This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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0answers
19 views

Might would? if i could? [duplicate]

How accurate is it to say I might would, if I could? Just reading on the intricacies of can and may and it got me curious.
-1
votes
1answer
206 views

“Tradeoff” usage

How is this word to be used in practice when a subject is also mentioned? I am interested in both the static situation of dealing with/being into/being subject to a tradeoff and the dynamic process ...
0
votes
2answers
453 views

Am I allowed to start a sentence with “Composed”?

Composed of an assortment of ten libraries including inhibitor library, stem cell signaling compound library, and anti-cancer compound library, among others, our bioactive screening libraries ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

Alternative word for pajama?

When I first saw the word "pajama", I felt it doesn't sound like an English word. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pajama says it's from Hindi and Urdu and showed up after 1883. I'm just ...
0
votes
6answers
39k views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Many more happy returns of the day ”?

Many people greet me "Many more happy returns of the day" on my birthday. I thought it is grammatically wrong. Can we use "many" and "more" at a time in a sentence. I thought that it is correct to ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

Can the relative pronoun “whose” be used for animals, things and countries? [duplicate]

When I was a student of English as a foreign language, more years ago than I care to count, I was taught that the relative pronoun “whose” could only be used for human beings, i.e., when someone ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Word to describe a person who expresses his or her feelings frequently?

I'm looking for a word to describe a person (it can be a term of animal behavior) who expresses his or her feelings frequently, particularly through facial expressions.
2
votes
3answers
561 views

Informal Suffix Usage: -ity/ety

Sometimes in very informal or comic book language one will see phrases such as "bonkity bonk", "flippity-flop", and "knockity knock". Other examples include "crunchity", "swirlity", etc, etc. I have ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

Is “so” always accompanied by “that”?

In the following question, why can’t answer three be the right answer to fill in the blank? The correct answer is supposed to be choice one. The new skyscraper was ____________ the buildings ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

what will be the alternate word for convey in the following sentence

I am writing my first official email in English which happens to be my second language. I am unsure about the correctness of the following sentence. Please help. The detected error is false positive, ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Use of less and lesser vs lesser and lesser

The consumer on an indifference curve is willing to sacrifice less and lesser of good y to get an additional unit of good x. This is an answer I got from a model answer paper while preparing for ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

“Request of modification” vs “modification request”

As the title says, which one is better? The entire phrase should be something like Any [request of modification/modification request] should be sent to the Manager first Thank you
0
votes
4answers
173 views

Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
4
votes
5answers
4k views

A word describes things that can be used only once

I am wondering if there is a single word that describes things that can be used only once. My focus is links that usually sent to our emails in order to activate accounts or reset passwords. However, ...
0
votes
3answers
621 views

Does “dissimulation” have a positive, negative, or neutral connotation?

I tried checking a few online dictionaries and can't get a feel for whether the word is generally used in a positive or negative sense. What is the connotation of "dissimulation"?
5
votes
2answers
422 views

Is there a medieval term for a highwayman?

What would you call somebody waylaying in the middle ages? I found the term "highwayman" but that doesn't seem to be any older than 1600 something, so way too new for what I'm looking for. An outlaw ...
-1
votes
1answer
93 views

One Step To Backward - Should I Use “To”? Or Avoid it? [closed]

One Step To Backward - Should I Use "To"? Or Avoid it? One Step To Backward. One Step Backward.
-1
votes
1answer
331 views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
2
votes
1answer
355 views

Is “acknowledge(accept status) sb + to + infinitive” valid?

When to acknowledge is used in the sense of to admit the gerund is used. I acknowledge having made a mistake. However, I was wondering what is the appropriate form in the sense of to accept ...
1
vote
1answer
177 views

To 'link' or 'relate' two items?

I'm developing a system in which users can 'link' separate items by using a 'Link' button. In the database, this 'link' is called a 'relation'. I'm inclined to change the text of the button to ...
-1
votes
2answers
200 views

Would “aftermath” ever be used to mean “a reaction of crackdown”?

In the context of revolution, there often comes the word "aftermath," usually meaning the bad consequences of a given revolution on the long run. Can I, however, use it to mean the immediate ...
0
votes
1answer
10k views

implement something for/in/on/with something?

Which preposition is correct to use in the following sentence?: Implementation of this technique for/in/on/with complex objects is complicated (meaning: it is complicated to apply this technique ...
4
votes
3answers
779 views

'-gate' as a suffix to coin words related to scandals and corruption cases

I noticed that for corrruption/scandals the usage of '-gate' suffix is pretty common, as we have recently seen with 'datagate' and before with 'watergate' Can anyone explain what the relation between ...
1
vote
2answers
958 views

“Ridiculous amount”: semantic change (amelioration) originated from an antiphrasis? When and how?

"Ridiculous" means laughable, laughable because it is obviously and hilariously not good enough. However in English "a ridiculous amount of money" is "a ridiculously large amount of money". In ...
2
votes
4answers
804 views

Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

“Get a scare” or “catch a scare”

A friend of mine insists that you can 'catch a scare', but I've only ever heard 'get a scare'. I googled the expression and mostly got 'catch a scare card' or 'catch a scare crow', with only one ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

What is the practical difference between ignorant and naive?

Defined in online dictionaries, Ignorant means a lack of education, while Naive means a lack of worldly experience. What is the practical difference between these two? When would I use one and not the ...
1
vote
1answer
300 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
0
votes
2answers
519 views

How to use word “emanate” [closed]

Are these two sentences correct? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate itself?
4
votes
2answers
953 views

Can food be described as “nice”?

Can food be described as 'nice'? This food is nice; This dish is nice. I always thought it could be, but I was speaking to a few friends and they argued (and strongly may I add) otherwise.
5
votes
1answer
273 views

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box,

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs:1918 through 1920;... Why (Daddy) in this sentence was written with a capital D?
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Is it “the humanities” or just “humanities”?

I.e., would I use "I hate the humanities" or "I hate humanities"? On that note, would the complementary statement be "I love the sciences" or "I love science"? "I love sciences" just sounds wrong, ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...
-1
votes
2answers
366 views

Can I use “progress” in this way? [closed]

I saw the following sentence: Something unknown has blocked the progress of the biggest diameter tunnel. Then, can I replace these words as follows: Seattle has progressed the biggest ...
5
votes
1answer
707 views

Does “abstruse” carry a positive or negative connotation?

Generally, does the word "abstruse" give positive or negative (or neutral) connotations? For example, "daedal" and "profound" would generally be considered a word with positive connotations, whereas ...
2
votes
2answers
337 views

“I beg leave to assure you” — letter by John Marshall

Richmond May 1st [17]99 (Source of Letter) Dear Sir You may possibly have seen a paragraph in a late publication, stating that several important offices in the gift of the Executive, ...
0
votes
1answer
535 views

Meaning of “my having completed my packing” [closed]

I ran into this in a novel: This expedition began this morning almost an hour later than I had planned, despite my having completed my packing, and loaded the Ford with all necessary items well ...
1
vote
4answers
12k views

What is the difference between “responsibility” and “obligation”?

I must admit that I am confused with these two words. For so long a time, I have been using them interchangeably. I have consulted the dictionary (of course) but I can't seem to pinpoint the glaring ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Looking for the inverse of “frictional”

Does frictional means "that which is produced by friction"? Or is there a better word that means "that which generates friction"?
0
votes
2answers
439 views

Was the verb “bring” once used as a noun?

In the book of Amos (KJV, Amos 4:1), we find the verb bring is capitalized in the middle of a sentence. This is in sharp contrast to the same verb written in v. 4 in lower case letters. Finding a ...
2
votes
3answers
133 views

Is “iterate over” being used correctly in “we briefly iterate over related work”?

Is this a correct use of the phrase "iterate over'? In Section Three, we briefly iterate over related work.
2
votes
1answer
865 views

go there vs go up there

What is the difference between 'go up there' and 'go there'? Examples: The boys want to go up there. He didn't want to go there. Are they interchangeable in the above examples?
1
vote
1answer
127 views

The Usage Domains of “why” and “how”

This question was inspired by the this thread over at physics.se. What are the correct uses of "why" and "how" as interrogatives? Do questions that begin with "why" necessarily pursue answers which ...
2
votes
3answers
131 views

Can I say that a scientific field has been “polymorphic” if it has changed dramatically over time?

The field of artificial intelligence, abbreviated as AI, has been quite turbulent and polymorphic since its creation. If not, what other word or construct could I use? By polymorphic I meant ...
0
votes
1answer
140 views

Harmony as a state usage

Can we say works in harmony with other groups. I understand the adjective is harmonious and all what I found in web is using as harmony as a name here. Can we use it to express state. Further, is In ...
0
votes
3answers
219 views

Akward sounding paragraph [closed]

The valves, by way of the flaps are able to control the flow of blood through the heart because the flaps open and close during the contractions of the heart. I think the bolded part especially, ...
1
vote
3answers
123 views

“… nor X either” and “… or X either”

My question is: are the following sentences acceptable in English? "I have never had a car, nor a bicycle either" "I have never had a car, or a bicycle either" I am not asking what the best ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
46
votes
6answers
27k views

How long can you say “the late so and so”?

When you refer to the deceased, you say "the late so and so." How long can you say that? Is JFK referred to as the late John F. Kennedy? How about Abraham Lincoln?
0
votes
3answers
1k views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...