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Why don't you say “good work” in English?

I am an Italian student and I am writing a thesis comparing our two languages. I am aware of the fact that you don't say "good job" or "good work", in order to wish someone the best in his/her job. ...
3
votes
4answers
722 views

Can a book have a feeling?

I was drawn to the expression, “The book feels expressive” in the following sentence of the article titled “The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Family” in The New Yorker February 4 issue: “In any case, ...
0
votes
1answer
395 views

“What do we do?” usage

If one means next, as if waiting for orders or instructions, is it possible to use the expression what do we do? Or should we say what are we going to do? Is there a reason to prefer one over the ...