This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
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2answers
120 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Does 'I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism' make sense?

I recently watched an interview with a terrible journalist and she said the line: I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism I'm specifically interested in doing good ...
3
votes
3answers
604 views

“Either” vs. “whether”

Which is better to use in this sentence, either or whether? Whether you are born with it or not. Either you are born with it or not. When talking about someone's innate talent, which of the two ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

Question about the word ilk?

Is it grammatically correct to use the word ilk as in, for example, this sentence: Ilk regardless, whether of noblemen or blackguards, no man has ever. . . . The Merriam-Webster dictionary ...
3
votes
2answers
102 views

Fear of an effect occurring causing the effect

For example a fear of not making a good impression on people causing a person to be paranoid of people's opinions and thus not making a good impression on them. Is this situational irony or something ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Is the word “patch” appropriate for source code update?

I've just checked in Wikipedia for some context where I could use the word patch, but most of the example usages I found only refers to "Software update" but not "Source code update" Is the word ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Does “deep exhale” fit into this sentence example?

(Ex. These loose leaf papers could be easily blown away, even by a kid's deep exhale.) I know that if I put >even by a kid who is deeply exhaling<, instead of what is in my example, the sentence ...
2
votes
3answers
395 views

What part of speech is “thank you”?

Can anybody please tell me the subject, verb, and object of this sentence: Thank you all for conducting a landmark experiment. I would also like to please know what part of speech thank you ...
1
vote
3answers
122 views

Usage: deepen, broaden, expand, and extend

I am wondering which of the following sentences is more often used in English: The recent studies are deepened by investigating new problems. The recent studies are broadened by adding new problems. ...
0
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0answers
32 views

A question about using just and only [duplicate]

This is my first question here. I don't know the difference between"only" and "just". Can anyone help me please? Thanks.
-1
votes
1answer
107 views

So, we don't use “what happens?”, do we?

Most of time I heard native English speakers say either "What is happening?" or "what happened?". When do we use "happen" in present tense? So, we don't use "what happens?", do we?
4
votes
3answers
276 views

About “dumb” luck

Pure luck, blind luck and dumb luck, are expressions used to refer to: complete luck; nothing but plain luck. I have no skill. I won by pure luck. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary) ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

amongst and amidst and other words ending in -st

Came across this article earlier today, and now I'm questioning everything- Are "amongst" and "amidst" synonymous as the article states? Also, rather than possessing the "excrescent -st suffix", ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

“metaphoric” versus “metaphorical”

Is there a difference between the words "metaphoric" and "metaphorical"? I'm reading an essay in which "metaphoric" is used. But that sounded a little odd to me. "Metaphorical" sounds better. ...
-1
votes
2answers
123 views

What connotations does the word “semblance” have?

Is the meaning of the word "semblance" closer to that of "fake" or that of "illusion"? I mean, does it have the negative connotations that "fake" or "counterfeit" have, or is it something that can be ...
0
votes
2answers
234 views

Is it proper to use the phrase “In conjunction with” in this context?

I am trying to phrase a sentence to say do something A along with something B. I do not want to use along with because both the process are extremely co-dependent and for the same reason I do not want ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Can your's ever be used? [duplicate]

I have a specific sentence in which I feel inclined to use "your's" but in not sure if it's correct. Then sentence is: "Every story has a beginning - This is your's." What "your's" stand for here is ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

Has the word lust got any positive meaning to it?

I've been hearing it quite a while... Sexual desire is the only meaning I know... But have heard people using it positively too.. Which doesn't seem to be giving that "sexual desire" sort of relation ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

Can I use “of” to mean “caused by”?

For instance, can I say: I'm not sure if it was a deception of the moon, but the field looked brown. In this case, "deception of the moon" means "illusion caused by the moon". Is it common to ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Section title for explaining where a subject fits into a field of study

A car is a form of transportation. But so is a bicycle. When a paper is discussing where a subject (say the car) fits into such a system and contrasting the car with the bicycle what should that ...
1
vote
4answers
4k views

Should've [came] vs [come] [closed]

In what situations would you use came over come and vice versa? For my example, I was talking to my roommate and I told him: You should have came to the party. Yhen I thought maybe that wasn't ...
4
votes
5answers
643 views

Is there a word or expression for improving software

I am writing a text and I have to say what skills I developed during my internship. What do you call improving software? Software improvement? I feel like there would be a better word or expression ...
3
votes
1answer
192 views

Can I use “henceforth” and “from now on” interchangeably?

Where did the word "henceforth" originated? How could I determine the correct usage of it? Is it also the same with "from this time forward?"
-1
votes
1answer
65 views

When are 'near', 'near by' and 'nearby' used? [duplicate]

I have read on other fora that 'nearby' is always one word, yet Bill Bryson, the famous travel writer, exclusively writes 'near by'.
6
votes
4answers
301 views

What line do they refer to in the idiomatic expression “on the line”?

The idiomatic expression on the line has two main meanings according to the American Heritage Dictionary: Ready or available for immediate payment. (A related expression is Cash on the ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Is “stick with reality” idiomatic?

Ok, let say you are running a restaurant. When making important decisions, you often subjectively give your own personal ideas without paying attention to the real needs in reality or in real world. ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Can “win the game” and “win in the game” be used interchangeably?

Ok, see this sentence: If your life is a game, then how to win the game of life? How to win Flappy bird game? or If your life is a game, then how to win in the game of life? How to ...
0
votes
3answers
220 views

Usage of can vs may [duplicate]

It is said that can and may both are used as a sense of possibility. If that’s the case, then what is the difference between: It can be very dangerous to cycle at night. It may be very dangerous ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

“Hereinafter” usage question

If I use "hereinafter" in a formal document in order to announce I'm abbreviating something can I use the full version afterwards or do I have to stay with the abbreviated version from there on out? ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Unrelated “because”

A student uses the following sentence: I love strong coffee, because there are coffee plantations in Kenya. The reason (because X) is unrelated to the statement. Is there a term for this?
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Is it acceptable to make a question by adding “or” at the end?

Example: "It is unacceptable for young ladies to put up their bare feet in public railway carriages, or?" I only ask because the germans do it all the time as in: "Ich habe dir schon einmal darum ...
-2
votes
2answers
41 views

I want to register domain name for blog, which one is correct? [closed]

This blog is about career should it be "careersblog" or "careerblog" Thank you very much.
0
votes
4answers
58 views

How should I call “summer prepared” for a car?

When a car has been made ready for summer, there is a word for it, at least in Dutch: the car is "zomerklaar". In case of winter it is called "winterklaar". Is there a word for it in English? A word ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Usage of the word “Slightly”

Given I have a set of some values, for example, a mean price for petrol in month for 12 months. All that values are steadily but slightly increasing in each consecutive month. Is it allowed to say ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

That's a lot of 'pizza'!

I've heard this expression on TV suggesting 'a lot/(too)big amount of something'. Is it just an extension of the expression that's a lot? Is it a common expression (AmE or BrE) or just a one-off ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Correctness of “Thank you for your time and looking forward to your response.” [closed]

I see "Thank you for your time and looking forward to your response." in my co-workers emails. Is it correct? What about "Merry Christmas and wishing you well."
15
votes
7answers
2k views

How to pronounce fractions larger than a twentieth, where the last digit of the denominator is a 1 or a 2? i.e. one thirtieth is to 30 as _ is to 31

Disclaimer: I speak British English. I've noticed a lot of differences between the way Americans and Brits pronounce numbers.1 Since the question concerns this, I thought it might be appropriate to ...
0
votes
3answers
61 views

Can I use “impression” to mean the act of impressing others?

Can impression be used to mean the act, process, or phenomenon (in a very transitory sense) of impressing others, like entertainment is used to refer to the activity of entertaining others?
18
votes
8answers
2k views

Is there a term for ascribing acts of the human mind to non-human objects, and when is it appropriate to do this?

Nota bene: English isn't my native language, so when I say acts of the human mind, I attempt to generalize things such as making assumptions, drawing conclusions and (to some extent) to reject. To me ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

What's the difference between “scribbled” and “scribbled down”?

Example: Scott scribbled a few words. Scott scribbled down a few words. What's the difference? I checked on Google Books and it seems like "scribbled a few words" is often immediately ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Can I use “bottom line” as “fundamental point”?

bottom line in English has 2 meanings: 1- the final total of an account, balance sheet, or other financial document. "the determination of Japanese companies to ignore the bottom line" ...
0
votes
2answers
280 views

Difference in usage between 'If I were you, I would X' and 'If I were you, I would have Xed'

"If I were you, I would look for another job" and "if I were you, I would have looked for another job" what is the difference between these two sentences?
1
vote
3answers
167 views

How may one properly use “born by …”?

If one's mother is Jane and their father is Dave, and their name is John Smith, would they say any of the following? I was born John Smith by Jane Doe and Dave Smith I was born John Smith by ...
0
votes
2answers
147 views

Do you remember the English expression “content is better than…” which means “real inside content is better than superficial outside appearance”?

I remember that once upon a time I heard the expression "content is better than...", which means that real inside content is better than superficial outside appearance. But I couldn't remember the ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

“Provenance”: use and abuse

The word provenance is used in the sense of denoting the origin of a thing or things. However, can it be used in the sense of asking about the origin of an expression or a word? Can you ask about ...
-2
votes
1answer
4k views

Usage of “reply”: Please reply to me or reply me (used in formal tone) [closed]

Which usage is correct? Please reply to me as soon as possible. Please reply me as soon as possible. In my understanding, people say, "Please reply my mail..." What about the ones I wrote above? I ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

“Often” usage in places

"I often go to Paris" could mean that you go twice a year, however, you wouldn't use "I often go to the dentist" even though you have your teeth checked twice a year." Why is that?
1
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0answers
21 views

is vs. are… which is correct? [duplicate]

I'm confused, perhaps unnecessarily by which term to use: What programs is company X involved in? OR What programs are company X involved in?
0
votes
0answers
34 views

deliver TO… deliver IN

To 'deliver to' is used when there is a directional move... like in: The parcel is delivered to your home in London. If the location isn't defined (like all over London f.i.) is it correct to say: ...
4
votes
3answers
151 views

Is “terroir” never translated?

It seems that terroir is always used in English as the original in French. Wikipedia proposes a somewhat vague translation: Terroir can be very loosely translated as "a sense of place" But is ...