This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0answers
20 views

Word choice: When to use “of” vs. “about”?

Word choice question: Is it OK to say "We want to update our approach to engaging and informing the public "of" the program and services,"? Seems to me we inform "about" a topic.
2
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1answer
45 views

Phrase about purity of a solid substance

Most high-purity deposits occur within the Carboniferous Limestone of the Peak District, the Mendips. Large areas of the Chalk outcrop also contain high-purity resources. Is it possible to ...
0
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1answer
73 views

In English, why is the “Heart” analogy always used to describe the core or central theme?

There are commonly used phrases like "heart of the city" and "heart of the matter". Even to describe the nature of people, we use words like "kind hearted" and "evil hearted". My question is, why is ...
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2answers
83 views

How to use the sound “ei” or “ey” in English conversation, which is quite popular in Australia?

I lived in Australia for 13 years and many times when speaking to local Aussie people, I often hear they use "ei" or "ey" (I do not know how to write that word, and that is why I am asking you) like ...
3
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3answers
61 views

Is it common to use the word “throbbings” (plural of throbbing) as a noun?

I ask because my word processor highlighted it as a wrong word. And I couldn't find any instances of my desired usage on Google. Here's an example sentence: I have migraines. I'm not talking ...
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1answer
45 views

Can “memorable” and “easy to remember” be interchanged?

This is the definition of memorable in the dictionary https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=define%3Amemorable memorable: worth remembering or ...
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2answers
61 views

How can we describe a broad sense of taste?

How can we describe a broad sense of taste? Can we say that we have a versatile taste? Or is it more correct to say that we have a diverse taste? Taste here is with reference to food.
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1answer
76 views

To prove some property “to stretch to some class of objects”

While collaborating in the writing of a scientific paper, one of the co-authors wrote ".../... and we will prove it to stretch to some class", is it usual ? The context is the following. "Then, ...
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3answers
55 views

Is “Chemistry” used for any relationship or just for romantic relationship?

In dictionary, Chemistry means the complex emotional or psychological interaction between people (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/chemistry) Seem the definition does not say that ...
0
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2answers
54 views

usage of refrain and abstain

I am frequently confused regarding two words : refrain and abstain. I understand that abstain has negative connotations as it conveys that something must be stopped. On the other hand, refrain carries ...
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4answers
52 views

How to thank a person when he agreed to collaborate [closed]

I want to say "thank you" to a person that agreed to collaborate in my research. I thought about writing "I am glad to know you agreed to collaborate...", but it sounds a little cumbersome. I want it ...
0
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3answers
41 views

Effective word to say destroy regarding student future

I want to convey message regrading destruction of student's future. However, I think destroy can not give effective meaning. I am confused which word is best in following sentence instead of destroy. ...
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2answers
57 views

the meaning and use of “no more than”

I 'm always confused about the meaning and use of "no more than " or "no more...than ". It's like the comparatives, but sometimes also like collocation. How should I distinguish it? For example, in ...
2
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2answers
97 views

How to use the word “finna” correctly?

I've heard both "I'm finna go to the store" and "He finna go to the store." Do we prefer with "is, am, are", or without? Is it a regional / dialectic difference, or are they interchangeable?
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0answers
42 views

Use of the term 'disappeared' - meaning 'exterminate' [duplicate]

Is it correct to say “...a young man who had been ‘disappeared’.” I need this to align with a statement used earlier in the text: “Many civilians simply ‘disappeared’ with no trace found afterwards.” ...
0
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1answer
82 views

What is the difference between apologize and apologise and how could use it in suitable place? [duplicate]

I am confused every time when I am using these words, then using any one of them without knowing its difference. Can anyone help me how could I use these words in appropriate situation?
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1answer
49 views

Use of don't and doesn't [duplicate]

In the following sentence which is correct, and why? As homeschool moms, we know there (don't/doesn't) seem to be enough hours in the day to tackle all that we want to teach our girls.
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2answers
53 views

How to explain that we stopped giving out cards for the day? [closed]

My restaurant uses a queue card (or ticket, I'm not sure what they're called) system. Question is, how should I say when I want to let my customers know that our restaurant stopped giving queue ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Lexical collocation of “former”

Imagine that you are the president of a company, and there was another person playing the same role before you. How should I describe the former president using the expression like "He was the ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Reset = “setting again” or to “setting back to the original state”?

In the OED dictionary, "Reset" has the following meanings: reset See definition in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary Line breaks: re¦set Pronunciation: /riːˈsɛt/ Definition of reset in English: ...
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6answers
3k views
0
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2answers
69 views

Is “is sent” correct?

File is sent. File has been sent. Is the line above grammatically correct? What is the correct one and what is the difference between both of them ?
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votes
4answers
671 views

Is Provocation necessarily deliberate?

Does provocation always imply that the provoker intender to provoke? Is there such a thing as "accidental provocation"? Is the 'deliberate' in "deliberate provocation" a redundant word?
4
votes
1answer
68 views

“Double Clicking” to mean, going in depth

I have been recently hearing the expression "double clicking" to mean 'going in depth'. For example: We will double click on this topic later on when required. I have never heard of such a usage ...
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3answers
52 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
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1answer
86 views

Does 'I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism' make sense?

I recently watched an interview with a terrible journalist and she said the line: I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism I'm specifically interested in doing good ...
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3answers
120 views

“Either” vs. “whether”

Which is better to use in this sentence, either or whether? Whether you are born with it or not. Either you are born with it or not. When talking about someone's innate talent, which of the two ...
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2answers
53 views

Question about the word ilk?

Is it grammatically correct to use the word ilk as in, for example, this sentence: Ilk regardless, whether of noblemen or blackguards, no man has ever. . . . The Merriam-Webster dictionary ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

Fear of an effect occurring causing the effect

For example a fear of not making a good impression on people causing a person to be paranoid of people's opinions and thus not making a good impression on them. Is this situational irony or something ...
0
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1answer
41 views

Is the word “patch” appropriate for source code update?

I've just checked in Wikipedia for some context where I could use the word patch, but most of the example usages I found only refers to "Software update" but not "Source code update" Is the word ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Does “deep exhale” fit into this sentence example?

(Ex. These loose leaf papers could be easily blown away, even by a kid's deep exhale.) I know that if I put >even by a kid who is deeply exhaling<, instead of what is in my example, the sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
90 views

What part of speech is “thank you”?

Can anybody please tell me the subject, verb, and object of this sentence: Thank you all for conducting a landmark experiment. I would also like to please know what part of speech thank you ...
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3answers
37 views

Usage: deepen, broaden, expand, and extend

I am wondering which of the following sentences is more often used in English: The recent studies are deepened by investigating new problems. The recent studies are broadened by adding new problems. ...
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0answers
32 views

A question about using just and only [duplicate]

This is my first question here. I don't know the difference between"only" and "just". Can anyone help me please? Thanks.
0
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1answer
68 views

So, we don't use “what happens?”, do we?

Most of time I heard native English speakers say either "What is happening?" or "what happened?". When do we use "happen" in present tense? So, we don't use "what happens?", do we?
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3answers
166 views

About “dumb” luck

Pure luck, blind luck and dumb luck, are expressions used to refer to: complete luck; nothing but plain luck. I have no skill. I won by pure luck. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary) ...
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0answers
40 views

amongst and amidst and other words ending in -st

Came across this article earlier today, and now I'm questioning everything- Are "amongst" and "amidst" synonymous as the article states? Also, rather than possessing the "excrescent -st suffix", ...
0
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1answer
26 views

“metaphoric” versus “metaphorical”

Is there a difference between the words "metaphoric" and "metaphorical"? I'm reading an essay in which "metaphoric" is used. But that sounded a little odd to me. "Metaphorical" sounds better. ...
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2answers
53 views

What connotations does the word “semblance” have?

Is the meaning of the word "semblance" closer to that of "fake" or that of "illusion"? I mean, does it have the negative connotations that "fake" or "counterfeit" have, or is it something that can be ...
0
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2answers
27 views

Is it proper to use the phrase “In conjunction with” in this context?

I am trying to phrase a sentence to say do something A along with something B. I do not want to use along with because both the process are extremely co-dependent and for the same reason I do not want ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Can your's ever be used? [duplicate]

I have a specific sentence in which I feel inclined to use "your's" but in not sure if it's correct. Then sentence is: "Every story has a beginning - This is your's." What "your's" stand for here is ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Has the word lust got any positive meaning to it?

I've been hearing it quite a while... Sexual desire is the only meaning I know... But have heard people using it positively too.. Which doesn't seem to be giving that "sexual desire" sort of relation ...
0
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2answers
64 views

Can I use “of” to mean “caused by”?

For instance, can I say: I'm not sure if it was a deception of the moon, but the field looked brown. In this case, "deception of the moon" means "illusion caused by the moon". Is it common to ...
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1answer
124 views

Section title for explaining where a subject fits into a field of study

A car is a form of transportation. But so is a bicycle. When a paper is discussing where a subject (say the car) fits into such a system and contrasting the car with the bicycle what should that ...
1
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4answers
239 views

Should've [came] vs [come] [closed]

In what situations would you use came over come and vice versa? For my example, I was talking to my roommate and I told him: You should have came to the party. Yhen I thought maybe that wasn't ...
-1
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0answers
86 views

which one is correct “you lack of idea”, “you lack idea”, “you are lack of idea”? [migrated]

I searched each of these "you lack of idea", "you lack idea", "you are lack of idea" & they all come out some results so there must be someone is using them. But, I do not know which expression ...
4
votes
5answers
585 views

Is there a word or expression for improving software

I am writing a text and I have to say what skills I developed during my internship. What do you call improving software? Software improvement? I feel like there would be a better word or expression ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Can I use “henceforth” and “from now on” interchangeably?

Where did the word "henceforth" originated? How could I determine the correct usage of it? Is it also the same with "from this time forward?"
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1answer
51 views

When are 'near', 'near by' and 'nearby' used? [duplicate]

I have read on other fora that 'nearby' is always one word, yet Bill Bryson, the famous travel writer, exclusively writes 'near by'.
4
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2answers
137 views

What line do they refer to in the idiomatic expression “on the line”?

The idiomatic expression on the line has two main meanings according to the American Heritage Dictionary: Ready or available for immediate payment. (A related expression is Cash on the ...