This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
votes
1answer
29 views

Using “speaking” in the wrong context

While talking about how a movie hasn't created enough buzz, can one say "Why aren't people speaking about that movie?" and not use the verb 'talking' as is done usually?
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Use of 'Like' and 'Unlike' prepositions

I am confused about the usage of the words like and unlike in sentences. Like and unlike make me confused because I see them being used everywhere almost interchangeably, and to make matters worse I ...
-4
votes
1answer
49 views

Is it better to say Aye instead of Yes when committing to something? [closed]

When I am asked to make a commitment rather than simply agree or assent to something, I automatically say "Aye". To me, "Yes" is too casual, and it sounds very harsh, especially when it needs to be ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Is term “Cruise” correct when you sail on sailboat?

3 questions. Is term "Cruise" correct when you sail on sailboat? I do not mean day trip but trips from 2 to 30 days. Sailboat is not necessarily big, about 30-50 feet. How do you call stays in ...
2
votes
3answers
86 views

Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?

I ngram-viewered 'a fifty-pence piece' and 'a fifty-pence coin' and found 'piece' to be more common than 'coin'. But for 'a one-pound piece' and 'a one-pound coin', it is the opposite. Any idea ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Noun form for “despise”

What would the noun form for despise be? My current two ideas are despite and derision. According to Google, the etymology of despite is Middle English (originally used as a noun meaning ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views
-1
votes
0answers
56 views

A word that means, “Something filled with many mistakes or errors”?

Is there a word that referrs to something full of errors, that can be used in the following sentence? She told him something that could not possibly be pronounced by any human, and the syntax ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Is this the right usage of respectively? Is this sentence clear?

Is this the correct use of respectively? 40% weight was placed on client evaluations, with 30%, 20%, and 10% weight attributed to manager, peer, and self-evaluations respectively. Also is it ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Is there a word to describe the act of suddenly halting by virtue of feeling shy or intimidated?

I'm looking for a word that can fit into this sentence, "She paused with timid caution and then resumed her lope as if led by the dangling of her small interlaced hands, a magnetic sweeping of the ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Starting soon or Started soon? [migrated]

I would like to ask if which one is the appropriate grammar for using "starting soon or started soon" Example: The commissioning will be starting soon. Is this right or wrong?
3
votes
5answers
380 views

Words for political without party affiliation?

I'm struggling to find the right word to describe a campaign I'm starting. I want to influence public policy around an agenda in a party neutral manner. Apolitical and non-political feel wrong. The ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Usage and origin of “prioritize”

Prioritize is a term coined a few decades ago and its usage, according to the AHD, should be considered informal by now: Like many verbs ending in -ize, prioritize has been tainted by ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

“high-quality” vs. “quality”

This appeared in the NYT the other day: "...creating a quality product is challenging." I've always been under the impression that one should say "high-quality" or "low-quality" or have some ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

On the use of “Dissent”. [closed]

The moratorium on the use of cars caused great dissent among the citizens. Can I use the word dissent in this sentence? If not, what can I use? Thanks!
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Does the word 'Dropout' have negative connatations?

My question is whether the word 'Dropout' has negative connotations? I would like to express in a job resume how I 'dropped out' of University during the first semester but my proofreader thinks ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Reported Usage Vs. Actual Usage

I'm currently writing a linguistics research essay and my professor wanted me to explain the differences between "reported usage" and "actual usage" of inter-dental stopping based on the surveys I ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Can one say “disjunct sets” and if not, why?

Can one only say "disjoint sets" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disjoint_sets and not "disjunct sets"? "Disjunct" exists in English and in other languages one would say "disjun(c/k)t" ...
16
votes
8answers
4k views

What do you call a place which is temporarily closed because it's a holiday?

When it's holiday and some company/firm/business place is temporarily closed, How do you express that? For example: Bob: I'm going to the Apple Store on Queens Road tomorrow, care to join me? ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

What does this sentence convey to you - “We will reply you after discussion with my manager and/or head of department.”

Does this sentence - "We will reply you after discussion with my manager and/or head of department" conveys that - 1) I am writing from the executive's point of view i.e. I will reply to you after ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

British (or South African) idioms

I'm editing a manuscript that was written and will be published in South Africa. While I am familiar with many British idioms, I have come across some that I do not know and ask for assistance. One ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

Elephantine memory. [closed]

When something is 'Elephantine', it means that it is similar to an elephant in a certain way. Since elephants have great memory, is it alright for me to say that someone has an elephantine memory? ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

“Kindly” vs “Please” : Which is better in official emails? [closed]

Consider the below sentences:- 1. Kindly review the document and let me know if I need to change something. 2. Please review the document and let me know if I need to change something. 3. Could you ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Pay for the purchase?

Is "pay for the purchase" correct? Would it not mean something like "pay for the privilege of being able to buy something"? The context is a school newsletter and the phrase is as follows: "These ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Does a “window of time” get smaller or shorter?

Also is there a general rule with such phrases?
0
votes
3answers
68 views

Another phrase or term for suicide [closed]

I'm writing a paper about the threats of cyberbullying and require some help. My question is I want to explain that cyberbullying can not only damage one's emotion and feeling but can also results in ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

A use for the phrase “tailor made”

I'm working on a web development/design agency and English is my second language. I wanted to know if the usage of this phrase suits the purpose: "tailor made". In our case, we want to say that our ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Is it correct to say “in their excursion..”?

When describing an event that affects the participant in the middle of an excursion, would it be right to say "in their excursion" or "during their excursion"? Is there a better way to phrase this. (I ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

the … assembly [migrated]

I'm not a native English speaker and need your help for the meaning of the word "assembly". I would like to use it for the name of an online-store. It's a online-store for curated, high quality/luxury ...
1
vote
2answers
317 views

Is “hail from (somewhere)” necessarily formal English?

Macmillan dictionary says hail from is "formal". link Cambridge dictionary notes hail from as "formal" in British English but doesn't say this for American English. link Oxford Learners ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

A biography of/about/on [closed]

Which do I use, in the sentence "I'm reading a biography ___ Winston Churchill" ?
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Correct usage of either 'as to' or 'from'

I am writing a title for an essay and am struggling to choose and differentiate between these two titles. My question is this: What is the most grammatically correct sentence between both sentences ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Correct word usage of highest [closed]

I have a questionnaire that I am analyzing and it needs to be documented. I am phrasing a sentence like : Q3 had the maximum number of '0' scores vs. Q3 had the highest number of '0' scores. ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

I am looking for alternatives to the phrase “way too” or “far too” as in “Way too often…”

I am editing a work written for professions and have come across a sentence beginning "Way too often I encounter ..." First, this seems very colloquial. In doing some research on google ([alternative ...
1
vote
6answers
85 views

More Largeness is Larger, More Smallness is Smaller, More “Medium-ness” is?

Another single word choice here; this one is along the lines of magnitude, e.g., good, better, best. In this case, I'm describing more largeness as "larger," and more smallness as "smaller." The ...
0
votes
2answers
18 views

“freeze somebody out (of something)” and “freeze out somebody (of something)” and “freeze out (of something) somebody”?

Just want to understand how to use this structure freeze somebody <--> out (of something): (informal) to be deliberately unfriendly to somebody, creating difficulties, etc. in order to stop or ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

What preposition properly collocates with “chuffed”? [closed]

As an American of upper middle age, I have noticed younger people using different (and to my ears, wrong) prepositions—for example, "bored of" rather than "bored by." So, hearing the word chuffed in ...
2
votes
3answers
84 views

Knick-knack and bric-a-brac?

There are several interesting words to describe the same idea: Knick-Knack and Bric-a-Brac, both defined as: Small, decorative object(s) of little value. Bric-a-Brac derives from French and is ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

Is “dandy” considered offensive? [closed]

Is calling someone a dandy considered offensive or has a negative meaning nowadays? English is not my native language, so I wanted to clarify this for me. I understand the meaning of the word, but I ...
7
votes
2answers
114 views

You can apologise *for* something, but can you apologise *that* something?

An interesting discussion came up in the chat following a sentence I suggested in another question where I said something along the lines of "I apologise that I have a prior commitment." or "I ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Is using the word “Likewise” in a sentence not professional or informal? [closed]

Last evening in my communication class, we had some discussion. In that discussion I used the word likewise in a sentence. But they said using likewise in a sentence anywhere is not professional or it ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Nutrition: qualitative or quantitative?

I've been tasked with copy-editing some text that includes the following: [...] makes it easy for you to cook with the maximum nutrition. I'm unsure about the correctness of the phrase "maximum ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

How does one determine when a comedian is also a humorist?

Wikipedia's list of humorists are categorised as people who write or perform humorous material, but the article also states: A humorist is usually distinct from a stand-up comedian. Woody Allen ...
-2
votes
3answers
63 views

Words for places to live (besides house) [closed]

Where I live (northeast Brazil) we have the following: Apartment (Apartamento in portuguese) The general word for a set of bedrooms + kitchen + bathrooms + living room in an apartment condominium. ...
-1
votes
0answers
36 views

The registration opened or has opened

I saw some organizations used "The registration has opened" while there are other organizations used "The registration has been opened already." May I know which one is correct? (1) or (2).
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Proper word usage for borne and bears

I get confused about tenses so I'm going to post an example of what I'm working on. My question will follow. Example text: Surely, I’ve been gone long enough for someone to notice my absence. ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Word to describe the in-depthness of something [closed]

Is in-depthness commonly used as a word? If so, is it spelled correctly (all spell checkers I tried do not recognize it as a word)? If not, is there a word describing the same idea of something being ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

letter has been sent to office by yesterday [closed]

I just want to say, the letter already send to our head office yesterday. Please advise the correct usage letter has been sent to office by yesterday - this usage is correct or not? please advise
-1
votes
2answers
39 views

You (are/had) better [closed]

I am familiar with the expression "had better" to be appropriate when giving advice to someone, but I see other versions as well. How should I use the following: You better ... You are ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Should we use the word “Actually” before a sentence? [closed]

Someone asked to me about some particular information. I replied to the email like this:- Hi, "Actually I was assigned the following task by my Manager"........ Is it grammatically correct to start ...