This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1answer
43 views

Does 'to prove' necessitate truth?

If I prove something, does it have to be true? I can structure the question more convolutedly: Does successfully proving something depend on the credulity of the audience, or the truth of the ...
1
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1answer
82 views

What's a word for someone being a tease or playful? [closed]

Is there a "clean" (non-sexual) word for someone who acts all playful and provocative just so they can get your attention and your compliments? I guess coquettish comes close, but its meaning seems ...
5
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1answer
75 views

'Prevaricate' as a synonym for 'vacillate'

There's a lot of motivation here. It boils down to a two-part question: is the usage of 'prevarication' as a synonym for 'vacillation' common, acceptable, and/or preferable; and is there any reason ...
2
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1answer
77 views

Looking for a word describing the act of a person passing an access machine that does not imply if it is an entry or exit [closed]

I am translating a computer program interface that deals with granting access to places and records entries and exits of employees. I need to find a word that describes the act of an employee using an ...
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3answers
72 views

Correct use of the word “legible”

I am of the understanding the term applies only to physical text (print or handwriting). Or at the very least applies only to that which you can see. Not what you can hear. Is this the correct use of ...
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2answers
81 views

Dove down vs Dove

He laid down four sticks beside this hole, and dove down into the river with one stick. From "Folk-tales of Salishan and Sahaptin tribes" by F. Boas Is the second "down" redundant here? From ...
3
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2answers
349 views

Is having sex a hobby? [closed]

Wiktionary defines a hobby as An activity that one enjoys doing in one's spare time. Other dictionaries tend to have similar definitions. Viewpoint 1 Some people believe that the word hobby ...
1
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1answer
66 views

Difference between undoubtably and undoubtedly? [closed]

These two words are often used interchangeably, but I don't believe their meaning is identical. I think I generally know how to use them in context, but could someone explain what he difference is ...
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2answers
55 views

Using the word "hypothetical' conditionally [closed]

Allow me to explain my question. So 'hypothetical', according to Merriam-Webster, is defined as follows: : involving or based on a suggested idea or theory : involving or based on a hypothesis :...
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0answers
31 views

Words describing ways in which words are used

What umbrella term can be used to describe the collection of writing techniques encompassing "irony, sarcasm, satire, simily, allegory, etc.", indicating the way in which words are used within a text, ...
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2answers
119 views

Meaning of “available soon” (from a test item)

stackexchange! I've been referring to this site for a while now and have finally decided to join you all. This is a semantics and use question about the phrase "available soon" that appeared as part ...
1
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3answers
103 views

“Cowardly” as an adverb [closed]

Is "cowardly" both an adjective and an adverb? Question inspired by this awkward error message from Homebrew. Error: Cowardly refusing to 'sudo brew install' Surely there is another way to ...
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1answer
124 views

What does “drop and give me zen” mean? [closed]

What does "drop and give me zen" mean? Maybe it's some kind of idiom. Can you explain it to me?
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0answers
39 views

The usage of “Imagine”

Normally we say "imagine that you are doing st..." Right? So I wrote in my paper "Imagine that you were living when Edison invented the light bulb..." But my teacher crossed it out and instead she ...
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2answers
86 views

What is a word for something that you desperately want and/or craved for, but NEVER GOT?

Take this situation; Everyone was given ice cream at the birthday party, except for Todd. After Todd got home, he felt very disheartened that he never got the chance to taste the ice-cream there. He ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Origin of “even you” without connotations of surprise/insult/praise? (Indian English)

I live in southern India, and I've noticed that in a Indian English, the word "even" can be used without indicating surprise, as it does elsewhere. Some examples: Even you should be able to ...
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4answers
371 views

What is the origin and extent of the Indian English usage of “only” to emphasize something?

I live in southern India, and for a long time I've been curious about this phenomenon that I've observed. Indian English uses the word "only" in a special way. It's used to emphasize things. Sort ...
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0answers
36 views

Is “of all” an adverb in “She behaved the worst of all” & “She is the worst of all”?

"the worst" in "She is the worst of all" is superlative adjective. "the worst" in "She behaved the worst of all" is superlative adverb. My question is: What is the function the "of all"? Is it an ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Distinguish twins vs distinguish between twins

I'm confused about the use of the word "Distinguish". The link shows an example sentence where the verb is used as an intransitive verb: Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? But I ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

What is the meaning of “being on birth control”?

I read about it all over the place and they say it is a way of preventing pregnancy using contraceptives like condoms, pills, etc. However, in a YouTube video, I heard someone recommending condom use ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Word-usage: Could the word “multiple stars” include binary stars?

This question might be off-topic here, but concerning English usage. We are translating some illustrated book for kids about astronomy, and then have a question as in the title. Referring to ...
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5answers
112 views

What makes an estimate “conservative?”

When estimating (time, for example), it's common to either ask for or offer a "conservative" estimate. Irrespective of political connotations, how does "conservative" describe a given estimate? Is a ...
10
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1answer
249 views

From the Spanish “xaquima” to the AmE “hackamore”

A hackamore: is a type of animal headgear which does not have a bit. Instead, it has a special type of noseband that works on pressure points on the face, nose, and chin. It is most commonly ...
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1answer
44 views

Ask about passive voice [closed]

Which is correct? John F.Kennedy became the 35th president of the USA in 1960-the youngest man ever was elected. or the youngest man ever to be elected
0
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1answer
47 views

Use of “only” and “alone”

How would you use "only" or "alone" to denote whether something happened exclusively in one place? For example "It happened only in the United States" or "It happened in the United States alone". The ...
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1answer
45 views

To use “Commit Suicide” [closed]

Does "commit suicide" necessarily mean that the person referred to actually died? Or, does it only mean that she tries to kill herself?
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0answers
25 views

Is it normal to use the word “rivalize” for describing, e.g., competing activity?

I would like to edit a phrase in an article describing some mathematical simulation of concurrent struggle on markets. It would be something like: ...if metallurgical enterprises would adhere ...
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0answers
47 views

So, only “Gone” adds an extra meaning when talking about the movement; but “go”, “went”, “going”,etc don't have that extra meaning? Is that right?

Ok, the verb "to go" can be used in many tenses: She goes to the supermarket. She is going to the supermarket. She went to the supermarket. She will go to the supermarket. She is going to go to ...
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1answer
57 views

Does anyone use “misconstruct” (instead of “misconstrue”) anymore?

Is it ever correct to say: I misconstruct the truth That is, to use misconstruct as a synonym for misconstrue? My research indicates that misconstruct was once used, i.e. is now archaic: ...
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0answers
19 views

User's Guide vs. User's Manual vs. Manual [duplicate]

I am discussing with my colleagues whether a 300+ page book that describes how to use a product we manufacture should be called a User's Manual, Manual or User's Guide, and how it should be referred ...
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2answers
63 views

Meaning of “if not” in a sentence

I don't understand the meaning of "if not" and grammar of the sentence in bold: As early as the 14th century, the organ supplied polyphony, in which case the odd-numbered verses of text were ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Adjective for describing a forehand shot in tennis that requires a lot of effort

I'm looking for an adjective to describe a forehand shot in tennis that requires a lot of effort (from hard hitter, baseliner, e.g. Thiem, Del Potro...) as opposing to an effortless, elegant forehand ...
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2answers
88 views

What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
3
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2answers
60 views

Noun meaning “something destructive”?

I am trying to think of a noun that describes things that are destructive. More specifically, a noun describing all devices and chemicals that cause destruction, encompassing explosives and chemicals ...
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0answers
57 views

Does “For/With me, I think …” at the beginning of a sentence make any sense?

I hear a lot of Vietnamese students say: "For me, I think ..." or "With me, I think ..." when they are practicing English. Example: "For/With me, I think smoking is bad." I think they ...
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0answers
35 views

I am having trouble deciding whether to use “so” or “instead” in the following sentence. Which is appropriate?

There are few surviving writings that could tell us more about wrestling in ancient times. __________, historians have learned about the sport by examining pictures on vases, coins, and cave walls.
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2answers
64 views

Marrying a woman [closed]

Is it possible in English to describe a woman who married a man as follows: She is under him. Thank You.
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0answers
19 views

Can verdure be used to describe the greenery on a tree?

I was searching for a word that would allow me to describe the greenery of a tree, and I remembered something similar to the word verdure, which either means the "lush greenness of flourishing ...
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2answers
62 views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “Here describes”? [closed]

In one of the manuals written by an american company I have found several sentences started with "Here describes". Example: "Here describes common processing method and notices for Task program". I'm ...
2
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2answers
209 views

Understanding “whistleblower”

The term, according to the Oxford Online Dictionary, means: whistle-blower A person who informs on a person or organization regarded as engaging in an unlawful or immoral activity. Also from ...
2
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0answers
94 views

Can 'more' be used before a present participle?

I'm wondering if this usage is grammatically correct, because I remember it being used in such a way but can't find any instances using google. Here's an example of what I'm talking about: I was ...
1
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2answers
85 views

Is “assaulter” a proper English term?

In light of recent events in the States, there were controversial discussions about the use of the word "rape" and "sexual assault". I know for a fact that "rapist" is the correct term to describe one ...
0
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2answers
187 views

“Could you Please provide me the details…”? [closed]

When we write a business email and want some information from the mail recipient, then which is the most professional way to ask for information. Does using "Please" in a sentence makes it look bad?
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1answer
30 views

Does the phrase 'liquefy conventional meanings' work?

For a non-native speaker it is always hard to 'hear' if particular metaphorical language works. In an article for an academic journal I am writing about how the recurrent usage of particular ...
1
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1answer
45 views

Can “morally” mean “approximately”? [closed]

I asked a question on Stack Overflow about these uses of "moral": Fast and Loose Reasoning is Morally Correct Purescript Aff documentation: This is moral equivalent of ErrorT (ContT Unit (Eff e))...
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0answers
35 views

Expired - Non-Expired

I have to classify the users, like Expired users and not expired users. Shall I use the term Non-Expired to indicate that user is still valid and have enough validity period ? Is there a term ...
2
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0answers
51 views

Can 'who' refer to an inanimate object such as a government body? [duplicate]

I'm wondering if it is possible to use 'who' in a sentence like this: 'the name of the government body who has assigned an identification number to the document.'
1
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1answer
43 views

Difference between 'come about', 'come around' and 'goes' [closed]

What's the difference in meaning between the following three sentences? Let's see how it comes about. Let's see how it goes. Let's see how it comes around. These words/phrasal verbs are -- by a ...
0
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1answer
33 views

How to use the phrase “via the form of” [closed]

This is my sentence: As you can guess from the name of my company, it focuses on providing supports to SMEs including financial support (via the form of preferential loans) and technical supports (via ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

Is 'steel-toed' shoes acceptable usage?

My father just asked me if I could buy some 'steel-toed' shoes on "the Internet". So I went to [That Popular Shoe Site] and typed 'steel toed shoes' in their search field and it showed me lots of ...