This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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2
votes
1answer
249 views

Found missing/Found to be missing?

Which one among the following is correct? These were found missing. or These were found to be missing. For me the former one sounds little bit odd since "found" and "missing" are next to ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Can I use excluding at the end of expression of interval?

I want to express the fact that first part one of an XML file extents from the beginning to the Parameters section, but it does not include Parameters section. Can I express it like this: The ...
-1
votes
2answers
71 views

How right to say “I'm came from somebody”

Let's imagine, Jack told me about your friend, which is lawyer. For example, lawyer's name is Mark. And He[Jack] said me: you have to say to Mark, that you know me. How I have to introduce myself to ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Can someone be instilled with medication?

I am looking specifically for how to use the first definition given here: to cause to enter drop by drop (instill medication into the infected eye) but I imagine usage rules would apply equally ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Placing however at the start of a sentence vs placing it in the middle of a sentence?

Basically, what's the difference between this: However, it didn't mean that I didn't have the potential to become a rock star. and this? It didn't mean, however, that I didn't have the ...
4
votes
3answers
140 views

Is yea an acceptable replacement for yeah?

I'm an amateur writer, writing almost entirely fanfiction, and I use the word 'yea' in my writings rather often instead of yeah. In sentences like "If you mean did that just happen? Yea." or "Yea... ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

“Serial potential drop” or “series of potential drops”

I would like to use the word serial in the sense that it denotes a sequential arrangement of objects. In that regard, is it better to say "serial potential drop" instead of "a series of potential ...
2
votes
2answers
275 views

What is the meaning of 'the food chain'?

The OED confirms my long-held suspicion that the original use of the term 'food chain' is becoming supplanted by an altogether different meaning. The term 'food chain' was used extensively in the ...
3
votes
1answer
182 views

What's the most preferred spelling of auto fill, auto-fill, and autofill?

When you are trying to say that something is automatically filled in, you use the word autofill, or if you were using past tense, autofilled. I see 3 main ways that people use it: auto fill / ...
-3
votes
2answers
72 views

Is it appropriate to say “ I used to be more frightened of spiders that he is now” [closed]

I'm not sure, because it doesn't sound and feel right.
2
votes
2answers
126 views

What is not a “coffin” but used to carry the corpse?

Coffin is box in which corpse is buried and is also used to carry the corpse to the grave. But Muslims carry the the corpse in cage sort of a thing, remove the corpse from it and then bury it. So ...
0
votes
2answers
140 views

What is the correct usage of the word “milquetoast”? [duplicate]

The google definition of this word states that it is a noun however in its own example of usage it is used as an adjective: "a frail, milquetoast character". I haven't found any reliable sources to ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Can you use “the legislator” as a general term to refer to the legislative power?

In Dutch, the term "de wetgever" (literally "the legislator", "the lawmaker") is often used to refer to the legislative power, the legislature. This is very often translated in English as "the ...
-1
votes
2answers
167 views

Can a regret be expressed? [closed]

I know that interest, dissatisfaction, condolence, apologies can all collocate with express, but I am not sure if regret can. I am thinking about the following sentence in particular: I would like ...
1
vote
4answers
160 views

Do we ask a waiter if we could have or get?

I have noticed a tendency among the younger generation, when ordering in a pub or restaurant, to say 'Please could I get beer-battered cod and chips', whereas I would and do say 'Please could I have ...
2
votes
1answer
280 views

How to write previous surname when married?

What is the correct way of writing previous surname when married? E.g. John Johnson (former Davis) Is it correct to use 'former' or should it be 'previous' or any other word, or just '(Davis)' ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Might would? if i could? [duplicate]

How accurate is it to say I might would, if I could? Just reading on the intricacies of can and may and it got me curious.
-1
votes
1answer
83 views

“Tradeoff” usage

How is this word to be used in practice when a subject is also mentioned? I am interested in both the static situation of dealing with/being into/being subject to a tradeoff and the dynamic process ...
0
votes
2answers
148 views

Am I allowed to start a sentence with “Composed”?

Composed of an assortment of ten libraries including inhibitor library, stem cell signaling compound library, and anti-cancer compound library, among others, our bioactive screening libraries ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Alternative word for pajama?

When I first saw the word "pajama", I felt it doesn't sound like an English word. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pajama says it's from Hindi and Urdu and showed up after 1883. I'm just ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Many more happy returns of the day ”?

Many people greet me "Many more happy returns of the day" on my birthday. I thought it is grammatically wrong. Can we use "many" and "more" at a time in a sentence. I thought that it is correct to ...
0
votes
1answer
865 views

Can the relative pronoun “whose” be used for animals, things and countries? [duplicate]

When I was a student of English as a foreign language, more years ago than I care to count, I was taught that the relative pronoun “whose” could only be used for human beings, i.e., when someone ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

Word to describe a person who expresses his or her own feelings frequently?

I'm looking for a word to describe a person (it can be a term of animal's behavior) who expresses his or her own feeling frequently, particularly through their facial expressions.
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Use of *this* to refer to both sides of a telephone conversation? [closed]

By convention, complementary words like here/there and this/that are relative in their usage, i.e., their meaning depends on which side of the conversation they fall into. However, To introduce ...
2
votes
3answers
201 views

Informal Suffix Usage: -ity/ety

Sometimes in very informal or comic book language one will see phrases such as "bonkity bonk", "flippity-flop", and "knockity knock". Other examples include "crunchity", "swirlity", etc, etc. I have ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Is “so” always accompanied by “that”?

In the following question, why can’t answer three be the right answer to fill in the blank? The correct answer is supposed to be choice one. The new skyscraper was ____________ the buildings ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

what will be the alternate word for convey in the following sentence

I am writing my first official email in English which happens to be my second language. I am unsure about the correctness of the following sentence. Please help. The detected error is false positive, ...
1
vote
1answer
723 views

Use of less and lesser vs lesser and lesser

The consumer on an indifference curve is willing to sacrifice less and lesser of good y to get an additional unit of good x. This is an answer I got from a model answer paper while preparing for ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“Request of modification” vs “modification request”

As the title says, which one is better? The entire phrase should be something like Any [request of modification/modification request] should be sent to the Manager first Thank you
0
votes
4answers
75 views

Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
1
vote
3answers
897 views

A word describes things that can be used only once

I am wondering if there is a single word that describes things that can be used only once. My focus is links that usually sent to our emails in order to activate accounts or reset passwords. However, ...
0
votes
3answers
321 views

Does “dissimulation” have a positive, negative, or neutral connotation?

I tried checking a few online dictionaries and can't get a feel for whether the word is generally used in a positive or negative sense. What is the connotation of "dissimulation"?
5
votes
2answers
165 views

Is there a medieval term for a highwayman?

What would you call somebody waylaying in the middle ages? I found the term "highwayman" but that doesn't seem to be any older than 1600 something, so way too new for what I'm looking for. An outlaw ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

One Step To Backward - Should I Use “To”? Or Avoid it? [closed]

One Step To Backward - Should I Use "To"? Or Avoid it? One Step To Backward. One Step Backward.
-1
votes
1answer
124 views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

Is “acknowledge(accept status) sb + to + infinitive” valid?

When to acknowledge is used in the sense of to admit the gerund is used. I acknowledge having made a mistake. However, I was wondering what is the appropriate form in the sense of to accept ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

To 'link' or 'relate' two items?

I'm developing a system in which users can 'link' separate items by using a 'Link' button. In the database, this 'link' is called a 'relation'. I'm inclined to change the text of the button to ...
-1
votes
2answers
80 views

Would “aftermath” ever be used to mean “a reaction of crackdown”?

In the context of revolution, there often comes the word "aftermath," usually meaning the bad consequences of a given revolution on the long run. Can I, however, use it to mean the immediate ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

implement something for/in/on/with something?

Which preposition is correct to use in the following sentence?: Implementation of this technique for/in/on/with complex objects is complicated (meaning: it is complicated to apply this technique ...
4
votes
2answers
530 views

'-gate' as a suffix to coin words related to scandals and corruption cases

I noticed that for corrruption/scandals the usage of '-gate' suffix is pretty common, as we have recently seen with 'datagate' and before with 'watergate' Can anyone explain what the relation between ...
0
votes
2answers
281 views

“Ridiculous amount”: semantic change (amelioration) originated from an antiphrasis? When and how?

"Ridiculous" means laughable, laughable because it is obviously and hilariously not good enough. However in English "a ridiculous amount of money" is "a ridiculously large amount of money". In ...
2
votes
4answers
449 views

Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

“Get a scare” or “catch a scare”

A friend of mine insists that you can 'catch a scare', but I've only ever heard 'get a scare'. I googled the expression and mostly got 'catch a scare card' or 'catch a scare crow', with only one ...
0
votes
3answers
978 views

What is the practical difference between ignorant and naive?

Defined in online dictionaries, Ignorant means a lack of education, while Naive means a lack of worldly experience. What is the practical difference between these two? When would I use one and not the ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
-1
votes
2answers
201 views

How to use word “emanate” [closed]

Are these two sentences correct? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate? But it did not take long before the problem started to emanate itself?
4
votes
2answers
357 views

Can food be described as “nice”?

Can food be described as 'nice'? This food is nice; This dish is nice. I always thought it could be, but I was speaking to a few friends and they argued (and strongly may I add) otherwise.
5
votes
1answer
166 views

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box,

Her love letters--to and from Daddy--were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs:1918 through 1920;... Why (Daddy) in this sentence was written with a capital D?
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Is it “the humanities” or just “humanities”?

I.e., would I use "I hate the humanities" or "I hate humanities"? On that note, would the complementary statement be "I love the sciences" or "I love science"? "I love sciences" just sounds wrong, ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...