Tagged Questions

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
votes
0answers
41 views

It was amazing! …and similar [on hold]

I am peeved to hear people overuse the words amazing and amazed such as "It was amazing!" instead of words like wonderful, great, beautiful, exceptional, awesome, etc. and even informals like super, ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Usage of “tum” in English speaking countries, other than the UK

I'm sure I've heard tummy used in American English and the English spoken in commonwealth countries as a sort of euphemism for stomach. I'm not sure so much how common it is to hear it reduced to tum, ...
6
votes
4answers
849 views

'Cultural amnesia' : what does it mean?

I came across this word while browsing and could not browse its definition. I understand amnesia, have heard of retrograde amnesia,but cultural amnesia appears jarring to my mind.
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Outdoor or Outdoors

Is one an "outdoor professional" or an "outdoors professional"? Let us say that one is a medic, guide, photographer, etc. That is a to say a combination of skills or job titles, rather than one.
0
votes
1answer
38 views

is this sentence all in the past tense? I'm struggling to write in the past tense but use active words?

The turf wicket at Cook reserve in Bedford has been vandalised on Sunday after diesel was poured liberally across all five cricket pitches, rendering them unusable.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

“Through” is used mostly with general verbs?

"while in some foreign countries" is correct but, "while through some foreign countries" is NOT Why is that? I guess it's because "through" is commonly used with general verbs as in "while traveling ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
0
votes
0answers
14 views

What does it mean in this context? [on hold]

Though that might, I suppose, ramp you up a notch or two. What does ramp up and notch mean here? To bat around aspects of logic and meaning. What does bat around mean?
1
vote
3answers
97 views

Is there a difference between “tongue-tied” and “speechless”?

Earlier today, a student of mine was telling me a story about how his colleague, upon seeing him wearing an over-the-top jacket, was so surprised that she couldn't say anything. Question: Which ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Is “enough” enough?

Are both of the following sentences grammatically correct? If so, do they have the same meaning? (1) "I don't know the mechanics of that process enough to opine on it." (2) "I don't know the ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Can I use “procrastinated” with an indirect object?

This is what I wrote: I found the inspiration and energy to get stuck into old todo's that were being consistently procrastinated. I believe this is an incorrect usage of the verb ...
-1
votes
4answers
151 views

two times three

When someone says "two times three', which do you imagine, 3+3 or 2+2+2? When someone says "multiply two by three, which do you imagine, 3+3 or 2+2+2? The results are the same, but the concept may ...
14
votes
9answers
4k views

Do submarines float?

Is it correct to say that a submarine floats if it is below the water surface? According to the dictionary definition, it seems to me that this is a correct way to refer to a submerged submarine. ...
-1
votes
1answer
86 views

Is 'efficate' a word in English? [on hold]

I routinely hear the word "efficate" being used. For example, "The most powerful way to efficate a change in the system is to participate." I do not find entries for this word in common English ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Op-Ed or Editorial?

I have a piece that is an opinion written by a columnist. If I only had the designation of an op-ed or of an editorial. What word better describes the piece? An editorial is supposed to be written by ...
-1
votes
1answer
41 views

Can aforementioned be used to mean “As I mentioned in…”?

Usually, I would use aforementioned to refer to a noun - the aforementioned song, book etc, but would it make sense to say "Aforementioned in the introduction..."? I'm writing an essay and I want to ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

One-word descriptor [on hold]

I know there is a word which is used in this context: to describe someone who is puffed up, cocky, superior, and overly macho. Think of George Bush on board the aircraft carrier, exclaiming that ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

“headquarters of” vs. “headquarters for”… is there a difference?

Is there a difference between "headquarters of" and "headquarters for"? It is the headquarters of many branches. It is the headquarters for many branches. It is the headquarters of the party. It is ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Larger organization – usage

What would be the correct verbiage for referring to an outside organization? For example: “Your team provided an opportunity for this division to derive change within our larger organization”
3
votes
5answers
92 views

Connotations of “inevitable” versus “unavoidable”

"Inevitable" and "unavoidable" have near-synonymous definitions per stock Google dictionary searches, and both words stem from the same Latin root, but I've also seen broad acknowledgement that they ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

“Permitting for” or just “permitting”?

Is the phrase "permitting for" okay to use in the same way "allowing for" would be when not working on a verb? This does that, permitting for fewer those. This does that, permitting fewer ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

In what context can the phrase “good for you” sound genuine and not sarcastic? [closed]

It seems that certain expressions no matter how one tries to say them, will always sound sarcastic. The expression good for you is one of these. An example of this: During the show American Idol, a ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

“none like him” vs “none like unto him”

Are "there is none like Him" and "there is none like unto Him" exactly synonymous, or is there a nuance between the two ? (the second construct is often used to translate certain Muslim idioms).
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“… and then Judah decides to eliminate his mistress.” Is it correct to use “eliminate” for “kill”? [closed]

In a review for the 1989 film "Crimes and Misdemeanors" a critic says: "...and after his mistress has been eliminated, Judah decides..." meaning "has been killed". I always thought of "eliminate" as ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

“Most important” vs “most importantly”

I was always under impression that "most important" is correct usage when going through the list of things. We need to pack socks, toothbrushes for the trip, but most important is to pack ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Does the word “comparatively” require two operands?

Comparatively is similar to relatively. When using relatively it is common that you are comparing against general knowledge or an aforementioned entity(ies). When using comparatively, do you need ...
8
votes
6answers
1k views

Is “worser” correct grammatically?

Is worser correct grammatically? I know it seems incorrect, but I stumbled upon the word when reading Hamlet: Oh, throw away the worser part of it, And live the purer with the other half. ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“Would you like some coffee?” “Thank you!” - In this context, does “thank you” mean “yes, please” or “no, thank you”?

The OED defines "thank you" as a polite expression used when acknowledging a gift, service, or compliment, or accepting or refusing an offer. ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

“ahead of” is NOT used with a particular time reference?

Am I right that the phrase "ahead of" is NOT used with a particular time reference such as "ahead of 2 o'clock"?
1
vote
1answer
49 views

President vs. The President

For several years now, I have noticed that commentators on the radio and TV are dropping the word "the" in certain circumstances. For example, "President prefers foreign aid at this time." or "United ...
0
votes
2answers
22 views

Using “resolve” to mean “turn (into)”

Liquidation is the process of resolving a company's assets into cash. Is the word resolve used correctly here?
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Why 'aye aye sir' instead of 'yes sir' in naval response?

From Wikipedia, I know Aye aye sir is used in a naval response. I want know the origin of why Aye aye sir is used here? Another question: when I saw TV series A Song of Ice and Fire, I found Aye is ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Subject of investigation vs. Object of investigation? [duplicate]

which of the following is better: "He is the subject of our current investigation." "He is the object of our current investigation."
0
votes
3answers
56 views

“Can see” or “see”?

In the song "Me Neither" Brad Paisley sings: "...would you like to dance Me neither I was just bein' polite Thank goodness my feet are much too tired I'm sure you're tired too, I can see an empty ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

-'s suffix for things? [duplicate]

According to Oxford Learner's Dictonaries, the -'s suffix can have these two meanings: (added to nouns) 1 belonging to the woman's hat Peter's desk children's clothes 2 used to refer ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Are “prop the door open” and “prop open the door” both correct?

So I feel like "prop open the door" is correct over "prop the door open" because the former splits the verbs, but the latter sounds better to me, for reasons I don't know. Is either correct over the ...
2
votes
3answers
70 views

Is the term “disillusion” being used correctly here?

It's easy to disillusion ourselves by thinking just because the output of our function looks very random, that it is very random. I asked a friend about this passage. I argue that it should ...
1
vote
3answers
58 views

Comma or no comma before the word “and” [duplicate]

I'm curious about whether to use comma before "and". Some people told me that using comma to connect two different sentences and two different subjects. Please provide some examples to explain the ...
2
votes
3answers
74 views

“go home straight” or “go straight home”

Which one of the following is the proper usage below? "go home straight" or "go straight home"? thanks.
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Which grade/class are you?

In our country, Turkey, when someone wants to know if you're a freshman, or sophomore, or w/e (knowing if you're in high school, or in university) he/she usually says: (making a literal translation ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

What's the difference between inhuman and inhumane? [closed]

What's the difference in meaning between the adjectives: "inhuman" and "inhumane"? Thefreedictionary defines both as: "lacking pity or compassion" but there has to be a slight difference in meaning ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

“simply”, “merely” and “only” - Are they interchageable in formal writing?

In the following sentence: "They are ....... wasting their time." Would "simply", "merely" and "only" be interchangeable? When I was a student of English I was taught the use of "simply" in formal ...
6
votes
1answer
71 views

Are there big difference in the degree of zeal among "fan, enthusiast, maniac, fiend, geek, zealot”? If Yes, what are they in order of the enthusiasm?

I saw the word, “language fiend” in a newspaper article yesterday. I thought I saved the text for the purpose of posting this question, but I didn't, so I can’t remember what the source of it was. ...
-1
votes
3answers
78 views

Is “hot sun” grammatically correct? [closed]

Can we use the term 'HOT SUN'. I am always confused if the term 'hot' can be used with sun. Eg: I don't want to go out in this hot sun.
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What is the right usage: Attend at gym or train at gym?

I want to ask a friend what is the name of the gym he is visiting. Which is the grammatically correct to ask What is the name of the gym you attend? or What is the name of the gym you train? or ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

How can I use “perspective” to express “in my opinion”?

Should I use "from my perspective", or "in my perspective" or "on my perspective?" Can "standpoint" and "view" be used in the same way?
0
votes
2answers
70 views

“Suddenly feeling heavier” vs “feeling suddenly heavier.”

Example: I nodded, my chest suddenly feeling heavier I nodded, my chest feeling suddenly heavier Are both sentences grammatical? Does it make any difference where suddenly is placed?
3
votes
3answers
231 views

Can the word “totem” be used as both a respectful and troublesome symbol?

Today’s (Oct. 10) Time magazine article titled “Hillary Clinton’s Burden of History” begins with the following passage: “Everything old is new again for the Clintons, as documents reveal White ...
1
vote
3answers
67 views

Difference between “abbreviation” and “symbol” in scientific contexts

I've noticed that the shorthand notations for chemical elements, such as C for carbon, are called symbols, not abbreviations. This also seems to be the case in several other scientific contexts, such ...