This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
votes
3answers
90 views

A word for describing their friendship … not satisfied with close , intimate etc.? [closed]

Which word can I use to describe the friendship between the two friends in the story 'My lost dollar' by Stephen Leacock? I thought of these words but dont think they fit in well : close, intimate, ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

“Do/Does not” vs “Will not” [migrated]

What is the correct usage of these two words in terms of a sentence that references conditional future situations. Eg: 1. a. If you do not leave tonight we can go out for ice cream. or b. ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Re-architecture

I am in need of a word to express to change the design or architecture (of a technical system) Is re-architect an acceptable word or formulation? Or improved the architecture of xyz a better choice? ...
5
votes
2answers
95 views

Is the word “pathology” used only for “disease”?

I wanted to ask about the exact meaning of pathology. Is it just for disease or can we use it for other things? I mean, for example, if I want to talk about the determination of harms in culture or ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

“Definitely require to” vs “Definitely required to” [migrated]

If you believe that the world is divided into good guys and bad guys, then you are definitely need to refine your brain. OR you are definitely require to refine your brain. OR you are ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Is the term “Christian name” in decline in British English?

I learned most of my British English as a lad of thirteen in 1968–69 and one of twenty in 1975–76, during which (academic) years I lived in Sussex. As a Yank (I think that at least is ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

very well comparable

Is "very well comparable" correct? Example: In the short story character A is very well comparable with character B. because both of them have a similar lifestyle. => If it is correct, can you say ...
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

“To whom it may concern” or “To whomever it may concern”? [duplicate]

Which is the best usage? "To whom it may concern" or "To whomever it may concern"?
0
votes
1answer
46 views

“I just noticed it” vs “I barely noticed it”

Are "I just noticed it" and "I barely noticed it" the same? Let's say somebody tells me something about something/somebody and I didn't know about it until the person told me and the person asks, ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is this correct and good use of “preface”?

As the question title asks, is this good and academically correct usage of "preface"? As pointed out by John Smith in preface to his "Blue is not Red" thesis, the world is not simply black and ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Descriptions of frequency versus present tense

Is there ever a difference between descriptions of frequency and the present tense? For example, is there a difference between "I speak English." (referring to frequent speaking of English) and "I ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

the difference between ''come of '' and.'' come from'' [migrated]

1/He came of a rich family. 2/He came from a rich family . Which is correct ? came of or came from ? Explain to me.
1
vote
1answer
62 views

What's the difference between quitting and resigning a job?

Is "resigning" simply more formal than "quitting"? Here's the case: I work for company A but am leaving to work for company B. Which is better? I work for company A but am quitting to ...
2
votes
3answers
122 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...
6
votes
2answers
711 views

What is the difference between words “psyched” and “thrilled”?

For people like me, non-native English speakers, it's really hard to figure out the differences in their meaning between words "psyched" and "thrilled". Are they interchangeable? Is the meaning ...
-1
votes
0answers
31 views

Is the title of the textbook “Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic” grammatically correct?

The asymmetry of this title has always bothered me. Is there a general rule about the usage of -ic and -ical endings?
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Proper use of “proud” and “prideful”

I have heard many people over use the word 'prideful' in sentences that tend to have a negative connotation. Many times, however, the sentence structure tends to sound awkward. Is there a set of rules ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

Is disinterested interchangeable with uninterested now? [closed]

I have always thought disinterested means unbiased and uninterested means bored. However in a passage on a state wide exam the text used disinterested in place of a situation where its definition ...
3
votes
4answers
110 views

Is use of “shall” archaic?

A friend of mine, pursuing BA(Hons) in English corrected me that no one uses shall now and often it is advised to prefer the use of should, would, etc. Although Downton Abbey is set upon a time ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Can I use the word bipartisan in a non-political context?

Example: "This wasn't a unilateral decision, but rather a bipartisan one."
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

How do I use the verb confined correctly? [closed]

Example: "Intelligence is usually confined to the ability to process information fast." Is that a correct use of the verb confined?
-2
votes
1answer
24 views

Opening and beginning

Fill in the gap: "... of the document". This refers to "the start of the document". I had 2 choices: "opening" and "beginning". I chose "opening" but the answer is "beginning". Why?
3
votes
4answers
72 views

Can you “commemorate” something bad?

Strictly speaking, from an etymological standpoint, there is no reason to suppose "commemorate" should imply either a positive or negative connotation of what is being remembered. That said, it feels ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

What is the term for feeling down because of bad weather?

I am looking for the word that refers to a state of tiredness or slight depression because of bad weather conditions. The opposite is also true, that is feeling well or well-disposed because of nice, ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Uncountable Work [duplicate]

I have a question about uncountable nouns in a sentence. For example, which of the following sentences is correct? This is an important future work. This is important future work. It seems that ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Can introspect be used only in first person ? Or better word to replace it, in following context

Meaning of introspect is examine one's thoughts and feeling. In fact, i have to find word for "introspect". I m writing a technical report, can I use the word "introspect" but the meaning i want to ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

“Garnered” the attention of

I've used this phrase a couple of times recently and it just now struck me that I'm not entirely sure if it's correct. I'm using it in pretty much the same context as "caught the attention of" or ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

When to use “come” & when to use “go”? [migrated]

I don't understand what this article is saying: We use come to describe movement between the speaker and listener, and movement from another place to the place where the speaker or listener is. ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

what is a word for “multifaceted information”? [closed]

It can be said as either "multifaceted information" or "information in multi-dimensional form ." some times, people used to provide a wide variety of information in a single graph or figure. So, what ...
2
votes
1answer
215 views

I have found this in a German newspaper: “Don't spring from the margin”

A German newspaper has published this instruction at a swimming pool in Berlin. Spring can also mean jump Margin is certainly not the edge of a pool I'd write Don't jump off the edge ...
3
votes
0answers
37 views

Do you know the word ROUTABILITY? [closed]

Is the word "routability" appropriate in the context of electrical engineering? I want to express whether the electrical routes between components can be routed or not.
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Difference between usage of room and space

There is no more space for you in this apartment. There is no more room for you in this car. How to determine which one to use?
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Difference between a rule and a requirement?

What is the difference between a rule and a requirement? Can these words be used interchangeable in a national standard?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

intention vs. purpose

Oxford Dictionaries define the nouns as intention A thing intended; an aim or plan purpose The reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists So which sentence ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

“dimension less than 8” or “less than 8 dimensions”?

This question is midway among English and mathematics, meaning that it requires acquaintance with both, but since I am interested in the correct English way to say something, I ask it here. Is it ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Is “mail” still used for “international correspondence” in British English?

While pondering this question asked earlier today, I started to wonder why post (in the sense of correspondence) is used in British English but not American English. So I looked up the etymology of ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

Which he doesn't or does?

Here's the context: A dying man has guilt, and one of the voices in his head is claiming he will experience hell, if he dies with it (the guilt). One voice hints that 'hell is a hoax', and the other ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Trial vs try out (verbs)

I've look them up in the major dictionaries. They seem to mean almost the same thing or do they? Apparently the only difference is trial is British. Let's try out / trial this new computer / system / ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What is the definition of DRAIN used as follows “..and I've gone out to have a DRAIN with him.”

What is the definition for "drain" as a NOUN as used by W. Somerset Maugham in the following: “..and I've gone out to have a DRAIN with him.” (From the short story "The Fall of Edward Barnard"). I ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

In what case we should use 'all right' in questions?

Here is a example: . all right? I know 'all right' means 'OK' here. But does it sounds more arrogating or annoying? What's the right situation to use it this way?
1
vote
0answers
63 views

How to say “As crucial as it is, it's surprising to…” [closed]

As a non-native English speaker, I'm trying to improve variety in my writing. For this particular, I want to express my feeling of surprise toward something that I always considered critical but ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

The usage of “Per se”

Is the usage of the phrase "Per se" correct in this sentence? Sometimes, religion, though not be enaugh per se, may lead to violence.
0
votes
1answer
91 views

“does there exist” or “does there exists” [closed]

I have seen many uses, even in books, of the three words "does there exist" and of the three words "does there exists". Examples: Does there exist a political business cycle? [1] Does there ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Asleep is to awake; as sleep is to _____?

Is there no word that fills this precise role? I can say someone gets 10 hours of sleep. But can I say someone gets 10 hours of wake? That doesn't sound right to me but maybe it is. Does anyone know ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How is the word 'but' used in the famous quote 'What is life but a series of inspired follies?'

The full quote attributed to George Bernard Shaw: What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn't come every day. I ...
13
votes
12answers
1k views

Word to describe someone who goes to all the events in town! [closed]

I'm looking for a short word that could describe people who are always going to every event in town. It doesn't need to be an existing word, feel free to create one of your own. It can also be made of ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Using “beau geste” as an opposite of sin

Beau geste defined here seems to be a noble act and from what I know to be the definition of sin, which has the word "immoral" in it, "beau geste" should be its antonym. Even if it isn't the perfect ...
-3
votes
2answers
35 views

can we use `localite` for business entity? [closed]

if any business was started in particular area, can we use "localite" for that business entity? For example: This business is localite to this area.
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Does “intimate” = “imply + infer”? Or just “hint at”?

I'm not clear on how intimate (in verb form) is perceived. Until I looked it up, I never would have believed (never seen) it used with inanimate objects as subject...I thought to intimate something ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

Difference among Show as, Show with, and Show by

Is there any differences among theses sentences? Which one is better? We show the quantity with n. We show the quantity as n. We show the quantity by n.