This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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2answers
58 views

Is this proper usage of the word “talks about”?

We were on the subject of borders within the EU/Europe; we were not talking about the actual EU and Europe borders. Europe and the EU are two different things. "Europe has open borders" works as ...
4
votes
3answers
127 views

Usage of “well-intended” vs. “well-intentioned”

It seems to me that the adjective well-intended is properly applied to an action, whereas well-intentioned is properly applied to an actor. For example, suppose John observes that Mary's car is dirty ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Is it allowed to use however with in spite of

Can you please tell me if it is allowed to use "however" with "in spite of" at the beginning of the sentence such as: The proposed model is efficient. However, in spite of positive impacts such as a, ...
11
votes
7answers
5k views

What word starts with “pro”, ends with “ive”, and means generally-accepted or -expected [closed]

A front page article in USA Today this morning refers to Hillary Clinton as the "prohibitive Democratic front-runner." I know that prohibitive is the wrong word here, but I can't remember the right ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Does “this generation” associated with a calendar date identify a generation unambiguously?

This question arises from the commentspace in this question on stats.SE. My comment was: Last I checked Terry Tao was the pre-eminent mathematician of this generation? To which another ...
0
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0answers
21 views

open my heart / open up my heart

In a translation I am trying to decide whether I should use open my heart / open up my heart which is better do they have the same meaning?
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Socket or outlet, which one do you use when explaining to a child? [closed]

I'm just curious.... In the USA, how do you explain to a child 'don't put anything in the electrical outlet' or 'don't play with a wall socket'?? How do you say the same thing around the globe?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Another way of saying “hanging by a thread”

Instead of using "Hanging by a thread" in the context of someone walking endlessly in the desert and being barely able to continue, what is a better choice of phrase?
2
votes
1answer
59 views

What is the correct usage of 'as to'?

I became curious about how to use 'as to.' I remember I've seen it several times in many sentences, but I cannot be quite sure of its correct usage. For example, am I using it right when I say "Would ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

'In doing this' or 'by doing this'? Which is more common in this context? [closed]

In doing this or by doing this? Is the following sentence correct as is? In doing this, [the products] benefit from greater diversification and wider reach. ('In doing this' refers to the ...
2
votes
4answers
140 views

Is it appropriate to use “reunion” for meeting only one person after a long time? If not, what's the alternative?

I met a childhood friend after over 15 years. It was myself, my spouse (who had never met the friend), and this friend. Would I use reunion for this situation, as it always makes me feel it's for a ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Electronic module or unit?

I make circuit boards with micro controllers that I mount inside plastic cases. I've always referred to them as electronic control modules. But what is really the best word for these? Electronic ...
16
votes
7answers
2k views

Is “a half dozen” necessarily 6, or can it be 5-7?

In my answer to a question on the SF & Fantasy stack, I assumed that "half a dozen" is imprecise enough to mean anywhere from 5 to 7. Another user challenged that assumption and stated that since ...
0
votes
5answers
151 views

searching for a suitable synonym for “ a group of people ” ex. young people , old people , etc

I specially want to use this word after "adolescent" . better said, I'm looking for a nice paraphrasing for " young people ".
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Question on word-usage: synergetic, synergistic, or synergy

In environmental psychology there is a specific cumulative effect which has been referred to in literature as: synergetic effect E.g.: Potential synergetic effects between local road traffic ...
3
votes
1answer
34 views

Subject of drip the verb

drip verb 1. let fall or be so wet as to shed small drops of liquid. "the tap won't stop dripping" synonyms: dribble, drop, leak More antonyms: gush (of liquid) fall in small drops. "water ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Correct?: To come upon such positive resonance

I am trying to find a good translation for the German Auf eine positive Resonanz stoßen Can one say Something comes upon such positive resonance when I want to express that something is ...
5
votes
3answers
109 views

When do we use stitch and sew? Can we use them interchangeably?

Would you use sew when it talks about wound? I hear some people using stitching while they talked about trousers and clothes.
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Can we use “therefore” before “before”?

Can I use "therefore" like this in a sentence? "Many Companies have various software systems which need to exchange data between one another despite their using different protocols. Therefore, ...
1
vote
3answers
50 views

Specious versus facile

How do you differentiate between the uses for the words specious (apparently but not actually valid) and facile (apparently neat and comprehensive only by ignoring the true complexities of an issue). ...
1
vote
3answers
78 views

Proportionate or proportional? [closed]

I'm writing up some maths notes, and I'm unsure about the wording of a sentence. Which should I write? In the degree system of measure, angles are measured proportionate to 360 degrees ... Or ...
3
votes
2answers
159 views

How common is the French loanword “métier”?

Our daughter lives in Leeds and is a scientist too, although not in my field, her speciality is haematology. My son lives in Manchester at the moment, for the music scene, he says. He writes his ...
3
votes
4answers
442 views

Usage of cotton

I know for sure that cotton can describe objects such as cotton clothes, cotton field, or cotton seed. However, I have a few questions. 1: Can cotton refer to the soft, gathered, and fluffy state of ...
-1
votes
1answer
63 views

Breathe vs. breath, why so much misuse? [closed]

I know the difference between the two. Breath is a noun and breathe is a verb. It was taught to me that way and I've never mixed them up in any way because their different pronunciation reflects ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

his very first novel vs his first novel [duplicate]

In a reading comprehension exercise for my students there is a sentence: "What was it like to become famous with your very first novel?" Does it mean that the author wrote more than two books? ... ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

What is the noun of 'to forsake'?

What is the noun of forsaking somebody, that is, the act of forsaking? Forsookenment? ;)
1
vote
3answers
76 views

What is a term for sarcastically downplaying something?

I remember reading the term for it years ago, but I can no longer remember what it is. It is when someone downplays a situation, usually sarcastically. They are fully aware of the problems of the ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Referring to something: choosing between “this + {noun}” versus “such + {noun}” [closed]

Recently, I've had a discussion with someone regarding how to know how to choose among the words "this" and "such" in written text, but could not find any usage style guidelines on this topic. ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

If I'm “dictating” am I recording what you say or telling you what to do? [closed]

In a document that I'm writing, I am trying to state that, in the course of conducting a user interview, I am "not simply dictating the desires of the user." My intention is to indicate that I am not ...
0
votes
1answer
127 views

Why is dissatisfactorily not a word?

Unsatisfactory, unsatisfactorily, and dissatisfactory are real words, but why is dissatisfactorily not a real word? I understand the difference between the two forms (un- vs dis-): What's the ...
5
votes
4answers
220 views

To outstay vs. overstay one's welcome

I came across the expression "outstayed my welcome" in the following excerpt of a novel I glance around and see that the café has filled up with people ordering lunch and that a couple is queuing ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Usage of “indisposed”

I have sometimes heard the word "indisposed" use as synonymous for "unavailable." Especially in the context of leaving a message. For example: "Hello. You have reached X. I am currently ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Usage of care: can I say that “I care about how the news paper wrote about me”?

Can I say that "I care about how the news paper wrote about me" I am sure about the usage that I care about my family. It implies that I love my family, I am emotionally attached with them, and they ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Mars orbits Sun [duplicate]

Why do we call the star in our solar system "The Sun" when all other celestial bodies are addressed simply as Jupiter, Neptune, or Sagittarius A Star? Ex: The Saturn has many rings. Incorrect Ex: ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

I love you for like ever [closed]

Can I say: "I love you for like ever" or I should say "I will love you for like ever" or both forms are correct? Thank you very much!
-1
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2answers
68 views

What do you call this “Rain rains” [duplicate]

Saying things like "rain rains" "thunder thunders" etc
0
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3answers
94 views

Does the phrase “Santa just isn't” make sense?

As the title says, does it make sense? It feels right. Not just though.
1
vote
2answers
132 views

“Lying supine” vs. “supine”

Is it natural to say "lying supine"? The word supine, by definition, already suggests lying [See: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/supine]. However, I was just confused because one of the ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Is the use of the word “recognize” accurate in these sentences? [closed]

The following are some learning outcomes a freshman student should achieve. Is the use of the word recognize accurate in these sentences? Or, is there a better way to say this? Recognize the types ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Does the word zealous have an implicit religious connotation? [duplicate]

Earlier today I was describing someone to a friend. I said, "I never realized how zealous he was." I meant for the meaning of zealous here to be religiously zealous. Without an adverb, I would ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to use his/her about a general group of people [duplicate]

Is it customary to use his instead of her even if you refer only to women like in my example below. It is a comment to a woman from a woman, likely referring to only women. Shouldn't you say "her own ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

What does “Towards Reference” phrase mean? [closed]

I wrote a conference paper about technical requirements of mesh networks in smart grids. Originally I named it "Engineering Requirements for Mesh Networks in Smart Grids", but a reviewer changed its ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

What are the differences of store(n.) and storage(n.)? [closed]

Store ex: The store's inventory has to be entered manually into the database. Storage ex: Storage closet is where you will find all our office supplies.
-1
votes
1answer
118 views

If pogonotrophy means to grow a beard, is there a term for shaving a beard?

If pogonotrophy means "to grow a beard", is there a term for shaving a beard? How would you use pogonotrophy in a sentence? And if there is an antonym for this word, how would you use it in a ...
2
votes
3answers
105 views

What is an adjective synonym for “discretion” or “up to you?”

This has been bothering me for some time, and I apologize for any mistakes here. What I'm looking for is another word for discretion without possession. It's almost like saying the phrase "up to ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

I saw this notice in a bank today. Is this an oxymoron? [closed]

Fresh coins / banknotes are available *Subject to availability I know what they mean to say but shouldn't they be using some other word instead of available in the first part of the notice? ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Are poor and rich both relative terms? [closed]

Are words poor and rich very relative and depends from person to person in context of perspective ?
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Use “them” or “it”, when refering to the abstract concept, fears [closed]

Use "them" or "it", when refering to the abstract concept, fears. "Let’s put our fears in a little bottle and use it as a garnish for meals, or sprinkle some on popcorn for scary movies." OR ...
-3
votes
2answers
84 views

What does “pitting folk” mean? [closed]

This is from the Economist (Jan 3, 2015). (You can see the full article here - ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

An .exe or a .exe? [duplicate]

In speech .exe translates to dot e-x-e. In writing, however, should one say an .exe or a .exe?