This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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1answer
79 views

Am I wrong here?

Our English teacher told us to frame a sentence using the word lively. I wrote: He was a lively person But she said it was wrong and couldn't be accepted. Is she wrong, or am I?
0
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1answer
235 views

Any alternatives for the word “deservability”?

The word "deservability" officially doesn't exist in dictionary. But, we might come across few situations where you need to make sentences like this one. You deserve that job. But sometimes, ...
0
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3answers
148 views

Is the phrase Comfort Room to mean rest room acceptable in English?

In the Philippines, people label the "rest rooms" with the letters CR which stands for "Comfort Room". Is this acceptable?
0
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3answers
158 views

“in” versus “at”

1 - I'm at home. 2 - I'm in the home. 3 - I'm at the home. I understand that the above three sentences are correct. If all the above are correct, then why this one is wrong? 4 - I'm ...
0
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2answers
32 views

“as she did X” vs “while she did X”

Another question related to correctly conveying a sense of time: Who will be held accountable for the costs incurred as the managers dragged their feet? vs Who will be held accountable for ...
6
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6answers
1k views

“Semantic”s relation to “Pedantic” [closed]

When pointing out to my friends one day that I should have used a different word in a previous conversation, I mentioned that I was being pedantic. They, ironically, corrected me saying I was being ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is it considered good style to use “relatedly” to start a sentence?

I sometimes like to start sentences with “Relatedly,”, as you might start them with “besides”, “however”, “furthermore,” and so on. (“Like” in that I find the word practical and concise. It could be ...
0
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1answer
220 views

Which pronoun best completes the sentence? [duplicate]

Which pronoun best completes the sentence? Every woman received ____ prize. Is it her or their? Please explain
1
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0answers
45 views

“fluent with search engines” - is fluency only related to languages? [closed]

I'm helping my friend write her CV in English and there was one phrase that felt natural to me at first, but then I was not exactly certain if it's correct: fluent with search engines Is it ...
15
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4answers
5k views

___, ___, and I am/are…

What is the proper way of saying: "Jim, John, and I am going to the beach." Whenever I say "Jim, John, and I are going somewhere", I stumble over "I are going". Should it be "am" or "are", or ...
1
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1answer
40 views

concentration usage

Are the following sentences acceptable? In country X, wealth is concentrated in the low density rural areas. In country X, the blue people are concentrated in the low density rural areas, while the ...
2
votes
3answers
154 views

“to spate” as a verb

As I was reading a book I came upon the following passage: And when rain at length arrives, how beneficent is its coming! Boisterously, richly, merrily it spates forth, like the large, hot ...
0
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1answer
153 views

Sports commentators' English

Football commentators are not renowned for their erudition, but one particular usage I am finding wearisome. I am not writing this by way of complaint as I know that is not the purpose of the site. ...
4
votes
3answers
406 views

saying “hello” when somebody asks something obvious

What exactly does it mean, when somebody answers "hello" to my (perhaps naive) question? Also, I have heard people say "hello" when they are outraged about something, such as for instance "for all ...
2
votes
1answer
192 views

Is it considered offensive to describe someone as a Saracen?

Prior to the 17th century 'Saracen' was the name given to a Muslim, whether of Arab or Turkish origin. It originates from the Crusades, from a region called Sarakene in the northern Sinai peninsula. ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

An easy way to differentiate between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac?

Are there any tips/tricks for easily differentiating between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac? To give you an idea—the question goes like this: Which reference would you use to find the ...
1
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2answers
49 views

Is the use of “this” correct in “There is this blog, but I don't remember its name”?

What I write should mean the following: "There is this blog, but I don't remember its name." So I thought I have to write it this way to achieve the meaning in a short way: "This blog." But is ...
1
vote
2answers
151 views

What does “…considered to be, well, school” mean here? Does “…, well, …” change it's meaning?

In Time magazine (March 5) article titled, “The New SAT: America treats its language like garbage,” John McWhorter, an associate professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

What are the casual words that helps to express yourself in Internet chat [closed]

English is the second language for most of us. So when we chat in the internet, sometime our wordings looks more formal and not interesting. But I found when I chat with native English Guys, they uses ...
1
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3answers
95 views

objectivization vs objectification

I'm in a bit of a trouble over the words objectivization objectification Which of the above would be correct in the context of making something objective (impersonal, unbiased). I suppose ...
0
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2answers
100 views

Is 'of' as in 'drink of' an old usage?

I drank of the jar. Is this 'of' an old usage? But I can't find the proof for that.
0
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2answers
62 views

Correct Usage of Names

if the name has a junior e.g. Jose A. Ruiz, Jr. which comes first when the surname is asked first? Which is correct Ruiz, Jose Jr. A. or Ruiz, Jr. Jose A.?
0
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2answers
38 views

“be denied” or “be denied by”

I'm reading Robert Bringhurst's book The Elements of Typographic Style (4th edition), and encounter this sentence on the top of page 10: That freedom is denied us if the tradition is concealed or ...
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1answer
29 views

Usage of dwell/hail [closed]

When I describe myself, I normally have to say where I'm from. If I were actually born and raised in Chicago, could I use dwell and/or hail? I dwell in Chicago. I hail in Chicago.
5
votes
2answers
123 views

Can the word “off-label” be used for other than medical application?

The New York Times article (March 4) introduces top 10 ramen destinations in New York under the title, “Ramen’s Big Splash.” I was amazed to find that ramen acquired so much popularity among New ...
1
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2answers
267 views

Equivocal meaning of “Have a backlog of (something)”

Isn't there an equivocal sense to saying "I have a backlog of (something)"? I have a backlog of work and would be unable to help you out on that. I have a few outfits that I haven't shot yet ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

Are “unlevel / unleveler” not so common words?

Suzanne Mettler, a professor of government at Cornell University wrote the article under the title, “College, the Great Unleveler” in New York Times (March 1). She pointed out that the degrees of ...
2
votes
1answer
174 views

To what extent is it correct to refer to a credit union as a bank? [closed]

To what extent is it correct to refer to a credit union as a bank? Is it correct to use the verb "banking" when referring to credit unions, for example "I do my banking at Northern Credit Union"? One ...
1
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2answers
48 views

What are the meanings of the common verbs we use to mean change? [closed]

Having acknowledged that the meanings of these verbs overlap, how would describe the prototypical use of each of these verbs? Become It was becoming dark. He became a pilot. Get It was getting ...
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votes
1answer
58 views

Usage of “Trainers having experienced working with XYZ organisation”

I am preparing a creative brochure for a workshop, where I need to mention our trainer's experience as "Our trainers have experience working with XYZ(elite organisation)". Could any one help me to get ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What is meant by 'intestinal fortitude'? 'ovariological fortitude'? [duplicate]

Is a good example of 'intestinal fortitude' when someone faces his/her fair share of adversity and bounces back from it? Or when a boxer is repeatedly pummeled and knocked down in a fight, and he ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do we use the word “oops”, if something goes wrong?

Why do we use the word oops in a sentence or when communicating with others, if something goes wrong? I would like to know the correct information regarding this question.
1
vote
1answer
94 views

“This cake, what is my favorite, makes me happy”

Lately I have heard many people using what in place of which in adjectival phrases: This cake, what is my favorite, makes me happy. This cake, which is my favorite, makes me happy. Is ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Can a female proprietor be called as “proprietor”?

I know the female version of proprietor can be called as proprietress or proprietrix. But I want to know whether a female proprietor can also be called a proprietor? Or does proprietor only indicate ...
1
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3answers
193 views

Is all use of illegal drugs abuse?

"abuse" is often defined as improper usage. When speaking about an illegal drug, it seems impossible to properly use it (I mean here recreational consumption, not specially licensed medical or ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

What does it mean when someone says “Would you please indulge me for a couple of minutes?”? [closed]

What does it mean when someone says "Would you please indulge me for a couple of minutes?"? The context in which I heard it makes it seem self-evident, but I may be wrong. Somebody was talking to ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Which one is right “Comment” or “Comments”

On webpages ( in contact-us forms and comment boxes ) plural and singular for of comment and comment/comments are variably used. 1) Add a comment 2) Submit comment 3) Post comments etc On ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Is `composability` a proper word in English?

Is composability a proper word in English ? Suppose I have a set of elements and can compose them to create different structures. May I call this property of the set "composability" ?
0
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1answer
103 views

Show I use “lay,” “laid,” or “lain” in the following passage? [closed]

The ground was ice-cold, no hint of anyone having lay/laid/lain there at all. Which one is the correct option?
0
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5answers
127 views

Would this qualify as “racism” or would it be called something else? [duplicate]

I was listening to an Aboriginal women speak about indigenous rights and the government. She made a few references juxtaposing Christianity and their beliefs. For example, it is perverse and ...
1
vote
3answers
687 views

Is it wrong to use “genocide” as a verb?

Just so you people don't think of me as a monster. I ask this question because recently I was playing NetHack and there is a magic scroll that allows you to genocide a species of monsters (usually ...
1
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2answers
561 views

In what context would I use the word “availabilities”?

In what context would I use the word “availabilities”? I believe it is a valid English word, in how could it be used? Many thanks
0
votes
1answer
275 views

What is meant by “the fifth estate”?

I've found several definitions that seem to be incompatible From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fifth+estate A class or group in society other than the nobility, the clergy, the middle ...
3
votes
1answer
294 views

What is the adjective corresponding to Venus?

What is the correct adjective corresponding to the noun Venus?
0
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4answers
456 views

Feminine equivalent of “priapic”

For a male, if you are enumerating your sexual conquests, you might refer to it as: "Priapic conquests" Ex: The pirates joined on deck and exchanged stories on their own priapic conquests. Is there ...
0
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2answers
79 views

The use of “though”

I'd like to know why the use of though in this sentence is wrong. Besides this he just gives money to the man and lets him walk away though of his bad injuries.
5
votes
2answers
331 views

What does Chris Christie is “350 pounds of toast” mean?

Maureen Dowd quoted Bill Maher’s description of Chris Christie as “350 pounds of toast,” in her article titled, “Christie puts the gloves on” in New York Times (February 22): “I tend to agree with ...
1
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3answers
130 views

“Half” for unequal divisions

A topic came up today concerning the usage of the word "half". I was describing a separation of labour into two obviously unequal groups. A colleague corrected me, saying that the word "half" ...
0
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2answers
246 views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

Can “about” and “around” be used interchangeably in some cases?

Example: He paced about/around the room. Can those words be used interchangeably? If that's the case, which one is more common?