This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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3answers
1k views

What is the vocative expression we can use to attract the attention of someone whose name or surname we don't know?

I was reading one of my old English Language books when I came across this: "Madame, Señora, Signora, etc, are foreign vocative expressions and they have no equivalent, in either ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“Gain in popularity” vs “Gain popularity”?

I've got the following sentence: These issues have allowed for alternatives, such as Spotify and Pandora, to gain in popularity. A friend expressed concern and believes that it would be more ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Incorrect expression “In that moment” [closed]

I was doing an exercise and I found this one: Correct one word in the incorrect expression "In that moment, the door opened" (the exercise highlights "In that moment" part). However, I think it is ...
20
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15answers
14k views

What is the word for an adult who is not mature?

What term can be used for an adult, especially a man, who is in his forties and still behaves like a teenager, shunning responsibilities typical of mature people, preferring to enjoy himself?
1
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1answer
111 views

Can “womenomics” be considered a neologism?

It is not the first time I come cross the term womenomics used to refer to a wider presence of women in the economic activities of a country. In this case it refers to Japan, a country where women ...
9
votes
4answers
52k views

Is “pronunciate” a word?

Is "pronunciate" a word? At first it doesn't seem to be, but why not? "Pronunciation" and "pronunciative" seem to be words, so it would seem natural that "pronunciate" would be. After Googling, I ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

When should we use the word 'status quo'? [closed]

I know 'status quo' means the existing state of affairs, especially regarding social or political issues. When should we use the word 'status quo'? (Here is a related ELU question.)
0
votes
1answer
236 views

“are added” -or- “are being added”?

Basically, what I want to say is: "new pictures are constantly added", but I need to omit "constantly", so how would be grammatically correct to say this phrase meaning constantly: "new pictures are ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

“Fewer resources” or “less resources”? [duplicate]

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word, and it flagged "less resources" as being ungrammatical and suggested "fewer resources". I did some research, and it appears that "fewer resources" seems to ...
3
votes
6answers
525 views

Person who involves in sexual harassment

Is there a proper word for describing the person who involves in sexual harassment.? I thought that it would be sexual harasser, but i am not sure whether it is right or wrong. Can anyone point the ...
18
votes
13answers
55k views

Is there a male equivalent of 'bitch'?

While I know you can attribute 'bitch' to a male, I feel there is a sense of femininity. I was wondering if there is a colloquial equivalent that describes someone with the qualities of a 'bitch' ...
9
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9answers
4k views

What do models do on the catwalk?

What is the appropriate verb that I should use to fill in the blank below? People march on parades, but models __ on the catwalk.
1
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2answers
716 views

What is differences between “level” and “degree”?

When we can use degree? And also when we can use level? Are they similar or not? For example in this sentence The way to tell a true unit from a degree of something is to look at the zero ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Where in the world are cabinets called cupboards?

I understand the difference between cabinet and cupboard. However, I have spent part of my life redoing houses and I have only ever heard of kitchen cabinets. In fact if I order "cabinets" the ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Presence of resources when using “construct” vs “build”

There are similar questions to this but I want to point out the following: When using the word "construct", does it implies that the resources are already available? Because when I use the word ...
-1
votes
1answer
921 views

“Bear something in mind” or “Bear in mind something”

I've been seeing both of these constructions all around, and I'd like to know if there is any rule that controls the usage of this expression. For what I've read, it seems to me that "Bear something ...
1
vote
1answer
164 views

Is it technically incorrect to state something in this manner?

"I want to work at the same hospital as Tom." Tom isn't a hospital, so it might sound odd in that sense, but it's also clear that Tom isn't a hospital, and I get the feeling that this is how most ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Can “recall” be used in an imperative sense?

Can "recall" be used in an imperative sense, interchangeably with "remember", such as in "Recall that..." as if I was saying "Remember that..." i.e. "John, recall I told you to go shopping"
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2answers
1k views

Let's suppose vs. Let us suppose

Imagine you are working on a formal research paper (several authors). At the time of making an asumption, what would be more correct: Let us suppose that... Let's suppose/assume that... ...
0
votes
1answer
654 views

Is this usage of “last” correct?

Let's say I have just written an argument for something in a text, and I then add: "Last argument implies that..." Is that correct? Or should I add "That/the last argument implies that" or "The ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Can the term 'loss of service' be used to describe a service offered to an unsatisfactory standard?

I'm trying to get a full refund for my services with my Internet Service Provider. My speeds are extremely slower than usual and they have recognised that the problem is their own fault. I am ...
2
votes
3answers
61 views

Solution to needs

Is this expression correct? "solution to your recruitment needs" You don't really solve ones needs, I suppose... You meet somebody's needs... I see it being used widely but I'm not sure if it's ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

“Happened to” or “Happened for”

If I am explaining and listing events that happened to someone or concern them in some way, should I say: This is a list of events that happened to person x. or This is a list of events ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Can I use the word “flesh” when referring to plants/crops?

If not, what would be a more appropriate word? Those potatoes had been potatoes eaten by worms. Now, they were nothing more than lumps of flesh with nothing inside.
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Rethink as a noun [closed]

I came across the word 'rethink' so many times. But it still puzzles me if it is correct to use the word 'rethink' as a noun. Is it okay to use the word 'rethink' as a noun? Your inputs are highly ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
45
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11answers
33k views

Singular of “dice”

After a discussion on the topic I found out that the oxford dictionary describes that Historically, dice is the plural of die, but in modern standard English dice is both the singular and the ...
1
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1answer
93 views

Should I use price, cost, or rate when referring to rent?

Example: I don't know which apartment to choose. The price/rate/cost in this city is just insane. What the most appropriate option?
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3answers
104 views

“Good”=“many” in “qualified with good years of teaching experience”?

What is the probability of "good" being interpreted to mean "many" rather than "positive" in this particular sentence: All the teachers are Professionally qualified with good years of teaching ...
1
vote
1answer
14k views

What is differences between “Dear and Darling”? [closed]

What is differences between them? Are they similar or not? Dear Mrs. Smith. John, darling, could you pass me the sugar, please? Johnny dear, please listen up. May I introduce my dear ...
15
votes
7answers
3k views

Is there a word that describes when two or more people have different understandings of the same word?

I'm asking this out of personal curiosity, it's not required for a document or anything. My friends and I often have interesting conversations or debates, and often times we get stuck on an issue ...
3
votes
2answers
176 views

What does “the Big Money crowd” mean?

I heard the following statement of Barron’s magazine piggybacked to today’s (April 28) AP radio news over AFN broadasting: “Two thirds of the money managers we surveyed think we are due for ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

The usage of “ inside-out and outside-in ” [closed]

Do we have both the usages of inside-out and outside-in? inside-out means: with the inner surface turned outward. So basically they are the opposite meaning? Perform inside-out and then perform ...
1
vote
4answers
480 views

a word for questioning the validity

suppose that someone at top echelon of an institution delivers a statement. I doubt whether the statement is a fact or not. Do I say "I question it" or anything else? what is the short laconic phrase ...
-4
votes
1answer
223 views

what percentile? 99th percentile! [closed]

I have used it many times and without a problem until one day, a tyke asked me, "why is it 99th percentile and not just 99"? I don't know how to explain it to him. Then I thought, jeez, I don't know ...
2
votes
3answers
688 views

turned his back on [closed]

The following is a multiple choice question in an English test paper: He turned his back on them when they most needed him. The italicized part means: A. criticized B. ignored C. ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

“Is there living in space?” vs “Is there life in space?” what is the rule or convention?

My Russian-speaking friend recently used this one in asking me a question: "do you think there is living in space?" while using the gerund "living" in place of a noun. To me it sounds horribly ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

“Equal” versus “Equals” [duplicate]

I've seen variants of this question, but nothing explicitly like the one below: Three feet equals/equal a yard. Which is correct? Is there a definitive explanation? Please indicate BrE vs AmE ...
1
vote
1answer
357 views

what's the difference between “Indispensable Amino Acid” and “Essential Amino Acid”?

As I have seen several times of the using of those two words in even the same book. But I don't know what's the difference meaning between those two words.
1
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4answers
535 views

Can other words replace “consideration” in “with all due consideration”?

The following is a multiple choice question in an English test: The employers prepared, with all due _______, for a conference with the Trade Union. A. caution B. concern C. ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Is 'many' used in positive sentences or not?

It is uncanny how many books will insist that neither 'many' nor 'much' can be used in positive sentences. Have you got many pens? / Have you got much money? --> correct I haven't got many pens. / I ...
0
votes
3answers
518 views

People who use “no” in every sentence [closed]

I want to know whether using unnecessary "No"s and negations paints individuals with a negative/insulting attitude. Examples from my dear workplace. Example 1: 1: "Hey Eric, today is so warm." 2: ...
7
votes
5answers
3k views

Pre-planning vs planning

The Oxford online dictionary defines "pre-plan" as to "plan in advance". But isn't that generally the point of planning - to do it in advance?
2
votes
3answers
444 views

Does the word “wizardry” have negative connotations?

The Free Dictionary defines wizardry as The art, skill, or practice of a wizard; sorcery. The first part certainly sounds positive, but then the word sorcery is cited as a synonym. This ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Etymology of a word

I'm curious how one describes the etymology of a word. Does the etymology of a word entail more than its origin? Does etymology also contain a words usages and history?
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3answers
2k views

etymology of eavesdropping [closed]

there's this word eavesdropping or eavesdrop, which I looked over in oxford and several other places. the closest I got to understanding it was that it originated from an obsolete noun "eavesdrop", ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “object of discussion” an established term, or is there another word for that?

In a review of, let's say, predatory habits of some animals, the subject of the discussion is the predatory habits. Is it correct to say that the animals, then, are the objects of discussion or ...
8
votes
6answers
2k views

Using “decadent” to describe a building or town in neglect or ruin

I have often seen decadent used to refer to a non-physical state, like a person who is spiritually or morally decadent. Could decadent be applied to something physical like a building or a town to ...
0
votes
6answers
931 views

“At schedule” vs. “by schedule” vs. “on schedule”

Let's assume that I wash my car every Saturday at noon. How do I say it using the word schedule: I wash my car at/by/on schedule. Update: It's not about doing something on a regular basis. It's ...
0
votes
1answer
274 views

Using the word “foible”, and its interpretation

There are situations when I get in doubt about the usage of a word, even after having used it for long and on a regular basis. One of those words is "foible". I thought it to be related to character ...