0
votes
1answer
48 views

Usage of “prevalent” in reference to a disease [closed]

Is it ok to use word 'prevalent' in the following sentence: Flu is very prevalent in the third world countries, that nobody cares about it.
2
votes
2answers
101 views

“More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage

What is the correct usage of the adjective "loud"? Please sing louder Please sing more loudly I came across this in one of the quizzes at office, and as per them, the correct answer was option 2. ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Can we use the word “initiative” as an adjective?

I'd like to ask if we can use the word initiative as an adjective. I have found it used that way, but there is no entry for initiative as an adjective in the Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary.
0
votes
1answer
67 views

As a noun, “abandon” is almost always preceded by the word “reckless”. [duplicate]

Feel free to correct me if you don't share the same experience, but in my own experience, usage of the word "abandon" as a noun without being apart of the phrase "reckless abandon" is extremely rare. ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Is “pejorative” used correctly in “no pejorative bone in his body”?

He doesn't have a pejorative bone in his body. This is meant to describe a timid, non-confrontational person. Is pejorative being used correctly here, in a figurative sense?
8
votes
6answers
1k views

Using “decadent” to describe a building or town in neglect or ruin

I have often seen decadent used to refer to a non-physical state, like a person who is spiritually or morally decadent. Could decadent be applied to something physical like a building or a town to ...
0
votes
4answers
70 views

Is “leading” a superlative adjective?

Is "leading" a superlative adjective? In the following sentence, does "leading" mean "best"? China's leading singer, Xue is holding a concert today. Should I necessarily say "one of China's ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

'Blowback' with 'much'

Jawad Sukhanyar & Rod Nordland, In Prison Release, Signs of Karzai’s Rift With U.S. (NYT): The amount of people advocating for a long-term relationship with Afghanistan is pretty small in ...
15
votes
6answers
3k views

Using “so” and “very” for ungradable adjectives

We generally use modifiers such as "so" and "very" for gradable/normal adjectives (water can be quite/so/very HOT, but not quite/so/very BOILING (an ungradable/extreme adjective). Yet would you say ...
0
votes
2answers
140 views

What is the correct usage of the word “milquetoast”? [duplicate]

The google definition of this word states that it is a noun however in its own example of usage it is used as an adjective: "a frail, milquetoast character". I haven't found any reliable sources to ...
0
votes
4answers
75 views

Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
1
vote
2answers
67 views

Looking for the inverse of “frictional”

Does frictional means "that which is produced by friction"? Or is there a better word that means "that which generates friction"?
41
votes
6answers
5k views

How long can you say “the late so and so”?

When you refer to the deceased, you say "the late so and so." How long can you say that? Is JFK referred to as the late John F. Kennedy? How about Abraham Lincoln?
0
votes
2answers
64 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
1
vote
2answers
545 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
1
vote
2answers
231 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
-1
votes
2answers
56 views

Whose conclusion vs concluding

I'm attempting to state the conclusion authors drew from a study. At first, I had written my sentence like this: Reardon, Arshan, and Attebery detail a study in which Texas teachers selectively ...
-1
votes
2answers
55 views

Is “homogeneous…as” grammatically correct?

Here is the sentence: "A is made of a homogeneous material as that of B" Is this sentence grammatically correct?? or is there any more appopriate phrase?? Please help me out..
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Battery is flat

I was born and raised in some anglophone Asian country where people use the word "flat" to describe a battery when no electrical current can be generated by it. Some would even use the word "flat" to ...
3
votes
6answers
4k views

Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”

A friend and I had a disagreement about something, in which he called one of my statements "dumb". As we were talking through the disagreement, it got a little heated and I tried repeating what he had ...
4
votes
1answer
759 views

What is the origin & meaning of “It used to drive me spare”? [duplicate]

While watching the eponymous documentary on Stephen Hawking, his wife described her husband's behaviour when he was deep in thought. She said he could be surrounded by children and not even notice ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Usage of “convivial”

Is "convivial" a formal and uncommon word? Can I say "a convivial community"?
-3
votes
2answers
360 views

An adjective for something that will happen next month

English is a so cool that I believe even an adjective which means "happening next month" exists. Tom is a rather strange man. He always has the urge to attend a _______ event but he always changes ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

Exclusive “from” or “to” [closed]

If I want to let a customer know that she/he can only buy spare parts from us, and put this into legal documents by using the word "exclusive", which proposition should I use? "from", "to" or ...
1
vote
2answers
118 views

Adjective “displaced” applied to an object

Can I apply the adjective displaced to an object, when I mean it is being used out of its typical environment? For instance: "the displaced ball floats around". (Assuming we're talking about a ball ...
6
votes
5answers
937 views

Usage of 'halcyon' to describe something other than a period of time

Can I use the term halcyon to mean calm or tranquil when describing something other than a period of time, especially a place or setting? For example, does the following sentence seems unnatural or ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
19
votes
6answers
2k views

Can “wet” be used for liquids other than water?

Wet can be used to describe being dowsed in liquids such as beer, milk, juice, urine etc. All of these, however, are water-based. Can wet be used for a liquid that has no water? Can you be wet by ...
13
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference in usage between “lethal” and “fatal”?

This cropped up when I was in a conversation with a friend. I guess fatal must talk of something which has necessarily resulted in death, while lethality is more about potential to cause death. Yet I ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Is it correct to say: too homogeneous?

This is the context: "I missed the diversity of church, it felt rather like a French-only church, or an under-21’s church may feel like—too homogeneous." I want to use the word homogeneousitic, but I ...
2
votes
1answer
140 views

“My late friends” — they're not dead!

Context: We're discussing about how we used to get penalized in school for being late to classes, many years ago. I wanted to say: In my old school, it was hilarious to see my late friends get ...
0
votes
2answers
325 views

Can we say “probable” where we have to say “possible”?

Can we say probable where we have to say possible? What is the exact meaning of that? I have searched this, but I didn't get the perfect example of that.
-1
votes
1answer
378 views

What's the difference between “active” and “busy”? [closed]

What's the difference in meaning between saying "I'm an active person." and "I'm a busy person."?
-2
votes
2answers
828 views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
-1
votes
3answers
219 views

Using the adjective “expressive” to mean an object allows for expression?

My intention is to say that systems of a particular type allow users to express ideas on them. I wanted to give the concept a more concise/general name, as a title for such systems. I called them ...
0
votes
2answers
454 views

Polite Compliments

Is a "polite compliment" necessarily a redundant statement when used in a group of people as opposed to a one-to-one situation?
10
votes
3answers
604 views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
3
votes
2answers
402 views

Is “titular” the appropriate word for a song that only uses the album title in its lyrics, not title?

Is a song on a music album considered to be the titular song if it doesn't share the title of the album, but incorporates it into the lyrics? If not, is there another appropriate term for this lyrical ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Continuing” vs. “continued”

So, just a few minutes ago we had this question asking whether one could substitute ongoing availability with continuing availability and what the difference would be, if any. Apart from the question ...
1
vote
2answers
139 views

Using the word “deadbeat” as an adjective

BBC quotes President Obama: America is "not a deadbeat nation", US President Barack Obama has said, as he warned Republicans unconditionally to approve a rise in the US debt ceiling. It appears ...
12
votes
5answers
469 views

The use of “real” in the following cases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Real quick question If you listen real close... Can you swing by real quick... Sentences like the above two are what I often hear in daily life. If I didn't ...
4
votes
2answers
915 views

Is “sound approach” an accepted phrase?

English is not my first language, and in my language (Bosnian) we write just as we speak ; so from time to time, I encounter phrases which I know I have heard before, but am not sure if I am writing ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

What is the difference between “stiff” and “rigid”?

Could an object be stiff but not rigid or vice versa? When is each one used? And what is the opposite of each of them?
2
votes
1answer
720 views

What is the difference between 'framework curriculum' and 'curricular framework'?

I know that curricular is an adjective and curriculum a noun, but are they both used in exactly the same meaning? Or are there some differences concerning what they imply or apply to? Being a ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Adjectives to describe the word “questions” [closed]

I'm writing an ad for yoghurt. It's about telling the truth about the consumer's new favourite flavour. I would like to say, You'll need to answer some _____ questions. They're personal ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “adorkable” mean? How popular is this word? To what kind of objects and occasions can I apply “adorkable”?

I happened to find the paperback book titled Adorkable, by Sarra Manning, on the GoodReads site. There is no entry for adorkable in the Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster dictionaries, or in ...
1
vote
3answers
515 views

What is the adjectival form of “primate”? [closed]

To say a man is close to a primate, what should I use, "primatic" or "primative"?